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* Posts by Charles 9

3696 posts • joined 10 Jun 2009

Premier League wants to PURGE ALL FOOTIE GIFs from social media

Charles 9
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"Will the FA employ Drones to spot all those malcontented Glassholes?"

Forget them. They already make "live shades" that woud've made Spider Jerusalem jealous. 4 GB+, can do video (many at 720p30), MicroSD, Bluetooth-capable, AND they look completely like ordinary glasses. Add a pair of prescription lenses and you have a perfect disguise that no one can force you to take off (since the prescription renders the glasses medically necessary).

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It's time for PGP to die, says ... no, not the NSA – a US crypto prof

Charles 9
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Re: Not saying PGP is perfect

I *tried* to put a certificate into a qr code. It doesn't work, at least not for 2048 bit certificates.

That's odd. 2048 bits should take up only 256 bytes, well within the QR Code limit of 2,953 bytes under ISO 8859-1 encoding. Even if you have to convert it to a text-compatible format, you should still be well within the limit, even counting necessary overhead.

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Who needs hackers? 'Password1' opens a third of all biz doors

Charles 9
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Re: Don't allow retries

One, they can send numerous zombies to simultaneously try the same account, creating a race condition. Two, many brute-force efforts come AFTER they purloin the shadow files (analogue: they take the still-closed safe with them) at which point they can crack at it at their leisure.

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Time to move away from Windows 7 ... whoa, whoa, who said anything about Windows 8?

Charles 9
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Re: Just built two W7 computers

"Just built two Ubuntu 12.04 (actually newer than win 7) computers and are already on about EOL it. How are you supposed to keep up?"

Just built as in a few months ago? Why didn't you go for 14.04 which is also an LTS release meaning you're good for three years at least?

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Dolby Atmos is coming home and it sounds amazing

Charles 9
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Despite them being two small holes, there's actually quite a bit of acoustics that goes into your ear. Consider the vibration of your skull as well as the reflections of sound waves down the ear canal. Ever considered how we're able to aurally perceive that something is behind us rather than in front of us, given the two sources can be an equal distance to the ears? Plus, as the article notes, we can also figure out if the sound is above us.

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Password manager LastPass goes titsup: Users LOCKED OUT

Charles 9
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I personally think we need to move beyond passwords. Except that for any possible solution I can think of (my personal favorite concept is two-way unique key exchange per-site per-user which can be performed offline if necessary), there's always a snag: the better fool, so to speak.

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Japanese boffins invent 4.4 TREEELLION frames per second camera

Charles 9
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Re: We're gonna need a bigger hard drive...

But that takes time you don't have. Last I checked, we don't have image processing ICs capable of running in the Terahertz range yet, and this may well requires something operating in petahertz to be able to process images in realtime in trillionths of a second. Anything less than realtime and you have to deal with storage and transfer bandwidth between the camera and storage AND the storage and the processor.

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Americans to be guinea pigs in vast chip-and-PIN security experiment

Charles 9
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Re: to counter mr mugger, you need a panic PIN

They ALREADY counter panic codes with frog marches. They won't let you go until you get the actual cash out of the machine. If you use a panic code, things are liable to get ugly. This also has the advantage that the mugger stays out of the ATM's ever-present eye. I frankly don't know how this can be countered without some unwanted side effect (I was thinking a booth that can only fit one, but what if it jams and locks you in, or you're too fat to fit?).

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High five from AMD: New supercomputer GPU maxes out at 5.07 TFLOPS

Charles 9
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Just curious. I notice some of the GPUs experience a 1:4 performance penalty when going from single- to double-precision, but many (bot notably not all) of the AMD GPUs manage to reduce the penalty to 1:2. Can anyone explain how they do this and why it isn't consistent across the board (unlike nVidia, whose GPUs seem to be consistently 1:4)?

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Verizon to FCC: What ya looking at? Everyone throttles internet traffic

Charles 9
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The issue applies to BOTH wired and wireless, though wireless gets hit with this problem harder than wired due to the physical limits of spectrum. The problem is that customers are expecting completely unlimited Internet access, no strings attached, but accounting and physics make fulfilling that exact demand infeasible. So what do you do when the customer expects nothing less while it's impossible for you or anyone else to deliver anything close?

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Charles 9
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Re: guaranteed minimum connection

I think part of the problem is that "guaranteed minimum" speeds would probably looked at with a sneer. IOW, they'd be trusted less than the "unlimited" claims. Let's face it; customers at this point are jaded. It's making the marketing department rather nervous, as they're running out of ways to entice the customers since the same-old stops working after a while. Meanwhile, accounting pushed back by reminding them that the uplinks costs are metered. I see it like this: how do you make a satisfactory sweet dish for a person who has no sweet spot in their tastebuds?

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Charles 9
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Re: Unlimited

And why hasn't this been challenged on the basis of false advertising (and I'm of the opinion that ANY advertisement should contain nothing but the truth, the WHOLE truth, and NOTHING BUT the truth)?

Put this way, since trunk Internet access is always metered, it would be considered fiscally unsound, and therefore unreasonable, to offer consumer Internet service that is actually unlimited (since in the long run that would be a money sink). Therefore, advertising unlimited Internet of any kind should be considered illegal false advertising.

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HGST brings PCM to flash show, STUNS world+dog with 3 MILLION IOPS

Charles 9
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Re: As much as I agree it's not flash

Perhaps, though if you're gonna crash such a party, you'd hope to bring something a little more surprising (you know, a "this changes everything" surprise). The read numbers are good but the write rates...plus there's the question of longevity, which is another issue with Flash RAM, especially with longer times and higher activities.

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BAD VIBES: High-speed video camera records your voice from trash

Charles 9
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Re: Laser eavesdropping

That and the windows can also vibrate from the walls which can't be muffled easily.

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Charles 9
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Re: @The last doughnut Er....

Doesn't sound much more difficult than trying to use a shotgun mic, and it has the same issues since both rely on the vibrating window glass. The laser offers greater range, though.

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Charles 9
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Re: Er....

True or not, it's not unheard of, and I'm pretty sure I've heard of a laser being used to detect vibration at some point in the not-too-distant past. If they did, they didn't use a mirror but the glass itself, much like how a shotgun microphone focuses on the acoustic vibrations of the flat window panes.

But here I thought they were trying to recreate the real sounds off old silent cinema (no chance at only 24fps). Silly me...

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NASA tests crazytech flying saucer thruster, could reach Mars in days

Charles 9
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Tactile feedback on a remote-controlled device like that is going to feel pretty awkward, given that, at the least, feedback is going to go through a minimum 6-minute lag (the closest Earth can come to Mars is some bit over 54 million kilometers). As the saying goes, sometimes, the only way to do things right is to get up close and personal.

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Ad biz now has one less excuse to sponsor freetards and filth

Charles 9
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I think they're already doing that with ad-blocker-blockers and hosting the desired content on the same server and system as the ads, thus making it an all-or-nothing proposition.

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Indie ISP to Netflix: Give it a rest about 'net neutrality' – and get your checkbook out

Charles 9
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Re: The Rest of the Story

"2. Transparent caching of Netflix content would be easy to achieve without compromising the content creators' intellectual property. All that is necessary is for the content to be encrypted, with the key sent to the player via a separate secure channel. Then, the cache itself could not be used for piracy. The player, of course, still could -- but this would be true with or without caching."

Hollywood does not believe this to be secure. Even if the content is encrypted with a common key, in order for the content to be transcypted to the subscriber's key, the key must be delivered to the machine at some point. The fear of Hollywood is that someone (an insider, a hacker) can intercept the key inside the machine at some point, because it has to be decrypted at that specific point, allowing for man-in-the-middle piracy. For them, nothing less than end-to-end encryption will suffice, because if the stuff is pirated at the source, the law can concentrate on Netflix, while if it happens at the receiving end, they know where to look as well. This becomes a lot harder with a man in the middle.

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Charles 9
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Re: We should outlaw DRM

The point of the cache network-wise is so that more than one person can access the same content without having to download it twice. This falls apart in the Netflix model because EACH user has a different encryption key, so the same copy delivered to two different users looks different during transit: resulting in a cache miss. And the content owners insist on it being this way end-to-end. They don't want the content transiting in ANY kind of "common" format: even a common encrypted format because, at some point, the content has to be transcrypted to the user's key, and it's there that a man in the middle can pirate the content. So in the end, because of the content owners, caches are useless for the purpose of significantly reducing common traffic because, essentially, NONE of the traffic is common at all, as they ALL pass with different encryption keys.

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Charles 9
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Re: Nearly had me agreeing

"All geek analogies should be based on cars! It's the law!"

NOT when it's a bulk transport analogy. Cars don't fit that analogy as they're not considered a bulk transport vehicle, so it HAS to be lorries. That's law, too. Even the Net Neut debate uses lorries in its diagrams."

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Charles 9
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Re: wireless

The reason it's so bad is that the US is so BIG. Wiring up tiny little Great Britain isn't exactly a picnic, but at least the distances aren't so bad. But in the US, you have people from coast to coast, and unless it's a big city, the ROI just isn't there unless the communities in need can sweeten the deals with exclusivity contracts. For many small communities, it's the price of admission: either bind themselves to contracts or go without. It's like that for other utilities, too, like natural gas, since there's a significant infrastructure investment required just to reach those communities.

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Charles 9
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Given that Netflix tends to aggravate their upstream costs, which are ALWAYS metered, perhaps there's some measure of fairness in it. Even when it comes to shipping physical things, there's some give and take involved. Sometimes, the buyer pays the shipping; other times the supplier eats the costs. Perhaps the next question to ask is whether or not the amount the customer pays between the ISP and Netflix is sufficient to fund all the upstream costs. If it's not sufficient, then the ISP probably has a case to ask for compensation from either end. It's something that has to be hashed out between all parties involved, just as bulk shippers need to cut deals with transport companies.

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Charles 9
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Re: Even the story doesn't seem to make sense.

But what about all the TRAFFIC this thing will generate? Who foots the bill for all the upstream usage?

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Charles 9
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So who foots the bill for all the upstream traffic these things generate when Netflix keeps updating content, according to the article?

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Charles 9
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Re: ISP level caches are surely one of the first things

I think what he was saying is that Netflix won't accept caches due to the copyrights (the owners won't allow stuff in the clear for fear of MITM piracy). The only way is Netflix-controlled servers on site on the ISP's dollar.

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It's official: You can now legally carrier-unlock your mobile in the US

Charles 9
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Re: A glimmer of hope

That's not what's stopping a skateboard maker from doing that. Apple does it now to some degree; it just suffers from "if man can make it, man can make it again" and "patents aren't enforceable across borders". Sometimes, standard screws are just a ton cheaper to use. Other times, it's demanded of the customer. Take the skateboard again. Above a certain level of skill, skateboarders start customizing their boards, which means they will be demanding parts that can be swapped out easily or they won't be buying.

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Charles 9
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Re: It's nice to see people are chipping away on the DMCA

I think the threat's starting to lose its bite. Some countries seem to be threatening to take the "or else" and close relations with the US, meaning they don't care anymore.

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Charles 9
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Re: A glimmer of hope

How about one that guarantees the right of exhaustion in regards to virtual (download-only) software? And prevents software from being leased without a formal written contract (to keep business software leases OK)?

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Stick a 4K in them: Super high-res TVs are DONE

Charles 9
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Re: Stereoscopic?

Static stereoscopes are nothing new. I once viewed a topographical photograph using an old-fashioned stereoscope. Both implements were in the neighborhood of 50 years old. Stereo photography still exists, but it's more of a a specialty field since you need both the stereo camera and some form of stereoscope. TVs are not well-suited for this because of the flicker (which would still exist for still photography).

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Charles 9
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Re: Stereoscopic?

You mean volumetric. I suspect true 3D TV will first appear by borrowing a trick from the CRT days: rapid refresh. The main obstacle to getting a volumetric display done with a spinning LED plane is the refresh rate. To achieve a 30Hz volumetric display with 360 voxels circumferential resolution, the planar elements need to be able to refresh themselves at least 5400 times per second (to cover a 180-degree sweep in 1/30 of a second).

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Charles 9
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For me, it would be an Ethernet port (I wired my house), and not just a good range of ports, but one-button access to all of them. I've seen 4K TVs on display and I felt them to overkill (and this was at point-blank range, too). 3D gives me a headache, so forget that.

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Secure microkernel that uses maths to be 'bug free' goes open source

Charles 9
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Re: Is there a Microsoft parallel to Godwin's Law?

Pehaps that's what we should call it from now on:

Eadon's Law: As an online discussion grows longer, the probability of a comparison involving Microsoft or its executives approaches 1.

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Charles 9
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Re: >Engineers know how to fix things. What do beancounters know?

That's also an urban myth. Army quartermasters themselves have revealed these to just be accounting generalities meant to get paperwork through. Sure, people complain about the $500 hammer, but then there's the $600 jet engine...

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Charles 9
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Re: Still vulnerable to hacking

We don't know for certain they hacked it. Besides, the drone was military tech, so you'd think they'd be using the encrypted military GPS. Cracking military security tech would be a first-order coup and something MANY antagonistic countries would be itching to get, bit Iran's keeping mum, which tells me their method was likely much more prosaic and specific.

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Charles 9
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Re: Technically speaking...

That's due to one of the trade-offs of microkernels: performance.

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Charles 9
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Ever thought they took that into consideration?

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July 14, 2015. Tuesday. No more support for Windows Server 2003. Good luck

Charles 9
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Re: The problem is......

Even when that service provider ceases to exist?

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The Pirate Bay opens mobile site

Charles 9
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Re: Yes, actually, carriers WILL love it

Followed by more complaints hitting the public airwaves and a possible public outcry over unfair billing. Perhaps even offers by competitors to defect.

That said, I will say that the carriers are up against a ceiling here; there's only so much they can send on their little slice of bandwidth, so there will be a breaking point at some point where the carriers either raise the fees universally or start dropping off as the business model becomes less viable.

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Are you broke? Good with electronics? Build a better AC/DC box, get back in black with $1m

Charles 9
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Re: why not

And if the conversion steps go bad?

Whatever happened to Keep It Simple, Stupid?

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Oh girl, you jus' didn't: Level 3 slaps Verizon in Netflix throttle blowup

Charles 9
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Re: More ports is still the wrong answer

So you'd rather have multiple sets of sewage pipes, gas lines, electrical trees, and so on?

Some monopolies come naturally not because of government regulation but because of aesthetics. Sewage, water, electricity, gas, and many other utilities tend to require lots of big, UGLY infrastructure to operate, and this raises NIMBY issues.

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Charles 9
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Re: Monopoly = Artificial Scarcity

It depends on the industry. When it comes to water, sewage, electricity, etc. Multiple providers are a problem because the infrastructure is an eyesore, leading to NIMBY issues. But most communication infrastructure isn't such an eyesore, to the point that two more more sets won't be so ugly.

The problem in this case is that utilities have a very high upfront cost (as in you have to put in all the money to lay down your basic infrastructure before you see one penny of return), making it a barrier of entry that favors incumbents who ALREADY have their infrastructure down (their upfront costs are already sunk).

View it another way, and you see the problem is a case of vertical integration. The incumbents own both the content and the means to distribute it (think rail companies that owned mines and timber forests in the past). Perhaps the most reasonable solution is to force a breakup of this integration. If the content and the transport were forced to operate separately, with the transport required to be an open and equal provider, then newcomers can lease time from the transport to get a foot in the door. That's why MVNOs work: they lease abilities from the big guys and compete by serving customers the mainstream doesn't prefer like the price-conscious.

PS. I think I should note: Verizon doesn't seem to allow MVNOs on its network. Sprint does (Boost, Virgin), as does T-Mobile (SimpleMobile, Family Mobile). AT&T seems to, but there seems to be a catch there as none of the MVNOs are able to undercut AT&T on price.

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NEW, SINISTER web tracking tech fingerprints your computer by making it draw

Charles 9
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And others outright kick you out because they've installed ad-blocker-blockers. And most of them that do host exclusive content, so it's either bend over or go without.

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Carlos: Slim your working week to just three days of toil

Charles 9
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"Its puzzled me for years why we still work all the time with all the automation compared to 100 or even 50 years ago."

It's a combination of the cost of living going up and the value of human labor going down. Kinda like running up the slope of a downhill-running treadmill. You have to work your tush off just to maintain.

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HIDDEN packet sniffer spy tech in MILLIONS of iPhones, iPads – expert

Charles 9
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Re: I suppose

The thing is, it's reaching the point where they don't NEED to hide it anymore. The government is such that no sense of privacy is increasingly the norm, and if you don't like it, you probably won't be doing much good anymore. IOW, by this point, the spooks don't care because they're EVERYWHERE.

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Manic malware Mayhem spreads through Linux, FreeBSD web servers

Charles 9
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Re: Linux and FreeBSD malware spreading?

By using PHP, which could be on the server as part of a LAMP setup. It tests to see if the server can take in files via Remote File Inclusion (the Google file mentioned is just the test). If it works, it uses RFI to insert a PHP plugin, which then gets added to the web server and given the server's permissions (not that it really matters if the plugin contains a privilege escalation).

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Charles 9
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Re: It's all about mitigation

"The thing I don't understand is that if they hard coded 8.8.8.8 as the DNS for finding humans.txt couldn't you just set the hosts file to redirect it as a temporary workaround?"

Doesn't it work the other way around, translating a DNS name to a number? Which means 8.8.8.8 or any other direct IPv4 address gets addressed directly? That's how some ad-blockers work: by assigning 127.0.0.1 (localhost) to all the ad-spewing domain names.

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NASA: Satellite which will END man-made CO2 debate in orbit at last

Charles 9
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Re: Third time lucky ... @Charles9

Ummm.... I'm NOT. I'm trying to put forth a true conundrum for the flat-earthers: one that can be reproduced by normal people (puncuring the conspiracy theories) and TTBOMK is infeasible on a flat earth.

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Meet the 'smallest GPU' for wearable gizmos ... wait, where did it go?

Charles 9
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I don't know how close to accurate most of those claims are, but I suspect the "tile-based" part is entirely accurate. From what I recall of my Dreamcast days, this was a specialty of the PowerVR GPU line.

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Can it be true? That I hold here, in my mortal hand, a nugget of PUREST ... BLACK?

Charles 9
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Re: Old News

And noted the risk could be mitigated with good star charts (to know where the stars were) and a small ship (to minimize occlusion). I think he put them all together in Gray Lensman and introduced a second one in Second Stage Lensman.

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