* Posts by Charles 9

7445 posts • joined 10 Jun 2009

Boffins' 5D laser-based storage tech could keep terabytes forever

Charles 9
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Re: re. voxel

They may be stretching the definition here a little bit, but I can see the point. Each point of data in this design supposedly is a volumetric element, just not of uniform size or orientation (thus the additional two dimensions).

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Charles 9
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Note they also said a specific temperature, so I imagine they physically measured the degree of deformation the substrate experienced during their experiment and extrapolated a point at which the data is too degraded to recover. IOW, it's a number to perhaps take with a pinch of salt but at least they can explain how they came up with it. Plus note the temperature was actually quite high (close to 500K) and nowhere near standard temperature or your average room temperature. As noted, glass is actually extremely stable as long as you don't get it up near the melting point (in fact that why glass is rather brittle--it has no "give").

PS. We've been hearing about holographic crystalline data storage for decades now (add Babylon 5 to the Sci-Fi worlds that make use of it in their fiction), but we've yet to see them actually get out of the lab. The end of the article, though, hopefully paints a different picture. Let's hope we can actually get our hands on this for an archival medium in the near future.

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Charles 9
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Re: Re:1974 film Zardoz

"In a nod to another comment I have made today, he also proposed a space elevator, to reduce the energy required to get into LEO."

At least that idea has a concrete status: Not Possible YET. We've already got a pretty decent idea of the physical characteristics needed to pull it off. We just haven't found or invented a material able to tick all the marks yet.

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Samsung now pushing Marshmallows into the Galaxy S6, Edge

Charles 9
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Re: You can have a single worldwided model that supports all bands

"That's not really true anymore, and it was never an issue of chipset so much as an issue of the discretes like power amplifiers and antenna switches, but Qualcomm sells a solution for this (google qualcomm rf 360)"

I've looked. So far as I know, no one's using it or we'd see a phone that can advertise "compatible with ALL LTE bands worldwide". Since I've yet to see one and given this would be quite a selling point for a globe-hobber, I have to assume something else is getting in the way.

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Charles 9
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Then you end up with something like Stagefright which is a potential total pwnage exploit that means practically EVERY phone is vulnerable, including the ones that are EOL but can still put Google in the hole for the security hole.

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Charles 9
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Re: Which flagships?

Can't. Radio frequencies aren't universal, and they haven't invented the universally tunable cell data chip yet (some physical limitations involved).

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Toshiba rolls out PC-busting monster: 1 terabyte TLC flash SSD

Charles 9
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4 times is still a bit over the top, plus there's the matter of bulk storage needs (where the price shoots up considerably). Get it down to around 2x even at high capacities and then you can declare a sunset on spinning rust (much as getting players below $100US was pretty much the sign that BluRay had overtaken DVD as the movie disc format of choice).

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Charles 9
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One thing's also not noted: the PRICE. Sure in terms of sheer performance SSD's going to eventually overtake spinning rust, but in terms of mass market adoption, they're going to have to do something about the price first, and if similar products are any indication, the prices will be such that anyone outside of an enterprise setting will probably wince.

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Stray electronic-magnetic leaks used to harvest PC crypto keys

Charles 9
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They're working on that part. It's already small enough IIRC that you could stuff it in a box and hide it in a closet somewhere.

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Charles 9
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Point being TEMPEST is such onerous that only the most important of computers are given the treatment. Now, these researchers are saying it can be done ANYWHERE, with inexpensive, not-too-hard-to-conceal equipment, meaning practically nothing is safe. Imagine the effect on business budgets if every single piece of electronics in their firms had to be given TEMPEST-level hardening.

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Charles 9
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Re: White noise jamming

Radio antennae can be made highly directional and highly frequency-selective (like a Yagi), allowing you to zero in on your target with enough precision to penetrate most of the noise.

As for getting enough iterations, just use a commonly-used encrypted target and hit the sniffer each time it's being decrypted (you can hide the device in a box in a closet, maybe).

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Brit spies can legally hack PCs and phones, say Brit spies' overseers

Charles 9
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Re: Good 4 the Goose

Except shortly after, some smarter cookies found a way around the divide and conquer approach: the political party. Not even George Washington (a man who saw this coming, BTW) couldn't avoid being labeled a Federalist while Democratic-Republicans would basically come to rule the roost for the next decade or so. Who cares how many pieces you divide the state if you've got insiders in all the pieces? And since the stakes are so high, someone WILL make the effort to do that. Why do you think the US is so dysfunctional today even with separation of powers? Because people naturally try to collect power, so they naturally try to find ways around barriers. To the point it's now a highly-polarized political landscape that has adopted the "my way or the highway" approach. Compromise has become a four-letter word (and a one-way ticket out of Washington), and those inside feel better to let nothing happen than to give an inch to The Enemy.

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Charles 9
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Re: Re. This is why

"Hint: why are random resource sucking games installed on a new phone in the first place?"

Because the developers are paying the phone manufacturers to do it, meaning it helps defray the cost of the phone, making it more affordable?

Put it this way. Many people aren't prepared to pay the complete, unsubsidized cost of a smartphone without any sponsorships or subscription plans.

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Charles 9
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Re: Now GCHQ has

I think the problem is that the trails eventually run into other states: usually hostile to the West. Police power tends to have its limits when one sovereign state is being stymied by another.

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Charles 9
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Re: It is not the fact that it does which is the issue, it is the code of conduct

And there's really no way to do #3 in a legally binding way due to the state holding ultimate, sovereign authority. IOW no country can be beholden to any other authority and remain sovereign.

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This Android Trojan steals banking creds and wipes your phone

Charles 9
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Re: Darwin is calling

Quote from the article:

"The Mazar BOT Android malware is read using booby-trapped multi-media messages. If installed, the malware gains admin rights that give it the ability to do almost anything with a victim's phone." (Emphasis mine)

Multimedia messages means MMS, and an Android exploit using MMS at this point probably means it's a Stagefright exploit, unless you can point where it says otherwise.

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Charles 9
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Re: Darwin is calling

Ever considered this is a Stagefright-based exploit, meaning the Install dialogue never appears? Instead, the malware rides the MMS straight through to System, gains root permissions, and goes from there all without your knowledge? Remember, many phones are prone to Stagefright AND at EOL meaning they'll never be patched to fix the exploit.

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Earthquake-sensing smartphone app fires off early alerts of disaster

Charles 9
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The Christchurch earthquake wasn't the type that could've provided any practical warning. First, the epicenter of the quake was out to sea, so no one would be there to detect it. Second, it was only 15km offshore, meaning the seismic waves wouldn't have to travel very far. Any Primary/Secondary lag time would be measured in seconds.

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Charles 9
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Re: Done this already

I guess we can consider ourselves fortunate that so few earthquakes are actually centered WITHIN a heavily-populated area because not only would there be no warning at all, not even a P wave because you're at the point they're being generated, but also maximum impact because all the energy's right there.

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31 nations sign data-sharing pact to tax multinationals

Charles 9
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Re: I note that America...

"Not exactly. They are sending their money through tax havens and may be buying US dollars in those tax havens. I very much doubt they are letting their money actually sit in the US.

Even US billionaires don't do that."

Actually, they do, just not as currency. The richest of the richest know the best place for wealth is in real estate, which by its very nature naturally appreciates due to increasing rarity and cannot be taxed as long as it's simply held. When they need money, they borrow against it and then hold the debt until they die when their heirs can employ a trick called the carryover basis to rebase the assets and dodge capital gains taxes when they sell off some of the assets to pay off the inherited debts. I believe they call that "Tax Planning 101".

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The Nano-NAS market is now a femto-flop being eaten by the cloud

Charles 9
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Re: Also: streamed video

Except, like I said, when data caps come into play. Besides, why waste bandwidth more than once. Download the silly thing and watch it as you download, then when you're done hold onto it, offload it so you can watch it again later on, and never have to worry about connections or removal of the piece from the service ever again. If there's one reason to be a multimedia packrat, it's because you never know when your source is going to disappear, and nothing beats local storage (with suitable redundancy) for assuring you have it no matter what.

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Charles 9
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Re: Also: streamed video

Isn't that hampered by low data caps, though?

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Most developers have never seen a successful project

Charles 9
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Re: Again I don't think it's methology

Problem is, real world projects tend to carry the burden of necessary complexity. Suppose you have a project that has to to A which depends on B which depends on both C and D which both depend on E that in turn depends on A. You pretty much get caught in an all-or-nothing situation because of these interrelations, not to mention the increased demand for software security means you MUST take a look at the entire codebase due to the problem of "gestalt" security holes (as in greater than the sum of the parts) that only appear when all the pieces come together. Then you find the bug that requires a change to one piece that cascades onto all the rest.

It's like my challenge to the UNIX program philosophy. How can you "Do One Thing And Do It Well" when your one thing depends on so many other things: not all of which you can expect to cooperate with you?

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Charles 9
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Re: Shiny new object/methodology syndrome

In other words, everyone wants everything yesterday and if you can't promise AND deliver that, they'll find someone else to chuck their money.

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Renewable energy 'simply WON'T WORK': Top Google engineers

Charles 9
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Don't be so sure. Thorium still produces weaponizable Uranium (U-233, I think) in its fuel cycle, and a determined state actor out of options may go through the lengths to extract it.

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Drones are dropping drugs into prisons and the US govt just doesn't know what to do

Charles 9
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Re: alternatively

"Legalize ALL drugs. Evolution in action."

Many drug users don't live in isolation. What are you going to do if there's a resulting rise in widows and orphans? It's like with the divorce dilemma: outlaw divorce and you'll likely see an increase in spousal homicides.

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AdBlock Plus, websites draft peace deal so ads can bypass blockade

Charles 9
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Oh? Tell that to the developer of World of Goo. BTW, if copy protection really was a problem, why is Netflix (which copy-protects its streams IIRC) doing so well, why are BluRay Discs (which are copy-protected) still the go-to medium for movies, and why are the studios adamant about copy protection and a Trusted Path for future 4K movie disc players?

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Charles 9
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Re: The reason for these "peace talks"

"Marketers can trivially bankrupt a developer by tying him up in court - it's been done several times in the past along with gagging orders so the dev can't say who's suing him (or even that he's being sued)."

What about if they run into a dev who employs a canary in a country where one legally cannot be compelled to lie or where being compelled to lie interferes with another law such a fiduciary duty (meaning you create a law versus law situation)?

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Charles 9
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Re: This is getting dumb now...

Doesn't work as well anymore. More ad networks are using the sites themselves as proxies to create All or Nothing situations by making the ads match domains.

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Charles 9
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Re: This is getting dumb now...

"That sounds quite risky, getting drivers from a site that has those kinds of intrusive ads."

But as the saying goes, Take It Or Leave It. And when it's a matter of money...

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Charles 9
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Re: We Prefer

"No, "it pays for the free content you benefit from" isn't an excuse - get funding from reputable sources!!!"

And if none is forthcoming? You either starve yourself or take your stuff off the Internet?

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Charles 9
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Re: This is getting dumb now...

Until you hit an adwall where blocking the ad also blocks the continue button. And before you say, "You don't need it," obscure drivers (not found anywhere else) are often kept behind these kinds of sites, so it's either suffer or go without, and since hardware is involved that means money.

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Charles 9
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Re: Plus Fail?

Won't work. Our metadata is worth more to the ad agencies than the average Net user is willing to pay. Ad agencies thus outbid us every time. Bet pretty soon most of the Internet will be locked behind ad walls, and the decision will come whether or not to go "autistic" and abandon the Internet.

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Put your private parts on display if you want to keep earning a living

Charles 9
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Re: Just unscrew it from the desk and bin it...

How do you unscrew it when it's done with "one-way" screws? WITHOUT getting a bill for tearing up the desk?

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1Gbps quad-antenna mobile broadband chip dives off Qualcomm's drawing board

Charles 9
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Re: Call Me A Crumugeon

"We've maxed out the bandwidth our senses can really use, so there are no more order of magnitude increases in our needs."

I don't think we have. Remember, our eyes are designed to detect changes in images and can do it as quickly as 1/200th of a second according to US Naval research. That's why most people can easily distinguish between a 30fps presentation and a 60fps one. What's to stop going up to 120fps and using 8K imagery that's projected using high-density VR displays put right in front of our eyes (meaning close enough to still see the pixels)?

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Charles 9
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Re: Call Me A Crumugeon

The article notes that one possible use right now would be to create a remote WiFi hotspot (under commercial agreements, I would imagine), in which case you may have 30 or 40 people streaming 4K Netflix at once.

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France joins India in telling Facebook to just Zuck off

Charles 9
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"Including a related word can make them easier to remember. They don't become less secure with extra words, and you won't be using that method if you're a slow typist."

But then you create a mnemonic pattern, and it's been noted that just about ANY mnemonic can be figured out if you get enough info. Plus even this can be too much for some people with really BAD memories.

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Charles 9
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"Using a long sentence of words in some weird order (still much easier to remember)"

Until you have to remember so many of them you start wondering, "Now was it 'correcthorsebatterystaple' or 'rositachiquitajuanitachihuahua'?" At least with messy passwords you more quickly realize you're in over your or any human's head.

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Boffins' gravitational wave detection hat trick blows open astronomy

Charles 9
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Re: Step 1 done - No

"Four detectors are really needed unless each Ligo itself can give some information on the diretcion of the wave."

They may just be able to give an insight on direction because each LIGO structure is two-dimensional (the L-shape mentioned). Plus we don't know how each LIGO structure is oriented relative to each other, which could help in terms of orientation of the detected wave.

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Trane thermostat is a hot spot for viruses on home networks

Charles 9
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Re: not a *real* problem

How can they block ssh when it's an encrypted protocol? Sure, they can block the standard port, but what's to stop a connection to a nonstandard port, or a pushed connection initiated by the device? As for why invade a thermostat, it becomes a beachhead or hideout point for the crooks: like those malwares that keep copies of itself strewn about. Even if the WiFi is changed out, they can use the hideout as a way to establish a new link and just pwn you all over again.

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Charles 9
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Can't. Don't stay home long enough (and don't have enough in the budget) to justify it staying a certain temperature when I'm not around (BTW, many people with irregular schedules also tend to be single, as (potential) spouses tend to get aggravated over such schedules. And since it takes time to get the place warmed up, the ideal solution MUST be one I can trigger when I'm not at home but on the way (which can literally be any time at all, so no scheduling system on Earth would be able to keep up).

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Charles 9
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Re: When is the IoT industry going to get smart on security?

"When is the IoT industry going to get smart on security?"

Probably when someone dies or has their life directly threatened by IoT tech.

Put it this way. The Internet of Things is a lot like the shoe-fitting x-ray machine, radium clock and watch faces, or thalidomide.

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Charles 9
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What if you work irregular hours and don't live your life to a schedule? Meaning you have no F'n clue when you're in or out of your house?

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We're going to use your toothbrush to snoop on you, says US spy boss

Charles 9
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Re: The marketing target has definitely changed

"They're not going to fit it with a mobile connection - too costly, too unreliable"

Amazon's Kindle shows how useful a Whispernet can be, and if they tie the mobile chip to the fridge's basic operation, they'll put you into a dilemma: either bend over or go without. And if EVERY refrigerator comes with this standard and ALL used fridges are mandated to be scrapped (probably under the guise of capturing damaging refrigerants), then it's either Big Brother in the fridge or coolers for the rest of your life...

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Charles 9
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Except you'd probably be too late. I bet they already have the chips in them and the ability to slip their way across any network or whispernet available. The only reason they're going public now is because they know you can't avoid it anymore.

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Charles 9
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Re: I don't see the point of IoT for me

Actually, I compare the IoT more to the shoe-fitting x-ray, the radium clock face, and thalidomide. Remember them?

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Charles 9
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REAL IoT items don't need your network OR permission to work. They can use Whispernets, Powerline networking, and other mesh networking techniques to find a way to exfiltrate their information will ye, nil ye. Heck, next thing you'll know you'll be buying secret network nodes without your knowledge.

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Smart toys spring dumb vulns. Again. This time: Cuddly bears, watches

Charles 9
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"Plus, as the 1000 other sources each tend to varying dobs, good luck finding my actual one."

They'll just go to the one source where they WILL know the true DOB: government websites. There's a lot of identity information that's open to the public for various legal reasons (voter registration checking and so on). I frankly think disguising a date of birth is an exercise in futility given there's already a known true source.

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That's cute, Germany – China shows the world how fusion is done

Charles 9
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Re: Bah!

I recall the energy stored in the Earth's core didn't come from the Sun but rather was captured during its formation.

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Thirty Meter Telescope needs to revisit earthly fine print

Charles 9
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Re: Time to move to La Palma

But what if the goal was to get BOTH high altitude AND a near-equatorial location? La Palma is too far north (28 degrees) while Mauna Kea at only 19 degrees is in the torrid zone. Is a tropical location a requirement for the TMT?

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