* Posts by Charles 9

6382 posts • joined 10 Jun 2009

Just ONE THOUSAND times BETTER than FLASH! Intel, Micron's amazing claim

Charles 9
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Re: hmm

"I'd heard that memristor from HP/Hynix was a done deal, simply waiting for market conditions to be right. Never sell your best if you can sell your old product line for a while longer...."

That's a fair strategy for evolutionary tech where the competition can choose to leapfrog you and go two steps ahead instead. Not so for revolutionary tech that can result in a paradigm shift, meaning your existing tech can be obsoleted cutting off your revenues. In the latter case, who dares wins since they gain the critical advantage of the first mover. If the market develops to be such that it can't support a lot of suppliers, you definitely don't want to be left behind.

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Got an Android phone? SMASH IT with a hammer – and do it NOW

Charles 9
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Re: Bloody tools

"This is the 21st century and we're talking about mobile devices right? Why don't you just use the hardware-implemented codecs on the hardware (via the SDKs)? I can play real time video on my phone's browser, or from within an app, without having to get my hands dirty writing c++ codecs."

Because time marches on. Codecs get improvements and eventually get replaced with entirely new ones. Hardware H.264 can have trouble when handling bleeding-edge video files that push the codec to its limits. And they're absolutely worthless for the new wave of H.265 video.

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Charles 9
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Re: Bloody tools

"Most of Android is built in Java,not c++."

Except performance-intensive stuff IS native-coded. And multimedia stuff tends to fall into that category: especially anything involving video. And even my S4 (also a quad at nearly 2GHz per along with a good mobile GPU chip) has difficulty doing 1080p H.264 video with subtitles (not starting with H.265). A 10% hit can mean the difference between a decent enough playback and one too herky-jerky to be satisfactory. And most consumers think opposite to you. "Screw security; I just wanna get stuff done!" Meaning you're outvoted.

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Charles 9
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Re: Great

I think the S4 is still on the Lollipop list, so it could still be updated.

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Charles 9
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Re: What?

It's referring to the Multimedia Messaage System (MMS), which uses the Simple Message System (SMS) as a conduit to enable phone users to pass multimedia attachments around. Think of it like a form of e-mail attachment. The text is sent that contains information for the phone to know where to connect to download the actual file.

Where the problem lies is that Android, like many other smartphones, tries to go one step ahead of you so you don't get frustrated in waiting. They pick up the attachment ahead of time after it receives the text, sets it up for you to see, and THAT'S where the exploit lies.

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Charles 9
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"Some thought would be need to given to older hardware which is no longer able to support the latest version of an OS. Backporting will only work so for so long. Might have to introduce official restrictions on older hardware."

And then you'll be playing right into the paranoid's hand since they figure old hardware is the only way to prevent Big Brother from watching you.

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Charles 9
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Re: filter at the telco level?

Not to mention that would make the ISPs legally liable and culpable for the content. IOW, they can now be sued or even charged criminally for not policing their network if they exploit the capability.

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Xen reports new guest-host escape, this time through CD-ROMs

Charles 9
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ANOTHER Redpill? And there are those who said a Redpill was trickier to accomplish...

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Today's smart home devices are too dumb to succeed

Charles 9
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"I can't see the problem with manufacturers doing that, they make their money on the hardware (especially the hub/gateway)."

And therein lies the problem. They want it to be THEIR hub in charge of the house, so the manufacturers don't want to cooperate with each other, lest they're considered Giving Information To The Enemy. Basically put, the competition is cut-throat. If they can't win, they'd rather NO ONE win since that means back to the status quo where they were actually doing all right.

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Charles 9
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"Ideally, there needs to be cross compatibility and standards (such as what they did with DLNA), otherwise you're going to get many different eco-systems, all with incompatible peripherals, meaning you will forever be locked into an individual companies IoT project."

I think that's the entire point. There can be only one in this case, so everyone's fighting to be the one hub to rule them all.

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Charles 9
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Re: The white light explained

That was exactly what I was thinking. You should be able to design a circuit that can recognize a "blink" off then quickly back on and see this as a safety signal and switch full white. Then a normal cycle takes it right back to the last known state before then.

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Charles 9
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Re: Some good points made

"Is a unified, extensible, open protocol too much to ask?"

HELL YEAH it's too much to ask because ALL the companies know to control the hub is to control the home. IOW, they're in such intense mutual competition that cooperation is out of the question. As the saying goes, there can be only one. The game is zero-sum here, so the companies are trying to be the ones who can control everyone else. Most likely scenarios will be (1) an outside who ONLY makes control units figures out how to control everyone else in spite of different protocols and becomes the king of the house or (2) the whole mess collapses in a stew of incompatible standards and consumer disgust over the whole thing.

PS. As for the whole smart light thing, I don't see the point of it myself for general use. I like to have real set-it-and-forget-it lights that I can just stick in and leave for a year or three. Controllable lights like this I'd reserve for specialist purposes like presentation lighting.

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Happy 30th anniversary, Tengen! Your anti-DRM NES chip fought the law, and the law won

Charles 9
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Re: Reverse Historical Engineering

Several manufacturers like Color Dreams IIRC charge-pumped the CiC, allowing them to release unlicensed games. Meanwhile, the Game Genie used a piggyback technique to slip through. However, some models that appeared just before the top-loaders had diodes to defend against charge pumps.

Tengen's reverse-engineered chip, BTW, was codenamed "Rabbit".

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Charles 9
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Re: They didnt want crap titles?

LJN was just a second NES label for Acclaim, an already-registered company. Much as Ultra Games was Konami's second NES label.

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Charles 9
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Re: Cut the reset pin and wire to a switch?

Just get one of the late-model top-loading units. IIRC they removed the CiC from them. There are also the aftermarket players that came about after Ninty's patent protections ran out. Since the NES has been studied top to bottom for such a long time support is quite extensive even by third parties.

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Boffins' audacious plan to blow up aircraft foiled by bomb-proof bag

Charles 9
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Meh

Blast containment in general, bully. Having better control over explosives is generally a Good Thing.

Now, the other aspects of what's being described in the article? Mixed feelings.

The testing sound like it has potential, but I still get the feeling it could still stand a few scenario tests. Just how was the Fly Bag tested? Under what conditions? It will help to see if more parameters need to be considered like perhaps a positive-pressure hold (to better simulate an in-to-out pressure differential that would occur while in-flight).

And the consortium wanting the bags to be mandatory? Hold your horses. Let's make sure we get this right first.

Meanwhile, this'll do diddly for the current preferred bomb technique: carry-on or wear-on explosives. Who's betting the next plane is bombed out of the sky courtesy of a kinky woman who pulls out a dildo bomb while in the toilet?

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Hardcore creationist finds 60-million-year-old fossils in backyard ... 'No, it hasn’t changed my mind about the Bible'

Charles 9
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Re: From a proud Bible thumper

Dorfl: "I Don't Call That Much Of An Argument."

// obligatory Discworld reference.

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YOU! DEGRASSE! It's time to make Pluto a proper planet again, says NASA boffin

Charles 9
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Re: Nomen est omen

The same problem exists with nuts. From a culinary perspective, it's an edible seed, but from a botanical perspective, nuts are a specific kind of edible seed that grows on trees and has no outer flesh, among other qualifications. Thus you end up with culinary nuts that aren't botanical nuts, like almonds and pistachios (drupes: they have outer flesh so are really the single large "pit" of a fruit) and peanuts (legumes: it's the "pea" part that is botanically accurate) and cashews (straight seeds of a fruit, not to mention toxic in raw form).

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Charles 9
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Re: They were correct

There's still the matter of Eris, which is supposed to be larger than Pluto.

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Charles 9
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Re: Purely physical critera

By those qualifications, though, we could end up jumping from eight to TEN planets. Recall the article mentioned Eris, which is larger than Pluto and just as round. Meaning in terms of size and roundness, if Pluto qualifies, so does Eris. About the only question mark with it is geologic activity. The probe has shown Pluto is geologically active, but we don't know the same for Eris.

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Charles 9
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Re: not a dwarf, its a PORG

Well, it's a whole lot less offensive than "midget". Given the choice between the two, someone in such a position would probably prefer the term "dwarf," as there's enough etymology behind it to make it more neutral, especially since the term "dwarfism" is already in the medical textbooks, lending it more neutrality via the clinical definition.

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Charles 9
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Re: Nomen est omen

The thing is, when it comes to science, precision matters. Science MUST be pedantic or mistakes linger. Once upon a time, the Church taught that the Earth was the center of everything; everything had to change then, too, didn't it?

That's why botanists distinctly classify the tomato as a fruit (more specifically, a berry like its cousin nightshade). Now the debate about Pluto continues with the thought of a new reason to classify: geologic activity. I mean, are there other Kuiper Belt Objects with atmospheres and active geology and so on? Is Erin geologically active, for example? Let the debate rage, I say. If textbooks have to be changed, then that's the price of progress. Is it worse to correct a big mistake than to let people live in incorrect ignorance?

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Driverless cars banished to fake Michigan 'town' until they learn to read

Charles 9
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Re: Flat Earth...

"Oh, and you can't get heavier than air objects to fly. And super-sonic speeds, never. As for instant global communications, no way. And you can't get computer controlled cars to go about without killing everyone...."

Well, we know SOME things are physically impossible such as a deterministic infinite loop detector.

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Charles 9
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Re: Flat Earth...

Well, we could make a flying car right now if we wanted them. We've had working prototypes since the 1990s. The reality check for the flying car is the same one that did in the Concorde: practicality. Not to mention Murphy's Law combined with plain old gravity.

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Charles 9
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Re: Microworld ghetto

I studied AI some in college once, so I'm curious to see perhaps an example of how trying to simplify things makes it impossible to bring the complications back in later on.

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Charles 9
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Re: Microworld ghetto

"The problem with microworlds is that systems developed in them tended to work brilliantly in the microworld, but when you tried to graduate those systems to more complex environments their performance tended to fall apart."

I would think BOTH approaches have their merits. After all, isn't it said a bird has to learn to stand before it can learn to fly? Why do Microworlds fail? Is it because the parameters don't take enough things into consideration or is it because the jump between graduations is too great? I mean, OK so you start by making sure the car works on an ideal world, then you start adding imperfections and make sure the car can compensate for those and work up from there. Why do you say this approach doesn't work?

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Charles 9
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Re: Scotland?

It depends on where in America you drive. It's a big place. Cruising through the plains states will be a cakewalk, yes, but the Google cars are currently road-testing in California, which has plenty of potential for crazy driving. Consider Los Angeles or San Francisco during rush hour.

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Charles 9
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Re: Finally...

IS the car really paying attention in all directions at once? That's important. Suppose a passing car splashes a puddle and blinds the front camera just as the branch comes down. In a situation such as this, testing for liminality is important.

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Charles 9
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Re: Feels they should decouple their tests

No virtual test can ever give truly accurate results of something mechanical in the real world. There are simply too many variables. It's like with war; eventually, you just have to put rubber on the road to get reliable results.

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Charles 9
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Re: Finally...

If the disasters truly were impossible to detect, such as the bridge collapsing while you're on it, then you're screwed either way. Where the big question mark is when something potentially avoidable occurs with scant warning from an unusual direction, say from above (a large tree branch suddenly falls on the road, for example), and options are limited (say there are cars behind and to the side). The test track would be a good place to test the limits of machine perception, but the tests themselves need to be able to put machine perception to the test accordingly. They have the setting; they still need the parameters.

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Crazy Chrysler security hole: USB stick fix incoming for 1.4 million cars

Charles 9
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Re: Muppets

Nice thought. All this over a typo...

PS. I personally preferred Laser Zone to AMC.

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Charles 9
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"If they can do this, then why can't Chrysler do an over the air update?"

Because the OTA channel is not secure. There's a risk of an OTA update getting hijacked.

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Charles 9
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Re: supply and demand

But Big Auto has Congress's ear. Trying making them enact more regulations usually takes an overwhelming consumer pushback.

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Charles 9
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Re: Dangerous incompetence

The only people in a real position to force a change are the buyers (government can be bought off). But barring a total disaster, most of them are too clueless to care.

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Charles 9
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So then how do you get someone completely computer-illiterate and isolated to update their car when a critical issue comes up? They can't do it themselves and are out of the loop so wouldn't know to go to the dealer.

BTW, that USB port can be a security issue in itself. Even with some kind of signature check, what happens when their private key gets compromised?

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Charles 9
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Re: Grounds for a gross negligence charge?

Was Toyota slapped with gross negligence for its Prius issues? If not, don't expect Chrysler to get charged here. And like I said before, it's hard to pin executives of a company for company troubles; AFAIK, executives only get nailed on personal matters.

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Charles 9
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Re: Muppets

No, watch how seriously Chrysler dodges the issue. Remember, executives have the ability to pin spacegoats. They can also lobby Congress and employ their international connections to dodge the charge. The only way Chrysler will pay attention is if there is a public backlash so great that people simply stop buying anything from the conglomerate. For example, if police cancel squad car contracts from Chrysler and switch to GM or Ford cars instead, then that means big money going away.

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ZOMBIE Commodore PET lurches out of its 1970s grave – as a FONDLESLAB

Charles 9
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Re: Xperia Play II...

Have you tried those gamepads that include spring-loaded cradles to hold your phone in place? With something like that, phone and controller can be handled like one piece.

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NIST in suspected 'meth lab' blast: US Congress is demanding answers

Charles 9
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Re: "NIST Police and Fire Departments"

""The place is so large it has its own resident herd of deer..."

The place doesn't necessarily have to be very large: just with plenty of forest which is their natural habitat. The base near where I live also has a resident herd which you can sometime see in the trees past the security fence.

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Charles 9
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Re: Desperate.

And what was wrong with using phenylephrine, which is sold in the OTC decongestants today?

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Charles 9
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1) It's not especially difficult if you exhibit laboratory levels of control and discipline. Most illicit drug manufacturers don't have that level of patience.

2) They turned to pseudoephedrine because actual ephedrine (which they turned to first) became more tightly controlled than a miser's purse: not just because of meth but also due to bad press it got from being used by athletes (combined with some deaths related to the herbal ephedra which contains ephedrine).

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Charles 9
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Re: proper lab protocol...

"He's not blind due to ethanol being an antidote for methanol poisoning. "

I guess you haven't read the Depression-era stories of moonshiners getting blind or even dying due to drinking the "foreshots" that came out of their illicit stills. Moonshining with plant-based sugars mean you usually have to discard the first few ounces of the distillate (the "foreshot") which contain most of the methanol not to mention other toxic byproducts.

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Charles 9
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Well, one serious question to ask of this would be, "Was this the result of official work or was someone trying to use the lab to do some meth moonlighting?"

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'Apple lures labels from free streams – and why is no one doing anything about it' shrieks group

Charles 9
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Re: Don't Worry, Be Happy

Advertisement timing is a technique used by both radio and TV to discourage station surfing which can cause station defections. Most people would normally look for something else to peruse when the commercials come on. But if all the stations are airing commercials at the same time, then there are no alternatives and perusers will just sit tight.

If more than one station is airing the same song at the same time, odds are the stations are part of the same conglomerate.

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You can secretly snoop on someone if they butt-dial you – US judges

Charles 9
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"The moral of the story: always lock your phone before stashing it, lest you incur a hefty long-distance charge and a business headache."

Trouble is, some instances of butt-dialing come from the fact the butt contact manages to complete the entire sequence of motions from pushing the power button to awaken the phone to the unlocking gesture to dialing. I've personally seen such things as well as butt-answering, so I've prudently chosen a belt clip for my phone which not only keeps the phone out of my pocket but also places a literal air gap between the screen and anything physical (which may still operate the screen if my body's touching the piece).

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The roots go deep: Kill Adobe Flash, kill it everywhere, bod says

Charles 9
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Re: Flash Bang Wallop What a Picture!

Because sandboxes don't offer up much protection, especially when it by necessity has to interact with the system. Look at Java. It was supposed to be in a sandbox until someone wrote a bypass exploit. Flash would be in the same boat.

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Charles 9
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Re: User pushback

Like INTRANET control sites. And since they're attached to high-ticket still-being-amortized hardware, you're basically up the creek. You wither put in Flash or find somewhere else to work.

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Charles 9
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"And you are right. Mozilla have not announced they are dumpling Flash, merely disabling it by default, which is a good thing."

Actually, Mozilla HAS announced an intention to eventually drop Flash. Project Shumway is intended to produce a replacement.

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Hackers invade systems holding medical files on 4.5 million Cali patients

Charles 9
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Re: I wonder

Probably because it's cheaper to pay fines and settlements than to overhaul the works.

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Microsoft: Hey, you. Done patching Windows this month? WRONG

Charles 9
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Re: Is this library even mandatory?

Actually, it IS mandatory due to the OpenType specification which allows for Type 1 fonts (which if you'll recall is what the ATM renders).

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