* Posts by John Smith 19

9947 posts • joined 10 Jun 2009

Buffoon in 999 call: 'Cat ate my bacon and I want to press charges'

John Smith 19
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Headmaster

"You're an idiot. Get off the line or we'll come and arrest you when we're not busy."

True.

But regrettably that would probably breach the Services guidlines on non urgent call handling.*

And modern call recording systems catch every word of both sides of the conversation.

*Official body. You know they'll have one. Wheather anyone can recall it's exact contents is another matter.

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Download Fest goers were human guinea pigs in spy tech experiment, admit police

John Smith 19
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Gimp

so the police view seems to be

If it's not made illegal for us to do it. We''ll do it.

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Microsoft Edge web browser: A well-presented mea culpa

John Smith 19
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"with legacy ActiveX-heavy intranet sites designed exclusively for IE."

And possibly not just intranet sites either.

Retards that did this sort of thing are like f**king cockroaches.

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Boffins get the inside dope, craft white laser

John Smith 19
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Go

Sounds like a functionally graded material at the nanoscale.

Clever, but the abstract is too vague to really tell.

Note that by their operating mechanism inherently narrow band frequency sources. You only get broadband with a materials selection and some kind of tuning hack around those frequencies.

Potentially very clever as a way of getting more bandwidth up a fibre.

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A third of workers admit they'd leak sensitive biz data for peanuts

John Smith 19
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some see problems I see opportunities

A sort of auction site for companies data perhaps?

If (shall we say) I had Company X's customer list what's it worth?

And what's if I throw in their standard customer charging schedule?

There customer base and the price level you'd have to beat to win their business.

Shall we start the bidding at.......

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If Microsoft made laptops, it'd make this: HP Spectre x360

John Smith 19
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Re: Pen?

"That said, coming up with good stuff and then not doing much with it, is almost standard practice for Microsoft, unfortunately."

Are you actually thinking that MS invented pen input?

No they didn't invent it.

They just killed the company that looked like they had the best shot at developing it.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PenPoint_OS

Then compare with

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Windows_for_Pen_Computing

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Virgin Galactic SpaceShipTwo crackup verdict: PILOT ERROR

John Smith 19
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There is *no* design manual for sub orbital space planes

Especially one that uses such a novel speed reduction process.

Lesson learned.

Hopefully the last one tht VG will have to learn.

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Wi-Fi 'reflector' hooks you up at 0.1 per cent of current power budget

John Smith 19
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Anyone reminded of this fellow?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Thing_%28listening_device%29

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Ballmer's billion-dollar blunders: When he gambled Microsoft's money and lost

John Smith 19
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Surface RT was a great success for Intel.

By hosting "not quite" Windows on a low performance ARM they neatly inserted the "AMR can't run Windows" meme in PC users minds.

Just a little favor for their favorite hardware mfg.

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Sydney adopts 'world's first' e-ink parking signs

John Smith 19
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The joker in the pack is update security.

As always.

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How to waste two years and lose $415m: Cisco's now-dead Whiptail deal

John Smith 19
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"Invicta's failure was fundamentally due to failures by Cisco management."

Let's hear that again.

"Invicta's failure was fundamentally due to failures by Cisco management."

TL:DR version.

Bought by a suit who thought $3Bn/yr revenue was not enough.

Killed by another suit who didn't like them, for various possible reasons.

Now where is that $400m+ bill going to be coming from you ask.

Easy.

Stockholder dividends.

You can bet none of the suits is on the hook for a cent of it.

On the upside it's not the $8Bn bath that HP took with Autonomy. Somehow "The deal wasn't quite as s**t as one another IT company did" is not a lot of comfort.

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IBM slurps database-as-a-service outfit Compose

John Smith 19
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while THE PATRIOT remains in force

All your data belong to them.

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NIST in suspected 'meth lab' blast: US Congress is demanding answers

John Smith 19
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"NIST Police and Fire Departments"

You know you're in the big leagues when the site has it's own fire and police departments.

A small side question as this is a federal facility are they regular rent-a-cops or more like an auxiliary of the FBI?

I agree crystal meth cooking is far to dangerous for amateurs and should be left in the hands of professionals, like this lot

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How British spies really spy: Information that didn't come from Snowden

John Smith 19
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"capacity to intercept the data travelling through a small percentage of the 100,000 bearer"

Of course we'd like to do more but we're just so constranined by resources.

Signed

GCHQ Management.

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John Smith 19
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Re: OK, let me get this straight..

"Do this translate as "every company and user that uses Gmail (being in the US) thus makes their traffic legally accessible to GCHQ"? Wow."

Overseas (IE US) --> fair game.

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Galloway and Greens challenge Brit spooks over dragnet snooping

John Smith 19
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"a certain set of rules and protocols" "met if there is a requirement to use any of these powers "

You wonder does she really believe this twaddle.

You think she probably does

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The Register's resident space boffin: All you need to know about the Pluto mission

John Smith 19
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Re: Whisper from space

"The transmitter aboard New Horizons produces only 10 Watts. Amazing it is detectable at a distance of 4.5 light hours!"

Indeed..

Now if I could only get that sort of response off my phone service......

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Robot surgeons kill 144 patients, hurt 1,391, malfunction 8,061 times

John Smith 19
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"119 injuries were caused by pieces of the robot falling off into the patient,"

You can bet this stuff is not cheap.

Sounds like a case of premium pricing, sub grade manufacture.

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Snowden to the IETF: Please make an internet for users, not the spies

John Smith 19
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The hysterical apolgist for *unlimited* state surveillance arrives right on cue

So self righteous.

So certain.

So anonymous

So predictable

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John Smith 19
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Internet protocols were originally set up with 2 driving ideas.

1) We are all friends here.

Developed by ARPA to allow researchers on ARPA projects to share computing resources

Sure you can peek at the packets you're trans shipping to someone else but you don't want to.

2) Encryption is expensive

So if you can't encrypt everything why bother? See also point 1.

But that was a world where the internet backbone was 56.5kbs and 8MB of 50ns memory put you in supercomputer territory.

Today real time encryption is possible (although ensuring the implementation is secure is not trivial) and the internet is no longer the sole property of the US Government.

Thanks to Snowden we now know as an absolute fact that major governments can monitor anyone they choose to, and so far (because the protocols have allowed them to) they have chosen to monitor everyone.

This rampant fishing trip mentality, where "innocent until proven guilty" has gone out the window (you're all guilty of something, we just haven't worked out what yet as an NKVD official might have put it in Stalin's time) has got to be stopped.

Societies should be able to defend themselves, but what we've been seeing is that the states they have created (or parts of them) seem to view the society itself as the enemy and peoples desire for privacy to be wrong because it prevents them from knowing everything about them forever.

Accept you can't have perfect security even in a prison, which seems to be what some spooks are keen to turn their countries into. Then let them go back to finding real threats, that actually buy stuff and talk to each other rather than this FUD BS which they seem to use instead of acting like proper investigators.

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Whitehall maps out Blighty's driverless future

John Smith 19
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"appropriate levels of security built into them to manage any risk of unauthorised access”.

So plenty of weasel space for the mfgs to play with when something goes wrong.

Good too see the Department for cars and roads Transport doing it's bit to keep Blighty ahead.

Roll on the first Amazon delivery van "powered" by Google?

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What's dying on the vine and rhymes with IBM?

John Smith 19
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"Of all the tech companies, I'm slowly coming 'round to be quite positive regarding IBM. "

True.

IBM developed the atomic force microscope, copper interconnect for chips and the first high temperature superconductors. They also developed and sold a commercially successful OO operating system (but just didn't tell anyone that's what it was).

You ask what the current generation of hardware mfgs have done?

Apple? Dell? HP?

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High Court smacks down 'emergency' UK spy bill as UNLAWFUL

John Smith 19
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Anyone find the antics of the serial downvoter ironic?

Someone so afraid to state, or argue, or even be recognized on their position on state surveillance that's the only way they can communicate.

Staggeringly pathetic.

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John Smith 19
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it's the unchanging common denominators,

"a.k.a. the Home Office, the Intelligence Services,the Police and so on. You can vote for any tint of government you like, but when the dust has settled, one layer down from the Home Secretary and the PM you'll still have exactly the same people scaring the new bosses rigid with the same intelligence stories and scenarios (accurate, exagerated and imagined) as they did the old ones, and pushing for the same "absolutely essential" measures (i.e. greater powers for them) that are needed "for the county's safety". Oh, and the terrible political consequences of not doing so."

You are correct.

Which is why something like 10 Home Secretaries all sound like the same sock puppet on this. :(

The group behind them simply have no concept of any limit on state surveillance. As far as they are concerned it's impossible to have too much data on too many people, despite the fact this is the equivalent of putting the haystack with the (terrorist) needle in it (the excuse for this in case anyone has forgotten that) into a field of haystacks.

This has no logical basis in reality. It's a compulsive desire (or fetish) to collect such information.

It's not a policy, it's a disease.

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John Smith 19
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Re: So?

"It was a Tory who took the case to the court, one of the few who voted against it in parliament as well."

It was a Tory and a Labor MP that took it to court.

Forget the party manifesto.

All MP's have just 2 variations.

The "democrats" who believe in the will of the people and the "authoritarians" who believe in the will of themselves.

And the authoritarian view is very seductive to the more feeble minded law maker, especially if they have a sense of entitlement.

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John Smith 19
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"this may do a lot to allay the fears" "legislation could be misused as a tool of oppression"

Should read

this may do a lot to allay the fears that this legislation will be misused as a tool of oppression.

FTFY.

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John Smith 19
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@Loyal Commenter

"plenty of resistance from the SNP (who will certainly be opposed), Tory back-benchers (many of whom are not nearly as right-wing as the front bench), and the Labour party.

SNP. Probably.

Tory back benchers. Torn between their "hang em high" and "small government is better government" memes.

The Labor Party. Who brought this in? The party whose leader wanted the UK to start carrying Identity Cards after the UK's only significant persistent terrorist (1 explosion a week or month on the mainland, not 1 a decade) threat had been disbanded?

I wouldn't be putting up any "Mission Accomplished" banners just yet.

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Intel TOCK BLOCK: 10nm Cannonlake delayed to 2017, bonus 14nm Kaby Lake to '16

John Smith 19
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"8086 JIT compiler inside. "

So like the "Machine Level Interface" used by the IBM AS400 and later iSeries machines.

But there you could see the swap from CISC to POWER PC inside at work.

But as others noted with the complexity of the 8086 ISA I think it's more an interpreter than a compiler

And exposing it would of course mean you'd freeze the architecture.

So the code museum runs on.

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John Smith 19
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Re: we're all doomed!

"Only a few generations of shrinkage to go. "

If I've got the math right 14nm is about 60 atoms wide.

But normally the oxide is 1/10 that.

So about 2 generations unless someone finds a really clever way to make high aspect ratio conductors, like 20 atoms high by 1 atom wide.

But I'm not sure how good insulators can be when they are 1 atom thick.

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John Smith 19
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At the end of the day though it'll still just implement the same Intel ISA we all know

and Microsoft seem to love.

8086 inside.(not TM)

Yay.

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Brit school software biz unchains lawyers after crappy security exposed

John Smith 19
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Oh look, it's #7 on the Common Weaknesses Enumeration list 2011.

As found here

The latest list is much longer

While writing your software to avoid these won't guarantee you're software is bug free it will be substantially more f**kup proof than otherwise.

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John Smith 19
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Skipping the "notify the developers and give then some time to fix it" part was not smart.

But lawering up and screaming "copyright" on a number just makes the company look like whiny ass b**ches with clueless legal representation.

I think the fellow who reported holes with the remote access to a CCTV system used by a lot of day care centres (reported by El Reg) did it better.

That companies reaction (called in the lawyers as well) was also pretty cretinous.

Companies. If there is any kind of serious competition in your market sector you will lose sales if you behave like this.

It's not like there aren't lists of "stupid s**t to avoid doing when writing software" already available.

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NASA boffins peer at Pluto: Could it be ... is that ... OATMEAL?

John Smith 19
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" complex hydrocarbons that had fallen from the sky "

It's raining oil

A space mission that could actually make a profit?

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Hacked US OPM boss: We'll fix our IT security – just give us $21 million

John Smith 19
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They can fix this for $21m

Bargain.

If I believed you could fix it for $21m.

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600 MEELLION apps open to brute force account guessing

John Smith 19
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FAIL

Are you f**king kidding me?

Seriously.

They can't even deliver the security of a 1970's college computer system?

Or is this a case of "not to worry" as long as you don't reuse your password?

Oh, you do reuse your passwords.

How unfortunate.

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It's ALIVE! Network Services contract finally staggers upright

John Smith 19
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700 question tender questionaire.

And people wonder why only the "The Usual Suspects (TM)" can afford to apply for this sort of thing.

And remember this is a relatively low value contract.

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Former spook bigwigs ask for rewrite of UK’s surveillance laws

John Smith 19
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Gimp

"seen no evidence" "..British government knowingly acts illegally" "intercepting private comms"

They just didn't bother to check the law in the first place?

The group toured GCHQ with blindfolds on ?

It's not "intercepted" till a human listens to them ? Just feeding it through speech recognition / key word detection and archiving it to unlimited storage is not "intercepting."

I see why it's difficult to develop English language parsers.

What's said is not in doubt. What's meant OTOH is a whole different question.

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India ponders home-baked chips for defence and nuke plants

John Smith 19
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Re: Baking != design

"Even if you design the chips, you still have to make sure that you design any IP blocks you use. It is easy enough to slip attack vectors into something like an ethernet controller."

True.

If you're really serious about this you have to have either complete control or complete visibility of the whole chain from layout to finished hardware executing code including all links between the stages to guard against substitution of doctored data files.

If you're a government whose' studied the Snowden documents and you want to keep your secrets a secret and your hardware invulnerable you have to make a very serious investment in time and trouble to do so.

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PLUTO FLYBY: Here's your IT angle, all you stargazing pedants

John Smith 19
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Meh

Re: Getting to the next star system at that speed is going to take a long time. :(

"Well, they did test the "throw nukes out the back and ride the shockwave" idea, but with conventional explosives. If the world's nuclear weapons arsenal was appropriated for a spaceship, it could send a toddler to Alpha Centauri before the toddler's retirement age."

Orion uses much smaller propulsion packages (in the kiloton range) than most nuclear weapons.

You could built a lot of them them from the worlds nuclear arsenals.

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John Smith 19
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Boffin

Re: Getting to the next star system at that speed is going to take a long time. :(

"One question I've often wondered. At our current technology level, what speeds would be be able to achieve if the motivation and cash was there? I"

With no new technology you're basically looking at hooking a nuclear reactor to a cluster of ion thrusters, possibly boosted by a booster stage that takes beamed microwave power from solar cells in LEO while inside the solar system. Biggest space nuke however was Russian at about 5Kw.

Once outside this you're looking at solar sails going in close to the sun behind an asteroid then accelerating hard.

The best I've seen with known physics IE not fusion, is the fission fragment rocket. That's a pulsed nuclear reactor whose fuel is made in layers < 10 micrometres thick. At that level fission fragments made when a U235 atom fissions can leave the surface of the fuel and using a magnetic field be pointed out the back.

The fragments are moving at between 3 and 5% of the speed of light versus something like the 0.001% of the speed of light of ion thruster streams.

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John Smith 19
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So far we've come, so far still to go.

16 km/sec --> fastest object to leave Earth.

That's roughly 0.000053 c

Getting to the next star system at that speed is going to take a long time. :(

Looks like the only serious chance is with the fission fragment rocket.

On an IT note. Look at how much practice and planning is done before the event.

Should be SOP for all major 1 shot events (system cut overs of various kinds mostly).

But is it?

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Reddit CEO U-turn: Site no longer a bastion of free speech – and stop posting so much hate

John Smith 19
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Meh

Not really thought about it before.

Might visit it now

Might not.

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Hacking Team: We're the good guys, but SO misunderstood. Like Batman

John Smith 19
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We live in an unsafe world. So they decided to help to make it *less* safe.

No doubt they do not see things that way.

It would take a pretty strong stomach to live with yourself if you did.

But that's what they are and that's what they do.

If you want to live like that you're infosec had better be airtight.Always.

Otherwise sooner or later you will discover that Karma is a bitch.

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John Smith 19
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"your criminal-ware is owned by all criminals - Governments and entrepreneurs."

Is there a line between these groups?

I'm having trouble telling one lot from the other.

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Hacking Team hacked: Spyware source code torrent blurts govt customers

John Smith 19
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"Ethical" governments are the ones willing to pay for the daVinci malware.

"The unethical get it for free when they torrent "Window XP mega ultimate w/ activation crack" :p"

Oh yeah.

I hate those guys.

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Hacking Team: Oh great, good job, guys ... now the TERRORISTS have our zero-day exploits

John Smith 19
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Joke

""And we ain't gettin' paid for it! They'll be using it for free! "

Indeed.

You spend literally hours weeks looking for vulnerability in flash and suddenly some thieving ingrate comes along and steals it.

Outrageous.

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Cool-headed boffins overcome sticky issue: Graphene-based film could turn heat down

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Note it's 4x copper and a *static* system

Heat pipes can do this but there is always the risk of a leak.

Now can they mass produce it?

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NASA chooses ace SPACE PILOTS who'll take the USA back into manned flight

John Smith 19
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"Returning the launches of American astronauts to American soil is a top priority"

Unlike Congress.

Who've consistently starved Commercial Cargo & Crew of requested funds.

Their top priority seems to be ensuring that Commercial Crew will not fly a 'naut until their fat a**sed cuckoo little precious SLS flies a meatsack.

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Symantec selling Veritas to private equity firm – report

John Smith 19
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Weren't Veritas the company whose CV said he had an MBA when he didn't ?

I think it was.

Kind of liked working for a Veritas reseller.

Good at free clothing supply.

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Osbo PRINTS first Tory budget in 19 years with his BARE HANDS

John Smith 19
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Gimp

Save a few billion right now

Limit GCHQ's tape storage budget.

Cancel all projects that have been on the Major Project Agencies Red light list repeatedly over the last 3 years or so.

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