* Posts by Charles 9

8178 posts • joined 10 Jun 2009

Singapore Airlines 777 catches fire after engine alarm

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Serious questions to answer on this one.

Since the plane only had an engine fault, not a fire, that only qualifies as an urgency, not an emergency. I think the initial incident only raised a "pan-pan" and they chose to return to the originating airport: sensible as the resources for correction would be greatest there. The fire only started AFTER landing, and since the disembarking stairs were already en route, they probably simply monitored the situation until either the stairs arrived (meaning everyone could get off quickly) or the situation deteriorated enough to warrant immediate evacuation.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: A close call?

Probably not, given the plane didn't catch fire until AFTER touchdown. No fire, no emergency, only an urgency. The difference between "pan-pan" and "mayday".

1
0

Dry those eyes, ad blockers are unlikely to kill the internet

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Security

About the only you could do that in a way that can't be blocked is to use an inline proxy and use names that are indistinguishable from the articles themselves, like with newspapers (they're on the same paper). But as I've said before, people quickly become jaded to ads over time. This phenomenon was noted all the way back in World War II, so the ad people know this. This means ads need to constantly evolve so as to keep getting people's attention. IOW, being obnoxious is a design feature, not a flaw, because it creates a "take it or leave it" scenario, and they figure more people will "take it" and keep reading than "leave it" and abandon the whole medium like people might do with TV and radio (I'm an example of the latter) if they're irked enough.

0
0

Medicos could be world's best security bypassers, study finds

Charles 9
Silver badge

"However, the tax-paying public does have access to the roads they pay for. "

The tax-paying public does have access to the hospitals they pay for., too.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: The existing security paradigm just doesn't work in a multi-user world.

Too risky for false positives, if you ask me. The problem here is that RFID is radio based, and most of the time radio detecting isn't very precise. There will be tons of badges floating through the halls, and the walls don't always shunt. They could pick up stray badges and end up with mistaken readings.

Another problem is that all this added radio transmission raises the risk of RF Interference, and medical equipment tends to be very sensitive which is why there were cell phone blackouts in the past in hospitals. RFID will mean raising the specter of more (and expensive) RFI testing. At least with current applications the badge readers are considered non-interfering because they only have a point-blank effective range.

1
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: The problem is stopping the wrong people from using the computer

OK, where does the money come from? Many hospitals are short-staffed already.

1
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: The Medico God complex.

What happened to "password"?

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Then you get....

They respond, "Because we need to know the information in order to retrieve your file." IOW, it's a case of the crowbar being IN the crate.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: For Pete's sake @Charles 9

"Goes to designated person."

There's your problem. There's no budget for "the designated person".

1
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Biometric systems

Problem is, sometimes the requirements CLASH. For example, as you say, the Emergency Room. Problem here is that, due to the environment, it's a pretty open area with lots of people roaming around. This makes it a prime target for infiltrating in the midst of the chaos. BUT emergency personnel ALSO need timely access to patient information in order to keep triage and treatments moving quickly because, well, you're dealing with emergencies here.

1
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: For Pete's sake @Charles 9

Spares can get stolen.

Replacements have to be verified.

The point is not that it costs manpower but that it costs time, which depending on what part of the hospital you're in can be quite precious (that's why I always note the Emergency Room, one place where time pressure is frequent).

1
2
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Keys get lost, cards get re-used indefinitely, passwords are a joke

Next thing you know, you collar someone with very sensitive skin and they develop a rash...

1
1
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: So a dilemma.

"It's only a few oddball cases, including severe allergic reactions, that make the news where the information is relevant and for those a physical bracelet, card or pendant is much easier and harder to abuse."

It's those oddballs that are the ones that give rise to malpractice suits, especially for those with UNDETECTED or UNREPORTED allergies or reactions. Plus, as noted, emergency rooms are BOTH prone to hacking AND in need of very quick turnaround (each for the same reasons). So again, you need BOTH fast AND right.

3
4
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: For Pete's sake

That hospital must have a good budget, then. Experience tells me your experience is the exception, not the norm.

2
1
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: For Pete's sake

"You quickly learn how to ensure you always have your badge with you. After all people also take care of their car keys, or they may not be able to get back home. AFAIK medical personnel working where radiations are present must carry a dosimeter."

And YOU just as quickly how often people STILL leave the damn things behind, skipping lunch and going hungry, requiring a cab or a ride or a locksmith, or simply walking home in the pouring rain. This IN SPITE of every precaution. Plus, losing access to critical information just when a Code Blue hits is NOT GOOD.

PS. I think they found that when it came to appendages that are used quite often, like the arms, hands, and digits, they found yet another dilemma. A tough installation can't read half the time, and a realiably-readable one tended to break too often. Again, waiting for a replacement in an environment where time is critical is a no-go.

2
1
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: For Pete's sake

You know the problem with keys? People keep LOSING them! Lanyards break, keys get caught in things, next thing you know it's vanished without trace or knowledge of how it happened. And trying to correct for these wastes time which is unacceptable in a medical area because time means LIVES.

4
5
Charles 9
Silver badge

"You must have a complex password, change it every 60 days, not reuse it - these are my favourites. Teach the user base how to generate pattern passwords that meet the rules and problem solved (from the users' perspectives)"

No, because some people have REALLY BAD recall:

"Now, was that CorrectHorseBatteryStaple or Engine+Paperclip+Donkey+Wrong?"

THAT kind of bad, which I see all the time. Medicos are caught between Scylla and Charybdis except they're not allows to sacrifice anyone. They need it RIGHT AND FAST, SECURE AND SIMPLE all at once, or people DIE and their survivors complain.

4
3
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: So a dilemma.

But in this case the expense is too great: the expense is lives, which for medicos is too great a price since they're under incredible (and usually legal) pressure to save those lives. A third option is therefore needed.

Put it this way. Balance isn't possible because BOTH ends are so heavy the beam is bending to the point of snapping. It's like the right vs. fast problem. You can't just do it right because going too slow means people DIE, and you can't just do it fast because doing it wrong means people DIE. Medicos have to get it RIGHT AND FAST at the same time. Which means you need a SIMPLE AND SECURE at the same time solution. Otherwise, people DIE and there will be cries to get something done, toot sweet. Until someone can formally PROVE this to be impossible, the argument will never end.

4
1
Charles 9
Silver badge

So a dilemma.

The IT people are trying to avoid violating patient confidentiality laws. Furthermore, they're also trying to avoid getting critical medical equipment hacked, which means for them lives are at stake.

But at the same time, actual medical personnel need to be able to call up critical information on a moment's notice, especially in Emergency Room situations, which means for them lives are at stake.

So security is running smack into ease of use, and this time BOTH have a legitimate, "lives are at stake" justification, so a compromise is not acceptable. What's needed is a spectrum-breaker: something that is actually BOTH very secure AND dead easy to use at the same time.

7
0

Gun-jumping French pols demand rapid end to English in EU

Charles 9
Silver badge

"The original Lingua Franca, from which the term derived, died out centuries ago. It was mostly based on Italian."

Thought it was more based on Latin, which in turn is the basis for the Romance (as in based in the language of Rome, that is Latin) languages. Though the mistake is understandable as Italian is a Romance language.

1
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Lingua Franca

"I work in the international team of a global company. Let me tell you, in Latin America, Japan, China, large parts of Africa, pretty much no one speaks English."

UNLESS they're ACTUALLY working internationally, as in with foreigners. For example, what do Chinese in Africa do? I doubt the Africans can expect to learn Chinese on the spot (Chinese and Japanese are tricky to learn on the quick--domestic language education there has to space it out over many years). That's when you need the lingua franca. And in most of the world, the lingua franca is English, simply because everyone has to deal with English-speakers at some point and usually most often, as the Dollar is still considered the most reliable currency in the global market.

6
0

'I urge everyone to fight back' – woman wins $10k from Microsoft over Windows 10 misery

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Good for her

AND THEY DON'T CARE.

It's not like you've got anywhere ELSE to go with your PC if you want to keep using all the software you're used to (especially games). It's what's called a captive market.

0
12
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: puzzled

Well, small claims is a state matter (otherwise, it's municipal, it depends on the state's judicial structure). So whether or not a small claim ruling has precedent depends on that state's laws. Also, if a small claim suit gets appealed, it usually goes to the same civil courts that handle the larger civil suits, and those typically DO set a precedent because the ruling has weight if THAT case gets sent to a Court of Appeals and so on.

5
0

NVMe SSDs tormented for months in some kind of sick review game

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: How to _really_ stress these drives...

I think what you mean is (using Linux notation):

cat /dev/urandom > randomfile

I tried finding the equivalent for a DOS/Windows Command Prompt but found any analogue to be nontrivial.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: cratered during file copy?

What about robocopy, which is designed for bulk jobs and also supports unbuffered copy?

5
0

Microsoft releases open source bug-bomb in the rambling house of C

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: >handling pointers directly makes for efficient, “close to the hardware” programming>

But what about dynamic allocation of data that is dynamically determined (example: an operation on a raw stream, like how gzip works). Now you have no idea how much data you're going to get, and the other end probably doesn't know either. Better-structured languages are more efficient, yes, when the data is more-structured, but then the real world intrudes and you have to handle data that may have no rhyme, reason, or even end.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: >handling pointers directly makes for efficient, “close to the hardware” programming>

All well and good when your data is well-structured. But what happens when you have to deal with UNstructured data, like a live stream? This is an example of the kind of stuff where you can't know ahead of time how much data you're gonna get, because often the other side doesn't know, either (usually because it's being generated on the fly, a la stream compression/encryption).

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Bounds checking for C and C++

"Or what if the memory doesn't store the bits correctly, or the CPU executes the instruction badly !!!"

Guess what? Those are real-life concerns. It's one reason why you can't make the processor pathways much smaller (because of quantum tunneling, electrons could "jump the tracks"). As I recall, high-uptime systems have redundancies for that reason.

In any event, if Pascal and Fortran really could build more efficient code than C, then they would be the languages of choice for highly-constrained applications like embedded systems, and last I checked, they either used C or (like for aircraft systems) specialized languages for the specific field. Fortran and Pascal may have been better in the past (because they were more restricted), but the real world intrudes.

0
0

Judge rules FBI can hack any time, any, place, anywhere

Charles 9
Silver badge

No, they'll just turn to their plan B: terrorists with the knowledge to make superplagues.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: ugh

The world will end first. Remember, Washington has nukes.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: What's created equal have to do with it?

Times changes. Pretty soon it'll become possible for one person to ruin civilization, after which no holds are barred if the government is to be able to fulfill its obligation to protect its citizen's inabliable rights. Basically, life can break the rules of man, which in the end are just ink on a page.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Think about the Children!

"So now the government has driven another nail into their own damned coffin "

No they won't. Why do you think they have that data center in Utah? It's a cover for their black-hat encryption-cracking outfit (that probably houses a working quantum computer to boot). The state always has more resources than you. Anything you can do to try to cover your tracks, they'll find a way to beat it. Even the One-Time Pad is not immune (simples: intercept and copy the pad).

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

"Congress shall make no law...abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press;..."

Sorry, but that's been abridged for nearly a century now. Look up US v. Schenck (1917) and the "Fire in a Crowded Theater" justification. No right is absolute as one person's rights inevitably butt up against another's.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

"Don't they realise they have now opened up all the US government and its departments to the world? After all 'you do it to me, therefore I can do it to you' comes into play."

Yes, but they're under the assumption they're ALREADY under attack,meaning the roles are actually reversed.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Logical Human reaction

"Open season doesn't even come close. People will only put up with the powerful having sway over them if it is *reasonable*. This goes to far beyond reasonable and they can expect an *unreasonable* (and probably exaggerated) response."

You overlook the appeal to emotion. The average joe reacts more to emotion than to reason, and "Think of the children!" is an emotion play. Showing someone is a child molester basically blackmarks you in the eyes of society: usually forever since even clearing your name is usually seen as a lie.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Planting of Evidence?

A: Nothing. That the thing about sovereignty. "My domain, my rules" basically.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Pascal Monet So the FBI has the right to hack the world

The key word in the Amendment being "unreasonable", but in matters of protection of the most innocent of its citizens (children) or against threats of a potentially existential nature (terrorists who could be willing to pull off a suicide nuke), you're basically crossing the Godzilla Threshold, in which case anything is considered reasonable. At least by their way of thinking.

0
0

England just not windy enough for wind farms, admits renewables boss

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Fundimental Lack of Understanding

"Yes, they would be trying to corner the market and they are. Solar alone is a $32 billion dollar PROFITABLE market in the U.S. and the global market is projected to reach $137 billion in the next 4 years. It is currently just shy of $100 billion now."

WITH or WITHOUT government subsidies? My point is that if renewables were profitable on their own, they'd be rushing to be the "first in who wins" without any intervention whatsoever.

0
0

Air-gapping SCADA systems won't help you, says man who knows

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Air gapping won't help you because.....a non airgapped system is insecure

How do you pay for it on a shoestring budget? You're kind of in a bind when accounting demands unicorns and cuts your paychecks...

0
0

This is how the EU's supreme court is stripping EU citizens of copyright protections

Charles 9
Silver badge

"No, the point is that a library catalogue enables access to the content. As does a hyperlink. To replicate the situation physically, let's do a thought experiment: it would be possible these days to build a library with a robot to fetch a book off its shelf and put it on a desk for you to read (there are modern warehouses that fetch stock and load trucks this way). Would that breach copyright?"

No, because we do not have a matter replicator yet. Following the hyperlink produces a COPY of the target in question. Since COPYing is involved, copyright is automatically invoked.

"Libraries do have exemptions, but only for educational or non-commercial use. You breach copyright when you photocopy the book to avoid buying it."

That's YOU, though, not the library. They're exempt from the redistribution restriction, for example, because (a) they're usually public, as in government-run, facilities, and (b) that's their purpose for existing: a middle ground between full lock-and-key and full public domain, a way to allow some additional exchange of information as mandated in the Constitution while still respecting copyright that helps to encourage new works being made. Rental houses an Redboxes have to buy special rental copies of movies at higher rates from publishers (so that publishers recoup lost sales), but libraries don't always have to, especially if some of their stocks are donated.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

"If a hyperlink is (or is deemed to facilitate) a breach of copyright, where does that leave a public library catalogue?"

Bad example as libraries typically possess legal exemptions from copyright enforcement because of their specific function. Meanwhile, a card catalog does not possess inline information that can retrieve the actual content as you retrieve the card. An online catalog might do this, though, via inline data that's retrieved by the computer and then displayed for you.

0
0

Apple pollutes data about you to protect your privacy. But it might not be enough

Charles 9
Silver badge

Kind of hard to do that over the Internet, and most places either don't take C.O.D. or place a hefty surcharge on it.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Sick and tired

Nope. 2D only. Doesn't work well in a car. Tried all the others (even Here); they don't compare to Google, especially if you're going to be driving in traffic.

0
0

Linux on PS3 white flag

Charles 9
Silver badge

White flag?

If it really was a white flag, they'd be allowing Linux again, with full hardware support. This is nothing but an attempted bribe. Why hasn't Sony been criminally charged with fraud for the bait-and-switch?

3
0

Why Oracle will win its Java copyright case – and why you'll be glad when it does

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Hmmm

"Also, I can certainly create audio CDs without ever purchasing the Red Book. Copyright only protects the book itself, not the knowledge it contains. That knowledge can be gotten legally in any number of ways, including simply reading the source of a program which implements CD audio creation."

Except those programs are copyrighted, too, as was Compaq's clone BIOS. They made a CLONE of IBM's BIOS that happened to be feature-exact. That was the basis for the "clean room" defense. But note that Google apparently copied Sun/Oracle's Java header code down to the errata, which in a proper clean-room effort wouldn't have been encountered or copied in.

0
0

Ransomware scum build weapon from JavaScript

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: One tiny step, MS... one tiny step and you blow it.

"If this had been done decades ago, users might be educated just a tad and not click on this crap."

You ever thought that maybe the average user is simply too stupid and is more likely to erase or change the extension, break the file, and cry for help? That's the kind of clientele Microsoft has to cater, remember: the kind incapable of learning. Yet they'll use their computers anyway, so yeah, the baby treatment is necessary; otherwise we're going to need to figure out a way to establish a licensing system for computers the way we do cars.

0
0

Computerised stock management? Nah, let’s use walkie-talkies

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Do you have any tea?

"Certain American versions seem to contain exceptional quantities of the second."

And many Americans WANT it that way because they want to quench their thirst first WITHOUT drinking water, get buzzed second. It tells you something when the #1 beer in America is a LIGHT beer.

0
0

Tor torpedoed! Tesco Bank app won't run with privacy tool installed

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Who are these narcissists who think they are the only ones entitled to freedom of choice?

"What I'd really like to see is merchants being stricter on insecure browsers and allowing us to impose geographic limits on the us of our own accounts. We need more security on the web, not less."

The only way to achieve that is with a Stateful Internet, meaning no anonymity. Otherwise, miscreants can use the anonymity inherent in today's Internet to masquerade and get around things like ID and geo-blocks.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Web is still best

"Of course the web is full of cancer too, but at least the very strict sand-boxing and script-blocker plugins can keep it in check."

You haven't run into the ad-blocker-blockers have you? Or those sites that don't show anything unless the ad stuff gets loaded? Or the sites that are trying to find ways around your ad blocking such as through local caching?

0
0

Top boffins detail how to save the open internet from breaking itself

Charles 9
Silver badge
Mushroom

Re: Late report or time travel?

The $64T question, however, is if it's possible to AVOID #3 and #2? Or does the human condition pretty much preclude this happening?

0
0

Forums