* Posts by Charles 9

8590 posts • joined 10 Jun 2009

Windows 10 needs proper privacy portal, says EFF

Charles 9
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Re: MS made me download software...

But there are two key niches of software where the VM isn't helpful: custom hardware (there's no way to virtualize it) and high-performance apps like the latest games (where virtualization creates too big a performance hit).

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Charles 9
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Re: Disk 1 of 2079?

ONLY 2079?

Seems a little slim if you ask me. Amounts to about 3 GB, and it's almost to the point you can't use a DVD as your install medium and need at least an 8GB USB stick.

Make it Disk 1 of 5362 and I think you'll make it more believable. Plus it would evoke quite an image. Just how big is a stack of 5,362 3.5" floppy disks is going to appear?

PS. To the guy who mentioned disk 37/38 failures, I'll go you one better. The failure occurs on disk 37, the drive that's at fault etches the disk, rendering it worthless, and then you find out right then and there that your original disk 37 that you thought was under lock and key somehow got stolen by someone who picked the lock and then sent it to the shredder. Oh, and getting a replacement means getting a whole new set which is $200+ not including shipping which accounting will not cover and takes 6-8 weeks when the deadline's tonight. Good luck.

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Charles 9
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Re: That EFF document is a solid gold reference

"The only thing that will change this merry go round is people voting with their feet. If you dont like it, dont use it. But we know that wont happen in any big numbers. So it is what it is.. and the big companies know it."

It's called a Captive Market. Where are people going to go when the business software, games, and so on, run on only one operating system? It's hard to jump ship when there's no life preservers and no other ships handy to pick you up.

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Charles 9
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Re: MS made me download software...

"Dear Microsoft, what an awesome job you're doing of pushing your customers to upgrade. You've pushed me so hard I'm upgrading to Linux. Brilliant!"

Unfortunately, many people end up crawling back because the software they use everyday doesn't work anywhere BUT Windows (as in it's WINE-incompatible and the like). OS is nothing, it's the apps that influence users' choices.

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Charles 9
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Re: That EFF document is a solid gold reference

Look, unless the EFF can legally force Microsoft to do anything (on pain of losing global revenues or being barred from major markets), you're not going to get Microsoft to do anything. THEY hold the cards in the form of a MUCH larger application market, especially in headliner games that can't be played anywhere else (including Linux, MacOS, OR any console). Unless you can beat those trump cards, Microsoft can sit pretty since for many it's a Hobson's Choice.

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'Daddy, what's a Blu-ray disc?'

Charles 9
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Re: TV show 'How It's Made'...

Hmm? I don't see CD's mentioned on this clip.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lAdxbEQBSAw

Where was it mentioned?

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Charles 9
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Re: Skeevy bastards

Pixel dimensions IS the resolution. You're simply describing the pixel density. Otherwise, why is it that we change display resolution when we go from say 1080p to 720p? Why is a picture file's dimensions described as its resolution?

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Charles 9
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Re: Daddy, what's a strawman?

"In theory AACS already provides that. Disks have unique Volume ID. Except it would require the player to be connected to the interwebs to receive revocation. And CSS has been broken anyway."

They uses a proprietary system, and IIRC certain 4k discs REQUIRE Internet access and say so on the case (the ones that don't, they don't care about too much). Combine this with an industry-standard secure protocol and the odds are they won't break it this time (and to be fair, they've learned, most consoles from the seventh gen on have been very hack-resistant) since breaking those algorithms have more serious implications.

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Charles 9
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Re: Daddy, what's a strawman?

Wait until the discs get serialized and have a shelf life. You know it's going to happen eventually as the publishers want to move everyone to a forced rental model, which will also put an end to the First Sale Doctrine.

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Charles 9
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Re: Skeevy bastards

Resolution actually is an AREA (TWO-dimensional) measurement. Thus why you normally need TWO numbers to describe it properly (width and height or whatever you want to call them). The end result is a PRODUCT telling you the exact number of pixels the screen contains. An UHD does indeed contain exactly four times the number of pixels a 1080p screen does. Simple math will demonstrate. You double each dimension so you multiply each one by two. Multiplication is commutative so you can move each 2x to the side and combine them to get 4x the original resolution. Thus doubling both dimensions quadruples the pixel count (what we could call the resolution, which is always shown as a product).

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Charles 9
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Re: quality..

"Paying for a gaming video card that can do 4k , is an extra dimension of pointlessness . Unless you are playing the game in a CINEMA"

Or are using a very large screen in the traditional position of a computer monitor (just a foot or two away) meaning you can actually see the pixels that close up and being able to discern detail from a longer distance can make a difference in say an FPS where you're in a sniper duel.

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Charles 9
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Re: quality..

"Yup - and if you want you can record that "warmer" sound into flac format (or onto a blank CDR), and you can then listen to an exact reproduction of that "warmer LP sound" wherever you are... you can even close your eyes and pretend that there is spinning vinyl somewhere nearby :)"

Isn't the problem here that you really CAN'T capture the full vinyl range even with FLAC because vinyl is an analog medium and therefore works on a continuous range (it operates over the R set, so to speak) whereas FLAC is digital and therefore has a discrete range (say in the Z set)? Now, Z ⊂ R but R ⊄ Z, meaning there's no physical way to fully duplicate the analog vinyl range on a digital FLAC; the best you can do is get a very close approximation.

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WD: Resistance is not futile

Charles 9
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Re: Promises

"They did actually make real products, but it quickly was surpassed by Flash. It was always too expensive. Certainly clever."

No, I think Bubble memory faded before flash took off. What killed it was that it was both too expensive and too finicky, both in manufacture and in end use, and it ultimately lost to both spinning rust and falling DRAM prices. It had to be literally warmed up to work (thus it made Konami's "Morning Music" famous because it was played during the Bubble System's warmup phase), and it functioned like a strict queue, so you had to dequeue the contents to read it and then remember to requeue it to keep the contents intact.

As for a potential comeback, research "racetrack memory," a related tech.

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Charles 9
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Re: Promises

Forget the jetpacks and flying cars. The big problem with them is simply sheer physics. It actually takes quite a bit of energy to get a body as big as our off the ground and KEEP it up there. That's why you don't see birds as big as ours nor with bones as massive.

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Google's brand new OS could replace Android

Charles 9
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Re: C/C++ vs Rust

If they have coders familiar with the language, maybe. There IS a microkernel OS named Redox OS being coded in Rust, so it is theoretically possible.

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Charles 9
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Re: How does using the Linux kernel prevent Google from distributing Android updates?

"Why would manufacturers be more keen to accept a demand for no proprietary drivers or other binary blobs in the new OS than in Android?"

I think the idea is that if more of these blobs can be moved to Userland, the kernel is easier to update whether they're updated or not. In other words, the kernel doesn't have to be held hostage by patent-protected hardware whose code is only provided in blobs at the manufacturer's pleasure.

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Charles 9
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Re: How does using the Linux kernel prevent Google from distributing Android updates?

"Although it's not settled law, contributing code to the kernel triggers the surrender of enormous amounts of software AND hardware patent rights to Linux and anyone else who wants to use it, thanks to the GPL poison-pill-patent-clause license."

Incorrect. The poison-pill clause only exists in GPLv3, while the kernel by necessity (due to the wide codebase) is still at GPLv2. Anyway, containerization provides a way to safely run proprietary, patented code in an open kernel without surrendering patent protections.

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Charles 9
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Re: Fuchsia

Until it can run Crysis (3), it'll be a nonstarter as a Windows-killer. Games remain a killer app there.

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PGP admins: Kill short keys now, or Alice will become Chuck

Charles 9
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Re: Convenience is never better than security.

Like I said, unless the neighborhood necessitates it. If the entire neighborhood has burglar bars, either there's a code requirement, or pretty much the whole neighborhood is high-crime, thus it becomes a case of not being an idiot and painting a bullseye on your wall. The house value drops because of the crime, not because of the bars.

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Charles 9
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Convenience is never better than security.

Incorrect. Convenience TRUMPS security because if it isn't convenient enough, people won't use it. That's always been the problem with PGP: it's not convenient enough for ordinary people to use. That's why we settle for dead bolts on the front door and normally don't bother with burglar bars on the windows unless the neighborhood necessitates it.

Security is only useful if people are willing to actually USE it.

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He's a p0wnball Wizard, and he's twisted one Ubuntu-powered game

Charles 9
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Re: I can't see much scope for exploits

That's the thing. Most of the machines that use tokens are at least partially mechanical and count the coins in the standard way by magnetic flux detection. The card readers are separate devices and tend to have anti-tampering safeguards in them. And as you said, the machine in question is a pinball machine which is played strictly for leisure: these don't award tickets.

Come to think of it, I don't think there IS a pinball machine at my local D&B, anyway.

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Charles 9
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Re: I can't see much scope for exploits

Dave & Busters doesn't even use tokens anymore unless it's by design (like those "over the ledge" ones). Everything (even the part where you get ten tokens for those machines) is done by prepaid cards.

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So what's the internet community doing about the NSA cracking VPN, HTTPS encryption?

Charles 9
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Re: Who is that sending?

"Solving that problem is a great deal harder, and it's the reason we have to deal with the ugly solution of SSL certification authorities."

But the problem here is that we know know Trent is being subverted. So how do Alice and Bob attest each other without a trusted third party available?

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Charles 9
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Re: Shor's algorithm

They're working on post-Quantum algorithms using lattices and so on. Thing is, most of them have holes in them.

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Google AdSense abused to distribute Android spyware

Charles 9
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Re: The gift that keeps on giving

2) I recall CNN got hit with a drive-by in the past, so it HAS happened.

3) For many the Internet is like the telephone was: an essential point of contact with your line of work and so on. Basically, unplugging means Walking On The Sun.

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Charles 9
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Re: Liability for this sites with the web site owner!

"Personally I would rather have an internet with no advertising and if some sites go to the wall so be it."

Even if one of those sites was your one and only favorite hobby site? And before you say another will pop up, why hasn't that happened for Kickass yet?

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Charles 9
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Re: @AC

So you see, put this (or another Towelroot-like exploit, a KNOWN silent install) together with Quadrooter (many phones out there use Qualcomm SoC) and you've got a very dangerous situation here, especially since the bulk of the vulnerable devices out there are EoL and made by companies out of the reach of any law enforcement who cares.

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Charles 9
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"Don't you muppets realise the most click ads are the most simple (Google & Bing search results), not some 50mb video with some shite music blaring out, all because I had the nerve to scroll down the page."

They do. They also know they don't get clicked as people get numbed to them. It's been that way for over 100 years, as E. E. Smith even wrote about it in First Lensman, which dates back to WW2. It's hard to get through to a jaded mind, but it's their job.

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Charles 9
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Re: Sue, sue and sue again

Then it'll never happen, simply because many of the firms have become transnational, meaning they can pit sovereignty against nations that want to interfere.

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Charles 9
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Re: no additional clicks

Maybe it really IS a "silent install" trojan, which could then use that other exploit mentioned last week or so to elevate to root and wreak havoc.

Do we have an indications this is a silent install?

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You say I mustn’t write down my password? Let me make a note of that

Charles 9
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Re: password manager

"I only remember my master and SSO password"

But what if someone manages to steal THAT password?

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ISPs face piracy sue-balls

Charles 9
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Re: Relax kids

But we're talking servers placed in non-American countries. Doesn't the word "sovereignty" tend to get in the way here?

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Charles 9
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Re: Relax kids

If KA was complying, why were they raided and taken down?

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Adblock Plus blocks Facebook's ad-blocker buster: It's a block party!

Charles 9
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Re: If you want to use Facebook with control over content

Bet you soon you won't be able to use that without blocking actual content, too.

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Charles 9
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Re: Where's the off switch?

Such a solution already exists. However, the problem with community-based solutions is that they expose the OTHER costs of keeping up systems like Facebook. In this case, you get hit with bandwidth usage.

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Charles 9
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Re: Don't forget 'connected' TV's

"It's connected to mains and an aerial. Both are strictly one way."

BZZZT! You've never heard of powerline networking, have you? And yes, they have ways to send them down upstream power lines, last I heard. The bandwidth is the pits right now, but that's all you need for demographics data.

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Charles 9
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Re: arms race

"There were multiple communication channels in existence on the net years before Facebook came along to monetise it. They are still viable. If Facebook and the online advertising industry were both to disappear from this Earth today people would still communicate."

In the years before Facebook, the post was cheap enough to be useable. Not anymore. Now, like I said, it's Facebook or Bust.

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Charles 9
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Ad blockers can be tuned more precisely, allowing you to handle the situation where the ad server and the content server are the same.

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Charles 9
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And if you're looking for something where an ad for it just happened to be on the TV before, you will unconsciously leap to that one first because it's the freshest instance of what you're looking for on your mind. That's the true magic of ads; they affect you subconsciously, lodging in your memory so that when the time does come for something of the sort, it automatically registers because it's exploiting the way our brains work.

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Nobody expects... a surprise haemorrhoid operation

Charles 9
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Re: *urph*

"Had to show that to get wee bugger out of the nursery, and a couple of times security asked to see our bands whilst I was wandering about the horsepistol with him in the snugli."

Blame that on too many instances of baby-snatching, some of them by women who could swear up and down (and pass a polygraph in so doing) that the baby is hers even when the DNA tests don't match.

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Charles 9
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They'd probably have to write it off. The traveler will likely never be in a position to pay, and all remaining parties can cite legal protection or sovereignty.

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Air gap breached by disk drive noise

Charles 9
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But still, I wouldn't really start worrying until someone found a way to make an airgapped computer exfiltrate data without installing anything in it first, allowing it to work on a pristine or even read-only boot image.

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Adblock Plus blocks Facebook block of Adblock Plus block of Facebook block of Adblock Plus block of Facebook ads

Charles 9
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Re: I find the best way to avoid adverts on Farcebook...

"If you want to get in touch with me, get a phone, pay a visit, send an owl, send an email. I see no need to enrich someone else with my personal data just to allow another communications channel."

Bad reception, can't afford it, can't afford it. And he's practically my only immediate family, so while YOU may be willing to disown your family over demographics, I'm not. Family comes first.

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Charles 9
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Re: I find the best way to avoid adverts on Farcebook...

"The answer is in the excerpt.... feature phone."

You didn't read the whole thing. I mentioned shoddy reception. At least Facebook is a lot like SMS: it works opportunistically (and BTW, SMS costs more than Facebook over there). And compared to back home, we get off light with advertising. Ads over there are everywhere: printed on tarps, plastered on any wall where there's space, legal or not.

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Charles 9
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Re: I find the best way to avoid adverts on Farcebook...

"Someone important only has FarceBook? Which institution do they come from?"

Countries where Facebook is free and loaded on to feature phones there while the Internet (including e-mail and all that) is at a premium. Yes, it really exists; try going to some of the less opulent places in southeast Asia.

As for cutting them off, that's kinda harsh for a member of your immediate family (not to mention culturally improper over there).

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Charles 9
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Re: I find the best way to avoid adverts on Farcebook...

"...is to not use Farcebook."

And what if the only point of contact you have with someone important (like a member of your family) is through Farcebook because they don't have e-mail or a reliable telephone?

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Hilton hotels' email so much like phishing it fooled its own techies

Charles 9
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Re: Newegg

This sounds like the reverse in this case. Someone's probably trying to establish an account in your name and used your e-mail address. Perhaps you should contact newegg and tell them you didn't create this account and that someone could be trying to usurp your online identity. Meaning you should start snooping around your contact details.

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Bungling Microsoft singlehandedly proves that golden backdoor keys are a terrible idea

Charles 9
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Re: Securer boot

You know that's over a year old, and the Win10 free update year has run out since then yet we haven't heard complaints about Win10 systems that are impossible to downgrade because of something like this (they can create keys that work with Win10 ONLY, you know?). Sounds like something that was backpedaled before release.

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Charles 9
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Re: "Security of Everyone" - WTF?

"Like encrypting all your files, plus all your backups if they're in an accessible disk or network drive, and then demanding bitcoins."

Nuke from orbit and then restore from an OFFLINE backup. Is it really that hard?

Some boot/EFI malwares, however, can SURVIVE a nuking.

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If you use ‘smart’ Bluetooth locks, you're asking to be burgled

Charles 9
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Re: Masterlock: keeping standards as low as possible

And if someone happens to walk up and ask what the **** they're doing?

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