* Posts by Jonathan Richards 1

635 posts • joined 10 Jun 2009

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Snowden latest: NSA planned sneak attacks on Android app stores

Jonathan Richards 1
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Tools or weapons

>> Intelligence agencies are (or should be) the hand that creates or utilizes a tool to do a job specified by the head (politicians).

I see your point. My (probably simplistic) view is that intelligence agencies should create intelligence tools, and the branches of the armed services should create tools which affect conflicts (also widely known as weapons). For sure, the expertise may exist in the intelligence agency, but blurring the lines between that an offensive operation is not helpful.

I am not sure that you're right that intelligence agencies wouldn't be steering their own course, choosing when and where to intervene without sufficient political oversight. In the UK context, vide Prime Minister Harold Wilson, who firmly believed that the British MI organisations were actively plotting against him.

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Jonathan Richards 1
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Offensive action

> The intelligence agencies reasoned that in such a situation then it needed to be able to put out software that could influence actions on the ground. [emphasis added]

Offensive... not just in the whole 'invasion-of-privacy+breach-of-trust' sense, but once an intelligence agency starts to think that it should "influence actions on the ground" it has ceased to gather intelligence and has inserted itself into active operations. This may be uncontroversial, but it means that equally offensive counter-operations are much more likely, i.e. it escalates the conflict. To what extent do governments have oversight when their "intelligence" agencies fan the flames of conflict? Discuss.

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mSpy: We haven't been breached. Customers: Oh yes you have

Jonathan Richards 1
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mSpy statement

Is it me, or is the phrasing of that mSpy statement a bit off? If I received text like that in an email, I'd be checking the headers; it just reads like something knocked off in a Lagos internet cafe rather than a statement from a reputable company, on a serious matter, to a widely-read news organization. Consequently, it's anything but reassuring (though I am not one of their customers)>

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You've come a long way, Inkscape: Open-source Illustrator sneaks up

Jonathan Richards 1
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Facepalm

Up to the minute reporting

> Inkscape recently released version 0.91 of their eponymous open source vector graphics application.

Ummm...

jonathan@Odin:~$ inkscape --version

Inkscape 0.91 r (Feb 12 2015)

Version 0.91 release was announced on January 30th. It was as recent as 2015, though, to be fair.

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Crude scammer targets Brit oil brokers

Jonathan Richards 1
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Amish spearphish

Good morning; you do not know me but I would be grateful if you would send by return email the usernames and passwords that you use for oil trading activities.

Thank you.

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DEEPENING MYSTERY of BRIGHT LIGHTS on dwarf world Ceres

Jonathan Richards 1
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OT: Re: Ceres bright spots iluminate without sun light

> the best guide that the content will be paranoid gibberish

Also, a spelling mistake in the title, and two instances of 'could of' in place of 'could have'. >Sigh<

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Jonathan Richards 1
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Ice. Shiny smooth ice...?

What's more interesting about the shiny (i.e. reflective: I guess nobody thinks they're actually luminous) spots is not that there are so many, but that there are so few. Ceres must be collecting dust all the time, and that dust must be shoved around by micro-impacts. One would expect an ice surface to be covered rather quickly, so what is it that causes these uncovered ice regions in those specific places?

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SHOCK! Robot cars do CRASH. Because other cars have human drivers

Jonathan Richards 1
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Re: Luddites

> There must be ways.

Yup. For urban traffic taking fixed and heavily used routes: trams and (for big enough cities) underground. For inter-city traffic: trains. For very short journeys: travelling walkways and escalators (e.g. Hong Kong).

I remain to be convinced that the effort to make car driving safer using autonomous-driving technology is viable. The object should be to move the people to where they want to be; to assume that the object is to make safe cars misses the point. To do the former, there exists under-exploited and established technology. Trains are already 27 times safer (in terms of fatalities per passenger-mile)[1] than cars, and airline flights are safer still, though flying is out of scope for this discussion.

[1]The figures are specifically for European railways. Source: The Guardian

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Jonathan Richards 1
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Re: Evidence == "Invasion of Privacy!"

It all depends on who is in control of the images, doesn't it. If they're taken with a camera which is an integral part of a car owned by an individual, I can't see any reason why the images are not the property of that individual, and the only way one could be made to cough them up is by a requirement of a court to produce evidence. I will not be buying or driving a car which uploads imagery to any second or third party without both my permission and my positive action to make it happen.

As far as the privacy on the street notion goes, one has no expectation of privacy on the street. Many cars already have dash cams, although maybe fewer in the UK than elsewhere. All in all, I think they're a Good ThingTM, because the imagery they capture is not, for the time being at least, being borged into some Big Brother database. Hell. I really hope that the Home Secretary doesn't read these comments.

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So what would the economic effect of leaving the EU be?

Jonathan Richards 1
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A tax free zone?

> turn England into a tax free zone (like the channel isles)

Leaving aside that you probably mean the UK, not England, that doesn't sound really practical. Who do you think pays (out of taxes) for the defence of the Channel Islands, for instance?

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Jonathan Richards 1
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Re: If you build a better mousetrap...................

> [T]he assumption ... seems a little misplaced.

Indeed it does. In my limited experience of both Australia and New Zealand, they see themselves very firmly as Pacific nations; they don't need to ship their goods halfway around the planet to trade with the UK, they have markets galore in south-east Asia, Japan and China, not to mention the trans-Pacific Trade Treaty negotiations with the US. For better or worse, the UK let go of those trade links when we hopped inside the EU tariff barrier, and we can't expect them to be magically re-established if we hop outside again and shout "Coo-ee - here we are. Guys! Guys...?"

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Jonathan Richards 1
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I'll venture another €0.02...

...further to my last, I'd like to point out that leaving the EU does not, of itself, change the regulatory regime that Mr Worstall seems to find oppressive, by one iota. EU Directives are issued, and then member states implement them (to whatever extent) in their national laws. The day after an EU exit, the UK would be faced with a huge legislative programme to roll back EU directed legislation, to the extent that we wanted to do that. [1] In the current situation, where Scotland will vote as a block NOT to distance the UK from the EU, the currrent (10 May 2015) administration will find it pretty hard to make that work.[2]

[1] As an example, I give you the Data Protection Act(s). Would we really want to sweep all that aside in some Act of Parliament which says "All EU directed legislation is hereby repealed."?

[2] I see that Graeme, above, has beaten me too it. What he said, too!

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Jonathan Richards 1
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Unhappy

My €0.02

> However, having the domestic economy continually subjected to competition from best practice in the rest of the world does spur on the continued advance in production methods.

It certainly creates an incentive to change production methods to be more competitive: it's the choice between that and sinking into a miserable decline. Both options are available, and the "continued advance" path isn't inevitable. It needs investment, leadership, innovation... and no I don't mean the latest wizard wheeze out of Hoxton. I'd also like to point out that some of that "best practice" includes things like environmental protection compliance, and that if I'm buying, oh, I don't know, an electric bicycle, I'm more likely to buy one made in an environmentally friendly way in Germany than I am to buy one made by dumping toxic waste in Yorkshire (even if it is "only ten tons").

> more efficient is a synonym for the people getting richer, for GDP rising

Define "the people". Unless you have a government willing to redistribute the wealth, it could very well be a very few people getting richer.

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Astroboffins eyeball MONSTER GAS HALO hugging Andromeda Galaxy

Jonathan Richards 1
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OT: Re: A Trillian Stars in a galaxy

> was not Zaphod Beeblebrox shagging Trillian

Possibly not. Dialogue from Fit the Second at 21:47

Trillian: Zaphod, please take your hand off me. And the other one. Thank you. And the other one.

Zaphod: I grew that one specially for you, Trillian, you know that? Took me six months but it was worth every minute.

Doesn't sound too hopeful, does it?

I always wondered about the Trillian character; all the other elements of the story were woven into the fabric of the Universal Improbability, but Trillian just seemed to drift away, having contributed only the phone number of her Islington flat.

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Facebook echo chamber: Or, the British media and the election

Jonathan Richards 1
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FAIL

@Worstall

> media outlets chase the prejudices of the audience, they don't shape them

Yeah, right. That's why billionaire newspaper owners buy these "media outlets", is it? Because they enjoy chasing audience prejudices? Of course newspapers shape their readership's opinions: that's the very reason for the editorial column in every freaking newspaper on the planet! Your initial premise was so outlandish that I didn't bother to read past it, sorry.

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iPhone case uses phone's OWN SIGNAL to charge it (forever, presumably)

Jonathan Richards 1
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Oo! Optional upgrade!

A case to go around the first case, which will harvest another 21% (30% of 70%) of your precious battery power. Now you're close to doubling battery life! Working title for the Case Overcase: Faraday Cage.

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'Rombertik' malware kills host computers if you attempt a cure

Jonathan Richards 1
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OT: Not on Ubuntu, then...

jonathan@Odin:~/tmp$ file /bin/sh

/bin/sh: symbolic link to `dash' [emphasis added]

This caught me out a little while ago when I expected /bin/sh to be bash.

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HP wag has last laugh at US prez wannabe with carlyfiorina.org snatch

Jonathan Richards 1
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Coat

29,971

Does counting the :( items make me a bad person? Or just sad? Rhetorical question: no need to answer. Maybe the author of carlyfiorina.org is being extremely correct. Did HP publish the number of redundancies to five significant figures?

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Good luck displacing Windows 7, Microsoft, it's still growing

Jonathan Richards 1
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Re: re Raspberry Pi

> Wrong on both counts

Well done, I hope your godson enjoys the Pi. What you generously bought him, though, was a Pi, together with a number of accessories, including the SD card with the OSs on it. That's not included in the Raspeberry Pi itself, so my point was that one has to make a positive effort to buy Win10 for it.

Also I agree that the GUI in some of the distros is a match for many of the Windows versions; I've never used 8 or 10, so I can't comment. I still think it's a stretch to call a Raspberry Pi a "desktop computer", though. If your godson is working with Python, a good IDE will be a boon: I've had short but good experience with Komodo Edit on Kubuntu, but I haven't tried installing it on my Raspberry Pi.

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Jonathan Richards 1
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re Raspberry Pi

> One wonders how much of that rise in Linux is the Raspberry Pi 2 Model B coming into use...

Hardly any, would be my guess. These are figures for desktop computers, which the Pi (in any guise) really isn't, so if they're counting it, they shouldn't. And, of course, when you buy the Raspi, it comes with no operating system at all. Few people are going to go out and buy Windows 10 for it, when there are shedloads of free, well-supported and established alternatives.

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Android tool catches apps silently pumping hundreds of ad, tracking servers red-handed

Jonathan Richards 1
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Re: Ghostery browser

Over 100,000 downloads at the time I snagged it, circa 1100 UTC.

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Calamity cargo capsule DOOMED: Space station pod in fireball re-entry

Jonathan Richards 1
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Who's got the book?

> It is expected to break up in the atmosphere in the next ten days.

Nice pass over southern England and several western European nations on the morning of 12th May, if it makes it that far. And perigee is at the northern extension of the orbit, too, according to Ben (above). Faites vos jeux, messieurs et madames.

Map

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Crap ad app hack hole affects '100 MEELLLION'

Jonathan Richards 1
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Infographic abuse

That bar chart is abominable. The first bar is for an interval width of 400K. There is no information for the |500K -1M| class; and then the next bar is 4M wide - ten times bigger than the first one, and the third one is 5M wide, just because consistency is so bo-o-o-ring, I guess. My reaction on seeing research presented this way is to think that the 'researchers' don't have enough good data to construct a proper histogram.

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Thank heavens for the silicon chip: A BRIEF history of data

Jonathan Richards 1
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Joke

Codd's Wallop

> This makes Africa not just the birthplace of data, but arguably the cradle of mathematics and also the database

Did those two bones have an outer join, then?

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Flying giant octopus menaces New York

Jonathan Richards 1
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Scientific estimates

> The manhole cover was hurled an impressive "200-300 feet" into the air, ...

Hmmm. I think those quote marks are entirely appropriate! New Statesman claims the ironwork hurl was 200-300 ft. Using g = 32 ft/s^2, and t = (2*s/g)^0.5, that would give a flight time between 7.06 and 8.66 seconds. Close, but since the bang occurs on the video at 0:05, and the cover lands again at 0:11 I think they've overestimated that height. The cover made it down again from apogee in 3 seconds, so peak height was

s = 0.5 * 32 * 3^2 = 16 * 9 = 144 ft.

It might just have touched 200 ft, given that YouTube timing can't be precise, but not close to 300 ft.

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Light the torches! NSA's BFF Senator Feinstein calls for e-book burning

Jonathan Richards 1
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Pirate

Re: You're more likely to kill yourself with The Anarchist Cookbook than anyone else.

Especially with the New Edition:

sample extract:

When you have collected 50ml of the nitroglycerine, shake the flask vigorously to drive out any dissolved gases.

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LOHAN leaps aloft & ports into virtual flight logger

Jonathan Richards 1
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Time axis mismatch

The exmaps rendering seems to have an axis labelling problem. The 3D view has Lohan bumbling around at ground level until 1654 UTC, (the bumbling presumably due to GPS jitter in and around the hangar). However, the altitude line graph has the flight starting at (close to) 1554 (timezone not specified). I'm guessing this is a daylight-saving time glitch in the processing of the raw log?

PS I'm viewing http://exmaps.com/c835c8 with GoogleTM Chrome: my Firefox won't render the 3D view even if I allow scripts etc. from all over the place.

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Rosetta probe to try contact with Philae lander on Thursday

Jonathan Richards 1
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Stop

Re: Hard science or a fishing expedition?

> Here's hoping it's not a Philae O Fish...

Anon you may be, but we can geolocate you by that execrable pun, you monster. It only works in the USA, where for some reason the word "fillet" is pronounced as if it was French, with a silent 't'. The correct pronunciation1 rhymes with "millet", "goblet" and "jacket", which I sincerely hope that you don't pronounce as 'millay', 'goblay' and 'jackay'!

1 http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/fillet

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Scotland to get National ID system 'by the backdoor', campaigners mull challenge

Jonathan Richards 1
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What goes around, comes around.

> there's definitely already an NHS unique number

Ah, yes. And at the birth of the NHS, what did it use for the person-ID? The National Identity Card number, as introduced during World War II to keep track of the population1. Although born after the war, I had one with the same pattern as a National Registration number, and my mother, on seeing her old National Health card immediately said "But that's my Identity Card number". So, using NHS numbers for person-ID has a certain satisfying symmetry, don't you think?

1http://www.1911census.org.uk/1939.htm

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Snapchat jihadist-fearing peers return with LAST GASP Snoopers' Charter demand

Jonathan Richards 1
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WTF?

Another Bill suggesting open-ended legislation by Order

Proposed Part 3A (1) enables the Secretary of State to make orders to "ensure that communications data is available to be obtained from telecommunications operators ..." It does not specify what those orders might entail, and does not limit them in any significant way at all. Part (2) says [ with elisions by me for clarity]

An order under this section may, in particular ... provide for ... the entering into by such [telecommunications] operators of arrangements with the Secretary of State or other persons under or by virtue of which the Secretary of State or other persons engage in activities on behalf of the operators on a commercial or other basis for the purpose of enabling the operators to comply with requirements imposed by virtue of this section. [emphasis added]

On plain reading, this seems to enable a Home Secretary forcibly to billet a PCDC (Parasitic Communications Data Collection) Team within a telecom operator, without paying said operator.

But that would prompt outrage, you say? Their Lordships seem to have thought of this. The very next sub-para says

[An order under this section may, in particular ... ] impose requirements or restrictions on telecommunications operators or other persons or provide for the imposition of such requirements or restrictions by notice of the Secretary of State. [emphasis added]

Again, plain reading suggests that this empowers a Home Secretary to draft an order to telecoms operators saying "Get on with it", and maybe "You are not permitted publically to disclose or discuss this order", or any other wizard wheeze that he or she may think is expedient.

There is a following passage, in which the SofS is required to consult with operators, OFCOM and the RIPA Technical Advisory Board, before issuing an order, but it doesn't say that he or she must pay any attention to the consultation outcome, and I for one worry that some future Home Secretary would drive on regardless.

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Your gran and her cronies are 'embracing online banking' – study

Jonathan Richards 1
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Aged grandmothers and younger villains

@ Dr Syntax: One of my grandmothers was born in 1881, and has been gone for fifty-four years, now, but that's not what I came here to say.

I think 108-year-old online banking customers ought to prompt just a little more diligence within the banks; the BBC carried a programme recently reporting on a banking scam wherein a vulnerable 94-year-old was tricked into transferring hundreds of thousands of pounds into some ne'er-do-well's pockets, as part of which the villains had set up online banking on her behalf. She has never owned a computer nor used online anything.

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I'll get my coat – there's a dusty one flying off Comet 67P

Jonathan Richards 1
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Not so close, really

I've mentioned before that 67P isn't going to get close to the sun, for values of close which mean much to humans. It won't get as close to the sun as you, dear Reader, are at this moment. Perihelion distance of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko is 1.243 AU. However there seems to be this abiding idea that it is going to plunge Sunwards and skim the photosphere, or something. It ain't.

Ref: ESA.int

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Virtual Vulture 2 swoops into Spaceport America

Jonathan Richards 1
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Canards

Does the X-plane model animate the canards realistically: in the video they appear to be at maximum elevation; probably at a stalling angle-of-attack, I would guess. Does Vulture 2 really fly like that?

Also, who chickened out of giving us the actual moment of virtual landing... or should I say impact...?

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Boffin finds formula for four-year-five-nines disk arrays

Jonathan Richards 1
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Boffin

Re: Something new every day

Not so much just caught up to the idea, as actually quantifying it with real-world failure numbers, and working out an optimum with a bit of maths. Just a bit more precise than your "bunch of". See icon!

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Anonymous: Snap on that Guy Fawkes mask, we're marching against child sex abuse

Jonathan Richards 1
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Stop

Re: Way beyond paedos

> They can no longer control the spread of information

I am old enough to remember the national hysteria over "Satanic Abuse" during the 1980's which resulted in some families having their children forcibly removed, as I recall, with no more evidence than could be fabricated and whipped up by and within groups of mis-guided social work teams. It became clear that there was NO organised Satanic Abuse, and the whole thing was just Salem Witch Trials all over again, though luckily no-one got burned at any stakes.

Now, with the WWW, the pot in which such anti-$BAD_THING fervour can be whipped up is so much bigger, and the froth that can be generated is so much larger, so that the danger of DIS-information is greater. I am, of course, in favour of real information being collected, sieved, collated, and verified. The interwebz are very bad at this. One has to decide whom one is to believe, at all times, everywhere. The critical questions are "Who is telling me this?" and "Why are they telling me?"

When Anon on The Register tells me that stuff is happening "Way beyond paedos", with unsupported statements, I'm afraid I don't get very satisfactory answers to those questions.

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Humanity can defeat SkyNet with BOOKS, says IT think tank

Jonathan Richards 1
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Re: more titles and Asimov

+1

I think it's because his First Law is in direct contradiction to much of what some organisations want robots for.

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P0wning for the fjords: Malware turns drones into DEAD PARROT

Jonathan Richards 1
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Re: Can't get it up.

> The fact gatherings and protests will then only be filmed from the authorities' point of view is entirely coincidental. [punctuation added; I can't help it...]

Really? How did anyone, authority or otherwise, ever get any footage of gatherings and protests in the past?

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Secret Service on alert after drone CRASHES into White House

Jonathan Richards 1
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Re: Pull!

I was thinking the same sort of thing. Maybe with a deployable net payload instead of a shot pattern. Such devices were well known as naval cannon ammunition in the days when the the objective was to shred the sails and rigging of enemy ships. I'm not suggesting installation of 32-pounders on the White House roof, but maybe an 8 or 10 gauge shotgun?

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ICANN CEO criticizes domain 'hoggers'

Jonathan Richards 1
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Re: Times like this...

Exactly. The value of a domain name is based solely on its availability, or scarcity. With a larger number of top level domains, the value is diluted, in exactly the way that the value of a currency is diluted when central banks create more money.

Has anyone ever asked Sir Tim whether he foresaw (or is now pleased to see) a market in names for sites on his WWW? Assignment: Team Register :-)

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Jonathan Richards 1
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Re: The truth often hurts

> it's no good getting mynewbusinessname.anythingelse because customers won't find you.

Err... have you looked at how most Web users actually navigate? If they aren't following a link from some social media post, it's odds-on that they will type what they think is your business name into Google[1]. I just tried this with a domain name I made up on the spur of the moment. GoogleTM, he say:

Showing results for startupfunders.com

Search instead for startupfunder.co.uk

Thus, I don't think that it's the case that you must have {whatever}.com in order to make your website findable.

[1] Other search engines are available: you and I know this, but the people I'm talking about don't. Many think Google is the Internet (Sandberg, S., 2015)

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Oi, Aussie sports fans! Take that selfie stick and stick it

Jonathan Richards 1
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Re: Just maybe they meant,

> a better shot or view of the action

Thus, there should also be a ban on the worst format ever for a camera, viz. a tablet computer. My sister has a wonderful photograph of Usain Bolt crossing an Olympic finishing line... at least she has a photograph of a tablet which is showing Usain Bolt crossing an Olympic finishing line, hoisted up into her line of vision by some tablet-toting-twassock at the crucial moment.

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FROSTY MISTRESS of the Outer System: Pluto yields to probe snapper

Jonathan Richards 1
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Boffin

Re: Billion

Whichever side of the debate one started on, this question is now settled. Nobody should now be writing 'billion' and meaning '1012. The convention that billion=109, trillion=1012, etc. is now practically universal, by which I mean all practitioners use it. It is wise merely to remember that this was not always the case, when reading older documents.

Ref: How many is a billion? [oxforddictionaries.com]

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'People ACTUALLY CONFUSE Facebook and the internet in some places'

Jonathan Richards 1
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Stop

Re: Half are below the median

Politico: We shall not rest until all the [schools|prisons|hospitals|police forces] are performing better than average!

The Populace: D'oh! Not again!

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ATTACK of the FLYING MOUNTAIN: 2004 BL86 goes by like a BULLET

Jonathan Richards 1
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Unhappy

Last chance to see...

As far as I can tell from http://ssd.jpl.nasa.gov/sbdb.cgi?sstr=2004%20BL86;orb=1 the asteroid won't be above the horizon for UK observers until close to dawn tomorrow (Monday 26th), so slim chance actually to see, even if one had a big enough telescope. Happy to be contradicted!!

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Alan Turing's LOST NOTEBOOK goes under the hammer

Jonathan Richards 1
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Stop

NEVER watch a movie expecting historical re-enactments. You won't get them. Ever.

You missed two of the greatest examples: "Braveheart", which managed to compress decades of actual history into mere weeks of story timeline, and "The Other Boleyn Girl" which I watched recently, and which concludes its credits with the boilerplate disclaimer along the lines of "This motion picture is a work of fiction and any resemblances to historical persons and events are purely coincidental". Amen to that.

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Wizard of Oz OFFICIALLY 'most significant movie' EVER, says PNAS

Jonathan Richards 1
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FAIL

TFA reported: Amaral's ultimate aim is to develop a method for determining "the most significant scientific papers". He explained: "More than 1 million scientific papers are published each year worldwide. It can be difficult to distinguish a good scientific paper from an average one, much like the movies. My next goal is to develop a good measure of scientific citations to get inside what is going on in the scientific literature."

So he's only about 51 (fifty-one, count 'em) years late with that idea, then. Eugene Garfield launched Science Citation Index in 1964, and by the time I was using it professionally in 1975 it was already massive, and massively useful. Sure, seminal papers like Southern blot, get referenced a lot, but it's perfectly possible to track the genuine interchange of useful ideas using it as a tool. (Well, it was then. I haven't used it for nearly thirty years, now).

Further reading: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Science_Citation_Index

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NINETY new DOOM ASTEROIDS found in 2014

Jonathan Richards 1
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Say what?

The caption on that video says:

Green circles represent near-Earth objects (asteroids and comets that come within 1.3 astronomical units, or Earth-moon distances, of the sun).

An AU is not the distance from the Earth to the moon; does anybody understand what they're driving at, or is it just a mistake? I'm speculating that it should have said '... or 389 Earth-moon distances,' since that's approximately the ratio.

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David Cameron: I'm off to the US to get my bro Barack to ban crypto – report

Jonathan Richards 1
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Re: Try Vote for Policies

Yes, what he said. If everyone took the time to read the manifestos, we'd have a chance of electing MPs that do the most of what we want them to do. The trouble is that the path from my vote, through MP selection, party infighting and leadership selection, to Her Majesty inviting some individual to form a government, is opaque at best.

On a related topic, all the pictures at the top of El Reg articles are too big, but *this* one is shockingly unpleasant :(

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Sony hack was good news for INSURERS and INVESTORS

Jonathan Richards 1
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Mushroom

Re: Liability?

> If the theft and publication of that correspondence renders her unemployable, wouldn’t Pascal have grounds for a massive lawsuit against her former employer?

See, this is another example of the mindset that says "anything I can get away with is OK". As I would like to see it, the way to be a respected film executive is to have a proper degree of respect for your staff and for the 'talent' that you employ. The fact that she (allegedly) trash-talks folk in company correspondence tells you something about the respect due to her (if you believe the content of the leaks). The damage is done at the point of writing the trash, not at the point of it becoming public knowledge.

In more enlightened times, this was known as having a conscience, and hypocrites did not run to their lawyers alleging that being found out was somehow somebody else's fault.

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