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* Posts by John Smith 19

9473 posts • joined 10 Jun 2009

Xerox copier flaw changes numbers in scanned docs

John Smith 19
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Re: Who has *seen* the office photocopier manual in your office?

"Yes, Messrs Sue, Grabbit and Run are mounting up, surely ..."

Ah, SS&F's sister firm in the UK.

Yes I think Xerox may well be hearing from them too.

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John Smith 19
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Who has *seen* the office photocopier manual in your office?

No I haven't either.

I'd also note that Xerox put a lot of graphical and written help text into their units, probably much of which already exists in the manuals, but which they doubt you can get hold of.

This is a UI fail. Yes I know the floor standing ones are network linked MFP which just happen to be called copiers but how many people use them for central scanning and distribution?

IOW who wants those smaller (but quality compromised) files IRL?

I sense lawyers going to "attack mode"

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John Smith 19
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@bazza

"Given that most photocopiers get used for copying nothing but text containing documents, it is surprising that Xerox saw fit to choose such a stingy default setting. That is pretty poor judgement on their part."

I'm not sure there is evidence this was on factory defaults. It could be the company/university set it to "economy" settings and that was one of them, along with using less ink for the black parts.

We just don't know.

But if this was the default that would be worrying.

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John Smith 19
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Re: There's all sorts of image processing going on in there

"I can just guess what would happen if we lost out on a RFC because the copier had changed a 6 to an 8."

Perhaps you already have?

Time for a visit to Messrs Shyster, Shyster and Flywheel?

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Brit Skylon spaceplane moves closer to lift-off

John Smith 19
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AC@14:07

They're, erh, unforeseen at the moment

Although Alan Bond has indicated that they taking another look at the heat exchanger mfg technology.

This was too expensive for F1 teams to use, despite the much smaller size radiators that would result (there's a lot of stuff that needs cooling on an F1 car. Much more so than your civilian motor).

He estimates they can cut the cost 5-10x.

For a rather pedestrian idea this would give a domestic GCH boiler about the size of a VHS video cassette.

Beyond that who would benefit from a very compact high efficiency heat transfer system?

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John Smith 19
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Meh

"Has anyone noticed the similarity in shape between this and the spaceships in the 1950's classic science fiction film "When Worlds Collide" (and films of similar ilk)."

Well strictly it resembles the AVRO 730 M3 reconnaissance bomber designed in the mid 1950s but cancelled by that rampant cockhoud idiot Duncan Sandys. Engines on tip pods and IIRC the forward canard.

However most people go for the SR71, but the engines are mid wing and the canted twin tails.

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John Smith 19
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Boffin

Re: Had the UK only invested more generously in this earlier

"Instead of bailing out banks and the financial ponzi moneylenders. Here's a way to leave a lasting impact on science, engineering and technology."

Well has you bothered to read the press release you'd know the money comes from ESA, not the BNSA.

It's a charming idea but the REL core staff had plenty of that when they were part of the UK launcher industry and Concorde.

They don't want to be a government project, with the "men from the ministry" always sniffing round and foisting their agendas on the programme.

This money is about starting to firm up the whole business case and hardware story IE Skylon, the Upper Stage to tranfer comm sats to GEO (recommended by the ESA fasability study) and the nuts and bolts of a serious piece of concrete for the takoffs (Skylons burn so much propellant it's been stated they can land on grass after a successful orbital delivery).

BTW Skylon is high risk in a way that, say, HS2 simply is not.

It is also high return.

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Samsung rolls out first mass-produced 3D NAND flash memory chip

John Smith 19
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Go

Interesting figures,

If they hold up sounds good.

16GB on a single chip.

We've come a long way.

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US feds: 'Let's make streaming copyrighted content a FELONY'

John Smith 19
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So who *are* this "Internet Policy Task Force "

Let me guess.

Big Media copyright holders.

Assorted paid conslutants to the industry.

Civil servants and Legislature staffers who are looking at some nice jobs in the industry if this goes ahead (look at the story around the DCMA clause that gives digital copyright to the recorder of the piece, not the performer).

And surprise, surprise they want stiffer penalties and the USG to become directly involved in a civil matter.

No questions about why otherwise law abiding citizens who would not hesitate to call 911 if they saw a little old lady being attacked in the street would commit this offense

And on a personal note, does the US Legislature not have some real problems to be dealing with? Like the fact the Legislature seems to be in grid lock over the budget again

thumbs down for this wasted effort.

Americans. You brought about regime change in Libya, Afghanistan and Iraq with varying degrees of success.

Perhaps it's time you had a go with your own elected representatives?

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John Smith 19
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Trollface

Re: Chop off their hands and gouge out their eyes

"This isn't a bad suggestion but the bleeding hearts of the world would be aghast at proper punishment for piracy."

Sounded like a cube rate in the NSA.

Now just a troll.

Do not feed.

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John Smith 19
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Facepalm

Re: How about...

"... making it a felony to be a corporate whore while in office?"

Because turkeys don't vote for Thanksgiving?

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John Smith 19
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Unhappy

Re: Sad

" If illegal streaming is a felony they can get a better return on all the systems that were put in place to stop terrorism, but don't stop terrorism. "

True.

But isn't copyright infringement a civil matter? IE it's a private dispute between the copyright owners and the person doing the streaming?

This smells of more paid conslutancy.

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Actifio plans wider data management portfolio

John Smith 19
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Guess it will depend if they support their ISV well and their ISVs produce good projects

Typical pattern with small co's is they support their top few big companies and everyone else slides.

If they support their ISVs well and create an ecosystem around the product (while staying independent) they could become a major player.

Could work. Thumbs up for their success so far.

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Report: NSA spying deals billion dollar knockout to US cloud prospects

John Smith 19
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Re: What if....

"What if the NSA runs out of storage capacity and decides to use the cloud. "

The probably do.

But it's their servers sitting in their offices.

They are not that stupid.

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John Smith 19
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FAIL

Re: Encryption

"Sorry to burst your bubble there but the person that created it knows how to break it."

That statement tells me you know very little about how modern encryption algorithms, the kind that become international standards not the kind baked into your cars key fob, are developed.

With that level of ignorance you're right to post AC.

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John Smith 19
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Re: Physics can disagree all it likes ...

"All done in the name of democracy, or was it corporate interests?"

Well in the aces of Alledne of Chile in the early 1970s it might have been the CIA pension fund holdings of RTZ, which (IIRC) he nationalized.

Interestingly the CIA seemed to avoid most of the Iran/Contra efforts to overthrow the Sandinista government of Nicaragua (another democratically elected left of centre government, unlike the Formosa family, that ran the country the way a mafia family would run a country for a generation).

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John Smith 19
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Losing $20-30Bn *might* get some attention.

That's a lot more than than the rebuild cost for the World Trade Centre buildings (about $2.4Bn). At $2m a life that still only adds about $6bn (and I'm pretty sure most people did not see anywhere near that).

I guess the question is what do you want to do with your information once it's on cloud servers (let's cuts this BS about "Oh it's not anywhere, it's in cyberspace." No it is not)?

Some things should be fairly easy to do with encrypted on the disk data, others (running a live database to support your company) less so.

And remembers a 1st rate encryption algorithm could have a 3rd rate implementation.

But note if the servers are a)Operated by a US company or b) Sited in the US (or both) THE PATRIOT act applies and they have to cough it all up to anyone with a federal badge.

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Queensland bans IBM from future work

John Smith 19
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Go

Wow a state that actually blacklisted one of the usual suspects.

BTW IBM as prime contractor it is very much your responsibility to ride herd on your sub contractors.

Now will the states procurement processes be reviewed so no one person (and not even an employee) can game the system as well as Mr Burns did.

I've been looking for a good example of what I mean by a "conslutant"

I think I've found one.

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IBM opens up Power chips, ARM-style, to take on Chipzilla

John Smith 19
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POWER did rule in the HPC field.

People who do geophysics simulation and visualization (IE oil companies) bought big RS/6000 SP2 systems over the SPARC multiprocessors others were touting at the time.

And they always wanted bigger

Going IBM gives you a)One of the worlds biggest computer companies b)Fallback wafer fab facilities if needed (the in house fab used to be pretty good, but I don't know if that's still true). c)US based (which Americans seem to like).

This consortium puts them in close touch with potentially very big users so they get feed back on what ISA people want in the core, which is always useful.

Thumbs up to IBM for this move, wheather it delivers the benefits they hope for is another matter.

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Horrific moment curvy mum-of-none Mail Online spills everyone's data

John Smith 19
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Meh

Re: In praise of the Daily Mail

"Let's not forget that, despite everything, it was the Daily Mail which had the balls to name five men as the murderers of Stephen Lawrence when the Metropolitan Police were doing sod all except wallowing in shit."

Doubly so given the suspicion that at one of the killers dads was (allegedly) shifting substantial amounts of Class A drugs and was very supportive of certain police officers, with regular brown paper "care parcels."

So yes they do deserve a thumbs up for that.

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John Smith 19
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Childcatcher

Re: @ AC1550h GMT - Right now I am on my knees praying

"Those images should feature CP*, best to be hosted in a hidden folder on mumsnet and then linked to the Daily Mail."

While deeply despicable you have to think that if you wanted to stir up plenty of TOTC type outrage the Daily Jailbait Mail would be the place to plant it.

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Limbaugh: If you hate Apple then you're a lefty blog-o-twat hipster

John Smith 19
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Meh

haters got to hate

I'll leave readers to chose whose who in this situation.

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John Smith 19
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Meh

Re: Draft dodger

"Limbaugh avoided service in Vietnam by claiming to have an anal cyst."

Excellent.

With John Wayne (Only uniforms he wore came from the props dept) Mel Gibson (skedaddled to Aus) and Shrub (Texas Air National Guard. Keeping Houston safe from VC insurgants) I can now go ahead with my new range of "All American (Draft Dodger)" teeshirts.

The only question is to do a quartet of this bunch of right wing blow hards or a set of individuals for customers to collect.

Decisions, decisions.

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John Smith 19
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"Is this the IT expert who's been advising Cameron and Perry?"

Neat.

Thumbs up for the idea. If true truly the gates of hell are not far off opening.

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John Smith 19
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Unhappy

Funny idea of freedom that Americans have.

You can bet he'd defend his 1st amendement right to the death.

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John Smith 19
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But the UK has a few like him.

Consider this little morsel from a British one

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Flippin' tosser: Sun's magnetic field poised to SWIVEL on it - NASA

John Smith 19
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should be very interesting to see its effect on Earths weather

Which give the effect on cloud seeding events by incoming cosmic rays could be severe.

Thumbs up for learning more about the nearest star to our planet.

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Can't agree on a coding style? Maybe the NEW YORK TIMES can help

John Smith 19
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Just realised we should call the K&R bracing style "biblical."

For the first {

shall be last and the last shall be first

}

That would have made things so much easier than it was.

<sigh>.

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John Smith 19
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Happy

"Whereas the Reg programming style guide requires that method and variable names contain alliteration and dodgy puns."

Hey. No peaking at the page source.

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John Smith 19
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Unhappy

I know this sounds dumb but..

Spaces accepted by every compiler.

TABs might glitch some software. I know "TABs are white space yadda yadda" (except of course in whitespace).

That said I presume all modern editors can accept tab keypresses and output them as spaces but when the re-read the file use tabs for the on screen version.

Someone mentioned even vi can do this so I guess that should be any modern editor beyond notepad.

Here's the thing. If 1 person writes the code they can use whatever style they want and if they don't use it consistently then it's their problem to figure out. So as long as they are a)The only developer on the project and b)Stay with the project from first code to retirement no problem.

Now how many of you have actually experienced that little fantasy IRL?

Not many I suspect. For the rest of us I'd suggest the problem is not what style to use it's using it consistently. Us meatsacks have real problems sticking to x spaces on each and every line of several thousand lines of code.

So I guess this will join the other style guides on the shelves (Kernigham & Plauger anyone?).

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IBM committed 'ethical transgressions' to win botched project

John Smith 19
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Re: I smell "covert reward" systems at work.

"It's all about Itaniums, baby!"

It is where Mattie is concerned.

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John Smith 19
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A little note on how that $Aus 1Bn came about.

That's not all the contract cost.

That's all the non-payments, over payments and under payments to staff (and anyone else) on the system

Added together.

Keep in mind in accountancy rules for this sort of thing unlike if the cash is mis-transferred (IE 1 account too big, one account too small) both transfers add to the total.

When NASA rolled out SAP across their 11 sites they found the "discrepancies" across 11 sites and about 50 years came to $576Bn. No I have not missed a decimal point.

So you could say that most of that $Aus 1Bn was "enabled" by the IBM software.

But not in a good way.

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John Smith 19
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FAIL

I smell "covert reward" systems at work.

Encouraged former employer to bid. OK.

Shifting the bid criteria weighting to favor them. Not OK

Like hiring Matt Bryant to do a server hardware evaluation.

Then we place the order for the HP Itaniums.

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Seagate goes back to ASICs, slurps upstart's brains in return for cash

John Smith 19
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e-beam direct write + gate arrays

European Silicon Structures and Ferranti ride again.

Who knew?

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Windows Phones BLAB passwords to hackers, thanks to weak crypto

John Smith 19
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WTF?

Re: Microsoft

"See what you mean, but the protocol is behaving as designed. e.g. This isn't a buffer overflow or similar type coding error....This is more a case of technology has moved on and the protocol is now too weak to use without specific mitigating controls in place..."

When was Windows 8 released again?

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Super-SVELTE BLUSH-PINK planet goes too far with star

John Smith 19
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*direct* imaging of the planet from 57 LY away.

We've come a long way in this area.

But damm 9x further away than Jupiter is from the Sun. That's huge

Thumbs up for the results, and what people are planning to do about it.

Exciting times.

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KingSpec's 2TB Multicore PCI-E SSD whopper vs the rest

John Smith 19
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Happy

Hourses for courses?

Large files served up fast?

Lots of scope for the "adult entertainment" market perhaps?

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Lawsuit: Infosys abuses visas to discriminate against US staff

John Smith 19
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Meh

"Clearly the visa programme needs to also take into account the job spec and the offered wage to see if it is a reasonable wage for that job before granting a visa. I"

As I believe the UK system does.

In fact does not the US Dept of Labor have detailed statistics on exactly what those rates are?

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John Smith 19
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Meh

"Infosys does not discriminate Americans. It discriminates against all employees who are expensive, including Indians. Infosys finds excuses to fire all those who are experienced. It only wants employees who are in complete control of the management and paid less. It lacks complete the middle management level. Irony is that it had to bring in the most experienced person who is already retired."

<parsing failure>

And in English?

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John Smith 19
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Re: The mouthpiece speaks!

"Says Infosys's token American...."

That's token Italian-American woman.

That makes her a "threefer" by my count.

Now if she were a disabled lesbian that would be just about perfect.

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Upstart's 'FLASH KILLER' chips pack a terabyte per tiny layer

John Smith 19
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Thumb Up

Sounds all good but its V 0.9 at best

And the price is a big one.

Thumbs up so far. It really does sound too good to be true.

And historically we know what that means......

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GenieDB uncorks database-as-a-service

John Smith 19
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Ever more data in *whose* hands?

BTW I seem to recall Lotus Notes solved the synching of multiple databases over low bandwidth data lines decades ago.

If you're Google or Amazon no doubt this is very exciting.

For the those of us who do care what jurisdiction our data is in (IE pretty much any place not the US) not so much.

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Leaked docs: SOD squad feeds NSA intelligence to drug enforcement plods

John Smith 19
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Unhappy

Re: Just stop it

"The war on drugs serves only the big crooks, big bad money floats into politics. Apart from the crooks nobody gains anything. Rather counter productive to say the least, like curing lung cancer with a shot gun."

I guess you don't know the old one about how they found a cure for cancer?

It's heroin.

Ever see a junkie who died of cancer?

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John Smith 19
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Holmes

Re: This is legal according to FISA?

"We have laws that rightly restrict abuse of the NSA's data gathering capability. Not only does it appear that there is a flood of data going out of NSA that isn't related to National Security and Counter-terrorism, but it appears that sworn government agents frequently perjure themselves on issues of where data is being sourced."

That only applies if the information is no good.

Of course it might be a bit awkward if most of those tips came from eavesdropping on US nationals, as opposed to foreigners.

So probably best not to say where it came from

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Sergey Brin's 'test-tube burger' cooked, eaten, declared meat-like

John Smith 19
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They were able to turn micoprotein into Quorn. I think turning beef muscle stem cells into "meat"

will likely to be fairly easy, given the shift is much simpler.

Usual note this is v 0.1 tech.

Odd I've never thought of Maastricht as a world capital for Haut Cuisine before.

So thumbs up for something I first discussed in "The Space Merchants" from the early 1950s.

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Jimbo Wales: ISP smut blocking systems simply 'ridiculous'

John Smith 19
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Gimp

And so the scope creep begins.

How long did that take? 2 weeks?

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Child porn hidden in legit hacked websites: 100s redirected to sick images

John Smith 19
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Big Brother

Re: child porn code word for broad censorship

"So the solution to this epidemic of child porn obviously is make the internet illegal. Adults can't be adults even if %99.99 of them would never dream of hurting a child or look at said sick images. We can't take a chance on that one in ten thousand pervert being allowed access even though he hardly needs the internet to harm children."

Yes, that's pretty much the excuse for spying on everyone.

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John Smith 19
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Meh

Re: I don't get this

"Either this is a group of very stupid people"

But smart enough to subvert multiple web sites and with what seems to be a private stash of CP they want to share with their friends, but not very securely, hence not encrypted or password protected.

"or someone is trying to whip up another moral panic."

Quite.

Time to sharpen up Occam's Razor?

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Big blue Avatar movie spawns THREE SEQUELS

John Smith 19
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Happy

Re: Yellow cab

"...packed with thermonuclear warheads, on fire, heading for the sun, perhaps"

Actually I had in mind 'ol Jar Jar cruising along with what some might describe as a "Cocklewell Carrott" between his lips.

Yes, the plot needs a bit of development but I'm sure with a few million I can think up something for him to do for the next 100+ minutes.

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John Smith 19
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Unhappy

Re: Target Audience?

"Are teen, pre-teen Americans.

Any of those here?"

Hard to say.

I have my suspicions.

Some of you can be very childish.

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