* Posts by John Smith 19

10794 posts • joined 10 Jun 2009

'Toyota dealer stole my wife's saucy snaps from phone, emailed them to a swingers website'

John Smith 19
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Just sayin' ...Cirdan...

You mean you heard it through the Grapevine?

Sorry, just couldn't resist.

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Russia accuses hostile foreign powers of plot to undermine its banks

John Smith 19
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What's the key weakeness of Russian banks?

Most of their money comes from gangsters?

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Exclusive: Team Trump's net neutrality guru talks to El Reg

John Smith 19
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Evidence based policy making

Sounds like a good idea.

Till of course the evidence does not say what the people who hired them wants it to.

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Still too much discretion when it comes to that 'terrorism' stuff, repeats David Anderson QC

John Smith 19
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Gimp

"seen by UK courts as overkill, especially where public security is an issue"

Which suggest UK Judges need to understand just how much information is being continually trawled up with no actual sense of due process.

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Soon only Ticketmaster will rip you off: Concert scalper bots face US ban

John Smith 19
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WTF?

"unfair or deceptive act or practice,"

And yet man-in-the-middle "high frequency trading" will still be legal.

What's the difference?

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Imagine every mistake you can make with a new software rollout...

John Smith 19
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"Dated case studies from the 80s and early 90s but still absolutely relevant. "

And yet despite the catalogue of fu**ups to study people keep managing to do it.

Or as the introduction to Peopleware put it

"Somewhere today someone is writing a Purchase Ledger system from scratch, and failing."

Of course 35 years later that statement cannot possibly still be true, can it?

Can it?

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John Smith 19
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"The US is only a week extradition treaty away.."

Au contraire, with a good legal team it can be a decade away.

But Blair's little love gift to Shrub is still in force

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John Smith 19
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FAIL

Oh dear, the Swiss army knife effect.

Yeah it's got umpteen dozen features, if you can remember which one to use and where it's at.

The SAP of courtroom systems?

Although how many times have the UK courts systems started to computerize?

How many times has it failed?

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What you need to know from re:Invent – FPGAs-as-a-service and more

John Smith 19
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"Then again there's the question of who's tapping the cables"

Indeed.

I wouldn't trust the UK govt either, especially given their newly passed Investigatory Powers Act.

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John Smith 19
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FAIL

configure & spin up Linux servers for internal use with strict security & access permissions.

Hahahahahahahahahaha

It's on a cloud.

In the US.

THE PATRIOT Act has not been repealed.

How secure is it going to be?

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NASA preps silicon-photonic modem for space laser internet test

John Smith 19
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This really starts to pay off with a string of them from Earth to Jupiter.

Who knows the next Pluto mission could make an average of 1Mbps, rather than about 1Kbps.

Provided the relays are in place first of course.

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Really weird quantum phenomenon spied lurking near neutron star

John Smith 19
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The abstract says 10^13G field strength. I presume this is Gauss

which is 10 000 Gauss to a Tesla, so 1 giga Tesla.

Given that fusion researchers are quite excited that their magnets can achieve about 20+T continuously that is a very powerful field indeed.

Impressive field. Impressive result.

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Fatal flaws in ten pacemakers make for Denial of Life attacks

John Smith 19
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Holmes

"Security by obscurity is a dangerous design approach"

Indeed

But very cheap.

Although it's quite surprising medical devices are just as stupid about it as the usual IoS webcam and thermostat makers.

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Tobacco giant predicts the end of smoking. Panic ensues

John Smith 19
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"Nicotine is a bitch of a drug to kick and is on par with heroin for addiction, "

I knew a couple who were ex-heroine addicts.

Could not quite smoking.

I knew then this was pretty bad s**t and any bo***ks about it being "non-addictive" was rubbish.

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Qubes goes commercial to keep its secure VM-focused OS dream alive

John Smith 19
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If they stay open source this is not necessarily a bad move.

the idea sounds good but I can't evaluate it.

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What's the first emotion you'd give an AI that might kill you? Yes, fear

John Smith 19
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Well for one of those SF books.....

How about JP Hogan's "The Two Faces of Tomorrow."

which actually looks at the idea of what "fear" might do to an AI, and how it could an AI's "creative" approach could have near lethal consequences.

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UK.gov was warned of smart meter debacle by Cabinet Office in 2012

John Smith 19
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"the EU's smart meter roll-out is about remote disconnection"

Didn't the UK vote to leave the EU?

That's suggests this is not compulsory

BTW Not surprising this report has been delayed. And note it was written by a sympathetic department for this, which suggests they would have chosen authors who were quite sympathetic to the idea to begin with.

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UK's new Snoopers' Charter just passed an encryption backdoor law by the backdoor

John Smith 19
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Gimp

Re: Theresa Stasi May. A fascist right wing authoritarian nutjob.

Which neatly points up that both the hard left Stasi and Mays hard right views are pretty much the same.

What's the difference between a Fascist jackboot on your neck and a Communist jackboot on your neck?

For most people, nothing.

The real line is between Authoritarians and Democrats. One believes in the rule of the people, one the rule of the people, by themselves. I'll leave readers to work out which.

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Investigatory Powers Act signed into UK law by Queen

John Smith 19
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Gimp

"oh f*ck off you unelected, nosey, busybodying witch!"

Still just the current sock puppet for this law.

It's the unelected senior spookocrats (just look for them the PPE graduates) that have always wanted and now got it.

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RIP HPE's The Machine product, 2014-2016: We hardly knew ye

John Smith 19
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Re: So some fast processors + biggish RAM + bigger chunk NVM with quick sharing by others.

"The idea was that it wouldn't have RAM or storage, just enormous quantities of NVRAM operating in both roles. "

So single level storage. Fine if you can get the price/bit of NVM down to DRAM at the same access speed. As for "large number of processors" SP2's of the late 90's were running up to about 64 K processors and IIRC 100's of 1000s of processors are certainly known today.

As for "be specialized hardware cores" aren't all processors SOC's and so (to a certain extent) "specialized"? If you mean specialized to individual companies servers then that would make each block of machines sold unique to their customer.

"Persistent" storage was available 40 years ago.

It's called "core."

NVM as the main memory for a processor node is somewhat bold. So how does it compare to flash?

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John Smith 19
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So some fast processors + biggish RAM + bigger chunk NVM with quick sharing by others.

Not really seeing what the fuss is about.

And it seems neither does HP.

In the mid 80's Chapel Hill did some student chips called "Smart memory" with fine grained processing built close to small chunks of RAM for immediate access.

30 years later that still looks quite advanced.

This does not.

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A Rowhammer ban-hammer for all, and it's all in software

John Smith 19
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Should't be possible.

But is.

The question of course is when is a lot of activity on a row malware and when is it a very busy record in a database?

Still <1% performance hit for a software solution is pretty impressive.

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Ofcom to force a legal separation of Openreach

John Smith 19
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The challenge of course is to keep Openreach independent

and not bought up by Rupert or Vermin.

UK Telecoms and broadband backbone in the hands of The Dirty Digger (TM) or Mr Beardy (TM).

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100k+ petition: MPs must consider debating Snoopers' Charter again

John Smith 19
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Gimp

People. The person you need to write to is your MP.

Remind them this is a a 100K signature petition.

Make it clear what this law does.

It's not the Snoopers Charter.

It's the Data Fetishist's Charter.

And try to educate them that the "4 Horsemen of the infocalypse" are more BS.

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London cops' tech slammed for failing abused kids – report

John Smith 19
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WTF?

"streetwise" "“alone and unsafe in a house with three men”."

WTF do they think she is?

Mindy McCready?

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Airbus flies new plane for the first time

John Smith 19
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"but the first flight of the first A350 was just as uneventful. And the A330."

Several things have helped, many of them IT related.

AFAIK all bit aircraft will be done on CAD systems and they can do automatic clearance and fit checking, Part of the original purpose of rollouts was to find what had not been done right and "shim" it together/apart as needed.

The mfg by "hogging out" large lumps of alloy or laying up large pieces of composite eliminates a shedload of fasteners and their accumulation of tolerance IE all the little bits being slightly out adding up to a whole part that's a lot out.

CFD (certainly below M1) is pretty good so any suspect features that may make handling difficult can be tested and either redesigned or flight rules adjusted so they are not a hazard (at least in early testing).

This results in generally much less drama with new types.

However you can get new problems as well. Airbus had issues when their 2 design centres had different versions of the same CAD SW. IIRC the datum points (where exactly is "0" in the X, Y, Z dimensions relative to each drawing) was just a bit out. This caused months of delay.

Possibly the ultimate case of "More haste, less speed." (-:

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NASA opens ISS to private sector modules

John Smith 19
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Re: A good chance for Bigelow Aerospace?

Hopefully, once it's had it's 2 years up with no leaks (which is what it's there to test).

It'll be interesting to see how many flights it would take to launch enough Bigelow modules to double the volume of ISS. Obviously they'd need fitting out afterward but again the problem with the big rockets and the Shuttle flights was large volume x heavy mass of structure.

I suspect the low(ish) mass of the Bigelow modules and their very compact size changes things quite a bit.

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Jovial NASA says Juno flyby a success

John Smith 19
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That's an approach speed of Mach 169

Which is pretty fast.

As for download speed....

I keep thinking some of those Mars orbiters are geared up to do data relay from ground probes.

Now they'd only be available when one of them had LOS with Juno and the clocks would have to be really tightly synched but in principal you could (if the hardware allows it) have it switched to some kind of high data rate in bursts, raising the average data rate, possibly quite a lot.

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Space crap: Flap, zap or strap? $30k from NASA for your pooper scooper

John Smith 19
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"Modern suits work on a lowered atmospheric pressure ("

A System that NASA have used for decades and seems harmless until something happens and the whole crew die because they can't waste all that time p**sing about with pre-breathing O2.

Still have trouble believing they could have devised such a stupid system.

It's not it's got to be backward compatible with Mercury/Gemini/Apollo or even Shuttle.

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John Smith 19
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"Mind you, I once had a girlfriend who only had one BM a week. I"

And I bet it hurt quite a bit as well.

Usually a sign of serious under hydration, often coupled with a high caffeine intake.

They have enough selection criteria for astronauts as it is.

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How to confuse a Euro-cop: Survey reveals the crypto they love to hate

John Smith 19
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"In the UK they can jail you for not disclosing the password"

True, but that means they actually have to do some investigation to find, you know, evidence that you may be doing something illegal.

And that's such a pain when you just want to hoover up all the data all the time.

Which is exactly what data fetishists want to do (along with storing it forever, because you never know when yesterdays nobody becomes today's somebody).

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No super-kinky web smut please, we're British

John Smith 19
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Childcatcher

Re: Yep, that'll work

OH, this is that SEL Tory MP who still can't manage to set her browsers access controls and demands ISP's do it for her.

IIRC she wanted every internet set to have an age rating.

She thought you could use those gambling sites to do so. They looked pretty trustworthy to her.

TOTC because, you know, that the usual excuse for this BS.

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USS Zumwalt gets Panama tug job after yet another breakdown

John Smith 19
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Welllllll. A B2 was something like a $Bn and this is much larger so by military standards

Quite good in terms of $/lb of hardware?

Isn't this an example of what Mary Caldor called "The Baroque Arsenal?"

IIRC she estimated each generation of "modern" weapons was about 3x the cost of the last.

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Who's in Peter's file? Moneybags Thiel hits up Silicon Valley brains to join his Trump think tank

John Smith 19
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Gimp

"doesn't appear to listen to anyone.." "..what he already thinks. On that particular day."

It's going to be a long, nasty, dirty job and someone's going to do it.

And you won't even have the anonymity of a rubber hood.

So what does "Chief Presidential Gimp" pay these days?

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Not fake news: Facebook reinvents SVG

John Smith 19
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Gimp

"To deliver the next Clippy? "

No. To deliver the next Gimpy. :-) ---->

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FYI: The FBI is being awfully evasive about its fresh cyber-spy powers

John Smith 19
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Is anyone hearing

"We had to destroy the constitution in order to save it"?

It's just me then.

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2016. AI boffins picked a hell of a year to train a neural net by making it watch the news

John Smith 19
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Oh, so that's why the news captions read "President Donald Drug" instead of Donald Trump

Still quite impressive.

From an episode of Torchwood to reality in a few years.

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LAKE OF frozen WATER THE SIZE OF NEW MEXICO FOUND ON MARS – NASA

John Smith 19
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Less thatn 200m down

That's not too bad. It's a lot more concentrated source of H2 and O2.

Although likely to be pretty gungy.

Good news.

But keep in mind if this is frozen as you take melt stuff out nothing comes in to fill up the space.

Sinkhole.

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Allow us to sum this up: UK ISP Plusnet minus net for nine-plus hours

John Smith 19
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Does anyone use ISP supplied email?

Don't trust them.

Means I can't dump the ISP without a lot of hassle if they are s**t.

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Irish eyes are crying: Tens of thousands of broadband modems wide open to hijacking

John Smith 19
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So first pen test question is "Do everything that should not be possible and see if it is."

Sounds like a waste of time.

Isn't.

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UK PM Theresa May's £2bn in R&D still a drop in the ocean

John Smith 19
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"doesn't actually compare too unfavourably to the EU average of 0.67%,"

Note that is the average figure over 28 countries.

Including those R&D powerhouses Greece, Portugal, Romania and Hungry. :(

Not impressed.

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Trump hires very best, greatest net neut haters to head FCC transition

John Smith 19
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FAIL

"fervent desire to undo what the other side put in place, almost regardless of merit,"

Washinton,

Where acting like a badly behaved kid in kindergarden is the route to promotion and advancement.

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New state of matter discovered by superconductivity gurus

John Smith 19
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"would different materials show a slightly different pseudogap in structure and not just temp? "

Another excellent question.

REBCO's are a family so changing the rare earth used (not actually that rare, as the Chinese found out) and tweaking the proportions gives you lots of variations. Lots of possible results here.

All the same, all different, maybe some have no gap etc.

The pattern should help to pin down a definitive theory (or at least the "shape" of a definitive theory) even more.

An actual theory offers the chance to find out the limits of current carrying (very important for magnet applications) and maximum operating temperature. How close we are to them and can we design better ones from first principles.

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John Smith 19
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Yttrium Barium Copper Oxide. That's a bit of an oldie.

True but that suggests it's been well tested and well characterized. Handy if you're going push something into the unknown. REBCO (Rare Earth, Barium, Copper) based superconductors have made massive strides in current capacity, which is why MIT think they can build a torus the size of Jet and yet get actual power out of it.

An interesting question would be "Do all superconductivity theories predict this pseudogap" ?

Obviously those that don't can probably be discounted. However ff none of them did then this really is unknown territory, possibly Nobel grade. Otherwise it's a case of finding the differences between what kind of pseudogap it will we and trying to find an experiment to tell them apart.

Exciting times for both experimental and theoretical physics.

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NASA trying to rein in next-generation super-heavy lifter costs

John Smith 19
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"How much have you got? That's what it will cost! "

It's because Con-gress mandated this and because it's a "development" project it's on cost plus funding (or given how these guys have gone, and this being an IT website it's cost+++ )

Con-gress mandated SLS. Outside of Orion they did not release any funds to build anything to sit on top of it.

BTW Despite NASA's profile in the media the organization runs on less than the DoD spends on AirCon for it's overseas bases (c $18Bn vs $40Bn)

Or even what the US spends on home delivered pizza (c $27Bn)

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John Smith 19
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"I read somewhere that skylon would not be able to compete with a reused falcon9."

Then you heard wrong.

Planned design payload for Skylon is 15 tonnes, with a 2 day turnaround.

"Probably because the payload on a single stage to orbit will be very small."#

On a rocket based vertical takeoff vehicle you are correct.

Skylon is a horizontal takeoff partial airbreather. That means engine thrust is << GTOW (it has wings) and air breathing gives it an Isp about 6x the best rocket engine propellant combination, allowing more of its GTOW to be structure. That lets it be reliable and robust.

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John Smith 19
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"The budget for the Space Shuttle was cut by Congress forcing them to use the SRBs "

A charming story, except it's not true.

Step forward Caspar "cap" Weinberger, Head of President Richard Millhouse Nixons Office of Management & Budget.

He set the fixed (or should I say "capped" : ) ) $1Bn a year budget, with no inflation adjustment (at a time of high US inflation), no contingency and no rollover of funds to a later year.

This funding profile bears no relation to the pattern of large development projects (low early on, big hump when the long lead time stuff is being ordered, gradual decline as stuff gets made).

That flushed any plans for a fully reusable 2 stage vehicle down the toilet of history. Only the orbiter + Mother of all RATO packs + Mother of all drop tanks architecture (dreamt up by an expat Brit IIRC) could make the project work at the budget they were given (a triamese might have worked but that was an even bigger gamble, and would have needed Von Braun grade management to make it work).

Do you get the feeling Tricky Dicky didn't much like the space programme and would have been happy for it to fail?

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IETF plants privacy test inside DNS

John Smith 19
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“pervasive monitoring is an attack”

Because it is?

This looks like a small first step to making that attack more difficult.

Hopefully it's something simple enough that people will be be comfortable about rolling into their stacks sooner rather than later.

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NASA's Orion: 100,000 parts riding 8 million pounds of thrust

John Smith 19
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eliminate the LOX pump, "oxygen rich, closed cycle"

No it does not eliminate the LO2 pump it shares the turbine with the fuel pump. In effect you eliminate the separate gas generator, but put the fast spinning, highly loaded turbines in a much more hostile environment.

In the Russian nomenclature it's the main chamber / Afterburner system.

But the real clever one was tapping some of the gases off the main chamber and driving the turbines with those.

That's called "gas tapoff" but was too easy for the US to pursue until Blue Origin came along.

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Forget 'shadow IT' – it's 'self-starting IT' now

John Smith 19
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actually "Self Starting IT" is pretty positive.

But as a man who heads a company that's a big enabler of this he would want it to be, wouldn't he?

Anyone remember they put "plus" as a keyword in COBOL because they thought managers could not handle "+" ?

How about "Better Than Excel*"l

*Sales database tool of choice.

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