* Posts by Charles 9

6213 posts • joined 10 Jun 2009

Microsoft adds 'non-security updates' to security patches

Charles 9
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Re: Stating the Obvious

"Until I have time to sort out a spare machine, install a suitable Linux variant on it, and either find suitable equivalents of all the software I need, or ensure I can get existing stuff running."

You'll be in for a long wait, I reckon. Too much software is WINE-unfriendly and has no Linux counterpart, which is why I had to come back to Windows.

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Net neut naught: Netflix throttles its own video

Charles 9
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Re: Not a violation of net neutrality

"It looks like they're now going to offer the ability to make the choice yourself, so that's that part sorted. If you want to boycott them for being dishonest by omission, go for it, but I don't see this as hypocrisy myself."

OK. Better. Defaulting to conserving mobile bandwidth is all right as long as there's an opt out. The quote you give is pretty accurate as Sprint and T-Mobile are the underdogs of the mobile market and tend to have more aggressive offers (such as what I have now, with two completely unmetered LTE lines). Try getting that at a reasonable price with Verizon or AT&T.

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Charles 9
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Re: Whither Internet?

And how pray shall the twain meet without some medium in between them? Mobile data is not being hampered by the Internet but the other way around, and as you've noted aerial bandwidth is physically limited AND pretty much already taken up, so how can content providers get their stuff to their unwired customers without using precious spectrum?

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Charles 9
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Important Question

Not being a Netflix user myself, I have to ask.

Is this a fixed, non-adjustable setting being made on the part of Netflix, or is Netflix just setting a default option for mobile customers which customers can choose to override? If there is an option for the user to opt out, then I don't see this being against Net Neutrality. As Netflix has said, this helps prevent sticker shock for mobile customers, particularly prepaid ones, who have low data caps. As long as the user can choose to turn the cap off, I don't see an issue.

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Wait! Where did you get that USB? Super-stealthy trojan only drives stick

Charles 9
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Re: Guvmint Work

Anything you can do, a determined adversary can copy unless you go straight to the chip level, and even then there may be bad actors in the manufacturing stage which nothing can prevent or mitigate given the sophistication of sleepers.

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Charles 9
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Re: Examples

If USB is broken,then hardware in general is broken because there is absolutely nothing being done that cannot be done another way by another bad actor posing as a good one. It's full on DTA mode with no alternative. You either get nothing done or run the risk of a backstab. No third option.

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Charles 9
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"I occasionally check Task Manager to see what's running & any 'Trojan' app is going to grab my attention pretty quickly."

NOT if it's a trojan running ON TOP of an existing legitimate app. That's how this thing works. It hitches a ride on a genuine portable app making them part and parcel.

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Charles 9
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Re: Guvmint Work

Many desktop computers don't carry built-in flash card readers (that's mainly the realm of laptops). So how do you trust the card reader you're going to need to install to make them readable?

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Police create mega crime database to rule them all. Is your numberplate in it? Could be

Charles 9
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Re: 3 points @Charles 9

"Simply having knock-on effects in public doesn't make the initial action a crime."

Yes it does. It's called, "Thinking It Through," which I don't see very much of these days. If you're getting drunk the night before you're supposed to go to work (meaning you KNOW you're supposed to be sober the next day), then that's willful disregard, and that's at least grounds for court action if consequences result. Okay, it may not necessarily be a crime (but if could, say if someone dies or is permanently maimed as a result), but negligence has a lower bar in the civil courts, and civil judgments are themselves both a punishment and compensation for wronging someone else.

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Charles 9
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Re: If Datamining worked

Well, since sports betting adjusts to the bets being made before the event, Diminishing Returns eventually kicks in.

As for the stock market, since unpredictable humans and insider hijinks are involved, the data set will always be inadequate to make a truly accurate prediction.

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Charles 9
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"Most people are able to overcome the 'natural instincts' to go around trying to have sex with anything that moves, defecate wherever they like, and grab hold of anything that takes their fancy."

We're NOT "overcoming" them. We're merely repressing them. Thing is, it builds up like water behind a dam, and the dam doesn't have very solid foundations. Or perhaps a better analogy, a forest that keeps getting tinder built up. Sooner or later, the dam's going to break down or the forest is going to flash into a blaze. Why do you think we see so much scandal these days? We LIKE to think we're creatures who can control our emotions, but when crisis hits, what do we turn to? Not the brain, the gut, and like I said we do it practically on a reflex, without even thinking so we don't even have time to consider our actions until it's too damn late.

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Charles 9
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Re: 3 points

"Finally, I would like the opportunity, as a responsible citizen, providing I do no intentional harm to others, the right to do whatever the fuck i like in private, with consenting adults of my choice. This may include unwise or immoral or simply depraved activities, not least of which might be the consumption of illicit substances."

Problem is, doing UNINTENTIONAL harm to others is STILL a crime: negligence, and things you do in private can have knock-on effects in public, such as getting too drunk to work, leaving your boss understaffed on the day of a surprise inspection, and so on. So no, you cannot do whatever the F you like in private because no man lives in complete isolation.

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Charles 9
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"What we really need is a cultural change towards acceptance of violence of all sorts in our society, be it the public brawl on the high street on a Friday night, or the more insidious violence that happens behind closed doors, and this is an area where predictive policing could really help."

I doubt it'll work. Violence is damn near instinctive, probably even biological. That's why it feels so damn GOOD to vent steam, to shoot guns at nothing in particular, to unload on a punching bag, and so on. I would say getting rid of violence is going to be a tall order when our bodies are against us in that regard.

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Stagefright flaw still a nightmare: '850 million' Androids face hijack risk

Charles 9
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Re: What is the point of this article, other than as advertising?

"Don't trust any mobile phone companies, don't buy an Android phone that can't be unlocked and rooted, and have Cyanongenmod applied to it. Going to update my 2012 phone to Marshmallow tonight, as it now has an SELinux enabled build, with official Cyanongenmod nightlies not far off. Without that I'd be stuck on insecure ICS."

And what about the increasing number of apps that don't like running in a rooted or custom ROM environment?

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Charles 9
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Re: click-to-play won't protect against trojan smut!

Then as the comedian once said, "You can't fix Stupid." At some point, you just have to give up the hopeless idiot as a lost cause.

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Charles 9
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Re: Play installs firmware?

Overlays have been around since Lollipop, but they're only now getting carrier and manufacturer attention.

As for separating the drivers and the rest of the OS, Android N should be a start to this if Google's word is accurate. Drivers can get tricky since they're usually tied to the kernel (due to the architecture; hardware on ARM is usually static rather than dynamic like it is on x86), and if the kernel itself has a problem, this can create a cascade effect.

And then there's the matter of the manufacturers working in cartel to keep a captive market. Especially now with Android apps increasingly root- and custom-aware.

And as for choosing Nexus, the main reasons I don't like them are lack of a removable battery (probably the least graceful part of the device to age) and lack of an SD slot.

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Charles 9
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Re: 850 million at risk

Because they're all UNOFFICIAL upgrades, and Android apps are increasingly becoming root-aware and custom-aware, meaning upgrading now entails a serious tradeoff.

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Charles 9
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Re: Too risky to use Android browsing the web.

NoScript IIRC ALSO safeguards media tags, making them click-to-play.

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Lost in the obits: Intel's Andy Grove's great warning to Silicon Valley

Charles 9
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Re: Bah!

So what do you do? You don't want your resourses raped and pillaged yet you don't want to be seen as slave-driving, and there's no guarantee the medium is a happy one (it could be UNhappy instead: too high to be comfortable to the business owners and at the same time not high enough to be considered breadwinning).

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Charles 9
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Re: My brain has already drained

Because if you expect to have any customers for your goods, you better make sure people get paid.

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Charles 9
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Re: Translating to:

"were you kidnapped and held at gunpoint and forced to work?"

Being told to work or starve amounts to the same thing. We may pray to be given this day our daily bread, but reality demands we sing for our supper. The problem is that jobs can be considered a resource just like everything else. And when there are twelve people on the island but only six coconuts, no matter how much you try to divide it, things can only get ugly.

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Reg reader casts call centre spell with a SECRET WORD

Charles 9
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Re: Recording illegal???

"How so, when I often hear "Your call may be recorded for your protection, or for training purposes.""

Odds are they're located in a "one party consent" area where only one party has to consent to recording the call to make it legal. Since the recording party is party to the conversation, consent is implied, making the whole recording legal.

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Four of the top 10 places in the world for internet are, er, in the US

Charles 9
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Re: I don't want to pile on...

"I would like to point out to the commentard that inferred the DC ranking was due to investment by the federal government, that is likely not the case (but I won't completely discount it)."

You're ignoring the special case that this is Washington, DC, the nation's capital. This place is practically packed with military contractors and lobby networks, especially around key areas like around the Capitol and along Embassy Row. If the government doesn't roll out the broadband (for its own purposes), then those aforesaid businesses will be calling for serious bandwidth to keep in touch, both with constituents and with Congresspeople. That's why Verizon made sure to make Washington FiOS territory. Plus there's the matter of the Pentagon and related military facilities in nearby Arlington, and the military these days is going to be data-hungry.

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It's nuts but 'shared' is still shorthand for 'worthless'

Charles 9
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Re: The difference with this company is the *sharer* gets a piece of the profit

"But sharing (or as it's know in business teamwork) is not really taught very well at most level to the extent people really practice it and get comfortable with it."

Because the business world is increasingly becoming zero-sum. You know all the work adages: everyone gets the blame, but only the top man gets the credit. In a "it's you or him for the raise/promotion/whatever" kind of world, teaming up is just as likely to get you a knife in the back as praise from the higher-ups.

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Charles 9
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Re: "Shared ownership is hell"

"Gifts, favors, BSD-style licenses -- that's the way to do it: no-strings-attached sharing."

Betrayals, backstabs, behind-the-back fingers-crossed double-crosses. That's why they're not considered prudent in most of today's society.

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How one developer just broke Node, Babel and thousands of projects in 11 lines of JavaScript

Charles 9
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Re: Good.

"Postquam Post Scriptum".

But for the record, PSS can be valid, too (as it would mean "Post Super Scriptum").

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Charles 9
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Re: Timing

" it's more about perceived good will in the brand and whether the brands could be confused."

Classic example I put up. The name "Cracker Barrel" has at least TWO non-conflicting registered trademarks (meaning the government has looked at them and agreed they're non-conflicting): one belongs to Kraft for a brand line of cheeses, the other belongs to a restaurant chain with an old-town theme appropriate for the name.

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Reprogrammble routers axed by TP-Link as FCC bans custom firmware

Charles 9
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Probably because the way it's designed prevents a selective block. It has to be all or nothing.

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Mystery Kindle update will block readers from books after Wednesday

Charles 9
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Re: I applied the big update to my Mk2 Paperwhite a couple of weeks ago.

Anytime you mess with internal storage, you have to accept the risk of a wipe. It just comes with the territory. It's like trying to rebuild a desk that's full of stuff when the desk is the only place the stuff can be stored. The protected books are returned automatically because those are the ones registered with Amazon. The self-uploaded books they don't know about.

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Charles 9
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Re: It's just a CA update

As someone noted, though, the Kindle reboots multiple times in so doing. Why would this be necessary for a key change unless something else is happening internal to the device?

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Charles 9
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Another likely reason for multiple rebooting may have to do with changing internal storage (perhaps encrypting or re-encrypting it), which would require at least one reboot to go into a maintenance mode so as to do it to the internal store in situ (in case there's not enough room to do it less-destructively) plus change the encrypted filesystem parameters to reflect this, then reboot into the new encrypted filesystem to continue the update.

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Charles 9
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Re: tin foil hats required

Which doesn't help too well if the text has strange formatting. Plus in order to do a plain text search, you need excerpts from the "forbidden publications" themselves, meaning the fuzz will be caught in an entrapment situation by holding excerpts of forbidden material themselves in order to search for more forbidden material.

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Charles 9
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Re: Non-cloudy thinking

"Yes, Amazon Kindle could just choose to block your access to books that you've already paid for.

If they wanted to wipe out all reputation, goodwill, trust and destroy their business overnight."

Didn't you read about the whole Nineteen Eighty-Four copies being wiped from Kindles without explanation? I know, ironic, but it actually happened (and as you can see, El Reg itself covered it).

Funny thing. Amazon's still kicking. Plus what if something permanent were to happen to Amazon? All reputation, goodwill, and trust would vanish if Amazon itself disappeared (and given the pace of technology, stranger things have happened, like the #2 bookseller in America suddenly up and closing).

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Charles 9
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Not if there's multiple keys and they need to check them one at a time, each one requiring a reboot.

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Charles 9
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Re: tin foil hats required

How does that help when people import their own e-books (not guaranteed to match any signatures)?

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Charles 9
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Re: OTA vs USB

Plus remember, some people with tablets and e-readers don't have computers.

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Charles 9
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Re: Non-cloudy thinking

"Yeah, I love having my precious collection all on a single point of failure."

Is it really that hard to keep your book collection in two separate locations so that one's ready in case the other fails? I do that for my multi-TB media collection using two hard drives, plus I use parity archiving to deal with bit rot.

Given 32GB MicroSDs can be hard pretty cheap these days, I don't see any problem with having two of them.

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FBI backs down against Apple: Feds may be able to crack killer's iPhone without iGiant's help

Charles 9
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Re: if they crack it

They don't have to. Countermeasures have already been introduced in the 5S onwards. It's just that this particular model, a 5C, predates them.

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Charles 9
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Re: taxi

Then you reply that the cash you have he can't readily handle. I was about to say the smallest you have is a hundred, but a Jersey cabbie would probably be able to handle it, so perhaps say you have foreign cash. Now you force the cabbie to declare he lied and that his card reader works or force him to waste time (and lose perhaps another fare) driving you back.

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Charles 9
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I wonder if the FBI backing down had to do with this little discovery. Since the exploit is publicly disclosed, the FBI can't deny it, and since it affects all iPhones to date (as the patch has not yet been released), the FBI also can't deny being able to use the exploit to get into the phone's data. So they're kinda caught in a blatant lie, meaning it's now extremely unlikely the court will grant the motion, seeing as necessity (meaning a lack of alternatives) is generally required to get such a motion granted.

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Charles 9
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Re: precedent

"That can't be. They changed the iCloud password, then for the phone to sync the password has to be entered again from the phone. Can't change the iCloud password back and make the iPhone happy."

Are you sure? If the iCloud account's password is changed back to the original password, the one the phone itself is synced against, how will it be able to tell the difference?

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iOS flaw exploited to decrypt iMessages, access iThing photos

Charles 9
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Re: FBI presumably salivating

And would you look at that? The FBI's actually backing off! Seems the revelation of this new exploit crumbled the foundation of their case since it's now proven they don't need Apple's help to get into the phone, and by law you can't compel something when an alternative is available (necessity is required).

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Charles 9
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Re: The tinfoil hats are strong with these ones.

"Yes, they do want a legal back door. But they want it because access is (1) physically impossible, (2) prohibitively expensive or, if you're ultra paranoid, (3) they don't want to reveal the technique they are using."

Well, the article says that, according to these researchers, (1) doesn't apply (it's proven possible), (2) is unlikely (though it takes state-class resources, it's unlikely to be too costly for a state), and (3) is moot (the secret's already out).

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Charles 9
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Re: Nation-state?

Just because you discover it's possible doesn't mean you have the resources to actually pull it off. Think "Traveling Salesman Problem". Simple to describe, utter nightmare to implement.

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Charles 9
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No, it's just they don't WANT to break it physically. They're trying to mandate a legal backdoor by judicial precedent.

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Charles 9
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Many people have trouble remembering more than a few of those numbers at a time. That's why we keep directories. If we're forced to remember a long PIN, we're likely to forget something else.

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Charles 9
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Physical access can break ANYTHING open since they can just use side-channel attacks coming from things like EMR to deduce whatever secret is needed. Worst comes to worst, they can decap the chip physically (defeating any booby-traps along the way). That's why they say that physical access = Game Over.

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'Contractual barriers' behind geo-blocking could breach EU rules

Charles 9
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Geo-locking of video is usually on the basis of sub-licensing. Different companies can license the content for distribution in their individual regions, and the companies and regions can't (and for practical reasons usually don't) cross. Whoever can show or sell the video in Europe is usually different from the one that sells it in America and different from the one that sells it in Australia/Oceania, and so on.

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Boffins find a way to put your facial expression on Donald Trump's mug

Charles 9
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Re: I hope it's *main* result will be to teach people to believe *nothing* digital

"Because without very strong audit trail and encryption anything you see or hear could be faked."

What makes you think the audit trail and encryption can't be faked, too, if they REALLY want you?

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How Microsoft copied malware techniques to make Get Windows 10 the world's PC pest

Charles 9
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What about EXISTING employees? Especially those ABOVE you?

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