* Posts by John Smith 19

10332 posts • joined 10 Jun 2009

The EU wants you to log into YouTube using your state-issued ID card

John Smith 19
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Big Brother

Estona, a country of 10m and virtually no IT infrastructure to speak of pre ID cards

About as close to an IT "Green field" site as you can get.

Former UK Home Secretary Clarke's favorite ID card example.

Yes, it's all in the details of how that system is implemented. .

The real question is do you trust your government? Because you're going to have to.

And do you trust the next one after that? And the next?

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Revealed: The revolving door between Google and the US govt – in pictures

John Smith 19
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Let's see that for the British government. After all this is the UK end of El Reg

What, you can't

It's secret?

There's a shocker.

you could also do one for the big 5 accountancy firms and HMRC "secondments."

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SpaceX is go for US military GPS sat launch, smashes ULA monopoly

John Smith 19
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To put this in perspective

ULA have an unbroken string of 100+ successful launches up to 24 tonnes to LEO

Ariane 5 has an unbroken string of 70+ successful launches up to 16 tonnes to LEO

So far SX have managed a successful run of 18 launches before CRS7 went bang.

Since then they have accumulated another 4 successful launches, with up to 113 tonnes to orbit.

I don't think Arianespace charge their government customers an arm and a leg for their special pixie dust "mission assurance."

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John Smith 19
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I think ULA prefere the term

reassuringly expensive.

Seriously, unlike a lot of other DoD payloads GPS sats are not a $Bn 1 off that absolutely, positively, cross-my-heart-and-hope-to-die have to work packages. the incremental cost of building another one if there's a launch failure is not that high.

Of course if SX manages to launch all the GPS satellites without failure people might begin to ask what exactly requires so much money to get the level of reliability that ULA have delivered.

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US govt quietly tweaks rules to let cops, Feds hack computers anywhere, anytime

John Smith 19
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It's called "Extra terratoriality"

And only the US of A seems to be delusional enough to have it and to enforce it.

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Unisys releases its ClearPath MCP OS for VMs or x86

John Smith 19
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Interesting idea. That makes it the *only* fully commercial large scale OS avalable

os/Z, Mackintosh. You want their facilities you play on their hardware.

This is a business grade OS that runs on commodity hardware.

That's quite intriguing if the license is reasonable.

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Stross' new Laundry list

John Smith 19
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There comes a time

When "gas explosion," "gas explosion setting fire to a chemical store" or "gas explosion setting fire to a chemical store whose fumes cause hallucinations" no longer cuts it.

And then you start having to tell something closer to the truth.

And then things get interesting.

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John Smith 19
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This should be fun

My memory is flaky,

Edinburgh, Newcastle or Sheffield I think.

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It's World IP Day! Celebrate by making money from a dead teenager

John Smith 19
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Amazing wht they will do to protect "The Rat" (¬ C 2016 John Smith 19 )

Yes I think people should be able to make a living by thinking cleverly.

Not their great-great-great-great-great-whatever grandchildren.

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More questions than answers, literally, from America's privacy rules

John Smith 19
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Fitting new technology into old law

Like the UK did with bulkd data slurping under the 1984 Telecomms Act.

That worked well, didn't it.

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'Impossible' EmDrive flying saucer thruster may herald new theory of inertia

John Smith 19
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WTF?

"f the axial length is equal to the diameter of the small end.." "..thrust should be reversed. "

So it's only a lucky guess that the original design produced any thrust at all in a measurable direction?

This is pretty exciting news as a viable explanation is the first step to moving beyond cut-and-try designs.

However with something this big we need to be very cautious as extraordinary (and they are) claims need extraordinary evidence.

The payoff for a system that turns electricity directly into thrust with no mass loss for everything in LEO and beyond is of course huge.

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How innocent people 'of no security interest' are mere keystrokes away in UK's spy databases

John Smith 19
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Gimp

Re: Concerns about data quality

"Those 'advocates' are not concerned for one very simple reason,they have been brainwashed by NEW LABOUR into believing that whatever a 'Labour' government says,must be true."

Wow, you really believe any Government minister has the brains to do this?

Blair liked the idea but this was cooked up by a cabal of senior intelligence civil servants centered around the Home Office and GCHQ.

The loose wording of the 1984 Telecomms bill suggest they may have been at it during the Miners Strike under Thatcher.

Data fetishism is a disease, not a political viewpoint.

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John Smith 19
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We thought if they had acces to everything they'd abuse that access

And boy, were we right.

And note, these are the trivial examples of misuse.

Others include

Making sure spouses are out of the country to ensure risk free adultery.

Tracking someone's movements to ensure they have no alibi if you're planning to commit a crime your going to frame them for.

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FBI's PRISM slurping is 'unconstitutional' – and America's secret spy court is OK with that

John Smith 19
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"The government has shown they have no respect for the law"

What law?

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Universal Credit at high risk of cyber-attack, fraud from the outset

John Smith 19
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Just to *roughly* get an idea of what we're talking about

So 6 benefits x Millions of people x Decades of benefit history x number of files to implement each benefits data model x No of hardware platforms --> "f**k me sideways" volume of data.

GB of data? Definitely. TB? Quite possible.

Clearly you'll need seasoned, hard core systems architects and experienced ETL types to have any serious chance of getting it done in an orderly fashion, probably with mainframe (possibly ICL/Fujitsu OS & DB) skills at some point. So no point in me applying. :-( .

One suggestion. Do the data cleaning before you upload to the new system. You will have fewer claimants on the system to start with but their details will be reliable details, and that give the claimants confidence it's going to work.

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John Smith 19
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FAIL

Smells of "We'll do *exactly* what the MInister asks for"

That's a senior civil servants version of "work to rule."

Usually driven by

a)It threatens us in some way

b)We don't think it's a good idea.

it should have been obvious from the onset this was a huge project both in terms of data volume and complexity. Phased (and fairly slow) roll out was the only way it was ever going to deliver the full benefits.

But that would not fit a certain Ministers agenda.

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Google found 760,935 compromised web sites in a year

John Smith 19
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Big Brother

Today we monitor.

Tomorrow we control.

All your revenue belong to us.

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What's wrong with the Daily Mail buying Yahoo?

John Smith 19
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But note Yahoo pays a *dividiend*

Something Amazon still deos not seem to do on a regular basis.

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John Smith 19
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Joke

Glenda tells it like it is.

Monday. "Buying Yahoo is the best thing that can happen to them."

Friday "Buying Yahoo. Aintyasick of it?"

Thoughtful analysis will resume on Monday.

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Cambridge Uni spins up green and beefy supercomputer project

John Smith 19
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a "Centre of research"

But not of course manufacturing.

That would be far too risky and assertive.

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Three-bit quantum gate a step closer to universal quantum computer

John Smith 19
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Perhaps people should read about Friedkin gates first?

That would be here

Key feature is gates that use zero energy to compute.

Which might be quite handy given how power requirements of new processors have risen and zero design to use asynchronous design.

Is it a quantum computer?

The fact it uses quantum data carriers suggests it might be.

TBH I think quantum systems are looking better at massive parallel correlation and search problems, rather like optical systems were touted at as being good for.

The real quantum computer that takes in a "normal" (but very large) computing problem, then solves

it using quantum electronics (whatever that is) seems as far away as ever.

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House passes broadband bill despite promise of White House veto

John Smith 19
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"alleviate the threat that the FCC.. will limit provider pricing flexibility"

Translation.

"It will stop the FCC setting WTF we want conditions on whoever we choose whenever we choose to do so."

Just a reminder.

The default personality type of all corporate cultures is "sociopath."

Sociopaths hate all restrictions on their behavior.

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Intel's XPoint emperor has no clothes, only soiled diapers

John Smith 19
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Meh

So grossly over hyped but still a fair improvement?

10x faster still sounds pretty good to me.

Of course that depends on the exact details of the test.

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US anti-encryption law is so 'braindead' it will outlaw file compression

John Smith 19
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Who writes this sort of law?

I mean really.

It's cretinous.

And anyone with superficial knowledge would know it.

So who writes such obviously s**t law?

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Prof Hawking to mail postage-stamp space craft to Alpha Centauri using frickin' lasers

John Smith 19
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Boffin

"how is this tiny spacecraft going to be able to phone home when it gets there? "

Well usually the idea has been to modulate the driving beam.

Like a passively powered RFID tag.

On a very large scale.

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John Smith 19
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"It would of course also be quite useful as a ground based weapon..."

Russian billionaire?

Does he have a private island by any chance?

With a dormant volcano on it?

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Ames boffins mix metals to boost electron velocity

John Smith 19
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Go

Obvious question

Could you make an alloy where the speed of electrons exceeds the speed of light?

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America's Intelligence Transparency Council to meet for the first time … behind closed doors

John Smith 19
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"You are free to do what we tell you!"

American domestic policy.

Perfectly synchronized with foreign policy.

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Watch: SpaceX finally lands Falcon rocket on robo-barge in one piece

John Smith 19
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Demand is a function of price at the moment.

"Reduce the price and demand will, for want of a better word, skyrocket."

It is hoped demand will skyrocket.

In reality there is very limited evidence for price elasticity in the launch services market. Hint. You can't buy a rocket, you buy basically a ticket on a rocket for ride at some (usually years) time in the future.

They will still be discarding the 2nd stage and that costs in the tens of millions and it's never not going to cost tens of millions

Will people be queuing up for launches at $40m in a way they are not at $60m?

My instinct says no. I don't think raising the money for a launch at $40m is that much easier for a project than it is at $60m.

But we'll find out.

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John Smith 19
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Re: It's an impressive *technical* achievement

"It can increase the number of launches possible in a set period as well?"

That's only useful if there are customers who want that capacity.

That only happens if a 30% price cut is big enough to offset the drop in SX revenues.

Some think it will be.

But that still means you throw away the 2nd stage which is around $15-20m.

While that continues a flight will still cost tens of $m.

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John Smith 19
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It's an impressive *technical* achievement

Now let's see what it does to their prices.

Because if it doesn't lower their prices a lot, so what?

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AI, VR, bots and YOU? A survivor's guide to The Future™

John Smith 19
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Thumb Up

I'm rather liking John Lewis IT

No big splashes, just getting on with it.

Intriguing way to run an IT operation.

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OpenStack 'Mitaka' materialises

John Smith 19
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"consistent calls for all OpenStack sub-projects," Mein Gott

That sounds like this could become substantially more usable.

No doubt all those who developed code for it already will bitterly complain about this, although it sounds like exactly what search and replace is for.

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Britain is sending a huge nuclear waste shipment to America. Why?

John Smith 19
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"Nuclear power is safe and if designed right, does have minimal waste, "

Trouble is the current designs don't do it right.

That's why there is so much waste (and this is not waste, it's weapons grade fuel) to bury.

Note 2 things.

PWR's can be fueled with transuranic elements and Pu to burn them up.

No one wants to do so and the US is even more difficult about reprocessing than the UK.

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EMC said to be ditching Documentum business

John Smith 19
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$600m/PA and 30% profit

Sounds like a pretty solid business to get into.

Now if they could figure a way to grow the business as well....

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Google reveals own security regime policy trusts no network, anywhere, ever

John Smith 19
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"Trust nothing" model. Excellent idea. But note the flip side

It demands a total picture of the device running.

Something Google seems quite fond of having, and collecting.

For the rest of us?

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Your pointy-haired boss 'bought a cloud' with his credit card. Now what?

John Smith 19
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Re: Missing the real point

" (1) What's the point? There's a search function anyway. (2) There's only a couple of hundred names and the webpages paginate in a rather clever way that utilises the height of the browser window to minimise scrolling and the calculations behind that, if the pages are to display where they break rather than just show a number, would have to calculate everything for every page and iterate the arrays four times over needlessly. So if it happens to break between James and Jones do you want A-Ja Jo-Z or A-J K-Z? In which case it shows the first n letters of the surname until there's a difference (and let's hope it doesn't break between A Smith and B Smith)."

Or just do a sorted query on the driver database and use that to drive the website so the data's sorted already?

There's the problem the PHB thinks is the problem, and then there's the real problem.

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John Smith 19
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Why the PHB should only be given *minimal* access to any system.

Anything more is asking for trouble.

Nice choice of Battlefield Earth for the picture.

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Google-funded study concludes: Make DMCA even more Google-friendly

John Smith 19
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Google. "selling youre imagery like it's our own."

I think that about sums it up.

I also see a market for a "DCMA documentation" generation app.

Funny how people respond when something is made much easier to do.

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US government updates secure email guide for first time in a decade

John Smith 19
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As always in IT "It depends"

Are you running the system for you staff, or to email outsiders? Relevant if you're LM or Boeing or BP. Small companies on one site, not so much.

Do you management think keeping all email (not just their personal ones) private is important?

Will management invest if they find the current system can't do the job?

Are there products and services you can trust to do the job (and afford) that you can buy if the current system can't cut it?

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Tesla books over $8bn in overnight sales claims Elon Musk

John Smith 19
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Re: 198,000

"I guess we'll find out how many of those orders are ultimately completed in a few years..."

True.

But that still puts $198m in Tesla's corporate account now.

You can do a lot of with that kind of money even overnight if you have the right setup.

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Jenkins 'fesses up after inadvertently slurping users' usage stats

John Smith 19
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Quite disturbing

If I knew what the Jenkins project is.

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Wait... who broke that? Things you need to do to make your world diagnosable

John Smith 19
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different times on their internal clocks, whatever logs..will be almost impossible to collate

One of those "Oh a couple of minutes between devices, what's the harm?" points.

I thought it was quite easy to set up a time server so all devices sync their clocks to it.

Apparently not.

His last point (lessons learned) is often ignored but it's the way you avoid doing this all over again in x weeks/months//years time.

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Tech's big dogs snarl at UK.gov over Snoopers' Charter

John Smith 19
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"unilateral assertions of extraterritorial jurisdiction"

Because only the US can do that.

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EU ministers to demand more data access after Brussels attacks

John Smith 19
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Gimp

Sound like the Madrid bombing when the UK got the Data Retention Directive through

Despite the Spanish not asking for it.

Let's hope other European nations have greater respect for civil liberties than the British.

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John Smith 19
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Gimp

Re: "Hastily arranged" meetings and civil liberties

But not you can believe by the euro spookocrats.

You can believe the European equivalent of the unelected cabal in the Home Office who've pushed for all this BS have been patiently waiting for something like this

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Bristol boffins blast 1.59 Gbps down ONE 20 MHz channel

John Smith 19
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So with LoS microwave you could give 10Mbp to remote homes.

No chance BT will offer that option of course.

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Met plod commissioner: Fraud victims should not be refunded by banks

John Smith 19
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WTF?

"90 percent of all online fraud..." statistic

Made up statistic alert...

But to be fair, it's an observations, not a recommendation.

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Dodgy software will bork America's F-35 fighters until at least 2019

John Smith 19
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Re: May I be the first to say...

""I had a guaranteed military sale with ED 209, erm the F35, - renovation program, spare parts for twenty-five, erm forty years... Who cares if it works or not?"

Indeed you can't read about this sort of clusterf**k development and not hear the words of everyone's favorite Bad VP,

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Only 0.1% of you are doing web server security right

John Smith 19
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I'm guessing there's a lot to setting up a full web server *properly*

And this is one of those bits that somehow aren't quite important enough to set up in the first phase, and forgotten about (by many) in the second phase.

Sounds like something that should be on by default.

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