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* Posts by John Smith 19

9548 posts • joined 10 Jun 2009

e-Borders fiasco: Brits stung for £224m after US IT giant sues UK govt

John Smith 19
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"So 97 million more to give a functioning system. "

Wrong.

That's Raytheon's estimate of what it would cost to fix.

And by a con-tractors estimate I mean what the con-tractor thinks the sucker customers will pay to make the pain go away.

In realty WTF knows what it would take to fix?

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John Smith 19
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FAIL

I'll be the cancellation looked great on the front page of the daily jailbait.

So the govt gave them *no* way to measure if it was doing what they wanted it to do.

then the next govt said it wasn't and cancelled it.

And let me guess. No penalty clauses either...

Of course this govt would never do what that govt did, right?

Like f**k.

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Eat up Martha! Microsoft slings handwriting recog into OneNote on Android

John Smith 19
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Happy

So even Redmond has to pay the Google tax.

Enjoying that not are they?

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Intel's Raspberry Pi rival Galileo can now run Windows

John Smith 19
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FAIL

Microsoft +Intel. The Micky & Mallory Knox of the IT business.

Can you say "dysfunctional co-dependent facilitators" ?

BTW I've never had to re-install a copy of Windows.

It sounds like a nightmare.

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UK government accused of hiding TRUTH about Universal Credit fiasco

John Smith 19
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But if the MPA published more frequently Ministers would have to explain their f**k ups more often

And they don't like that.

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Boffins find hundreds of thousands of woefully insecure IoT devices

John Smith 19
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"All your lightbulb are belong to us."

Exactly*

*Note I'm not advocating anyone do this, merely that if the IoT expands without security, privacy and access control built into the architecture of the products (and their controllers) this is simply inevitable given human greed.

It'll just be (to some) another money making opportunity.

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John Smith 19
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The IoT. All the s**t development practices of the real internet

baked into potentially life threatening hardware.

How could a fellow possibly resist signing up for such a delightful package?

And remember this is a small team with limited resources just trying to prove a point.

Think what happens when someone decides to do it for the money.

"Dear Siemens/Hotpoint/Zanussi unless the sum of 10 euros per machine is paid to us we will use the security flaws we have discovered in your appliances to destroy or disable them permanently.

A hacker collective."

Welcome to the future.

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UK fuzz want PINCODES on ALL mobile phones

John Smith 19
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Big Brother

Pheeeeew. For a moment there I thought

he wanted the pin code of every mobile phone in Britain.

Although I'd guess that would be the next step.

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Detroit losing MILLIONS because it buys CHEAP BATTERIES – report

John Smith 19
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Go

@JeffyPoooh

"PS. There's a company in eastern Canada that makes better e-parking meters. Rugged as all get out I hear."

That wouldn't have anything to do with Eastern Canadian winters being arse numbingly cold and the local municipalities getting a tad irate if their money collectors parking meters die on them?

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John Smith 19
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Re: Only a complete idiot...

"here is a chance that current Detroit meters were designed before AA batteries became very popular late in the Walkman era. Before that, 9V batteries were the most sold smaller cells and internal switching power supplies to up the voltage to the needed 5V were very inefficient."

You mean about pre 1985?

That was a long time ago.

Parking meter timer?

That's a Horovitz & Hill job if ever I saw one.

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Oracle reveals 32-core, 10 BEEELLION-transistor SPARC M7

John Smith 19
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A SPARC thread without Matt Bryant....

It's just, you know, unexpected.

Takes a bit of getting used to.

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You'll find Yoda at the back of every IT conference

John Smith 19
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Re: Sir

""Surely by having such a model you are just going to encourage people to employ a proxy in front of the firewall so it only ever sees a handful of IP addresses rather than a couple of hundred?"

All the directors in the room were suddenly all ears and the guy on the podium was looking daggers..lovely :) Mind you, I was never asked to go to another one."

Job done.

You mean Director don't come to these things to learn useful stuff to save their companies money?

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John Smith 19
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Terminator

Hmmm.

They cynicism is strong in this one.

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John Smith 19
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"Hairy Jedi snot."

Priceless.

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Revealed ... GCHQ's incredible hacking tool to sweep net for vulnerabilities: Nmap

John Smith 19
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Gimp

They are like f**king cockroaches.

And yes the injection of malware to another computer system is illegal under UK law unless you whisper the magik incantation "national security."

In which case it isn't.

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It's time for PGP to die, says ... no, not the NSA – a US crypto prof

John Smith 19
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Quick precis.

"I don't like PGP supporting email clients"--> PGP is rubbish --> PGP should be replaced.

I don't use it so I'm a layman in this argument.

Let me suggest that a lot of people use a web based email system even when they know they shouldn't.

They want to compose an email and the whole process of encryption/log on/select addressee/send email/log off is done for them.

Do that and a lot of people start using it because it's no longer so f**king clumsy.

And of course the resulting TLA and FLA budget requests will either bankrupt the respective governments or trigger the instant development of a useable quantum computer.

Or the governments concerned could realize that most of this surveillance is being driven by a combination of politician paranoia and data fetishist lust.

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Why your mum was WRONG about whiffy tattooed people

John Smith 19
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Coat

"you want fame, well fame costs and here's where you start paying for it, in sweat."

I know.

I'm going.

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New voting rules leave innocent Brits at risk of SPAM TSUNAMI

John Smith 19
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IT Angle

Time for a map of councils who can trusted and who can't?

Staying off open databases IE the types that are sold to marketing companies, is SOP if you want to reduce (but don't expect to totally avoid) avoid a torrent of useless s**t through your door.

Dummy phone numbers, addresses, emails and names are all good when requesting product literature.

Remember if you keep a track of which alias you used you can track which company sold your details to the A-hole on the phone.

Signed

Orinoco Womble.

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Hackers' Paradise: The rise of soft options and the demise of hard choices

John Smith 19
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"with a competent operating system, these machines were essentially bomb proof."

The author may not know if any system has an MMU but most of the readers here do.

And anything above the '286 should be able to muster a competent MMU to get the job done if the OS meets it half way.

The question is why does it not meet the hardware half way?

I'm describing the article as basic tutorial/nostalgia/rant.

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Snowden leaks show that terrorists are JUST LIKE US

John Smith 19
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So I guess the TLA will just have to rely on that 20 yr old hole in image compression software

It's tough to build a really minimal installation that does not have a load of extraneous stuff on it all of which offers potential entry points.

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Marvell: NO WAY should we have to pay jumbo $1.54bn patent judgment

John Smith 19
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"yet all declined, citing prior art. I"

I've always wondered if when one of these cases happens the "prior art" document is incorporated into the list of documents the USPTO should check the to see if this has been done before.

Doing this should widen the knowledgebase sufficiently to stop later attempts at patents from being accepted, filtering out rubbish.

Nahhhhh.

That would prevent the pack of scum bag lawyers involved from trousering the large green. they love so much and deprive the USPTO of income.

so probably not.

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Snowden on NSA's MonsterMind TERROR: It may trigger cyberwar

John Smith 19
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Well if you do wnat to orchestrate a DoS get the US Govt to organize it.

Obvious really.

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NIST wants better SCADA security

John Smith 19
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It's a start

But boy has it been a long time coming.

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Japanese boffins invent 4.4 TREEELLION frames per second camera

John Smith 19
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Astonishing.

You're talking about watching atoms vibrate in a crystal.

When you look deeper into objects your understanding is likely to change quite a lot.

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Bath boffins put BUGS on chips – on purpose

John Smith 19
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Neat.

The bulk of the sensor should be fairly simple and relatively undemanding as it's basically a special purpose volt meter.

However the cell will probably have to be replaceable/disposable because the bacteria are going to die at high concentrations.

Likewise if you want a spectrum of nasties it can detect you'll want exchangeable cartridges on this thing.

Still thumbs up for a lightweight, low power simple device.

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ANU boffins demo 'tractor beam' in water

John Smith 19
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Neat.

Exploiting longitudinal waves in water seems a very under studied area of science to me.

A while back a team worked out that you could focus water waves on a tidal power site by simply sticking a pattern of posts in the water. Effectively creating a watery phased array system.

Thumbs up for this and a hope it becomes available for the next big spill.

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China to test recoverable moon orbiter

John Smith 19
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11.2Km/s is the speed you get "falling" from the Moons orbit to the Earth orbit.

Lunar return needs much smaller velocity changes, hence much less powerful and lower Isp can do the job in the first place.

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Crypto Daddy Phil Zimmerman says surveillance society is DOOMED

John Smith 19
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It's good to be reminded that there *are* cases where the people won.

But remember this is the USA.

THE PATRIOT Act trumps everything.

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DON'T PANIC! Satellite comms hacking won't be able to crash an aircraft

John Smith 19
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WTF?

So can't do what it says but you can f**k up the satellite phone calls and reroute them?

Which could be very valuable if some corporate fat cat thinks he's talking to an adviser telling him thinks which are in fact total BS

But hard coded passwords in airborne equipment.

Are you f**king mad?

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BT scoops up Wales PSN contracts, elbows out Logicalis

John Smith 19
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WTF?

So *despite* being the incumbant they don't have a home team advantage?

I smell the work of BT's "relationship management team" at work vigorously lubricating the sales channel.

If this is correct then at least Logicalis got a great entry for their corporate CV. :( .

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Tiny transforming bots: Meet these self-assembling 'thoughtful' droids

John Smith 19
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Actually the clever bit is the *design* software.

And when boffins use the word "arbitrary" they mean that they can design a part to a specific size, shape or requirement, rather than a cut-and-try-and-hope-it-works process.

Keep in mind this version is made in paper.

That is not a requirement for future versions.

My instinct is the limits are set by the areal strength of the shape memory materials.

Thumbs up for clever thinking and not breaking the bank to do the research.

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Surprise! Government mega-infrastructure project cocked up

John Smith 19
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@LarsG

"I feel a little better now I know it's not just the UK who are masters of the great IT balls up."

True.

You could buy most of a high speed rail network for that kind of money.

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IBM boffins stuff 16 million-neuron chips into binary 'frog' brain

John Smith 19
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It's only when you try to mimic the human brain architecture you discover *how* clever it is.

The roughly 10^10 neurons and 10^15 synapses runs on < 400W.despite being 3d packed.

Binary synapes are not without uses. IIRC the WISARD machine used them and demonstrated facial recognition in 1/30 sec IE 1 TV frame in the late 80's.

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Are you managing your suppliers or are they managing you?

John Smith 19
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Depends if you're government or a customer who gives a s**t

In the former they manage the sucker client

In the latter it depends how clueless are the people they are dealing with.

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'POWER from AIR' backscatter tech now juices up Internet of Stuff Wi-Fi gizmos

John Smith 19
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Meh

Once saw a wirelsse burglar alarm this could benfit

The individual remote boxes (window sensors, IR etc) ate batteries..

Frankly if the IoT is going to take off people won't want the huge PITA of changing batteries, all of which will no doubt be different between different products, making buying them in bulk to do a mass replace impossible.

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Israel snooped on John Kerry's phone calls during Middle East peace talks

John Smith 19
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"And that gives Israel a lot of confidence to do, well, nearly whatever it wants."

Also much like Syria.

I guess the suppliers won't have to worry about a dip in sales of White Phosphorous any time soon.

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John Smith 19
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Oh dear it seems even their *closest* "alie" spy on the US...

Hahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahaha.

Because only the stupid could not see that one coming.

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Evidence during FOI disputes can be provided in SECRET

John Smith 19
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I smell a version of the justification of "Super injuctions"

And I can smell it from here.

Actually the "public interest" routine was trotted out by the UK govt during the "supergun" trial.

3 (of 4 involved) govt Ministers trotted out "Public Interest Immunity" certificates. 1 declined.

The "public interest" was in the public not knowing that a)At least one Director was reporting everything to the security services (and by extension the US and Israel). b) Everyone except Customs & Excise knew what the "gas pipe" was and where it was going, which was why they seized it.

My instinct is one of those companies is BAe and their CEO dropped in on call-me-Dave (as apparently unlike any CEO from a normal company he can) and said it would damage "British" IE BAe shareholder interests if that fact got out.

Paranoid?

Moi?

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John Smith 19
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Meh

@pascal monet

"Now it'll all be National Security Letters, secret tribunals and kangaroo courts. When is Congress going to be dissolved ? It's not like anybody would object to sending them all to Guantanamo anyway, no ?"

Yes, all very dramatic.

You did realize this was referring to the British Court of Appeal and the British Dept of BIS, right?

Oh you didn't.

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John Smith 19
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"If information is exempt from disclosure and the requestor goes to the Tribunal where it is disclosed to them as part of the process it defeats the object of the exemption(s) in the first place."

Except it wasn't.

It was the of the tribunal to decide if it was.

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Multifunction printer p0wnage just getting worse, researcher finds

John Smith 19
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Pwnd by a printer in HR.

Am I the only person here thinking "Good?"

And while I'm on the subject printers remotely accessible from the internet?

Are their leasors (because the big stuff is not usually owned by the company) using some kind of f**ked up remote user support deal?

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Who will kill power companies? TESLA, says Morgan Stanley

John Smith 19
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The only renewable I detect is the smell of BS

For which there is a virtually infinite supply already.

AFAIK the major customer for this Panasonic Tesla plant is Tesla

Who make cars.

Not home load leveling packages. Not business load leveling packages.

For this little fantasy to happen a)The Tesla plant has to have spare mfg capacity to sell and b)Someone has to want it.

Thing is as business ramps up they are going to need that capacity for themselves.

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What's the point of the Internet of Things?

John Smith 19
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Well that's one solid customer made.

Now what about the other several hundred million needed to fund an actual company?

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BAD VIBES: High-speed video camera records your voice from trash

John Smith 19
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Re: Insufficient data

"MATLAB?! I've heard MATLAB referred to as "FORTRAN meets APL in car crash", but my point is that it is useful (very very useful) to prove an algorithm but not as quick as "proper code". (Oh, and it does very pretty graphics for little effort.)

So I wonder what 2 hours would come down to."

I think that question came up that Register article about doing software for economics.

IIRC Mathlab Vs C++ came out about 500:1.

so probably custom hardware needed.

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John Smith 19
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Boffin

@Bloakery1

"There was an interesting bug found in the US embassy in Moscow and to this day nobody knows hw it works!!!"

1/2 true.

The device was found in a carved wooden copy of the American seal given as a "gift" by the Russians.

The device was a metal structure with a thin metal membrane on one end.

When "illuminated" by a microwave beam (IIRC) the device's resonant frequency shifted which could be detected. Having no battery it never ran out and only emitted RF when painted by an external source.

It's basically the principle of an RFID tag.

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John Smith 19
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Re: Er....

"Wasn't there a rumour that one of the spy agencies had bugged the other by bouncing a laser off a mirror through a window ?"

It's called a laser Doppler velocimeter. It's been claimed to have been in use since the 1970's.

Wheather or not it's actually worked is another matter....

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NASA tests crazytech flying saucer thruster, could reach Mars in days

John Smith 19
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Re: At last

"My flying car (pace The Jetsons) could be imminent."

Probably not any time soon.

Note that 720+mN for 2.5Kw input is actually very efficient by ion drive standards

Suspiciously efficient in fact.

The NASA thruster seems to be more in the microNewton range.

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Robot snaps on yellow RUBBER GLOVES, preps to invade Canada

John Smith 19
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Seeing a big hole in the page

I guess there should be a picture of it there?

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Leaked docs reveal power of malware-for-government product 'FinFisher'

John Smith 19
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Holmes

So quite a lot of AV not very good?

I wonder what would happen if the support documentation for routers and socket addresses got good enough that ordinary users could figure out if they wanted stuff to go out through a port or not?

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UK.gov wants public sector to rip up data protection law

John Smith 19
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Gimp

Obligatory "Brazil" reference

"Buttle, not Tuttle"

Know what I mean?

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