* Posts by Charles 9

3876 posts • joined 10 Jun 2009

Indie ISP to Netflix: Give it a rest about 'net neutrality' – and get your checkbook out

Charles 9
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Re: Nearly had me agreeing

"All geek analogies should be based on cars! It's the law!"

NOT when it's a bulk transport analogy. Cars don't fit that analogy as they're not considered a bulk transport vehicle, so it HAS to be lorries. That's law, too. Even the Net Neut debate uses lorries in its diagrams."

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Charles 9
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Re: wireless

The reason it's so bad is that the US is so BIG. Wiring up tiny little Great Britain isn't exactly a picnic, but at least the distances aren't so bad. But in the US, you have people from coast to coast, and unless it's a big city, the ROI just isn't there unless the communities in need can sweeten the deals with exclusivity contracts. For many small communities, it's the price of admission: either bind themselves to contracts or go without. It's like that for other utilities, too, like natural gas, since there's a significant infrastructure investment required just to reach those communities.

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Charles 9
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Given that Netflix tends to aggravate their upstream costs, which are ALWAYS metered, perhaps there's some measure of fairness in it. Even when it comes to shipping physical things, there's some give and take involved. Sometimes, the buyer pays the shipping; other times the supplier eats the costs. Perhaps the next question to ask is whether or not the amount the customer pays between the ISP and Netflix is sufficient to fund all the upstream costs. If it's not sufficient, then the ISP probably has a case to ask for compensation from either end. It's something that has to be hashed out between all parties involved, just as bulk shippers need to cut deals with transport companies.

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Charles 9
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Re: Even the story doesn't seem to make sense.

But what about all the TRAFFIC this thing will generate? Who foots the bill for all the upstream usage?

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Charles 9
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So who foots the bill for all the upstream traffic these things generate when Netflix keeps updating content, according to the article?

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Charles 9
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Re: ISP level caches are surely one of the first things

I think what he was saying is that Netflix won't accept caches due to the copyrights (the owners won't allow stuff in the clear for fear of MITM piracy). The only way is Netflix-controlled servers on site on the ISP's dollar.

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It's official: You can now legally carrier-unlock your mobile in the US

Charles 9
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Re: A glimmer of hope

That's not what's stopping a skateboard maker from doing that. Apple does it now to some degree; it just suffers from "if man can make it, man can make it again" and "patents aren't enforceable across borders". Sometimes, standard screws are just a ton cheaper to use. Other times, it's demanded of the customer. Take the skateboard again. Above a certain level of skill, skateboarders start customizing their boards, which means they will be demanding parts that can be swapped out easily or they won't be buying.

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Charles 9
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Re: It's nice to see people are chipping away on the DMCA

I think the threat's starting to lose its bite. Some countries seem to be threatening to take the "or else" and close relations with the US, meaning they don't care anymore.

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Charles 9
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Re: A glimmer of hope

How about one that guarantees the right of exhaustion in regards to virtual (download-only) software? And prevents software from being leased without a formal written contract (to keep business software leases OK)?

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Stick a 4K in them: Super high-res TVs are DONE

Charles 9
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Re: Stereoscopic?

Static stereoscopes are nothing new. I once viewed a topographical photograph using an old-fashioned stereoscope. Both implements were in the neighborhood of 50 years old. Stereo photography still exists, but it's more of a a specialty field since you need both the stereo camera and some form of stereoscope. TVs are not well-suited for this because of the flicker (which would still exist for still photography).

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Charles 9
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Re: Stereoscopic?

You mean volumetric. I suspect true 3D TV will first appear by borrowing a trick from the CRT days: rapid refresh. The main obstacle to getting a volumetric display done with a spinning LED plane is the refresh rate. To achieve a 30Hz volumetric display with 360 voxels circumferential resolution, the planar elements need to be able to refresh themselves at least 5400 times per second (to cover a 180-degree sweep in 1/30 of a second).

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Charles 9
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For me, it would be an Ethernet port (I wired my house), and not just a good range of ports, but one-button access to all of them. I've seen 4K TVs on display and I felt them to overkill (and this was at point-blank range, too). 3D gives me a headache, so forget that.

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Secure microkernel that uses maths to be 'bug free' goes open source

Charles 9
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Re: Is there a Microsoft parallel to Godwin's Law?

Pehaps that's what we should call it from now on:

Eadon's Law: As an online discussion grows longer, the probability of a comparison involving Microsoft or its executives approaches 1.

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Charles 9
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Re: >Engineers know how to fix things. What do beancounters know?

That's also an urban myth. Army quartermasters themselves have revealed these to just be accounting generalities meant to get paperwork through. Sure, people complain about the $500 hammer, but then there's the $600 jet engine...

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Charles 9
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Re: Still vulnerable to hacking

We don't know for certain they hacked it. Besides, the drone was military tech, so you'd think they'd be using the encrypted military GPS. Cracking military security tech would be a first-order coup and something MANY antagonistic countries would be itching to get, bit Iran's keeping mum, which tells me their method was likely much more prosaic and specific.

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Charles 9
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Re: Technically speaking...

That's due to one of the trade-offs of microkernels: performance.

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Charles 9
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Ever thought they took that into consideration?

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July 14, 2015. Tuesday. No more support for Windows Server 2003. Good luck

Charles 9
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Re: The problem is......

Even when that service provider ceases to exist?

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Charles 9
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If you're running a 16-bit control app, chances are it's running direct hardware (to the metal) code: one of the types of code you CAN'T virtualize because it's a proprietary interface no one else knows about. A few months back, a few of us were having a discussion about a lathe or some other CnC machine that relied on Windows XP (at the time IT went EOL) and couldn't use anything else because of the proprietary hardware driver that ONLY worked on XP (it was an ISA board IIRC). Since the machine was still in its amortization and the firm was facing stiff competition with razor-thin margins, it was basically chance it or fold.

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Charles 9
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Re: The problem is......

No, the REAL real problem is having BOTH issues at the same time. Imagine being FORCED to upgrade to an OS where you KNOW your mission-critical, unupgradeable custom software is going to fall flat on its face. Better hope the IT has enough in the budget for a new custom job or the entire company could be hosed.

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The Pirate Bay opens mobile site

Charles 9
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Re: Yes, actually, carriers WILL love it

Followed by more complaints hitting the public airwaves and a possible public outcry over unfair billing. Perhaps even offers by competitors to defect.

That said, I will say that the carriers are up against a ceiling here; there's only so much they can send on their little slice of bandwidth, so there will be a breaking point at some point where the carriers either raise the fees universally or start dropping off as the business model becomes less viable.

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Are you broke? Good with electronics? Build a better AC/DC box, get back in black with $1m

Charles 9
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Re: why not

And if the conversion steps go bad?

Whatever happened to Keep It Simple, Stupid?

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Oh girl, you jus' didn't: Level 3 slaps Verizon in Netflix throttle blowup

Charles 9
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Re: More ports is still the wrong answer

So you'd rather have multiple sets of sewage pipes, gas lines, electrical trees, and so on?

Some monopolies come naturally not because of government regulation but because of aesthetics. Sewage, water, electricity, gas, and many other utilities tend to require lots of big, UGLY infrastructure to operate, and this raises NIMBY issues.

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Charles 9
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Re: Monopoly = Artificial Scarcity

It depends on the industry. When it comes to water, sewage, electricity, etc. Multiple providers are a problem because the infrastructure is an eyesore, leading to NIMBY issues. But most communication infrastructure isn't such an eyesore, to the point that two more more sets won't be so ugly.

The problem in this case is that utilities have a very high upfront cost (as in you have to put in all the money to lay down your basic infrastructure before you see one penny of return), making it a barrier of entry that favors incumbents who ALREADY have their infrastructure down (their upfront costs are already sunk).

View it another way, and you see the problem is a case of vertical integration. The incumbents own both the content and the means to distribute it (think rail companies that owned mines and timber forests in the past). Perhaps the most reasonable solution is to force a breakup of this integration. If the content and the transport were forced to operate separately, with the transport required to be an open and equal provider, then newcomers can lease time from the transport to get a foot in the door. That's why MVNOs work: they lease abilities from the big guys and compete by serving customers the mainstream doesn't prefer like the price-conscious.

PS. I think I should note: Verizon doesn't seem to allow MVNOs on its network. Sprint does (Boost, Virgin), as does T-Mobile (SimpleMobile, Family Mobile). AT&T seems to, but there seems to be a catch there as none of the MVNOs are able to undercut AT&T on price.

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NEW, SINISTER web tracking tech fingerprints your computer by making it draw

Charles 9
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And others outright kick you out because they've installed ad-blocker-blockers. And most of them that do host exclusive content, so it's either bend over or go without.

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Carlos: Slim your working week to just three days of toil

Charles 9
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"Its puzzled me for years why we still work all the time with all the automation compared to 100 or even 50 years ago."

It's a combination of the cost of living going up and the value of human labor going down. Kinda like running up the slope of a downhill-running treadmill. You have to work your tush off just to maintain.

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HIDDEN packet sniffer spy tech in MILLIONS of iPhones, iPads – expert

Charles 9
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Re: I suppose

The thing is, it's reaching the point where they don't NEED to hide it anymore. The government is such that no sense of privacy is increasingly the norm, and if you don't like it, you probably won't be doing much good anymore. IOW, by this point, the spooks don't care because they're EVERYWHERE.

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Manic malware Mayhem spreads through Linux, FreeBSD web servers

Charles 9
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Re: Linux and FreeBSD malware spreading?

By using PHP, which could be on the server as part of a LAMP setup. It tests to see if the server can take in files via Remote File Inclusion (the Google file mentioned is just the test). If it works, it uses RFI to insert a PHP plugin, which then gets added to the web server and given the server's permissions (not that it really matters if the plugin contains a privilege escalation).

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Charles 9
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Re: It's all about mitigation

"The thing I don't understand is that if they hard coded 8.8.8.8 as the DNS for finding humans.txt couldn't you just set the hosts file to redirect it as a temporary workaround?"

Doesn't it work the other way around, translating a DNS name to a number? Which means 8.8.8.8 or any other direct IPv4 address gets addressed directly? That's how some ad-blockers work: by assigning 127.0.0.1 (localhost) to all the ad-spewing domain names.

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NASA: Satellite which will END man-made CO2 debate in orbit at last

Charles 9
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Re: Third time lucky ... @Charles9

Ummm.... I'm NOT. I'm trying to put forth a true conundrum for the flat-earthers: one that can be reproduced by normal people (puncuring the conspiracy theories) and TTBOMK is infeasible on a flat earth.

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Charles 9
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Re: Third time lucky ...

Has anyone told the flat-earthers of the following experiment?

- Fly around the world TWICE, at right angles to each other (once to the west, once to the south). Start from say Nairobi, Kenya (which is practically on the Equator). The two paths should cross exactly once other than in Nairobi, and on a globe that point can be predicted. It will also be exactly halfway. I tried plotting it out on a plate and found I could not achieve the halfway bit on a flat surface without twists and turns and should be noticeable on a plane because the normal procedure for a turn is to roll AND yaw (meaning to not notice the turn would require a magical force that can turn you without you noticing it, not even with your biological gyroscopes). Then there's the matter of the TWO pole flyovers on the southbound trip, one of which occurs AFTER the intersection (which on a flat earth would require going INSIDE the first flight path, preventing access to the edge).

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Charles 9
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Re: I know, lets stop breathing

I'll stop as soon as all the other animals on the planet stop breathing, too.

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Charles 9
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Re: The Butterfly effect.

How confident is NASA that their historical data is as accurate as their current data and that either set of data is not misread or miscalibrated in some way. The article you cite does not describe HOW they come to their findings (the specific sources of all their data). Did they take oceanic CO2 concentrations into consideration or the idea that melting ice could itself release CO2?

As for the Tacoma-Narrows bridge collapse, we know more now than we knew then. The phenomenon isn't as complicated as you make it out to be. We know describe the phenomenon as "flutter". After an airliner broke up mid-flight due to flutter, we learned more about natural metal flexibility when exposed to steady wind and how this flex can somehow oscillate in a resonant frequency resulting in accelerated metal fatigue. We now design things so as to increase bracing at key points to as to prevent flutter (modern airliners and the replacement Tacoma-Narrows Bridge are both built sturdier to prevent another incident of flutter).

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Meet the 'smallest GPU' for wearable gizmos ... wait, where did it go?

Charles 9
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I don't know how close to accurate most of those claims are, but I suspect the "tile-based" part is entirely accurate. From what I recall of my Dreamcast days, this was a specialty of the PowerVR GPU line.

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Can it be true? That I hold here, in my mortal hand, a nugget of PUREST ... BLACK?

Charles 9
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Re: Old News

And noted the risk could be mitigated with good star charts (to know where the stars were) and a small ship (to minimize occlusion). I think he put them all together in Gray Lensman and introduced a second one in Second Stage Lensman.

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Charles 9
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Re: If I coat my car with this...

Haven't most PDs switched to LIDAR by this point? Which would make this useless since they tend to aim for your plate (which by law MUST be visible AND reflective) and only need a short burst, usually around a blind curve or over a hilltop, to get a speed reading?

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D-Wave to bust 1,000-qubit barrier with new quantum compute device

Charles 9
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As I thought. Which means, as far as I'm concerned, they're NOT true quantum computers.

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Charles 9
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Has anyone verified that these things actually ARE quantum computers by, say, running Shor's Algorithm on them in sufficiently-high bit counts?

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Use Tor or 'extremist' Tails Linux? Congrats, you're on an NSA list

Charles 9
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Re: Just Because I'm Paranoid The Inevitable Conclusion

The Man would just reply, "It ain't paranoia if everybody REALLY IS out to get you." As far as they're concerned, one man can destroy civilization out of nowhere, meaning EVERYONE's a potential existential threat. And it's against instinct to accept existential threats.

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Charles 9
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Re: However...

Bet you the MIB are becoming just as good at FILTERING the noise. Plus they know the Internet only works efficiently when the routes are open. Otherwise, you end up like Freenet, where things take forever to get done. Efficient or anonymous--pick ONE.

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Another 'NSA-proof' webmail biz popped by JavaScript injection bug

Charles 9
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Re: Sigh...

For the average Joe, when you say a key, they expect a PHYSICAL key, like a dedicated fob (although those can be STOLEN).

The problem is that to make the system as intuitive as possible for as many people as possible, you can't make them come to you. You'll have to go to them, which means integrating with third-party e-mail clients. Now, Thunderbird has an add-on mechanism, but what about Outlook?

Then there's the matter of being rooted outside the e-mail program. Then the malware can control the encryptor, meaning you're hosed in any event.

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Watch: DARPA shows off first successful test of STEERABLE bullet

Charles 9
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Re: Presumably . . .

I assume sabotage rounds are no longer so useful in modern conflicts because (1) the enemy probably has its own ammunition supply chain, and (2) the increased likelihood of armed civilians meaning a civilian might get one of the sabotage rounds.

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Charles 9
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Re: DARPA: The Better To Murder You With, My Dear

But the excuse is that precision guidance to this point has generally been with decently big things: things that can easily hit more than one thing at once or cause enough collateral damage that innocents can get caught up in it. They're precision guided but NOT for the most part precision effect. Now, a .50 cal round is tiny enough that you CAN get a precision effect. It's HERE that your trope would apply barring a case of mistaken identity.

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Wireless-controlled contraception implant is coming, says MIT

Charles 9
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Then the solution for a malcontent is to use one of two things: more power or better direction. With enough power (regulations be damned) you can hit the thing across the room. It's also possible to use a WiFi directional antenna that focuses the directed energy, allowing for a longer range albeit at a narrower angle.

That's always been the fear with NFC. Sure, the spec only provides enough power for a point-blank shot, but what malcontent's going to stick with the standard, and how will the NFC device be able to tell the difference on its end?

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USA to insist on pre-flight mobe power probe

Charles 9
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Re: I wonder how they got this information?

You're saying they're not vetted thoroughly before being hired?

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Charles 9
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Re: Gel implant bras

I know a better solution, mentioned it years ago: the dildo bomb. A woman can smuggle two of them: perfect for a binary explosive, and since they're INSIDE the woman, nothing short of a full-on strip search would pick it up. And one huge final advantage: they're removable.

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Charles 9
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The checks are INCOMING, not OUTGOING. They're being made on flights TO the US.

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Sorry, chaps! We didn't mean to steamroller legit No-IP users – Microsoft

Charles 9
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Re: a Nevada judge

A judgment in Redmond would not affect the operations of No-IP, which is based in Nevada.

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Charles 9
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Re: Have I understood this correctly?

"Another poster mentioned (can't remember if it was here, probably not) that in North Korea, the security forces have been known to shut the power off in an entire building before doing physical searches, just to check out what DVDs are locked inside people's players."

Did they remember to outlaw the use of top-loading players which can still be opened with the lights out? Or front-loaders with the paper-clip manual opening hole?

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PANDA chomps through Spotify's DRM

Charles 9
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Re: Use spotify myself

Here's the thing. What if Spotify goes titsup? Temporarily or otherwise? The big problem with DRM is trying to deal with the possibility that the Right Manager no longer exists.

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