* Posts by John Smith 19

10616 posts • joined 10 Jun 2009

Internet of Things security? Start with who owns the data

John Smith 19
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WTF?

There’s no cyber security regulation as such that applies to IOT stakeholders as such,”

But their f**king well ought to be.

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NHS 'paperless roadmap': Fewer dead trees, more data control

John Smith 19
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"This could be all made an awful lot easier using.... you know, something simple like"

My British friends tell me some places use the new fangled fascimile machines, apparently.

Welcome to the early 90's.

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Ordinary punters will get squat from smart meters, reckons report

John Smith 19
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Doesn'nt Brexit make this optional?

Brexit.

"Taking back control" (of your stair cupboard)

And no "supper savings" are only the same as "customer savings" if the suppler decides to pass them back to the customer.

BTW Aren't most UK utility suppliers foreign owned, so most of those savings go back to more profit to their (foreign) parent.

And you can bet that won't change post Brexit.

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Dutch bicycle company pretends to be television company

John Smith 19
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Coat

So disguise any of your gear as a TV except actual gear.

Got it.

No officer that is not my coat. I have never seen that bag of brown nuggets before.

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Lean in and pivot: Even Steve Jobs didn't work alone, startup boy

John Smith 19
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"which is why both of them needed each other to create Apple."

And I think that's the author's point.

The tech in a tech company is (sadly) just the start.

A lot of s**t has to line up just right to make a successful tech company in the UK with its financial culture of "If it's not making a profit in 18 months (and ready for IP in 2 years) we're not interested."

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SpaceX: Breach in liquid oxygen tank caused Falcon 9 fireball ... probably

John Smith 19
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What is a dewer? And what is the NMR lab?

I think a dewer is a glass of a particular single malt Whisky. :)

A Dewar is the usual scientists name for a vacuum insulated flask, named after their inventor.

What most people would call a Thermos (which was a company that made them).

I'd guess he means a Nuclear Magnetic Resonance lab that does NMR to study chemical compounds, rather than imaging.

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John Smith 19
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A few notes

There are extensive threads on this here including a thread devoted to the wild and wacky.

F9 telemetry is by FO Ethernet connections and there are 3 000 channels of it. I've no idea what sampling schedule they use on each channel. In principle some could just be switch opens/closures and a time stamp. It's a common rule of telemetry engineering to choose sample rates that are adequate for the task being sampled but with Gigabit Ethernet and an FO line they may be more generous. The issue is of course lining those samples up exactly with when they were taken.

Unauthorised activation of the Flight Termination System was ruled out some time ago.

High pressure gas bottles store a lot of energy (one of their uses is to provide the muscle to open and close fluid valves on rockets). Range Safety assess them in lbs of TNT equivalent, so pretty serious. However AFAIK no tank has ever failed and they are designed to leak (bleeding off the energy) before burst (which is short and very explosive). However F9 COPV's (gas tanks) are Aluminium lined carbon fibre overwrapped, where most are steel lined. This has suggests thermal expansion/contraction mismatch coupled with mfg issues.

That said a chain is only as strong as its weakest link. It's more likely some of the couplings or pipework ruptured. Presumably shrapnel from this punched into the fuel tank and had enough thermal or kinetic energy to ignite the now mixing LOX/RP1

BTW SX expect to open their refurbed pad 39 in November so I expect they will begin launches from their ASAP after that from that pad. How long this pad will need to get back to being launch ready is anybodies guess. Given that SX are quite into "continuous improvement" I'd guess they'll also want to make a few tweaks in the rebuild as well.

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Sad reality: It's cheaper to get hacked than build strong IT defenses

John Smith 19
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"yet again the fucking bean-counters chose the low cost option"

It was a cost benefit analysis.

The cold equations said it'd cost them a shed load of money to do the changes and save about180 lives and 180 burns cases so the Board said f**k em.

IIRC one of those burns case was an 11YO boy. :(

Please note insurers regularly put a value on human life and some industries or products specify the model. IIRC a weighted average life time salary is often used, about $1-2m.

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'Faceless' Liberty Global has 'sucked the very soul' out of Virgin Media

John Smith 19
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"but I'd rather stick with BT (yes BT)."

Possibly the worst statement of them all.

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Anti-ICANN Cruzade continues: Senator Ted still desperately trying to defund US govt

John Smith 19
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"What the hell is wrong with the US sentate?"

Well..

The US Government was AFAIK modeled on the 17th century system for running a town council.

It's never been seriously revised. IE a tacit concensus by a bunch of wealthy white men who might disagree on the details but all saw things basically the same way. Once one of them stops "playing the game" chaos can promptly ensue. And it has....

There is no age limit on Con-gresspeople or Senators,

Once they are the incumbent they are a b**ger to shift as long as they keep looking after the interests of their state/district. Accepting sacrifices due to changing national (or global) realities seems practically unheard of, hence the 2 (or is it 3) corporate bailouts of Ford and Chrysler.

Actual party line following seems to be virtually non existent. You get nominal Democrats to the right of Wacqui Jacqui Smith (Like the CA Democrat who loves the NSA) and quite relaxed Republicans.

IAN a Political Scientist. Indeed I'm not any kind of scientist.

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John Smith 19
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FAIL

Focus your hatred on Cruze, not on Republicans. He's 1 lone loudmouth.

Who's looking to be President.

And looking to shut down the USG while he's at it.

US Reg readers. If all the debunking has been online you need to move to the print media. Start writing letters and emails to your favorite newspaper or magazine and tell them why his claims are BS.

BTW Isn't someone who carries out disruptive acts against the USG a terrorist (at least I'm fairly sure the USG thinks that way) ?

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My God, I've got nothing on! Microsoft's $200m Wunderlist is down

John Smith 19
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"runs on iPhone, iPad, Apple Watch, Android, Windows and browser."

But MS are just getting warmed.

They'll soon cut that list down.

T'was ever and so.

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I want to remotely disable Londoners' cars, says Met's top cop

John Smith 19
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Big Brother

Shock new:: Top Cop demands more powers. "It's a warzone, we can't cope. Blah blah"

Who would have thought it?

No Commissioner Howe, I don't think so.

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John Smith 19
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Holmes

"without having to smash the windscreen and pay damages to an innocent man."

Then they need to get rid of the policeman doing that, don't they?

Has the Met ever fired a policeman for such behavior, ever?

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Zombie Moore's Law shows hardware is eating software

John Smith 19
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Go

What's really changed is the development tools

From a time when most custom chips were laid out with a set a coloured pencils and graph paper.

I'd suggest access to good tools was what made ARM doable by a very small team.

What a same size team could do today would be much larger.

But if this new hardware has it's own instruction set you'll have to generate a code generator for you're favorite tool chain (and languages) to support it.

The fact you can do this (beyond knocking up some in house assembler) may be one of Unix's lasting contributions.

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Magneto-resistant upstart Everspin gets itself into an IPO whizz

John Smith 19
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Go

"How the fuck are you still in business?"

7 funding rounds and a 52% gross profit margin perhaps?

They claim 600 customers like what they do so some would consider it quite attractive.

The question is are they more attractive than any other competitor products?

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Are you sure you want to outsource IT? Yes/No. Check this box to accept Ts&Cs

John Smith 19
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WTF?

Bottom line. Your data is not just "in the cloud," it's physically "somewhere"

And that "somewhere" determines what your legal rights are and how difficult it will be to honor any legal obligations you have for data protection.

And if that's the USA they seem to be basically f**k all. THE PATRIOT Act is still in force.

Assuming you're a competent IT Manager/FD who wants to do this because you actually believe it's a good idea let me suggest a couple of things.

Benchmark the T&C's. let me suggest the bigger they are the more weasling they are going to do.

How does their backup and restore policy compare to your current process? You do have a tested backup and restore process, don't you?

Start backwards. Plan the ETL from your selected cloud in the event of a massive failure of either their hardware or their business.

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John Smith 19
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"Shady Enterprise Services Inc "

Hmm.

Do they call the CEO "Slim" ?

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Robot overlords? Pshaw! I ain't afraid of no AI – researchers

John Smith 19
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beware of the definition of "mundane tasks."

Still waiting for my robot butler.

Now that we know the actual size of the human brain, and it's processing power, we know how dumb all those 1960's "Computers taking over" story plots were.Taking over the world at 1MHz and

with 2 1/4 MB of RAM (roughly the DEC 36 that ran PLANNER).

We also now know we can build a server farm with at least 1 human processing throughput. It's 1 human, but it thinks several thousand times faster than that human. And it can be replicated fairly easily with enough money.

The question then becomes is it "AI" or is it just a specialist program chomping on a big set of data or is it the class of problems it's solving (normally only viewed as solvable with "intelligence") that makes it "AI" ?

Still waiting for the robot butler.

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John Smith 19
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"if for no other reason than "what if the 'bad guys' do it first?""

Actually that was pretty much the reason for the Manhattan Project.

It was only post war it was discovered the Germans couldn't get a Graphite based reactor to work (too much Boron impurity IIRC) and had wildly miscalculated the critical mass of a device.

The Japanese barely had a nuclear program to speak of.

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What's Chinese and crashing in flames? No, not its economy – its crocked space station

John Smith 19
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Boffin

Obvious question.

It's a space station

Couldn't the send a 'naut or two up to fix it?

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Indefatigable WikiBots keep Wikipedia battles going long after humans give up and go home

John Smith 19
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"bots on German Wikipedia revert each other to a much lesser extent "

Hmmm.

You mean there are things that can be said in German that can be read in different ways?

Who knew.

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Wow, RIP hackers ... It's Cyber-Lord Blunkett to the rescue for UK big biz

John Smith 19
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Yes this is the David Blunket

But I'm not quite sure what he's a Chairman of.

Is it a QUANGO running a govt backed accreditation scheme? Is a private company with close-to-copyright-infringing similar name?

I will suggest that the UK level of SME infosec is so p***poor that anything that raises the baseline across a significant number of them is a good idea.

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Lenovo denies claims it plotted with Microsoft to block Linux installs

John Smith 19
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Re: Microsoft will be paying vendors to deploy their malware os Windows 10....

Not he first time MS and Intel and storage media have done suspicious things.

In "Startup," which charted the rise and fall of Go Corps pen based OS Jerry Kaplan recalls how they wanted to use an Intel proprietary storage format (a forerunner of micro SD cards). When they contacted Intel they were put through to MS and offered an extortionate deal for such.

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Financial Conduct Authority: No need to look any closer at insurers’ use of Big Data

John Smith 19
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Gimp

"Risk segmentation." Isn't that what insureres do?

Of course that depends on how much you can rely on what people say on social media being true.

Normally I lie through my back hole just on principle.

This might (but only might) be the thing that teaches the non super user (IE the vast majority of users who use the "stuff" but have no real IT knowledge) that maybe they might like to ye know watch what they post a bit, perhaps?

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Latest F-35 bang seat* mods will stop them breaking pilots' necks, beams US

John Smith 19
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Re: minimum weight

Good idea.

BTW each helmet is apparently tuned to the pilots eyesight and eye motion tracking.

According to The Economist it takes 2 days for a helmet to be calibrated to a pilot.

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Pluto's emitting X-rays, and NASA doesn't quite know how

John Smith 19
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Oops

Turns out the triboelectrification produces the 10s of Kv but the actual emission methods is plain old electrons squirting at a metal target.

The clever bit is that the rubbing 2 materials together process replaces the big, very heavy EHT PSU

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John Smith 19
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WTF?

1 word. Triboelectrification.

Apparently a piece of sellotape being pulled from its backing in a vacuum chamber can release 15KeV X Rays.

I have no f**king clue how that works but DARPA funded a project and it's apparently the basis of the SoA in hand held Xray flourescence metal analysers.

So there are other ways to make Xrays (or if you're into chip lithography Xtreme UV) other than the classic than banging electrons into lumps of metal (AKA Coolidge Tube) and plasma's (which turn out to only be good for "soft" Xrays into the 100s of eV's.

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2,000 year old man found dead near 2,000 year old computer

John Smith 19
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Meh

There is a simpler explanation

Keep in mind that knowledge is power. And the ability to predict things this mechanism granted it's operator were considerable.

So how about early prototype of something which would have changed the world lost at sea, possibly with it's developers? With the knowledge of how it worked and how to make it lost at the same time.

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Skype shuts down London office, hangs up on hundreds of devs

John Smith 19
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Gimp

Re: Clippy

Still wish it could have been customised as Gimpy ----->

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John Smith 19
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Unhappy

"Ok, and a userbase."

That's what they bought.

" It seems they can't do that though. Instead of competing, they have to buy up and destroy the competition. "

The legacy of Bad Boy Billy.

It was never enough that he won. The other fellow had to lose. And by "lose" I mean be thoroughly stomped into the ground so there was nothing left.

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Radar missile decoys will draw enemy missiles away from RAF jets

John Smith 19
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"these modules will be heavily reliant on the intercept data as well"

Indeed.

Also how much of a steer can they get from the aircraft (presumed) radar warning receiver.

If they can be preset by a data link from this they are half way home and it's the air forces job to supply the list.

If not then they are pretty clever at building both a RWR and a radar jammer (presumably both are SDR's running on some fairly beefy processor or custom ASICs). the other challenge is giving them enough output power to swamp the signal from the real target (probably less than people think)

Of course the $64 question is of course how commons are radar homing missiles in the arsenals of the various assorted bad guys that the RAF is facing at present? I'm guessing any such that IS would be using will be abandoned kit from the armies of whatever country they are in.

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Brits: Can banks do biometric security? We'd trust them before the government

John Smith 19
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Banks more trusted than governments. Not much of a choice really.

Like choosing a babysitter (since they will be babysitting your very personal data) from a choice of a convicted rapist or an RSO.

I think the real preferred answer (by anyone with half a brain) is "None of the above."

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FBI overpaid $999,900 to crack San Bernardino iPhone 5c password

John Smith 19
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Meh

"Skorobogatov claims it took him 4 months, "

For the first go at the problem.

Future ones would be a couple of days once he has his technique and tools down.

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John Smith 19
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Big Brother

So probably known to TLA's within a week of it's launch?

For the conspiracy minded the load leveling "bug" isn't a design flaw.

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Conviction by computer: Ministry of Justice wants defendants to plead guilty online

John Smith 19
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FAIL

Yet another go at improving the efficency of the court system through IT

Because all the previous efforts have worked out so well, haven't they?

IIRC this (along with GP's in the NHS) remains a big user of that new fangled fax machine.

Hint. It's not the IT, it's the processes you need to get better first, and that means getting people involved who actually use them.

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Emacs and Vim both release first new updates in years

John Smith 19
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Happy

"Emacs is getting close, it has a web browser now, just needs a text editor."

Boom boom.

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Idris Elba thrashes Night Manager Hiddleston for James Bond job vacancy

John Smith 19
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"Tom Hardy.. " " kept previous opponents in the cellar for casual dismemberment"

Well sometimes having casual affairs with married women just doesn't quite cut it, so to speak. :)

Note that apart from his signature characters he has shown his softer side in "This Means War" and "A for Andromeda."

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John Smith 19
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Let's keep in mind you need someone who does bad things OHMSS

And Tom Hardy looks like a guy who could do very bad things in a good cause.*

Good point about Craig and some of the rapey moments. I wonder how many people realize that he is in fact a Scouser?

*Although perhaps without those monologues of his (Peaky Blinders, Lawless) that leave people wondering "Err, yes. WTF did he just say?"

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National Cyber Security Centre to shift UK to 'active' defence

John Smith 19
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Re: "large-scale, non-sophisticated attacks"

"hat means they're not big enough to be certain of having the range of knowledge and skill to realize the things you realize."

That's actually not a question of knowledge.

It's a question of common sense.

The smartest thing I know is that I don't know everything. So I'd hire a company that did specialize in that area and hire them.

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John Smith 19
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"If you don't kill the distribution it doesn't matter how good your defences are "

Exactly.

Now if these "offensive operations" do that then those SME's some people seem so concerned about don't get to see this threat.

In the 2nd decade of the 21st century all businesses should realize that if they have an internet link anyone from some bored skiddie in Arizona to a unit of the Chinese army to a disgruntled football supporter could rock up at your virtual doorstep.

Cybercrime is like state surveillance. Once you've sunk the development costs you can use the same tools to attack as many targets as you have resources. Get £10 or £10m it's all good (to the criminal). "We're too small to bother with " is no defense because for the criminal it is no bother to hit you as well everyone else.

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John Smith 19
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FAIL

"large-scale, non-sophisticated attacks"

You mean pay for the work those businesses were too stupid or too penny pinching to do themselves?

If a business is too short sited to realize it's vulnerable, or too short sighted to realize it needs to protect itself why, exactly, should anyone else do it for them?

In the same vein I think the Bank of England should not work out bail out plans for banks, they should work out bail out plans for customers and let the bank go to the wall. Anything else is basically a license to fail.

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World's largest internet exchange sues Germany over mass surveillance

John Smith 19
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Gimp

...and power is addictive.

Indeed.

This is beyond all rational need for such data hence, data fetishist.

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Rise of the Machines at Sea: The British firm building robot boats

John Smith 19
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Boffin

Re: Submarine tracker

"Once you’ve found a sub, it is cheaper to drop a small roboat on the surface to track it where ever it moves. Doesn’t need any weapons because you rarely need to actually sink subs and that bit is easy when you know where they are. When the price drops, you can just drop a ring of roboats around the ports to pick up subs when they leave port."

You may have noticed in the story on the £800m MoD business incubator that BAE and Birmingham U have developed a "Quantum Gravitmeter."

Such devices (pioneered by the late Dr Robert L. Forward at Hughes in the late 60's) can detect the gravity anomaly of a hand in front of them based on the difference between gravity in one direction and another.

So I'd guess the mass of a large ICBM submarine even at say a kilometre would still be quite detectable.

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John Smith 19
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IT Angle

Interssting software development challenges and a nice part of the UK to work in.

Odds on bet they get bought by BAE and all prices then quadruple?

It's been a bad week and I'm not feeling optimistic.

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Brexit will happen. The EU GDPR will happen. You can't avoid either

John Smith 19
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Unhappy

"What we really need to know for definite""whether or not the UK will retain GDPR"

Excellent question and a simple yes or no from the UK Government would let people start planning this with confidence.

Let's see if HMG can manage such a statement in less than a few years.

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John Smith 19
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FAIL

so from limited (DPA 1998) to excellent (GDPR compliance) to s**t (Art 50 trigger+2 Years)

What an almighty clusterf**k

Still the UK can still dump all it's data into the US without any problem. Yay.

Not so sure how many other European countries (yes Britain is a part of the European land mass, whatever they think) will want to send any of their data to the UK if they can help it.

One interesting side effect of Brexit will be to see just how "special" the special relationship with the US is once the UK is no longer it's back door stepping stone into Europe.

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It's here! Defence Secretary launches £800m MoD tech creche

John Smith 19
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Unhappy

Some military tech is very clever, but either very specialzed or very poorly licensed.

Which might explain why no one has a laser cannon driven by thermal batteries or LCD's weren't licensed from RSRE Malvern when invented.

The UK has had lots of defense based electronics jobs.

Many of them gone because you're critically dependent on 1 customer, who historically has been a monumental PITA to work with.

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MoD confirms award of giant frikkin' laser cannon contract

John Smith 19
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Joke

"had been delayed by a challenge from rival bidders"

Oh dear.

See what happens when you choose to economize on l'argent in the (alleged) brown paper envelope?

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