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* Posts by MondoMan

373 posts • joined 8 May 2007

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Apple takes blade to 13-inch MacBook Pro with Retina display

MondoMan
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Meh

Re: Mavericks @Khaptain

Actually, Mavericks is off Half Moon Bay in Northern (really central) California, about halfway between Palo Alto and San Francisco, but over the hills on the coast: quoth the Wiki "Mavericks is a surfing location in Northern California. It is located approximately 2 miles from shore outside Pillar Point Harbor, just north of the town of Half Moon Bay at the village of Princeton-by-the-Sea."

I recently shared a table at a Palo Alto Starbucks with a pair of young surfer/coders who had hair way too short for dreads and didn't say "man" at all during the half hour I was there. A few "dude!"'s were heard, but they were actually having a very earnest and intelligent conversation about potential fiance relationships as they typed on their Macbooks. Scottish accents would have ruined the mood...

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Boffins ID freakish spine-smothered prehistoric critter: The CLAW gave it away

MondoMan
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The Charge of the Light Brigade?

Sounds like a lot of excellent old-style paleontological analysis. But, then there's this:

"Most gene-based studies suggest that arthropods and velvet worms are closely related to each other; however, our results indicate that arthropods are actually closer to water bears, or tardigrades, ..."

Their results use "cladistic analysis", which is basically creating a family tree by counting up matching features, then putting individuals with the most shared features closest together. The problem with this is, of course, that it's the human analyst who decides what's a feature and what's not. One analyst may count all hair on an organism as a single feature, while her compatriot counts scalp hair, facial hair, leg hair, nose hair, and ear hair(!) each as a separate feature. Since there's no objective *amount* of difference between features, the analysis is skewed by the choice of features.

The introduction of DNA analysis for use in creating evolutionary family trees has largely overcome this problem. Not only is DNA the actual genetic material specifying the creature's features, but one can often identify similarities between organisms' DNA that don't show in the physical animal (e.g. mutated genes that no longer can produce a gene product), or see that a feature that seems to be present in two animals is in fact encoded by unrelated genes in each, and thus is not an indicator of evolutionary relatedness (e.g. eyes that came about via completely different evolutionary routes).

Of course, if one compares only a tiny portion of the genomes of two animals (perhaps even just one or two genes), the chances of making an error in the evolutionary ordering are greatly increased. I hope that's the situation the paper's author is referring to here, rather than claiming to have overturned a robust DNA-based evolutionary tree.

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MondoMan
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Link to the actual paper

Presumably as a result of strict anti-drug laws forbidding references to hallucigenia, the identity of the actual paper in question was censored from the story. Never fear, here it is:

http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/nature13576.html

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Forty-five years ago: FOOTPRINTS FOUND ON MOON

MondoMan
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Beg to differ...

"The big advantage private operators like Musk have is that they can take a more relaxed view of human life."

No, the big advantage private operators have is that they're free to build systems from the ground up with operational efficiency in mind. They have no Congress forcing them to buy from cost-plus military contractors, no legacy multi-thousand-person facilities like the Johnson Space Center, no tradition of gold-plated but cost-inefficient design. IIRC, the Dragon's total control center staff is less than a dozen people. If NASA were running commercial air travel, it would still be available only to billionaires and wouldn't yet have made it across the Atlantic or Pacific.

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Silicon Valley royalty royally slammed for 'persistent, troubling deficit' of diversity

MondoMan
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Facepalm

Re: The waaahambulance of the imperfect reality

Probably could have chosen a better word than "whitening"...

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Storm-battered Rockall adventurer recalls 'worst experience of my life'

MondoMan
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1985??

People can still claim bits of land for their countries by landing on them? I thought that went out in the 19th century at the latest.

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Retiring Reg hack explains how bass playing = tech reporting

MondoMan
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Nice goodbye, Rik! Only in Regland does technical and industry knowledge mix so well with something like ska (me, too, for first hearing it in the 80s).

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Hey! Where! are! the! white! women! at!? It's! Yahoo!

MondoMan
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Re: I always write "prefer not to say"

There's always "other - human" or "to Mars" or "Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends".

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MondoMan
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Flame

Is the US second only to apartheid South Africa in its obsession with race?

The dirty little secret of simplistic "race"-based diversity goals in tech -- they're an acceptable way to discriminate against Asians. It's pretty obvious such discrimination is widespread in admissions at many universities, limited only somewhat by laws such as California's Proposition 209. It's sad to see that the 20th century's "Jewish quotas" have given rise to 21st century "Asian quotas".

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Dream job ad appears: Data wrangler for Square Kilometre Array

MondoMan
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Living dangerously?

Is this one of those lone-operator-in-the-boonies jobs where you've got to set your own broken bones after you clear the scorpions off the cot in the medical nook?

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British boffin tells Obama's science advisor: You're wrong on climate change

MondoMan
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Re: Boffins disagreeing with each other?

There hasn't been any real scientific debate over AGW itself for over a decade now. We know from overwhelming observable evidence that it's happening and that it's primarily man made.

Since "AGW" is the acronym for "anthropogenic global warming", meaning "man-made global warming", you don't even need any observable evidence to know that it's man-made.

If you were perhaps thinking instead about what part of GW is AGW, you're not in much luck either. The only evidence for that so far depends on the climate models being complete, but they've already shown themselves unable to predict the recent "hiatus" in rising temps, not to mention clouds and other important features of the climate system. The current argument for GW being mostly AGW is "we can't think of any way to model it without AGW," which ironically was just about what the Intelligent Design folks used as their argument.

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Pictures of elite 'Chinese military hacker' published

MondoMan
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Headmaster

Khakis?

I had always thought "khaki" was a tan color, not the dark green color in the photo. That looks like olive drab to me.

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Help me Obi-Wan Kenobi! 3D HOLO-PHONE hinted in Amazon vid

MondoMan
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Black Helicopters

Hints from Amazon's website

There's a link to request a pass for the launch event on June 18th. If you're a developer (as opposed to just an Amazon customer or a media flack), among the questions are:

Describe an innovative way in which you have used gyroscopes, accelerometers, or other device sensors in your app development.

Are you interested in developing apps utilizing a new type of sensor?

Do you have machine learning experience? Please describe.

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Marc Andreessen: Edward Snowden is a 'textbook traitor'

MondoMan
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Big Brother

Re: get over it!

You're just about right, G. The problem is that he didn't just hand over the documents about the likely illegal spying on US citizens and residents, but he handed over everything, including really sensitive secrets such as info about compromising Huawei's internal network and locations of cable taps around the world. Do the latter is traitorous in effect (and has nothing to do with Constitutional rights), so the bottom line is that he's both a patriot and a traitor, with the latter part solely due to his failure to vet what info he made public.

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US citizens want stricter CO2 regulations by two to one – Yale poll

MondoMan
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Facepalm

Re: It is an outright lie.

Then I'm sure you'd be happy to breathe in some botulinum toxin at a 350x lower concentration of 1ppm.

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MondoMan
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Re: About time

Sure hope Sean Lock crossed the Atlantic by swimming, because if he instead flew on a modern jet, he more than used up years of his carbon quota. :)

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MondoMan
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Re: Begging the question

Exactly. However, the way I interpret the results is that the American populace, recognizing the lack of any health benefits from reducing CO2 emissions at coal plants, realize that any such regulation is in practice impossible. Thus, it really means "are you OK with no further cuts in coal plant CO2 emissions?"

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FAA: All systems GO for Virgin Galactic space plane to launch from US

MondoMan
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Pint

Re: Comparison with SpaceX

True, but Burt Rutan is almost as studly a dude as Elon Musk.

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Boeing CEO says no more 'moonshots' after 787 Dreamliner ordeal

MondoMan
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Re: The 787 was a risk-averse management boondoggle

Just because all your software modules are in the same IDE doesn't mean module/module interfaces or the calls using them are suddenly perfect, although it does help with certain classes of errors.

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MondoMan
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Unhappy

The 787 was a risk-averse management boondoggle

Rather than being an Apollo-style moonshot, the 787 was more of a Soviet-style moonshot. The top management at the time (and still today) wanted to hurt the Seattle-area mechanics' (assemblers') union, which had a history of striking (only some of the time because management was trying to screw them over). Thus, they decided to move parts of the 787 work out of the Seattle area, to "partner" companies around the world. As a bonus (management thought), they required the partners to use their own money, not Boeing's, to design their part and build their tooling and factories. What could possibly go wrong with outsourcing big chunks of design and production?

The 787 fiasco was the result. It turns out the partners were nowhere as good as Boeing's in-house Seattle-area staff at design, at assembly quality, and at identifying and solving the early-year assembly teething problems. In fact, IIRC, the Italian partner won't be allowed to work with Boeing again, and wings, the most critical and proprietary part of the design, won't be allowed to be designed by non-Boeing staff ever again.

Vought, a US subcontractor, not only produced delayed structures, but incomplete ones, even after a few years of intensive on-site help from Boeing employees, so in the end Boeing had to buy all the Vought plants and employees doing the Boeing work and bring them in-house to get the work done right.

The 787 was a fiasco because top Boeing management tried to play small ball on a moonshot project. They failed to realize that their scheme reduced shorter-term capital expenditures, but at the cost of vastly increased integration risk -- the risk that the parts wouldn't fit and function properly together once they were put together to form a plane in Seattle. In the end, initial capital savings were overwhelmed by the extra capital, labor, and airline compensation costs of not getting the project done right the first time.

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Space hackers prepare to reactivate antiquated spacecraft

MondoMan
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Angel

Re: Our most famous spacecraft

"The "most famous" plaudits probably go to the ISS, Mir, the Shuttle, Eagle Lander, the Millennium Falcon and the Enterprise ..."

Ahh, the Eagle Lander -- at first I thought you meant this:

http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=space+1999+eagle&qpvt=space+1999+eagle&FORM=IGRE

Then I started reminiscing about the U.F.O. show and its under-appreciated spacecraft -- S.I.D.

http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=ufo+sid&FORM=HDRSC2

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MondoMan
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Very nice

"One of mankind's most famous spacecraft" is sure pushing it, but overall this is a very cool story and kudos go to the space hackers and crowdfunders on this. Thanks, Iain.

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Jupiter's Great Red Spot becoming mere pimple

MondoMan
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Big Brother

I obey

I had thought it was "at least" 400 years old, but the Register says "about" 400 years old, so I'm falling in line. Fits with the 8000-year-old Earth and all that, you know.

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Giant pop can FOUND ON MOON

MondoMan
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Pint

Re: What about the Apollo missions!?!

Exactly -- have they not heard of the famous Tang?

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Report: Climate change has already hit USA - and time is RUNNING OUT

MondoMan
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Headmaster

Re: The Reg has become schizophrenic.

Just a note that the preferred term is now "dissident" rather than "denialist", because of the Holocaust/Nazi undertones of the latter.

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MondoMan
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Re: Aren't clouds where rain and snow come from?

@vogon

"there's been no increase in that rate"

Perhaps you missed the sharply upwards curving graph in the article?

I certainly missed any *sea level* data in that graph; perhaps you can point me to a source for your special X-Ray goggles? :)

No there isn't - see the Wikipedia article on the temperature record.

Really? Wikipedia? That may explain things... :)

~ 800,000 years of available figures for average temperature versus CO2 in the atmosphere also predicts a similar outcome.

OK, so what temp does the 800,000 years predict for 280ppm? for 340ppm? for 400ppm? Is it even technically a function?

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MondoMan
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Re: "Truthy" math

"...the science now shows with 95 percent certainty that human activity is the dominant cause of observed warming since the mid-20th century," is actually just based on the report writers' personal opinions, and not on any mathematical or statistical calculation"

No - as it it says 'science shows' so via measurements and probability statistics. You are confusing this with 'I think'.

Sorry, you've been deceived as well. Here's the link to the IPCC report. Feel free to post a reference to any "measurements and probability statistics" in it that are used to get "95 percent certainty."

Wow, 5 thumbs down so far, yet nobody has been able to post an example of or reference to a numeric derivation of the "95 percent certainty"??? I'm happy to be corrected, but the hiding behind downthumbies is just gonna make me arrogant :)

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MondoMan
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Re: "Truthy" math

Thanks for the Lovejoy reference, Vogon! Even if it weren't flawed, it's too new for the IPCC or US reports to have included, so I'm still waiting for the stats/math supporting the 95% there.

What I DO like about Lovejoy (great name!) 2014 is that he admits that the current IPCC approach to e.g. "fingerprinting" is all based on models which have known flaws and can't even account for the current "pause" in global surface temps. Thus, he argues that an empirical data-based approach is required, and in this he is exactly right.

In Lovejoy 2014 his source of "empirical" data is multiproxy reconstructions of past temperatures as a source of info on natural variability in the climate. Unfortunately, not only are multiproxy reconstructions known to be flawed in that they report artificially low variability, the three particular reconstructions he uses are known to be flawed in technique and/or by using flawed proxies. Sadly, GIGO.

I will keep him in mind, as I really enjoyed his writing style and approach of attacking the problems that should have been studied starting ten or 15 years ago. If he decides to go in search of multiproxy data worthy of his techniques, I hope he'll consult his fellow Canadian Stephen McIntyre.

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MondoMan
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Re: Aren't clouds where rain and snow come from?

but temperature and sea levels have been demonstrably rising for a long time

We know that sea levels have been rising slowly but steadily during the past century or so, and there's been no increase in that rate, so no worries on the sea level front for hundreds of years from now at least.

Temperatures have been fluctuating substantially during the past 120 years of thermometer records, and there is plausible evidence that temperatures were higher than they are today about 1000 years ago as well as during other periods in the last 10,000 years.

The predictions of significant warming before 2100 *are* in fact based on computer models, not on any formulas linked to empirical measurements.

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MondoMan
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Facepalm

Re: "Truthy" math

"...the science now shows with 95 percent certainty that human activity is the dominant cause of observed warming since the mid-20th century," is actually just based on the report writers' personal opinions, and not on any mathematical or statistical calculation"

No - as it it says 'science shows' so via measurements and probability statistics. You are confusing this with 'I think'.

Sorry, you've been deceived as well. Here's the link to the IPCC report. Feel free to post a reference to any "measurements and probability statistics" in it that are used to get "95 percent certainty."

http://www.issuelab.org/resource/climate_change_2013_the_physical_science_basis

As I wrote originally, the 95 percent number is arbitrary and just there to dress up the *opinions* of the report's authors.

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MondoMan
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WTF?

Aren't clouds where rain and snow come from?

It seems that many of the adverse-impact worries center on cloud effects: too much rain, not enough rain, snow at the wrong part of the season, and so forth. With predictions of increased droughts and damage due to torrential rains, I would expect that such phenomena are well-understood and well-modeled.

However, prominent climate scientists such as modeler Gavin Schmidt at GISS have admitted that we don't yet understand either the magnitude of the effect that clouds have on climate, or even the sign(!) -- whether they lead to increased or decreased temperatures. Given that, it's not surprising that models are not considered reliable in predicting regional rain and snow or the lack thereof.

Yet, the US climate assessment report persists in predicting them. I thought it was only the Republicans that were supposed to be denying published science. :)

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MondoMan
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Holmes

"Truthy" math

It's a bit worrisome to find out that the latest IPCC reports' "...the science now shows with 95 percent certainty that human activity is the dominant cause of observed warming since the mid-20th century," is actually just based on the report writers' personal opinions, and not on any mathematical or statistical calculation.

Besides it being an opinion rather than a calculation, it's also worrisome that the opinion has gone up from 90 percent in the previous IPCC report, even though the current IPCC document reports *more*, not less, uncertainty about our understanding of the climate system. I would have thought that more uncertainty in our understanding would lead to less confidence that human activity was the main cause, but then I'm not a *climate* scientist. :)

As we are currently blessed with not just one, but two rather good incarnations of a certain famous consulting detective, methinks the IPCC could do worse than to employ one or both of them to raise its game.

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The ULTIMATE space geek accessory: Apollo 15's joystick up for sale

MondoMan
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Re: I'll bet it will be quite stiff

Hey now -- a bit o' radiation cranks up the DNA repair machinery, which fixes other errors, too, so you live longer. Hasn't The Simpsons been an especially long-lived show?

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PARTY TIME! MIT slips $100 to each student ... in Bitcoin

MondoMan
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Re: funky symbols

Hah! At first, I thought you were an alum making a cryptic joke about the "charming" j/psi particle, but I see you're just another liteweight. :)

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All men are part of a PURE GENETIC ELITE, says geno-science bloke

MondoMan
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Re: @Arnaut

"The oldest fossil DNA I'm aware of only dates back about 130My, well after the appearance of the dinosaurs, and then only for weevils, so obviously the history of chromosomes can't reliably be known beyond that point."

Actually, given a lot of descendents from different branches of the evo tree, we can infer what was in the common ancestor's genome, more or less. If you make assumptions about rates of base sequence change, you can even make date guesstimates.

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MondoMan
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WTF?

I'm surprised no one has made an "X Men" joke

Even X Men need bodies, just like this post.

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MondoMan
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Devil

Re: Some clarification @boltar

Not all of us are missing cheeks; my tongue fits nicely in mine.

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MondoMan
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Boffin

Some clarification

First, we blokes are, in fact, typically genetically inferior to the fairer sex because of all those hundreds of genes missing from the Y that remain intact on the X. To demonstrate this, one just needs to examine the proportion of men vs. women affected by genetic diseases such as red/green color blindness or the "royal disease" (the hemophilia B-carrying X chromosome passed on to many European royal houses of the 19th century by Queen Victoria) that afflicted the Tsarevich Alexei and entangled his family with the infamous Rasputin. This is because women, with two X chromosomes, essentially have a backup copy for each gene in case one is defective. Men, lacking backups for almost all of their X chromosome genes, are liable to manifest the illness when their one and only copy of the gene is defective.

That said, this paper really addresses the question of whether the few remaining "normal" genes on the Y (excluding those few dealing directly with sex determination, sperm maturation and so forth that are unique to the Y) are just randomly-chosen lucky survivors of eons of genetic carnage (the canonical "rotting Y" theory) or whether their presence is specifically needed on the Y for some reason.

To test this, the team (made up of scientists at the Whitehead, Univ. of Wash. in St. Louis, and Baylor) sequenced the Y chromosomes of a range of mammals, reasoning that if the remaining functional genes on the Y were just randomly-chosen, different sets of genes would survive on the Y chromosomes of different mammals, each having undergone a unique history of genetic change since the species' last common ancestor eons ago. If however, these genes were actually required on the Y in a range of mammals to significantly enhance male fitness vs. not having them on the Y, then the *same* set of genes should have functionally survived on each of the different mammals' Y chromosomes. This latter result is what the team observed; they also observed that this small set of genes is widely expressed throughout the body, even in tissues that do not obviously differ between males and females.

As yet, the functions of these genes are unknown, but they each have cognate counterparts on the X chromosome. Perhaps each gene's Y version has the same function as its cognate X version. However, since the sequences do differ somewhat, there is the intriguing possibility that the Y and X versions *differ* at least somewhat in their specific functionality. The authors speculate that such differences may lead to functional differences between XX and XY versions of cell types that previously had been assumed to function identically in men and woman, and that this may account for some of the observed differences between men and women in e.g. disease susceptibility and other traits. Thus, although we must suffer our burden as the genetically weaker sex, we may yet have some unique traits to salve our wounded senses of self-worth.

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Japan plans SEVEN satellite launches to supercharge GPS

MondoMan
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Pint

Re: "The corrected data is then compressed from 2mbps to 2kbps..."

"Really? 1000-to-1? It's not really very interesting data then is it?"

It's not the size, it's how you use it.

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MondoMan
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Facepalm

Is this just WAAS?

Is this perhaps just the super-accurate Japanese version of the US WAAS system? Essentially, a Differential GPS system broadcasting the corrections from a geostationary satellite?

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Most Americans doubt Big Bang, not too sure about evolution, climate change – survey

MondoMan
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Re: @ John Smith 19

You wrote a last throwaway:

"And of course there are the home countries of all those work visas coming into the US.

Japan, China, Singapore, S. Korea etc.

Not known for their Christianity, are they?"

Actually, South Koreans are well-known for the speed and intensity with which they have embraced Christianity.

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MondoMan
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Re: the questions

Very poorly written, so you've got to wonder about the skills of the authors of this survey, or whether they were trying to get a certain response.

For example, "The average temperature of the world is rising, mostly because of man-made heat-trapping greenhouse gases". While it's true that we are emitting an ever-rising amount of these gases, which should lead to more heat-trapping according to simple physics, it's also true that even the IPCC in its latest report has admitted that the average world temps have not risen during the past 10-15 years. So, the IPCC (and I along with them) would have to answer "Not at all confident" on this one.

Or, for a question supposedly designed to focus on the Big Bang: "The universe began 13.8 billion years ago with a big bang." Now, I'm a believer in the Big Bang theory, but have no idea whether the current estimate of the age of the universe is 10 billion years, 13.8 billion years, 15 billion years, or some other number in that general ballpark. I'd have to answer at best "Somewhat confidant" just because of the specific age issue.

Bottom line: good survey questions isolate a single issue at hand in each question -- they don't jumble multiple facts/issues as was done in many of these questions.

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Algorithm ramps up genetic computation

MondoMan
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Re: not bad.... but..

@Grikath: "And it wouldn't show the actual level of expression, "

It *will* show the stead-state relative level of transcript abundance, which I know isn't the same thing, but tends to be related.

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MondoMan
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Boffin

Neato torpedo!

Perhaps this will help clarify the researchers' work:

DNA serves as the blueprint/instruction manual for the cell. However, the information in the DNA must be converted to other forms in order for it to perform any function, that is, to be "expressed". Thus, "gene expression" is just what function(s) are performed by an individual gene, and *how much* of that function is performed. The term is also used to refer to all the genes in the cell: all the functions being performed, and the level/amount of each function.

The cell uses many ways to regulate gene expression (to adjust the levels of different functions), most of which are difficult to measure and ascribe to a specific gene function when looking at all the functions of a cell. This paper is concerned with only the initial step of gene regulation -- "transcription". Transcription is simply the copying of modest stretches of DNA into sequence-identical working copies made of the similar molecule RNA. Essentially, it is like photocopying specific blueprint pages from the manual. Just as with a paper manual and photocopying, one simple way to get more use out of a single blueprint page in the manual is to make many photocopies of it. One can get a rough idea of what's being done on a project just by looking at all the photocopies in use there -- many copies of a given page or group of pages suggest much work on the function related to those pages, while a complete absence of a given page suggests no work currently being done on that function.

Similarly, collecting all the RNA transcripts from a group of cells, determining the sequence of each, and matching those up with the entire DNA genomic sequence allows one to infer which gene functions are in heavy use, light use, or unused. (Of course, given the other types of gene expression regulation, this will be an important, but partial, description of the gene expression in the cells.)

The researchers' new technique comes in the "...matching those up with the entire DNA genomic sequence..." step. Current bulk transcript sequencing techniques produce sequence fragments ("reads") on the order of 500 "letters" or "bases" long (DNA and RNA each have 4 possible letters). Since the entire genomic sequence in mammalian cells is about 3G bases long, and each cell typically has two copies, each transcript read must be aligned with 6G of genomic sequence. A simplistic sliding-comparison alignment algorithm would involve on the order of 10 to 1000 x 10^9 comparisons for just *one* transcript read; a proper experiment would involve mapping 10^6 or more reads so the number of comparisons (and compute time) rises rather rapidly!

By contrast, my understanding of the researchers' new technique is that they use a k-tuple approach which in principle requires compute time only linearly proportional to the total transcript read sequence lengths plus the 6 x 10^9 genomic sequence. The insight is that by breaking down the transcript reads into overlapping "tuples" of length k, and just counting how many times each k-tuple appears in the entire set of transcript reads, an expression "bar chart" can quickly be constructed on the genomic sequence.

For example, if one chose k=10, one would have 4^10 = 1048576 or approximately 1M possible 10-base-long tuple sequences. One would then go through all the (say, one million) transcript read sequences, producing about 500 tuples from each (500 bases average length, tuples offset by 1), or about 500M total. If the transcript read sequences were completely random, each of the 1M possible 10-tuples would have about 500 "hits". However, we know the sequences are NOT random, and in particular much of the genomic DNA will not be transcribed at all, so we expect many (most?) 10-tuples will show zero/few hits, and some more than 500.

To "read out" the results, one would just move along the genomic DNA sequence, shifting over one base at a time, and look up the transcript read hit count for the 10-tuple beginning at that position in the genomic sequence. While there might be short spurious peaks and valleys, in general, an expressed gene fragment would show up as a contiguous stretch of DNA where most positions showed roughly-equal levels of 10-tuple hit counts. The average hit count level would indicate the relative expression of that gene fragment.

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Liftoff! SpaceX Falcon 9 lifts Dragon on third resupply mission to ISS

MondoMan
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Alien

Soft landing's real use is on Mars

Elon has stated he wants to send a manned mission to Mars, which interestingly enough has no oceans for splashdowns and not enough atmosphere for parachutes all the way down.

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Red-faced LOHAN team 'fesses up in blown SPEARS fuse fiasco

MondoMan
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Pint

Re: glass vs blade fuse

The automotive-style standard and mini blade fuses I'm familiar are *much* harder to visually evaluate, and must be viewed from the side. The glass tubes are easy to evaluate from any angle, even if buried in a circuitry box. As a final bonus, they float if dropped in your beer.

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Borked Bitcoin bunker MtGox in administration: Lawyer seizes control

MondoMan
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Big Brother

This has all happened before

A few years ago, back when Bitcoin had soared and had hit the heady value of 30 USD (and when people still used graphics cards to mine BTC!), Mt Gox suffered an enormous theft, other large thefts/scams were in the news, and BTC dropped about 10x in value. Many proclaimed the end of Bitcoin and the press lost interest...

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Spy-happy Condoleezza Rice joins Dropbox board as privacy adviser

MondoMan
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Re: What did Rice do for DropBox or top people there to land a cushy deal

She was also provost of Stanford University for many many years; since Stanford founded and nurtures Silicon Valley, that's not a bad link to have on board.

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MondoMan
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Devil

Re: the Italian courts

The Italian courts are also retrying Amanda Knox yet again for a crime she didn't commit, even though they have the true perp convicted and in jail.

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MondoMan
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Devil

Re: internal contradictions were the only thing that brought down the Soviet Union...

Yes, just like with Lukashenko's Belarus.

Oh, wait.....

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