* Posts by Charles 9

4740 posts • joined 10 Jun 2009

4K refresh sees Blu-ray climb to 100GB, again

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: How long until 100GB M-DISC is available?

At least 2TB, and yes considering tropical climate and potential loosey-goosey radio and electrical regulations. And like I said, budget is tight. And with low data rates and data caps, the cloud is out, too.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Neil Barnes

BEEN interested. They were among the FIRST into HD (where widescreen became the norm).

As for 4K, now things get ugly. HD raised the level of detail to the point things occasionally get TOO detailed to enjoy the experience. For this reason, pr0n likely won't jump to 4K that quickly, as this will only raise the Ick Factor.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: How long until 100GB M-DISC is available?

What about for a large amount of precious data? And price IS an issue?

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: How long until 100GB M-DISC is available?

I think they're already here, but quantities are limited and the price is too steep. Plus 100GB is a bit small for me now.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

I've thought about it, but with my archival demands already in the terabyte range, I need something a bit more capacious. The Archival Disc is a possible solution but the price point will take time to reach consumer affordability.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: It hinges on...

BD+ showed a way to keep the target moving. If the authentication program is different for each disc (meaning they can be updated quickly), then the pirates have to keep cracking the programs.

0
0

Polygraph.com owner pleads guilty to helping others beat lie detector

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: The issue is not that people lie

Pathological liar who lies about everything - Include obvious questions. If the person lies about those, put him aside as such and investigate further.

Sociopath - Use questions that may trigger alternate responses. Sociopaths rarely are perpetually calm; they merely react differently and can be tested for such.

Delusion - Test for delusion using contextual questions. If subject is deluded enough to believe his own lie, set aside for psychiatric evaluation.

Random/erratic pulse/breating for other reasons - Check for these before the polygraph. If they're like this before the test, you can predict inconsistency and try another way.

0
2

Jeb Bush: Repeal Obamacare and replace it with APPLE WATCHES

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Aye

So why doesn't someone approach it from the viewpoint of sick and dead people don't pay taxes?

2
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Aye

Why can't your friend apply for a subsidy on the grounds of unaffordability?

7
0

That DRM support in Firefox you never asked for? It's here

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Product returns galore!

a) Lots of Southeast Asia aren't even to the Blu-Ray level yet, so Sony may just keep China out of the loop, or put them under much tighter guard.

b) Like I said, I think they'll tolerate the returns for accidental suicides if it means their tech doesn't leak. After all, their secret carries a price tag much higher than the rest of the device's development. Meanwhile, with the caveat of "opening of device voids warranty" combined with tamper-evident stickers, I think they'll be able to make more cases that the "returns" were actually intrusions.

0
2
Charles 9
Silver badge

And when the viewers are ad-averse, meaning ads turn the viewers AWAY?

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: @h4rm0ny

The movies companies are finding their C) solution, however. They'll tolerate some piracy, just not beyond a certain level of quality. Their DRM is mainly meant to block High-Definition piracy up to a point (usually the home-video point, at which point most of the revenue's already been extracted). They see cams and such as the realm of the desperate: people who wouldn't see the movie unless it was a penny. These are essentially unconvertible and can be ignored. As for the bad press, given they still get plenty of customers, the press can't be THAT bad for them. With the exception of franchises (and you wonder why so many sequels), movie fans just aren't as loyal as music fans (who tend to have their favorites).

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: DRM in open source couldn't work?

And that's why 4K will NEVER be run on systems controllable by the user, they made that abundantly clear. They'll insist on end-to-end encrypted streams (that includes the link to the TV which will be an improved HDCP). Players will be locked-down tamper-detecting black boxes that require Internet connections for extra verification. And they'll probably deny home/hobby users access to 4K recording equipment for years (and keep the professional stuff too expensive for all but the big boys to afford) so the analog gap can't be exploited.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: More reasons to go to PaleMoon or other alternatives

"It's in a sandbox, it can't check that much."

Then how do these things check against screen scrapers, a well-known bypass technique.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Barriers to purchase

"Youtube does it now."

EXCEPT, like I said earlier, Internet watchers are more ad-averse. More of them see the ads as a deal-breaker and install ad blockers. That's why things like AdBlock and NoScript are so popular.

As for regional deals, that's because economic models break down when you go international, and for the content providers it means less money in the long run. And since it's their content, it's their rules. If the money doesn't match up, they can always lock it up so no one gets to see it.

0
1
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: 32-bit first?

There are plenty of other plugins out there besides those three, and many of them are 32-bit-only. So that leaves little choice in the matter.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Barriers to purchase

The free-to-air stations are paid for by the advertisers (one problem Internet TV has is that its customers are more ad-averse than others). If a show doesn't draw people, it gets cancelled. Many cable networks take a cut from the providers, who in turn charge their subscribers. And the BBC has their television tax. Pirates, as the name imply, simply don't care.

As for the content creators, they're the ones stumping down. Their natural first question will thus be, "Where's the money, sonny?"

5
0

Australia cracks tech giants' tax dodge code

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Still Seems simple

"Then it doesn't enter the country."

Does the word "bootlegger" mean anything to you? If someone wants something badly enough, they'll get it in spite of God, Queen, and the Government. Economic tourism would boom for any nearby country willing to sell the phones, and even if Customs stops their entry, they'll just get smuggled in.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: And their small competitors?

But take one tiny country that's not interested in the treaty, they become a tax haven, and the whole system falls apart since they hold sovereign power and can determine their own fate.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Seems simple

And if a cartel exists such that no objective third party is at hand? Suppose the actual cost to manufacture varies wildly between regions due to resource costs, transportation, and so on, and they can't be objectively determined due to sovereign secrecy?

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: What the call "Overs" are extra costs added

True, but that requires the cooperation of other sovereign nations. And if the tax haven has sovereign power as well and doesn't want to play? Short of complete isolation (unlikely due to natural competing interests between nations), companies WILL find a way to funnel through the tax haven.

1
0

Home routers co-opted into self-sustaining DDoS botnet

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Countermeasures

Well, most aftermarket routers I know have three different reset conditions. One is the standard reset, which just warm boots the router in case it gets stuck or something. The second is as you say, Reset to Defaults, which is used in case a configuration change you made bricks the router or locks you out. The third one is the one you want, Reset to Stock, which should reflash the firmware with a baseline version out of ROM. I know the last two routers I bought had all three options, and since the last one is hardware-based, it's immune to malware.

0
0

Why Joe Hockey's Oz tax proposals only get five out of 10

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Not to mention

Here's the rub. How do you carry through without threatening another country's sovereign power? That's always been the big problem with tax havens. Short of war, how do you make the tax havens stop being tax havens?

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Sales tax

Because the sellers have the ability to re-home in tax havens, meaning everyone loses.

0
0

Infosec bods demo GPU keylogger. Don't tell the NS... oh, wait

Charles 9
Silver badge
FAIL

Re: Remember

There's more than one way to pwn a system (and BTW, recall where the term "rooting" comes from). Does the name "Slapper" ring any bells? How about "Windingo," which is still in the wild today? And let's not forget about "Heartbleed" and "Shellshock".

0
0

What the BLEEP? BitTorrent's secure messaging app arrives

Charles 9
Silver badge

Indeed, there's a driver called DFMirage which works as a low-level display hook. It can be used in combination with the TightVNC fork to improve host performance. And of course there's always cameras. How does BLEEP intend to defeat stuff like that?

1
0

Mozilla to whack HTTP sites with feature-ban stick

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: When I can self sign and provide the public key by DNSSEC...

No, it can't be sniffed or they'd be able to break or alter the hash to make it look legitimate. Like with SSH, you need the whole conversation to be sniff-resistant or someone can find a way to inject into the session. IOW, an authenticated connection can't easily stay authenticated if stuff is transmitted in the clear.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: re: bigtimehustler

"I'd rather see an extension to http/https that just provided signed digests of such blobs. The problem is the browser knowing two things:"

I made such a proposal earlier. I say make this an extension of HTTPS itself to request a hash/hashes of a page using current best practice algorithms (and allowing for better ones down the road). For static content, these hashes can be computed when they're uploaded (dynamic content by nature can't be cached anyway). Existing caches can be hashed client-side for a quick transition. Anyway, make the request by HTTPS itself to ensure at least a channel mostly safe from MITM (if this can be intercepted, so can the page itself, meaning you're screwed anyway). If the hash provided by HTTPS matches an existing hash, use the cached copy; otherwise, serve it and update the local copy. Simple enough to implement, I think, and it wouldn't have to interfere with the existing spec since it can work on top of it.

1
0

SHOCK! Robot cars do CRASH. Because other cars have human drivers

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: caused by human error and inattention

"Driving is more than yaw computations. Sorry, was that a packet of crisps that can be safely run over or a rock that must be avoided by an aggressive manoeuvre. No time to get a response from Watson in this crappy 4G zone."

A packet of crisps would probably return a different infrared signature than a rock, Plus there's the matter of motion (a packets of crisps will react to the wind differently than a rock due to weight and aerodynamics). And if it's a rock IN a packet of crisps, that's pretty much sabotage at this point.

Put it this way. A LOT of thought has gone into the various scenarios that the average driver faces as well as how we as drivers identify and react to these. The bulk of that knowledge is probably in the prototype cars, already at hand no Internet necessary. Same for the maps.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Evidence == "Invasion of Privacy!"

"Why haven't I seen any mention of this?"

Because the same thing happens when a photographer takes a picture of the street. Unless you specifically were the focus, the courts have previously ruled you are under no expectation of privacy on a public street.

2
0

Boffins set to reveal state of play on fully duplex comms - on the same FREQ

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: This concept is not new.

Sidetone is most definitely not intentional and in fact has been a natural artifact of the telephone system from its inception...because of the single pair of communication lines involved. Two lines limits you to one conversation line due to the limits of electricity. Put it this way: without sidetone, you couldn't properly record a telephone conversation using an acoustic coupler.

There are two things which are intentional concerning sidetone. One is the attenuation of sidetone in traditional phones. This was because raw sidetone (at least since the introduction of the Edison carbon microphone) was too loud and made people speak too softly. The other is the introduction of sidetone in cell phones (which normally don't feature this because they can normally separate the two parties of the conversation) because otherwise people thought the signal was too soft and started to talk too loudly.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: orbital angular momentum proposals ...

I've read about the OAM business but had been sitting on the fence looking for more concrete proof. Seems this report will provide the basis for a counter-example to slam the door on OAM. All I'm saying at this point is, "Let's see the proof, sonny."

1
0

Gaze upon the desirable Son of Alpha: Samsung Galaxy A5

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: USB port does not support hosting?

But if that were true, they'd have never implemented it in the first place, rather than implement it one time then drop it the next.

Anyway, a non-replaceable battery is a deal-breaker for me. I actually take care of my phones so they stand a passing fair chance of outlasting the battery, plus I've had incidences of batteries wearing out prematurely.

1
1

Windows 10 bombshell: Microsoft to KILL OFF Patch Tuesday

Charles 9
Silver badge

"Well, don't look at the majority of Linux distros if you decide to jump ship. With the advent of systemd, they'll all be rebooting at the drop of a hat."

Given that you can supposedly stop and restart init (which systemd is supposed to replace) without rebooting, how does systemd make things any different, unless you're saying systemd ties itself to the kernel, which I've yet to see. Why don't you PROVE that systemd forces more reboots.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Just like Windows Phone

But now with Android the dominant phone platform, you'd think Google would have the muscle to push back and INSIST on them being able to update Android themselves, regardless of manufacturer, as a matter of security. Make it a condition of carrying the Play Store and all of Google's special Android sauce. What manufacturer (apart from those like Amazon who have their own infrastructure) would refuse to carry that and hamstring their phones? Why wasn't this forced with Lollipop?

6
3

Microsoft discontinues Media Center with Windows 10

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Anyone remember...

The WMC logo was primarily centered around PlaysForSure, the means by which a portable device can be given the capability to play otherwise-DRM-restricted WMV files. When .wmv fell by the wayside (mostly because Apple won that round of the portable player wars, meaning MP4 became the dominant format), so did PlaysForSure and the logo program.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: take up was also poor due to...

Things like CableCARD receivers are the reason for the .wtv format. It allowed for the CableCARD to encrypt the recordings, enforcing DRM. If you use a FTA antenna (meaning no DRM), then the recordings are not significantly encrypted and can be converted (say to .dvr-ms) or used with a video editor like avidemux with only moderate effort.

I personally like the layout of Windows Media Center, but after the cable companies encrypted all the FTA channels (on the basis that satellite companies do it to enforce locality restriction), it just wasn't really fun anymore. I now record with a USB-based Happauge box that can accept HD component inputs that allow me to record HDTV footage. It's a bit clunky to use, but I can't knock the results.

2
0

Lies, damn lies and election polls: Why GE2015 pundits fluffed the numbers so badly

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: We don't vote for parties...

The trouble is, as BOTH sides of the water proved hundreds of years ago, is that people NATURALLY form cliques or blocs. George Washington himself expressed it AND was right about the whole thing (he was against parties, too). BUT the behaviour is basically human nature and practically inevitable because parties represent strength in numbers: gangs for lack of a better term. George ended up being labeled a Federalist against his wishes.

10
0

OECD nations gang up on internet retailers, tax dodgers

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: This will not work

"The check should stop at the first half of step 3. Any company with global revenue above XBn should be taxed locally in all countries it operates unconditionally. "Case closed". A number between 1 and 5 Bn is about right for that. Any bitching and moaning about the "adverse effects" is baseless as the entry cost of taxation at standard rate in a country is the cost of employing one measly account clerk. As you are no longer avoiding tax, you do not need to contract KPMG for 50mil to do your tax bill in all but a handful of countries."

Ever heard of "Smurfing"? The company will just splinter off into multiple smaller ones, each apparently independent and keeping their revenues under the trigger value. Plus they can argue what constitutes "doing business" until the sun stops.

4
0

ACLU files new lawsuits in hunt for police 'Stingray' mobe-trackers

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Interesting concept...

"At least one LEO has been sanctioned for this and another came perilously close to being jailed for contempt late last year - in the latter case the entire body of evidence relating to the Stingray intercepts was withdrawn from the prosecution case with the judge's assent.

In other cases, the prosecution has withdrawn cases entirely rather than face being compelled to explain how the devices work."

Makes me wonder what happens when Stingray is used and they discover that they've cuffed a high-profile criminal like a serial killer. The high profile will mean they'll be under tremendous public pressure to get a conviction unless they're prepared for a riot (and recent riots have shown things aren't getting much better there with public relations).

0
0

Smart grid security WORSE than we thought

Charles 9
Silver badge

Except that's very inefficient and power-hungry. Look at Freenet. How can you achieve something like this in a world where power may not be readily available and efficiency is a critical metric?

1
0

Hordes spaff cash on Chip titchyputer to rival Pi (maybe)

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: MK802

For the record, there are different models of MK802, and the earlier ones used the infamous Allwinner A10 (newer models use Rockchips, which appear to be more open). The model IV looks pretty potent with a quad-core CPU and Android 4.2 onboard (there's a variant model IIRC that can run Ubuntu or a variant thereof).

0
0

JavaScript CPU cache snooper tells crooks EVERYTHING you do online

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: no software issue

Trouble is, there are "Average Joe" jobs that ALSO require high performance. Such as video encoding (home movies) or gaming.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Solution

They can achieve the former with a drive-by attack, usually by means of an ad network (and more sites are incorporating ad-blocker-blockers so that you have to take the ad in order to view the exclusive, not- available-anywhere-else content).

0
0

Infusion pump is hackable … but rumours of death are exaggerated

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Network accessibility

"A well setup network will presumably use mac address checking and the like to prevent rouge devices connecting but I don't know how easy those are to be defeated."

And what's to stop a bad boy from pretending to be (or hiding itself in) a new device being sent in to replace an old one? Since it's coming in at the critical "first contact" phase, it's more likely to slip in unnoticed as it's thought to just be a new member of the team.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: So an exploit can be delivered over WiFi. What about a harmful agent?

Then consider humble little potassium. We NEED small doses of it regularly because it helps regulate the heart, but one quick injection of KCl and your heart (and you) is not waking up (that's why it's usually the coup de grace of lethal injection).

1
0

High-speed powerline: Home connectivity without the cables

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: The time has come, the Walrus said ...

Depends on where you go. Places like the Philippines tend to have shoddy electrical work. Slapdash and impromptu repairs, not to mention lots of screwed-on replacement plugs and jury-rigs, are distressingly common.

0
0

iPhone case uses phone's OWN SIGNAL to charge it (forever, presumably)

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: And for their next trick...

They have. Been considered for over a century. Thing is, the case charger has one key advantage: point-blank range (your idea falls flat because the charging capability falls off quadratically over distance--twice the distance, one-fourth the power).

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Remember Zeno?

"Q: If Achilles covers half the distance to his destination every day, when does he arrive?"

Question needs to be qualified. If "half the distance" is measured as of the start of his journey (which would make sense since most people travel relatively uniform distances), then the answer is obviously "two days". Your answer assumes "half the distance" is measured as of the start of each day.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Wind turbine idea

Given how much of a pain hand crank chargers are when they're actually under load (read: charging), I don't know if wind has enough oomph to defeat the resistance.

0
0

Forums