* Posts by John Smith 19

10363 posts • joined 10 Jun 2009

Feinstein-Burr's bonkers backdoor crypto law is dead in the water

John Smith 19
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What is it about this woman

Who combines the nuttiness of Teresa May with the bonkers ideas of Jacqui Smith?

Is she the most Right Wing "Democrat" in the house?

Or just the most Right Wing one we hear about?

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John Smith 19
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Gimp

Data fetishists never sleep.

They will use any and every murder/explosion/blackmail case to insist that If they had these powers it would not have happened.

This always comes from the high level spook bureaucrats.

Find "Thomas Brian Reynolds."

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Brexit? Cutting the old school tie would do more for Brit tech world

John Smith 19
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"You got to ask yourself, cui bono? "

Always a good idea.

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CERT warns of hardcoded creds in medical app

John Smith 19
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A genius plan. Again.

What could go wrong.

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NASA: We'll try again in the morning after friction ruins engorgement

John Smith 19
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Oh dear, Mr Floppy?

Had to be said.

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Thai bloke battles jumbo python in toilet todger thriller

John Smith 19
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Hmm. "Enter the Python."

Sounds like some kind of low rent chopsokey movie

Mine's the one with the John Woo back catalogue in the pocket.

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IETF spikes government metadata collection with DNS request crypto plan

John Smith 19
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"the IETF community decided that pervasive monitoring is an attack,"

Because it is?

Metadata and traffic analysis, and the building of contact webs from them, have been the data fetishists secret weapon for a long time. Hence the NSA's reaction to the publication of "The Hut Six Story."

If we want an internet that protects freedom and privacy we can no longer treat the intermediate nodes as friendly, nor accept the paths of packets will not be tracked not because any one person threatens the state, but simply because the state can.

Which is also half the definition of psychopathic behavior in humans.

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Pepper robot acts like real teenager, gets job at Pizza Hut

John Smith 19
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Is anyone else thinking "Get on the cart, toadies" ?

Actually for those who really want robotics to become science fact and not SF you are going to need systems that can read peoples feelings and respond to them.

Although the way supermarkets are going self service at checkouts will there be many human service jobs left for it to take over?

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Don't tell the Cabinet Office: HMRC is building its own online ID system

John Smith 19
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"..will yield £1bn in extra tax revenue.."

Or they could just ask Bernie Eccleston to cough up his alleged £2bn in unpaid taxes.

Or in fact all the other people whose details they have been passed.

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India launches hypersonic space shuttle precursor

John Smith 19
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This is a *long* way from being a launch vehicle. It's more like the X37b

IOW still likely to need a bloody big expendable rocket to get it anywhere.

Mind you it has tested TPS materials to M5

Handy if one were to (just for example) be planning to build a M5 cruise missile, would it not?

Likewise if you replaced that 6.5t test vehicle with say a 500Kg "physics package" that would probably have some other uses.

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Galileo satnav fleet waxes orbital

John Smith 19
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Hydrazine. Nasty stuff.

Never really understood why SX went with it for the landing thrusters on the Dragon capsule.

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Wayne Rooney razzles in X-Men: Apocalypse plug

John Smith 19
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Wayne Rooney is an X man?

Now that makes sense.

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I spy a secret High Court: We're no 'star chamber', it says in 4-year report

John Smith 19
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Interesting no complaint upheld against the spooks till the Snowden documents started coming.

So no evidence to identify capabilities --> You're being paranoid. Dismissed. Next case.

Snowden documents --> Oh they were spying on everyone.

"Justice" as from the Humphrey Appleby play book.

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Got $130,000 down the back of the sofa? Great. Grab an HP 3D printer

John Smith 19
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Not quite as s**t as the article made it sound. Lots of *potential* but not much up front

So it's more like a line printer or fax than most existing systems, which are more like 3d plotters.

Nylon to start but promise of conductive (2 thou wide) tracks and ceramics as well eventually, and the high end model has a cleaning station to clean all the unused powder off the finished article, yours for a <cough> modest $25k.

But as for "risked damaging” the brand" you are f**king kidding me, right?

You can be the cartridges will cost a fortune (supposedly they will supply 200l drums of the stuff) and probably maintain HP's 1 in 3 failure rate if someone does refill them.

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Is uBeam the new Theranos?

John Smith 19
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Doing the maths never stopped Merkins handing cash out to plausible types.

NASP was started by a very optimistic report from the principal promoter investigator.

When the USAF actually had an independent assessment done they found he'd even got the properties of the air flowing through the system favorably wrong.

By then the USG had spent around $1Bn+ trying to make it work.

Perhaps this is the origin of the term scamjet?

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Gov to pull plug on online ID verification portal Gateway in 2018

John Smith 19
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So you've got a template of what works and what doesn't

And they still can't manage to produce a better version

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Non-police orgs merrily accessed PNC without authority, says HMIC

John Smith 19
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Joke

Wot?

No wheeel clamping companies?

No Scouting Assocation?

Seriously WTF is special about Thurrock Council.?

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First successful Hyperloop test module hits 100mph in four seconds

John Smith 19
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Freight is toughter than you think

Are they talking pallets about 1mx1m or containers IE 8' x 8' in cross section?

One is relatively human sized, the other is not.

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Lending Club CEO booted out for dodgy deals

John Smith 19
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"Innovations in digital finance,"

Mmm yes,

That's basically what a CDO was at the time.

Remember what they did?

If you want a quick, funny run down on what and how watch "The Big Short."

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Kepler space telescope spots 1,284 new planets

John Smith 19
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So we can start putting some numbers on the Drake equation.

Excellent news.

Still waiting for any radio signals from some of those alien civilizations that should be out there.

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Lauri Love: 'Britain's FBI' loses court attempt to evade decryption laws

John Smith 19
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It'd be interesting to see if UK courst could get a US hacker into them on this evidence

Because IIRC the bar to get a US citizen back to blighty is much higher.

The Blair/Bush extradition treaty.

The gift that keeps on taking.

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Congress calls for change to NSA spying law

John Smith 19
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Funny Grassley didn't mention the Boston Marathon bombing in his little list of terror attacks

Oh wait

That would have been one where they had all that surveillance in place.

But did nothing.

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Microsoft bods tell El Reg: We've re-pivoted open-source .NET Core

John Smith 19
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The task of a commercial software tools company is *not* to help you do useful work.

It's to so tie you to their systems you keep buying them.

If you do useful work as a result that's a bonus.

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Six-year-old patched Stuxnet hole still the web's biggest killer

John Smith 19
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WTF?

"Windows versions older than Windows 8 that have not applied the August 2010 patch."

6 years to patch your PC.

Wouldn't it be simpler to remove the PC from the person?

It's clear they have no idea how to use it.

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Don't split Openreach, says BT, and we'll splash BEELLIONS on broadband and 4G

John Smith 19
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Cut them up and cut them up *now*

Every monopoly (and BT remains effectively a monopoly in the back end) knows knows the most important thing is protecting the monopoly.

And they will do and say anything to do this.

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Review legacy code: Waking dragons is risk worth taking, says Trainline ops head

John Smith 19
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Re: dragon-free zones

"The crazy thing is that this would probably work. All you need besides the PPP is a guy who looks good in suit and can convincingly talk weapons-grade BS for a couple of hours with a straight face. "

Hmm. Yes I can think of a few of those.

"Oh, and be careful with the pricing. The package you sell must be insanely expensive."

I think they prefer the word "reassuringly."

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John Smith 19
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Boffin

So having found a bad design pattern they then proactively looked for other copies of it.

Something IBM Federal Systems learned writing the software for the Shuttle.

Part of the reason they were the the basis of the CMM.

Am I impressed?

Not really.

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Stop resetting your passwords, says UK govt's spy network

John Smith 19
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Gimp

So if you trust the security services with your passwords – and who out there doesn't?

As Edward Snowden has demonstrated the answer is of course in the UK the answer is no one

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Robot surgeon outperforms human doctor with porcine patients

John Smith 19
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Surgeons *will* fight this tooth and nail to the bitter end.

They will cite speed. The machines will get faster. At some point they will be faster and more accurate than a human.

They will cite safety. The first 16 patients to repair shrapnel damage to the heart killed all the patients. However they were all pigs.

They will say it doesn't care about it's patients. And?

What they won't say is it makes skills they have have spent hundreds of $1000 acquiring reproducible and (ultimately) the only surgeons you will need will be those to develop new surgical procedures. A much smaller number.

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F-35s failed 'scramble test' because of buggy software

John Smith 19
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@Wolftone

"Someone is looking at the F-14 Tomcat's, then looking back at the F-35 monstrosity and is wondering where it all went wrong.

Well the F14 was built by Grumman in NY state.

The F35 is built by LM Corp. The ba**ard child of a myriad of mergers in the US aerospace industry sanctioned (and I'm fairly sure encouraged) by the DoD to create a "national champion" because of fears individually they couldn't complete in the world arms sales market.

Much like what was BAe System was created by active encouragement of the MoD in the UK.

It's no surprise how well these companies like to work together.

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John Smith 19
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WTF?

Re: I think there is a wonderfull message behind this

"lead engineer"... not exaaaactly, rather he wrote the coding standards (decent ones, from what I gather) for the project:

http://www.stroustrup.com/JSF-AV-rules.pdf

141 f**king pages.

WTF?

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The EU wants you to log into YouTube using your state-issued ID card

John Smith 19
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Big Brother

Estona, a country of 10m and virtually no IT infrastructure to speak of pre ID cards

About as close to an IT "Green field" site as you can get.

Former UK Home Secretary Clarke's favorite ID card example.

Yes, it's all in the details of how that system is implemented. .

The real question is do you trust your government? Because you're going to have to.

And do you trust the next one after that? And the next?

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Revealed: The revolving door between Google and the US govt – in pictures

John Smith 19
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Let's see that for the British government. After all this is the UK end of El Reg

What, you can't

It's secret?

There's a shocker.

you could also do one for the big 5 accountancy firms and HMRC "secondments."

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SpaceX is go for US military GPS sat launch, smashes ULA monopoly

John Smith 19
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To put this in perspective

ULA have an unbroken string of 100+ successful launches up to 24 tonnes to LEO

Ariane 5 has an unbroken string of 70+ successful launches up to 16 tonnes to LEO

So far SX have managed a successful run of 18 launches before CRS7 went bang.

Since then they have accumulated another 4 successful launches, with up to 113 tonnes to orbit.

I don't think Arianespace charge their government customers an arm and a leg for their special pixie dust "mission assurance."

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John Smith 19
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I think ULA prefere the term

reassuringly expensive.

Seriously, unlike a lot of other DoD payloads GPS sats are not a $Bn 1 off that absolutely, positively, cross-my-heart-and-hope-to-die have to work packages. the incremental cost of building another one if there's a launch failure is not that high.

Of course if SX manages to launch all the GPS satellites without failure people might begin to ask what exactly requires so much money to get the level of reliability that ULA have delivered.

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US govt quietly tweaks rules to let cops, Feds hack computers anywhere, anytime

John Smith 19
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It's called "Extra terratoriality"

And only the US of A seems to be delusional enough to have it and to enforce it.

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Unisys releases its ClearPath MCP OS for VMs or x86

John Smith 19
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Go

Interesting idea. That makes it the *only* fully commercial large scale OS avalable

os/Z, Mackintosh. You want their facilities you play on their hardware.

This is a business grade OS that runs on commodity hardware.

That's quite intriguing if the license is reasonable.

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Stross' new Laundry list

John Smith 19
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There comes a time

When "gas explosion," "gas explosion setting fire to a chemical store" or "gas explosion setting fire to a chemical store whose fumes cause hallucinations" no longer cuts it.

And then you start having to tell something closer to the truth.

And then things get interesting.

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John Smith 19
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Go

This should be fun

My memory is flaky,

Edinburgh, Newcastle or Sheffield I think.

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It's World IP Day! Celebrate by making money from a dead teenager

John Smith 19
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Amazing wht they will do to protect "The Rat" (¬ C 2016 John Smith 19 )

Yes I think people should be able to make a living by thinking cleverly.

Not their great-great-great-great-great-whatever grandchildren.

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More questions than answers, literally, from America's privacy rules

John Smith 19
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Fitting new technology into old law

Like the UK did with bulkd data slurping under the 1984 Telecomms Act.

That worked well, didn't it.

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'Impossible' EmDrive flying saucer thruster may herald new theory of inertia

John Smith 19
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WTF?

"f the axial length is equal to the diameter of the small end.." "..thrust should be reversed. "

So it's only a lucky guess that the original design produced any thrust at all in a measurable direction?

This is pretty exciting news as a viable explanation is the first step to moving beyond cut-and-try designs.

However with something this big we need to be very cautious as extraordinary (and they are) claims need extraordinary evidence.

The payoff for a system that turns electricity directly into thrust with no mass loss for everything in LEO and beyond is of course huge.

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How innocent people 'of no security interest' are mere keystrokes away in UK's spy databases

John Smith 19
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Gimp

Re: Concerns about data quality

"Those 'advocates' are not concerned for one very simple reason,they have been brainwashed by NEW LABOUR into believing that whatever a 'Labour' government says,must be true."

Wow, you really believe any Government minister has the brains to do this?

Blair liked the idea but this was cooked up by a cabal of senior intelligence civil servants centered around the Home Office and GCHQ.

The loose wording of the 1984 Telecomms bill suggest they may have been at it during the Miners Strike under Thatcher.

Data fetishism is a disease, not a political viewpoint.

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John Smith 19
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We thought if they had acces to everything they'd abuse that access

And boy, were we right.

And note, these are the trivial examples of misuse.

Others include

Making sure spouses are out of the country to ensure risk free adultery.

Tracking someone's movements to ensure they have no alibi if you're planning to commit a crime your going to frame them for.

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FBI's PRISM slurping is 'unconstitutional' – and America's secret spy court is OK with that

John Smith 19
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"The government has shown they have no respect for the law"

What law?

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Universal Credit at high risk of cyber-attack, fraud from the outset

John Smith 19
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Just to *roughly* get an idea of what we're talking about

So 6 benefits x Millions of people x Decades of benefit history x number of files to implement each benefits data model x No of hardware platforms --> "f**k me sideways" volume of data.

GB of data? Definitely. TB? Quite possible.

Clearly you'll need seasoned, hard core systems architects and experienced ETL types to have any serious chance of getting it done in an orderly fashion, probably with mainframe (possibly ICL/Fujitsu OS & DB) skills at some point. So no point in me applying. :-( .

One suggestion. Do the data cleaning before you upload to the new system. You will have fewer claimants on the system to start with but their details will be reliable details, and that give the claimants confidence it's going to work.

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Google found 760,935 compromised web sites in a year

John Smith 19
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Big Brother

Today we monitor.

Tomorrow we control.

All your revenue belong to us.

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What's wrong with the Daily Mail buying Yahoo?

John Smith 19
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But note Yahoo pays a *dividiend*

Something Amazon still deos not seem to do on a regular basis.

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John Smith 19
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Joke

Glenda tells it like it is.

Monday. "Buying Yahoo is the best thing that can happen to them."

Friday "Buying Yahoo. Aintyasick of it?"

Thoughtful analysis will resume on Monday.

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Cambridge Uni spins up green and beefy supercomputer project

John Smith 19
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a "Centre of research"

But not of course manufacturing.

That would be far too risky and assertive.

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