* Posts by Charles 9

3874 posts • joined 10 Jun 2009

Child porn hidden in legit hacked websites: 100s redirected to sick images

Charles 9
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Re: Solution is Easy

Wasn't the point of article being that the stuff was also being smuggled into perfectly legitimate websites, making IP filtering useless (because the same IP points to both legit and KP content)? Who knows? Maybe El Reg's been secretly hacked and stashing KP (theoretical example, everyone).

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Charles 9
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"If this isn't stopped soon, the child porn industry may never recover!"

Actually, last I checked, the KP market was strictly mutual barter. While the posted images may be useless as barter, producers would probably just stake out some fresh material. After all, we don't know how old is this stuff, do we?

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The hammer falls: Feds propose drastic controls on Apple's iTunes Store

Charles 9
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Re: "fail to see the reason why I'd want an electronic book"

Now try getting enough books to last you a few months through the luggage weight AND size limits along with all the OTHER things you'll be needing for the trip.

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Charles 9
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Re: Dream list by dreamers

"This is basically what Amazon's plan is, except they can't afford to price very much below cost since they barely break even, and aren't as widely hated as Apple is."

Which means what Apple SHOULD have done was go direct to the authorities and accuse Amazon of dumping. Why didn't Apple accuse Amazon of dumping to keep out competition?

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Bad timing: New HTML5 trickery lets hackers silently spy on browsers

Charles 9
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Re: Inevitable?

A VM isn't going to do squat for concealing your Internet-facing IP (the VM still has to go through the ISP), and if the Feds can trace an Onion route, tracing through another proxy will be a cakewalk to them.

As for removing JaveScript, so much of the Internet now uses stateful interaction. So unless you want the world to know what you're doing (because the only way to keep state that doesn't involve JavaScript and/or cookies is to encode it in the URL like in the OLD days), we're stuck with it.

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Jimbo Wales: ISP smut blocking systems simply 'ridiculous'

Charles 9
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Re: money would be better spent...

" money would be better spent...stopping the illegal images being made in the first place."

Except that would basically be impossible because anything a human can conceive, a human can work around. As long as we have humans, we'll have deviants.

Besides, many of these pedophiles operate in countries or areas where the reach of the law is lax or nonexistent or in countries where custom or sex laws work to their favor.

So, if the source is savvy enough to keep away from your reach, how do you propose to stop their production?

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Charles 9
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Re: misguided strategy

...many of which will emerge on encrypted channels hosted in countries that don't respect the laws of the Western World. So unless the Western World wants to ban any and all encryption (and to do that would take something on the level of the Great Firewall of China, only MORE pervasive), this is an exercise in futility. There's already an attitude of distrust of government. Something like this would only throw fuel on the fire and re-stoke all the "1984" rumours.

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Upgraded 3D printed rifle shoots 14 times before breaking

Charles 9
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Re: inevitable

Plus there's the fact that these guns, unlike things like the Glock, are ALMOST COMPLETELY nonmetallic, meaning they can pass a metal detector. The only thing stopping an assassin at this point is the lack of nonmetallic ammo, but if someone starts regularly making a .22LR ceramic round in a carbon fiber casing, then even the Secret Service would have to watch their backs for a gun that can work at 20 yards (at least far enough to clear a security gap and still hit—make the round poison-tipped and it needn't be instantly fatal) and can pass a metal detector.

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Charles 9
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Re: Why go to all this trouble...

Now try getting one past a metal detector. 3D printed guns are almost there; they just need a nonmetallic bullet (say ceramic in a carbon fiber casing). Then metal detectors are this side of useless for ground events. Airplanes have their own problems but I can see ways around them, too (Dildo bomb, anyone?).

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Charles 9
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Re: We stand to have access restricted to 3D by spooked bureaucrats.

But consider this:

A single man is able to produce a firearm from a man-portable machine (so unlike CNC it can be built out of the view of cameras, say inside a vehicle or in the woods) that can fit in a pocket and, at least by itself, can pass a metal detector.

The only problem right now is the ammunition, but what if he uses a hard-plastic slug contained in a carbon fiber casing? Completely nonmetallic. Now NO ONE is safe.

About the only other thing I can think of that can work at distance, fit in a pocket, AND get past a metal detector is a ceramic dirk or shuriken, but knife throwing is an art compared to shooting a gun.

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HALF of air passengers leave phones on ... yet STILL no DEATH PLUNGE

Charles 9
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Re: I'm all in favour of them being switched off

Oh? I'd much rather they be distracted by e-books (no room for physical books) or a muted session of Angry Birds, Plants vs. Zombies, or whatever (tray tables too small and slippery to use real playing cards). Left without distractions, they may decide to vent their anxiety on ME.

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Charles 9
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Re: And this is why I hate people...

Many planes in operation (especially long haulers like the 747) were built before or just after cell phones were invented: in an age when they couldn't have conceived of that kind of interference testing.

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Charles 9
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Re: Mythbusters ...

Except being in the "loop" in California and with the assistance of Discovery Networks and Beyond Productions, they can and do enlist the proper experts in their field, and in the case of the cell phone interference myth did contact pilots, airport authorities, and electronic manufacturers for their input. While their result may not be exactly authoritative, it's better than anything we've seen to date involving consumer electronics to date unless you can cite something better that accounts for the rapid churn of consumer electronics and the wide age range of aircraft in operation.

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Charles 9
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Re: Only a matter of time

"A workable idea or complete cobblers ?"

Somewhat cobblers because there are so many frequencies in use, not just in the US but worldwide (think foreign visitors). A dummy station would have to operate at all those frequencies, and some of them could actually interfere with the in-flight electronics unless thoroughly tested, which could itself present problems.

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Charles 9
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Re: full undivided attention of everyone on the plane is required

"Yes. There is just one issue with this, the airplane is full of electronics. Now many even have LCD screens that make a lot of radio noise on there own, in the power range of 0.1mW and up to 0.5mW at low frequencies. They are all turned on during takeoff and landing."

THOSE were tested by the FAA and FCC prior to them being allowed on aircraft. All of them have had their radiation checked to make sure they don't interfere with aircraft electronics, and each new one installed has to be tested for the same thing.

Technically, for ANY electronic device (and even devices not designed to transmit WILL transmit, see Title 47 CFR Part 15) to be useable on an aircraft, it has to be subject to the same stress tests. However, cell phones and other consumer electronics have such high churn that as soon as a device is tested, its successor is on the market, which will now need to be tested itself, ad nauseum. And all carriers flying in the US MUST submit to them in order to operate in the US. And the FAA has the power to make demands of these carriers (that's how Airworthiness Directives work). See the problem?

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Charles 9
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Re: Not just radio signal safety

For some people, important hard-to-replace things may be carried out of instinct, such as (as noted) passports and other forms of ID as well as medical supplies (prescription pills, insulin, etc.) and other things that may be difficult to resupply if lost and/or may be needed immediately upon landing.

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Charles 9
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Murply's Law

"Safety critical equipment is heavily tested for `radiated immunity' as they term it."

But do they test for every conceivable form of radio transmission? You know, making sure they don't miss that one perfect combination of device, frequency, and power that carries down the fly-by-wire system and makes a flight surface slide just enough to cause loss of control but not show up on the black boxes?

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Gmail, Outlook.com and e-voting 'pwned' on stage in crypto-dodge hack

Charles 9
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Re: " change your password without re-typing the old one"

Odd. Perhaps it's just Outlook, but the last time I tried to change a Microsoft account password, it wouldn't let me until I responded to the automated e-mail sent to another e-mail account.

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Wii U sales plunge: Nintendo hopes Mario and Zelda will shift some kit

Charles 9
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Re: They can still turn this around...

"The scars... they still have not healed... damn the world for not appreciating Yu Suzuki's masterpiece!"

I think Shenmue was mainly the victim of bad timing. It was so ambitious it fell victim to the decline of the Dreamcast and once that was done, Sega was through with the console business. Not only that, they become very leery about questionable projects like Shenmue, which while critically acclaimed just wasn't pushing out the right numbers.

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Charles 9
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Goes to show even Nintendo can have a bad day. Reminds me of their N64 days when they tried going out on a limb and got left hanging as a result. Similarly, Nintendo thought their tablet controller would get some traction, but this looks like another rare misfire. It'll be curious to see what happens going forward as Nintendo starts to wind the original Wii down.

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Galaxy S4 FIREBALL ATE MY HOUSE, claims Hong Kong man

Charles 9
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Re: I hope he gets his payout.

That's a "hard" problem with battery engineering. It mainly has to do with the highly reactive nature of metallic lithium. Basically, you can't even expose metallic lithium to the AIR safely unless you're certain it's very, VERY dry (I'm sure we can recall just HOW reactive this stuff is to water, even in vapor form).

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Charles 9
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Re: Could end in tears...

But then they did a corollary experiment. Instead of the third rail, they used an electric fence and found that it can be close enough to the business end to allow a shock. So basically peeing at point blank COULD do it, especially since urine usually has salts dissolved in it which act as electrolytes (making it more conductive).

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Move over, Freeview, just like you promised: You're hogging the 4G bed

Charles 9
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Re: 1800MHz

"1800MHz is just 1800Mhz. When did it become Band III?"

When it was defined as such by the 3GPP. These bands are defined as part of e-UTRA. Wikipedia can provide more information (it's an informational article with plenty of references, so it should be reliable enough).

According to e-UTRA, Band III has an uplink range of 1710 MHz to 1785 MHz and a downlink range of 1805 MHz to 1880 MHz. It's approximate center (and therefore its common nomenclature) is in fact 1800MHz and is recognized as the old Digital Cellular System frequency.

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Charles 9
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"800MHz also has the broadest handset support, as it's expected to be used widely across Europe. GSM Arena lists 51 handsets usable on the new networks, while 48 will work on EE's existing 4G network and 44 run all the way up to 2.6GHz."

It's been my understanding that the most frequently used LTE frequency was 1800MHz (Band III). Study a list of LTE operations and most continents use Band III. Africa, Europe, and the Middle East have settled on it, and Asia keeps the option open. The only holdout are the Americas, mainly because there it's an active military frequency.

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AMD's newest chip: Another step toward 'transformation'

Charles 9
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Re: AMD is focused on all viable revenue streams

I agree. It certainly looks like a classic case of diversification. As the PC market is reaching saturation, AMD have been smart to look at other ways to leverage its experience. That's why they bought ATI: so they'd have a GPU for use in their CPU/GPU combinations. It seems AMD correctly saw ahead because we're seeing plenty of GPU-equipped SoC's. Expanding into ARM? Savvy bet hedging.

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Lingering fingerprint fingering fingered in iOS 7 for NEW iPHONE

Charles 9
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Re: Samaritan mode, anyone?

I just take a Big Brother approach to lending the phone. I'm always within a foot of the person. If they don't want me to overhear the conversation, they don't get to use the phone. I do the dialing and don't pass the phone until I hear ringing. And as soon as the call ends, I politely but firmly request the phone back. To date I haven't had any problems. My home screen has no personal data on it (just apps and a time/weather widget), and I don't allow enough time or opportunity to peek. As for someone trying to run off with the phone, well that's why I keep within a foot of the person.

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FSF passes collection plate for free Android clone Replicant

Charles 9
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Re: Radio stack?

Makes me wonder what would happen if somehow nVidia got ANOTHER federal contract (of equal importance to their DoD contract—perhaps a NASA contract) that REQUIRES open-sourcing, placing nVidia in a contractual clash.

(Doubt it would happen. nVidia would probably be automatically excluded from any such contract due to their DoD contract—it's hard to trump a defense contract in terms of priority.)

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Charles 9
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Joke

Re: Pushing Water Uphill @AC 10:17

"Conserve Air — Breathe Less"

(Seen on an actual sign from the Star Wars spoof Spaceballs.)

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New in Android 4.3: At last we get a grip on privacy-invading crApps

Charles 9
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Re: This is great for the minority of knowledgeable users

No, because the develop may not want to play ball and go back to Apple instead. Consider that the developer doesn't HAVE to release for Android.

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'Wandering Dago' tuck truck ejected from NY race track

Charles 9
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Re: @Charles 9

No, the whoosh was the sound of the basketball court down the road. Your comments weren't ironic ENOUGH. First rule about irony, sarcasm, or some other form of intentional untruth: be prepared to be taken seriously.

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Charles 9
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Re: Deemed offensive to Italian Americans, oddly, not Hispanics

I don't. I just have to remember that what the British consider "chips" deviates from the American concept (which IIRC is the original, as an American chef invented what Americans call the potato chip).

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Charles 9
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"sk, Americans eh? What's wrong with nipping outside to suck on a fag? :)"

Because in America, "fag" an abbreviation for "faggot", which is an even worse epithet to a male homosexual than "queer" (probably because it's supposed to deride the act rather than the appearance that "queer" provokes). So the word's basically an insult to any man (you're either deriding a homosexual or implying a straight man is not).

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Charles 9
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The problem in this case is they're not disparaging their own race the way Blacks and Irish are. They're disparaging Hispanics, too, while they're of Italian descent.

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Only 1 in 5 Americans believe in pure evolution – and that's an upswing

Charles 9
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Re: Logic has nothing to do with it

I'm surprised the religious man didn't immediately reply, "But atheism means believing in NO GODS AT ALL: thus the "a" (none). I may disbelieve millions of gods but I DO believe in ONE, making me a MONOtheist."

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Charles 9
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Re: Situation Normal

"and doing the same thing over and over will eventually have a different result."

When people do the same thing over and over and EXPECT a different result, we call it INSANITY.

BUT

When people do the same thing over and over and ACTUALLY GET a different result, we call it PERSISTENCE.

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Charles 9
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Re: Trouble with all this

"I always get a kick out of some who survive some tragic event thanking God for saving them, but not wondering why that God was so utterly inept as to allow them to get into the mess that they were "saved from" in the first place."

The religious have an answer to that, too: growth by ordeal. What doesn't break you makes you stronger, so the Lord intentionally tests you so you learn from the experience.

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Charles 9
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"If god created the heavens and the earth, where did the material to construct him, or the idea of him come from?"

A proper religious sort would reply, "He didn't come from anywhere. He simply is, was, and will be inside and outside of time. Therefore, God is beyond limits and can't be described in any limiting way, including by time."

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Charles 9
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Re: I believe ...

"So you don't believe in American beers then?"

You can believe in American beers again. Just don't go for the big boys. Stick to honest microbreweries which by now are scattered all over the country.

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Zynga ABANDONS ALL HOPE of opening US gambling operation

Charles 9
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Re: The gold standard for free to play games is Team Fortress 2

Don't you mean the Orange Box? And while it's true that TF2 spent a number of years as a paid game (albeit the price dropped eventually to $10 before a premium pass became optional), the fact that many people actually paid for it says they got something seriously right about it and simply altered the pricing model to better reflect the times (the game went F2P about two years ago).

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Pentagon: Mobe operators want our radio bands? Fine, but it'll cost $3.5bn

Charles 9
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If the military weren't so fixated on this frequency, we could've freed up the DCS bands and allowed the use of LTE Band III, aligning us with most of the civilized world in terms of an open cell frequencies.

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Worldwide tax crackdown planned against tech globocorps

Charles 9
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Re: the tax man cometh.

I figured such a system would result in collateral damage, but your description helps visualize this. The system WOULD be disadvantageous to industries with unavoidably high costs of operation. That's why I qualified my earlier statement. Perhaps not removing the business expense deduction altogether but limiting it to distinguish between honest costs of operation and dodges. But here too will I acknowledge this as a "hard" problem where there may not be a cut-and-dry solution.

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Charles 9
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Re: the tax man cometh.

I understand that corporate income tax is taxed based on net income, but has anyone done a study on the pros and cons of changing it to one based on gross income, removing or limiting the deduction for business expenses?

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Ex-prez Carter: 'America has no functioning democracy' with PRISM

Charles 9
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Re: Spy on the Spies

"The electorate, in an elected position?"

Don't seem to be doing much for the current situation in American government, are they? The trouble with the electorate is that you can't assume they will act rationally, and once a majority of the electorate are acting IRrationally, you can game the system by playing to their emotions. That's what's happening now.

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Charles 9
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Re: Democracy no more

"How can we return to the kindler, gentler world that we would like?"

Two words: WE CAN'T.

We're entering a world where one bad man can ruin the rest of us. Knowledge is power, but now knowledge is cheap, too, because we're in an AGE of information. Meanwhile, humans come in all types of personalities: including the homicidal maniac and the paranoid lunatic. Put one of the latter together with the vast sum of human knowledge, and imagine the possibilities. They probably won't be pretty.

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Charles 9
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Re: He's right

"It is not clear that the 22nd amendment is especially useful or necessary. It was a reaction to FDR's run of four, which was highly situational, arguably appropriate given the circumstances between 1929 and 1945, and quite unlikely to have been repeated soon. By adding it we have established a requirement for change under circumstances when it might be undesirable or could be meaningless (as, for instance, if the current Vice President moves up because the current President is ineligible). In any case, we have term limits as long as elections are relatively free."

The problem was that FDR was gaining increasing support throughout his terms, not the least because of his political clout (boosted by experience), causing something of a feedback loop. Your experience makes you a better choice over the challenger, winning you another term and MORE experience, etc. And it resulted in a president-for-life that lasted longer than probably even the Founding Fathers would've been comfortable with. If FDR had been in better health, there was a fair chance he'd have the leverage to continue being President even after World War II.

You see that these days with some of the most veteran congresspeople. It takes something quite extraordinary on either side to unseat one of them unwillingly.

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Android MasterKey found buried in kiddie cake game on Google Play - report

Charles 9
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Re: @I ain't Spartacus

Think ad-based apps. No internet access means no ads. No ads = no revenue = no reason for the dev to release for Android. See the problem?

And while it's YOUR phone, it's THEIR app. Go their way or go without, and if more people go without, devs again won't see a reason to release for Android, and remember when the security model was first made, Android was the underdog against Apple. They needed a way to attract developers.

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Charles 9
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"Google should have more strict policies about permissions refusing apps asking for unnecessary permissions. I know by direct experience that Apple Appstore does it and I have to admit that is a good thing for end-users (a bit more problematic for me that I had to do more work to fix my app)."

How about this? For each section of access a program seeks, the developer needs to provide a justification for it. These justifications can be evaluated by Google to see if they match up (if something happens outside the listed justification, the application is rejected), then they can be posted to the Play Store as a "Why?", visible to the user, for each permission an app requests.

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Charles 9
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Re: @I ain't Spartacus

"Why can't vanilla Android have a built in application firewall to let you do that? It is not like it would make any odds to Google's profits."

Even if developers feel betrayed by Google and switch back to the Apple Store exclusively? For a good while, many of the best apps went to Apple first, THEN to Android. Might see a rebound of this if devs lose security control.

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Laser-wielding boffins develop ETERNAL MEMORY from quartz

Charles 9
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Give it 20 years and we'll be shuffling 1TB/hr video'/holovideo files on a regular basis and STILL complaining on there not being enough storage to go around. Because when it comes to mass storage, we ALWAYS seem to find way to fill it up.

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Why data storage technology is pretty much PERFECT

Charles 9
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Re: No more powerful code can ever be devised; further research is pointless

I suspect the "further research is pointless" merely points to the fact that we won't be able to find a better error-correcting system overall than Reed-Solomon because they account for physical limitations. You can create something of equal performance, but never better performance. As you've noted, research instead has turned more toward adaptation (the Information Dispersal Algorithm) and specialization (Turbocodes). I sometimes wonder if someone can find a system equal in performance to Reed-Solomon but simpler to implement, but I'm not an expert in those matters.

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