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* Posts by Charles 9

3467 posts • joined 10 Jun 2009

Microsoft reveals Xbox One, the console that can read your heartbeat

Charles 9
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Re: The sleek, black 64-bit system carries an eight-core x86 processor...

Plus PCs have had multiple cores for nearly a decade (and gaming PCs for longer). Every gaming developer worth its salt realizes multicore (as well as using the GPU for more than graphics) is the way to go and has been working hard to tune their games and engines to use them more efficiently.

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Charles 9
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Re: No second-hand games

"Tying discs to an Xbox account is another matter but, as has been said, there are other laws that make that illegal in the EU."

What if Microsoft classes all software transactions as LEASES instead, exempting them from exhaustion and making the EULAs binding lease agreements?

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Charles 9
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Re: XBox One == Creepy Snooping Apparatus

Isn't Valve working on a Linux-powered Steam box?

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Charles 9
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Re: Not looking too good

Any word from Sony itself about how it will handle things. Because, lest we recall, there is one other company that adopts a similar model to what Microsoft is proposing.

Valve.

Funny how we don't get too many complaints from Steam users about the lack of resale (and I would imagine Microsoft's legal team has their files all set up for Europe as well--bet you every software transaction is a LEASE and therefore not subject to exhaustion).

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Charles 9
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Re: XBox One vs PS4

IIRC, NONE for either one...YET. Live demo units don't seem to be available for either one as of yet.

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Charles 9
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Re: No second-hand games

Since the XBox One will use BluRays, odds are the serialization will occur at the ROM Mark. This still allows for rapid pressing of the BD discs. You can't burn a ROM Mark (you can't be certified as a BD-R device unless you explicitly DON'T have the capability), and only the pressing plants have the ROM Mark machines (which are carefully monitored by the consortium). Quite simply, no piracy unless the console is hacked (and I would think Microsoft, Sony, and Nintendo have been doing their homework regarding hardening against hacks).

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Opera rewrite comes to Android

Charles 9
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Seems I jumped to the GS4 just in time. Opera Mobile was already clunky on my old phone (so were all the other browsers, though). I've mixed opinions. It runs fine here, but what about older phones?

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James Bond inspires US bill to require smart guns for all

Charles 9
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Re: gets my goat

Ever heard of a one-man army? How about a one-man militia? Entirely possible and within the law (by definition, militias are outside government control; the National Guard doesn't count). And regulated in this case means equipped (like the Regulars).

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Soylent Corporation prepares to DEFEAT FOOD

Charles 9
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Re: Licence

No, because there is no TRADEMARK on the term "Soylent". Indeed, the makers can probably claim the term is too simple (it's just a portmanteau of "Soy" and "Lentil"--see "Make Room! Make Room!") to make the word eligible for trademark.

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Review: Samsung Galaxy S4

Charles 9
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Re: Well I like it....

Having the removable battery is less a matter of the spare battery and more a matter of being able to shut the thing off if all else fails. I'm a bit leery about non-removable batteries in spite of the presence of hardwired reset switches. Switches are all well and good...until they break. For my money, there's no peace of mind like being able to pull the plug (or in this case, pull the battery), as I've yet to read of a way a device can keep running for long without a source of electricity.

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Charles 9
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That's entirely up to you. I was willing to go cutting edge because my old phone was getting clunky and I wanted to get a phone that would see me though for the next two years, preferably three or more. Admitted, phone tech keep pressing on, but things seem to be plateauing a bit which gives me hope the phone will last a bit longer.

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Charles 9
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Re: Jedit "On the downside, being a mini-tablet it was too big for most pockets "

"It's a continued grumble in the office that our work Blackberrys are not "cool" but you can at least put them in your jeans pocket without castrating yourself everytime you sit down. Consequently, the BBs go everywhere with their owners, whereas other phones we have tried have often been left on the desk."

Have you considered a belt clip pouch? Not the quick-release types (HATE them--they come loose at the worst moments) but simple flip cover affairs with magnetic closures. I've been using these for years (since the N95) and found them to be the best solution for taking a phone with me. A comfortable case all to itself reduces scratch risks, the fact your legs can't squash the phone reduces crack/break risk, and it's pretty easy to get out if need be (and in case you ask, I also normally wear the clip under a shirt or the like so it isn't an obvious target for theft).

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Charles 9
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Re: I give it a couple of months...

Blame partitioning. Internal flash on Android phones tends to get split into different-sized partitions. Learned that when I started rooting and customizing my Android devices (I have four as of know--two are rooted and customized, one rooted but not customized due to lack of mods—it's one of those cheap Allwinner tablets—and my S4, which I'm thinking about rooting a little bit down the road).

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Charles 9
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I thought I should add in this interesting bit of information. As the S 4's back cover is just a snap-on piece of plastic, it IS altogether possible to replace the cover with something more to your liking. Samsung already sells flip covers the merge the plastic cover with a flip cover for the front of the phone, plus some aftermarket metal covers are showing up, though I read these can interfere with reception.

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Charles 9
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They're already working on it (see xda-developers).

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Charles 9
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I think I'll wait a bit for some more custom ROMs to appear. Since I got mine free and clear, I just need to unlock it, then root it (already a technique out for it). Many of the custom ROMs prefer the Trebuchet home screen, and I'm rather fond of its simplicity.

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Charles 9
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Re: No Exynos in the US

All the US models are different. The Stock model can't do LTE in the US (none of them do Bands 1, 3, 5, 7, 8, or 20). Each US model supports that carrier's LTE bands (T-Mobile USA and AT&T use 4 and 17, Sprint uses 25). No skin off my nose; the other bands my phone supports are useable where I go abroad as well.

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Charles 9
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Re: Are the 32Gb or 64Gb version available yet?

AFAIK, not in America. No biggie in this case thanks to support for 64GB SDXC Micro cards and USB On-the-Go. I'd be more inclined to use USB OTG if they provide an OTG cable that provides BOTH the USB host socket AND power (that's my one beef with USB OTG--you typically can't both charge the phone and run On the Go at the same time).

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Congress: It's not the Glass that's scary - It's the GOOGLE

Charles 9
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YOU may stay away from Facebook and the like, but what about *everyone you know*? Unless you're a complete hermit, SOMEONE knows you. And if that someone took a picture of you and then posted it somewhere on a social network, then a trace on you has been established. As more pictures of you emerge, it becomes possible to identify you from a stranger's photo.

As for your supposed tech, someone will just come up with a way to block your blocker. And no, not even the paper bag technique will likely work (if you can walk the streets with a paper bag, someone else will just show up with a leaf blower).

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Charles 9
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"If a person wearing it films me walking into a shop it isn't going to inherently know who I am, my google account info etc"

It MIGHT. One of Google's projects involves face recognition. If Google analyzes the video and recognizes your face, BAM.

The big concern is COVERT recording, and that horse has already bolted. Sure, they tried to make camera phones click when they're used but the pervos (who slip the things into their SHOES, no less) just switch to video recording which can't give any audible clues (or it would spoil the recording). I'm pretty sure a sophisticated pervo would make Bluetooth camera shades...oh wait, they already have them (http://www.lightinthebox.com/Sunglasses-with-4GB-MP3-Player-with-camera-video-Bluetooth-Black-HF139-_p110137.html), with twice the memory of Spider Jerusalem's signature Live Shades, too.

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Nvidia opens pre-orders for handheld Shield console three days early

Charles 9
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Trollface

But...can it play Crysis?

(Sorry, just had to throw that in.)

But seriously, it mentions Steam, but Steam on Android is more an extension of the Steam interface rather than a gaming portal—unless that is changing. It would be something if longtime Valve favorites like Half-Life 2 and Team Fortress 2 were to make the jump (TF2 was the first Valve game to join the penguins, after all), but I'm not getting my hopes up.

Also, I'd be interested to see if other powerful Android phones like the HTC One and Samsung GS4 can somehow get in on the party in some way.

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US government wants security research on car-to-car nets

Charles 9
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Re: “vehicle cybersecurity”

IIRC you had to be IN the car to attach something to the car's system bus. Or are you saying this will translate to the wireless transmissions, saying they will inevitably be hacked all to pieces?

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Unlocking Technology Act plans to let freedom ring for devices

Charles 9
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Re: Hmm

Not illegal, just VERY bad for business. People have gotten used to Windows for over 20 years now. It's what they want, and as the business mantra goes, that's what they'll get.

Any store that has TRIED to sell Linux desktops end up with confused questions and irate customers unable to do their taxes or the like because the software is for Windows (Oops). If even Walmart can't make Linux on the desktop work, it's pretty much given Microsoft currently holds a NATURAL near-monopoly on the desktop market.

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Charles 9
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Re: Hmm

Why not right now? Sue Microsoft on the grounds that their price incentives for Windows exclusivity is anti-competitive. Doesn't existing law already cover for anti-competitive business practices?

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'Liberator': Proof that you CAN'T make a working gun in a 3D printer

Charles 9
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Re: why bother

I'd hardly call making a small, concealable weapon capable of killing at a distance that can't be picked up by metal detectors pointless. Most airports still just use metal detectors, not to mention all the other places like courthouses guarded just by metal detectors.

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Charles 9
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Re: why bother

But most of those zip guns are made of metal pipes and whatnot. The big row is this advances the idea of making a NONMETALLIC zip gun. It's not there YET, but having something like this spurs the imagination. There's really very little metal in it; what's to say someone can't put this together with a strong enough nonmetallic firing pin and perhaps a ceramic bullet in perhaps a carbon fiber casing or the like. Suddenly you have a ZERO-metal firearm; improve the design a little more or use a printer that can use stronger plastics and you'll have yourself a nonmetallic derringer good at a short but practical range (say a few meters--too far for a knife). And since many places including many airports are still limited to metal detectors...

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Charles 9
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Re: 3D Printers: The Jeffy Boot-Strap Test

As I pointed out in another reply, people are actually researching this aspect. Perhaps once 3D printers can reliably do metal, then they can pass the Jeffy Boot-Strap Test.

Point is, they really ARE working on it.

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Charles 9
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Re: Your better off printing a sling shot.

I think El Reg mentioned a research project into exactly that, so you may be surprised.

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Charles 9
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Re: Ever hear of a zip gun?

Now try making it completely nonmetallic yet still lethal. Then metal detectors become useless.

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Charles 9
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Except such a law would never get past the southern and western states who still adhere to their folklore about mountain men, rugged survivalism, and the Wild West. To them (many of whom seceded from the union once already), Washington is the real enemy, not the terrorists. To them, the phrase "from my cold, dead fingers" has real meaning.

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Charles 9
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And BTW, what kind of political leader would even THINK of carpet-bombing, to say nothing of nuking, their own population? My answer is one that would soon be swamped in his own capital, making the bombing option useless unless that leader's not too concerned about his/her future.

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Charles 9
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The whole balleyhoo isn't that the gun can be printed at home but that the gun is made of a minimal amount of metal. Guns on airplanes have always been the stuff of nightmares; it's the image that NOWHERE is safe. Sure, everyone points to the nail and the bullets, but then the question becomes, "What if they used black powder, a ceramic bullet, a carbon fiber casing, and a diamond firing pin?" Suddenly, you have a completely nonmetallic firearm. How's the airport going to be able to check that when it's on someone's person?

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Hemp used to make graphene-like supercapacitors

Charles 9
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Re: Hemp bast is a waste product?

Not really. Cotton beats hemp for most fabric uses, as it's tougher (lasts longer) and softer (more durable) than hemp. And like hemp, cotton naturally wicks.

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Charles 9
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Re: Hemp!

If it's such a miracle plant, why isn't it used more often in countries where it isn't restricted by drug regulations? The main reason is that hemp is rather a jack-of-all-trades plant. It's useful, yes, but it's no miracle maker. Furthermore, it's a tough plant to process completely.

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Charles 9
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Re: Hemp!

Nah, hemp was impractical as a sea rope because it wicks (you have to tar hemp rope before you can use it at sea), so they went with manila rope instead which didn't wick.

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Apple: ebook price fixing? Nooo, nothing to do with us, no siree

Charles 9
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Re: 'Cost' for an e-book

What if the proofreaders, editors, and the like, like the authors, work on commission or royalty, such that the cost is not one-off but per-book?

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Charles 9
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Re: Too much marketing information (for Apples peace of mind)

The trouble is that with Android taking the lead in the mobile market and with mutli-purpose tablets reaching ubiquity, the market is anything but clear. Sure the nook and Sony markets are tame compared to Amazon, but there's less lock-in with Android devices. Which means Amazon gaining a complete monopoly would be difficult—there's still plenty of room for market disruption.

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NASA: Our ALIEN HUNTING star-scan 'scope is KNACKERED

Charles 9
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Happy

Give the space engineers of the world credit. Their track record concerning exoplanetary equipment has recently been quite impressive. Remember, we're talking a telescope that is a year past its working life. You have several rovers on Mars still trundling years past the "mission accomplished" state, and European scientists just recently bid adieu to its cryonic space telescope after it managed to hang on for a few extra months. That's what I call bang for the buck.

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Rules, shmules: Fliers leaving devices switched on in droves

Charles 9
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Re: Engineering tolerances?

News Flash: This ACTUALLY HAPPENED. It's still listed as the most tragic airliner accident on record: the Tenerife disaster on the Canary Islands.

- Airport diversions due to terrorist attack, CHECK (Bombing at Las Palmas)

- Poor weather conditions, CHECK (Zero-V fog)

- Tricky landing conditions, CHECK (Airport is over 600m up and way too small)

- Poor English at the control tower, CHECK (ATCs not used to speaking English)

And note this occurred in 1977, BEFORE cell phones were the norm. As others have said, many planes have long duty cycles and therefore may not be well-hardened against internal radio transmissions. And note that frequency is not always at play--that's why even a modern GSM cell phone can still cause clicks when next to a radio, even though neither operate in the other's frequency ranges. I've PERSONALLY heard police radios (which operate around 800MHz) coming out of TV speakers which should have no tuning equipment to speak of. For the FCC, it's a case of "better safe than sorry".

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UK.gov's love affair with ID cards: Curse or farce?

Charles 9
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Let's take the argument to the extreme. How does one prove an identity without said identity being traceable? I suspect identity is INHERENTLY traceable, so there's no in-between available. Next question is: is being tracked worth the price? Let's take it to the extreme: what if privacy becomes an actual existential threat to some large area? How would you respond to this? Do you sacrifice your privacy to defeat it or let the threat come to pass and likely die as a result?

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Obama orders gov data must be 'open and machine-readable'

Charles 9
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Re: Executive orders are policy of all executive branch agencies

The thing is, federal law already in place states that the products of the US government (with a few exceptions) are supposed to be in the public domain. Seems this Executive Order is simply applying this law and specifying how this publicly-available information should be distributed.

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HTC profits PLUNGE 98%: Pins hopes on HTC One, 'Facebook mobe'

Charles 9
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Re: 2 years on...

I have the Desire Z myself, which is approaching three years old and is showing signs of getting clunky as the app demands grow. Much as I like it, I keep getting the impression it's time to move on. I'm currently favoring Samsung's Galaxy S IV, mostly because, unlike the HTC One (Sorry) I can install an SD card and remove the battery.

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Thousands rally behind teen girl cuffed, expelled in harmless 'explosion'

Charles 9
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I have to wonder if a whole bunch of students were to display a show of solidarity and repeat the experiment en masse, creating a unique form of student strike. I don't know about you, but I don't think any school board will be very inclined to expel a sizable chunk of any school's population.

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Science of the lambs: Boffins grow GLOW-IN-THE-DARK sheep

Charles 9
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Re: NOT glow in the dark - you need UV. NOT DARK.

So IOW, they're FLUORescent not PHOSPHORescent.

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New Google Play terms ban non-store app updates

Charles 9
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Re: Binary executables only

IIRC that counts as installing an app, which means Android intervenes and will either block it as third-party or (if you enable the option) prompt you accordingly. The key aspect is making the app accessible to Android, which normally requires going through the Installer or Android won't see it (theoretically, if you root your device and let a program have SuperUper permission, they could do it outside the Installer framework, but apart from backup programs I don't recall such a program existing).

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CURSE you, EINSTEIN! Humanity still chained in relativistic PRISON

Charles 9
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Re: Stupid question

Imagine if you will the venerable Saturn V rocket on the verge of takeoff. The rockets at the bottom fire and start pushing up the bottom of the rocket. However, the top of the rocket does not react momentarily. For that instant, the rocket compresses and propagates up the height of the rocket until the top start moving.

A similar thing can be observed with the humble Slinky. There is an El Reg article about a Slinky experiment that discusses the phenomenon at length.

Basically put, nothing in the universe is perfectly rigid. Apply a force at one end of the rod and, instead of the whole rod moving at once, the rod will compress at that end, and a compression wave will run down the length of the rod at subuminar speed. The other end won't react immediately because of this.

Incidentally, this compression phenomenon exists regardless of friction, as it can also occur in space where friction is as close to zero as we can get it.

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White House backs US web sales tax - eBay hits panic alarm

Charles 9
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Re: Nightmare.

"In all seriousnous, I don't see the calculations as insurmountable. And from the sound of it some businesses should be doing this anyway for non-internet sales. Awkward yes, and the complexity even if it was only a state level must be... well quite complex - I've forgotten how to do combinations and factorials. But should be possible to code a cheapish app for the job, the trick would be getting the underlying tax rates and locations without paying for access to other people's databases."

The problem is that there are further complications. Consider tax exemptions. For example, Virginia does not tax medicines, but the definition of medicine isn't entirely clear. A bottle of aspirin is generally a yes while an energy shot (also in the medicine aisle) is generally a no, but what about a non-pharmaceutical pain reliever? Then you have tax holidays, which can shift from year to year and may not apply from one year to the next, and they usually have item qualifications of their own.

So how can one make a concrete set of rules for taxation when it's not even clear what is subject to taxation? And as for the feds, there's a strong push against a federal sales/consumption tax of any sort (they considered it a century ago and rejected it--too much subversion potential)--a VAT would be considered a consumption tax, which most people are against.

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Charles 9
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Except the federal government isn't interested in a unified sales or consumption tax. They talked about a century ago and determined it's too prone to corruption and subversion. Some of the problems with sales taxes involve preventing black markets appearing that don't keep records. Value-Added Taxing tends to prevent this because the taxing occurs at wholesale levels rather than at retail but it has its own foibles.

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Guess who PC-slaying tablets are killing next? Keyboard biz Logitech

Charles 9
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Re: Don't mention Squeezebox or Ultimate Ears

I have a K400 myself, and I move it around from place to place. It works well for PCs and for my Samsung Smart TV. When it comes to the Pi, though, it's hit or miss. I suspect this is more to do with power constraints. I'll give it a try against a self-powered hub and see if it works better. AFAICT, any problems with the device stem more from compatibility issues than the device itself.

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Black-eyed Pies reel from BeagleBoard's $45 Linux micro blow

Charles 9
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Re: I'll see your ARM core and raise you a SATA port. ;-)

Point taken, but at the same time using the CPU as a gatekeeper helps to block potential memory exploits. FireWire has better throughput because of Direct Memory Access, but it also opens the door to potential memory exploits (and since FireWare was two-way you had to allow two-way access to the memory). Looks like a hard one to solve: place a gatekeeper and you lose the speed and efficiency advantages; don't and you risk memory exploits.

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