* Posts by Charles 9

8257 posts • joined 10 Jun 2009

Alleged skipper of pirate site KickAss Torrents keel-hauled in Poland

Charles 9
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Re: What first amendment?

"And a nuclear bomb - however craply implemented - is always going to be the more effective weapon in those terms because the vast bulk of the population has no idea what nuclear weapons really are, and just considers them to be super-scary end-of-the-universe stuff."

But they have to actually SEE the effects to be terrorized. That's why 9/11 was so effective; an airlines crashes into a skyscraper and actually brings it down. In order for atomic terror to work, it has to be a REAL atomic explosion like that seen in the Trinity test (which people have seen on film). Just imagine the kind of terror you could inflict if you could, without warning, nuke the Rio Opening Ceremonies...

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Charles 9
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Re: Meanwhile other forms of entertainment are readily available

"How a business model that alienates customers can survive is beyond me. I doubt active law enforcement is going to help. Better start by fixing the root cause of the problem first. No?"

The root cause of the problem is that media companies want repeat business (as does anyone, one-and-dones don't cut it long-term), and (at least legally) they have a captive market, so capitalism says they can dictate terms and you're left with a "take it or leave it". Thing is, for every one that leaves, there are ten who will take it, so the money's there.

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Charles 9
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Re: Big content: 3

"I do agree with you, but the stupid watch less and less new content because they have realised it is all garbage lately."

I don't think so. Garbage is what they WANT to watch, given all the sequels and me-toos you see on the big and small screens all the time. Given the ratings gravitate towards them, this points to a hopeless fight to get truly satisfying content.

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Charles 9
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Re: What first amendment?

"If I have a directory of local fences* is that illegal even if I never buy or sell stolen goods? Are Yell (is that still a thing) breaking the law by listing gun stores?"

Does the term "aiding and abetting" ring a bell? Or perhaps "enabling"? If you do something to enable or encourage an illegal act, that's illegal in itself. That's why crime-for-hire is ITSELF a crime. They consider it closing loopholes.

Unless Yell lists black market gun sites, they're covered under the First AND Second Amendment.

"When does knowledge, and the dissemination of it, become so dangerous that our betters have to make it illegal?"

What about the knowledge to make an atomic bomb or perhaps the secrets to a plague? What was that saying? "A little knowledge can be dangerous." Or was it, "There are some things man is not meant to know."?

"Government of the people, by the people, for the people."

But then you end up with what we have now: "government of the charismatic, by the stupid, for the affluent". It's the natural human condition to find a way to get a leg up over the neighbors. PLUS stupid people are statistically certain. Put them together, and no government that you describe is destined to survive for very long. Even Greece fell to the Romans eventually.

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Charles 9
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Re: The end of piracy again!

Half the proxies are poisoned, though. This was true of the KA proxies, too, which was why you always wanted the clear quill which kept the ads to a minimum.

And I'm talking the click-anywhere types of ads that open up full screen and try their damndest to get past the ad blockers by matching domains and so on. Or the clickbait ads. Or the ad walls. Not to mention the fake ones that try to foist "Click to Install" trojans on you (and you can't really block those because most of them run on fast-flux).

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Charles 9
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Re: The end of piracy again!

Most people avoid TPB these days because it's ad-ridden (meaning potentially malware-ridden.).

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Charles 9
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Re: Big content: 3

Problem is Big Content has the stupid on their side. As long as the stupid continue to buy movie tickets and so on, they'll have a guaranteed revenue stream, meaning infinite money to attack squeaky nails.

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US standards lab says SMS is no good for authentication

Charles 9
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Re: Good riddance

"In order to bank at all you have to have some sort of network connection, so you can do the second factor over the network."

The problem is if the NETWORK is compromised. Which is why the second factor MUST be out of band. Otherwise, it's all the eggs in one basket, so to speak.

As for fobs and tokens and so on, wasn't RSA hacked and the algorithm leaked so that the keys could be cloned?

"...and should go back to banking with a teller in person."

And if your bank has NO tellers?

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Charles 9
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Re: Good riddance

Well then, how DO you do two-factor authentication with no wireless data coverage to speak of?

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Charles 9
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Because users have a NEED (not a WANT, a NEED) to bank on the go, such as to quickly transfer funds because their bank card is low and it's close to closing time and so on. And given that many people are willing to go without their WALLET but not without their PHONES, and you've got a real issue here because they're going to use it will ne, nil ye. You better find a way to make those apps tight, then.

As for two-factor, there's also the problem that, if you can't use the phone as a second factor, most people DON'T HAVE a second factor at all. Which means two-factor authentication is no longer possible.

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By 2040, computers will need more electricity than the world can generate

Charles 9
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Re: MISPWOSO

Are you also taking into consideration the physical limitations integrated circuits are already hitting, meaning you can't get much smaller before making things too small for the electrons (which have a fixed size) from working properly? Where would we go beyond that limit?

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You really do want to use biometrics for payments, beam banks

Charles 9
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"Or we can remember a password that we can change by thinking of a new one"

Yes, tough choice, because many people CAN'T remember passwords. Hell, many people can't remember PINs? Why do you think reset exploits are so good? Because people forget them all too easily.

How do you authenticate someone with nothing to KNOW or HAVE?

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Charles 9
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Re: Biometrics ruins cybersecurity

So what happens when you have a terrible memory and keep forgetting your phone?

It may be inconvenient for YOU, but for many people biometrics is the ONLY thing guaranteed to be on their person. You can't rely on what they KNOW (for they may not have a good enough memory to KNOW anything) OR what they HAVE (for they may not have anything on their person), so what choice do you have?

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Smartphones aren't tiny PCs, but that's how we use them in the West

Charles 9
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Re: Guess you don't you fly much

"Remember a direct deposit account also enables direct withdrawals."

Oh? Where does it say that? Last I checked, direct deposits and direct debits had to be authorized separately.

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Charles 9
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Re: unique

"Well, I mean, nearly everyone has a phone everywhere. But we *don't* generally walk around with it unlocked and the banking app loaded."

It's not that hard. You just turn it on while you're in line or as you make your approach.

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Charles 9
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Re: unique

"1) take card from wallet

2) tap card"

You mean:

1) Take card from wallet.

2) Tap card, but pad refuses to read. Try again, doesn't work.

3) Say sod this and swipe, only to remember it's a Chip card.

4) Try to insert the Chip, but it's broken.

5) Call the whole thing off.

OR:

1) Take card from wallet.

2) Tap card, but find out the NFC reader's turned off.

Plus, consider many people don't like to carry their wallets around (for fear of identity theft) or have no way to (because their clothes have no pockets) but they still have ways to carry their phone (like on a clip).

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Microsoft ordered to fix 'excessively intrusive, insecure' Windows 10

Charles 9
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Re: Privacy? How about basic usability?

"And which of these do you use?"

Check out the Steam Library. Compare the size of the Linux one with the Windows one. Most of the newer ones use cutting-edge stuff including DX11. WINE stinks at cutting edge. Fallout 4 happens to be one of the most prominent. We can probably also throw in Metal Gear Solid 5 and the Final Fantasy XIII trilogy.

Put it this way. If Linux gaming really were all that, (A) Valve would be having no difficulty getting mainstream developers to code for Linux to get away from Windows' thumb, yet you have developers like Bethesda Softworks (who made Fallout 4) going on record saying that developing on Linux is too mercurial. And (B), you'd see the professional gaming circuit, who thrives on the cutting edge, and who do it for a living, using Linux gaming boxes to extract the last bit of performance out of their rigs. Yet we don't see that.

"Not forgetting also that updates on doze require a reboot for making really stupidly minor updates to the system."

That's what I meant by monthly. Most of them update system components, which is why they require a reboot. About the same thing happened when I was on Xubuntu (yes, I tried Linux firsthand, and I didn't like it). As for rebooting, consider the target audience (Joe Stupids who don't understand the concept of rebooting). If they don't reboot, they can get pwned and Microsoft gets the blame for it. Sounds like a case of "damned if you do, damned if you don't," only they have more "Joe Stupid" Windows customers than sophisticated ones, and the latter tend to have enterprise contracts with different rules.

"If your machines are really that bad, you really need to get off Windows."

Wish I could, but like most people the software I use everyday has no analogue anywhere else meaning we're kinda stuck here. That's what you don't seem to understand. When someone is stuck in a leaky boat in the middle of the shark-filled ocean, there's really only one option for you. Such as it is for most people: there are no alternatives.

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Charles 9
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Re: Privacy? How about basic usability?

Many games are Windows-ONLY, WINE-INCOMPATIBLE, and VM-UNFRIENDLY. Plus I don't like rebooting unless I HAVE to, which is usually only about once a month (too many times I've seen machines try to reboot and fail, so it's a real uptime issue here). Show me games like Fallout 4 running on Linux at the same speed as Windows and I'll consider it. Otherwise, call me when the Linux Steam library gets close to the Windows Steam library. Plus there's DX12 coming up, and it has more support than that for Vulkan. SERIOUS PC gamers tend to stay away from Linux. Otherwise, we'd be seeing professional gaming rigs (such as that used for competitions) running on Linux. Until then...

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Charles 9
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Re: Trust the government...

"Not a hope, they are the primary driver of this slurping in the first place. May wants MORE of it."

Well, that's the price of admission. And you can't exactly leave it because EVERY country wants the same data for the sake of its sovereign security. Any option that ignores that reality is basically asking for anarchy.

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Charles 9
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Re: What about the US?

Fallout 4, for starters. Bethesda has sworn off Linux, so no port is likely, and it's a near-cutting-edge game so WINE won't hack it and VM's can't do it without a serious performance penalty. And let's not get to incoming DX12 games which require Win10 and which WINE won't even begin to cover for a while yet. There's a very good reason the Linux Steam library is less than half the size of the Windows Steam library.

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Charles 9
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Re: What about the US?

But what of something you really want (or worse, NEED) is Windows-only, WINE-incompatible, and VM-unfriendly?

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Charles 9
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Re: Privacy? How about basic usability?

Well, that's what's called a "captive market". If you depend on SharePoint, and support is a legal requirement, then you're kinda stuck with an "all or nothing" situation. So you end up asking yourself what it's going to take you to go nuclear and abandon EVERYTHING, even at expense to your business (or in my case, at expense to my massive game collection, most of which is strictly Windows-ONLY).

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Charles 9
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Well, SOMEONE has to be entrusted with your personal data: for census, benefits, taxes, and so on if nothing else. Kinda comes with the territory, so they're going to have your data anyway as a matter of course. Anything otherwise and you're talking anarchy. They're the sovereign: the ultimate authority in the country. Given that, might as well limit yourself to the one entity in the country that MUST AND WILL have it.

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Charles 9
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Re: To think that...

"It's not 'do one thing and do it well' - it's trying to be a swiss army knife."

Well, when you're running in a system where the entire landscape can change on a moment's notice (think dynamic, hotplugging buses like USB and so on, where NOTHING is fixed anymore), you pretty much HAVE to be a jack of all trades to be able to handle that curveball coming out of nowhere.

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IETF boffins design a DNS for digital money

Charles 9
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I don't know if I'd be too keen on the concept becoming a reality as of yet, but I would love to at least see the conversation that ensues, to see just what issues and pitfalls could be involved in such a system. I think the biggest issue here is that of trust, but that touches on an issue that affects civilization itself: you NEED a minimum level of trust for civilization to function at all; otherwise it's DTA mode which inevitably leads to anarchy. It's, as they say, an extremely thorny issue which is exactly why I want to see an extended conversation on it. Get everything out in the open.

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Your antivirus doesn't like Ammyy. And fraudsters will use that to RAT you out (again)

Charles 9
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Re: I dunno if this would work...

I've thought about it, but then you get the "Turtles All the Way Down" problem. How can you be sure the "known good" copy really IS "known good" if the intruders are savvy enough to not only replace the copy but also its hash as well (or worse, if it's a well-resourced enemy like a State, successfully pull off a Preimage Attack and submit a bad copy with the same hash)?

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Charles 9
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Re: I have fun with the scammers...

But what if the malcontents have a Red Pill that can jailbreak them out of the guest OS into the host?

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Charles 9
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Re: I have fun with the scammers...

"I wonder if I should let on that I've got sites like TV & Ammyy listed in my HOSTS file & therefore can't access them from this computer at all?"

NO! Don't! Then they'll know what's up and go to Plan B: a relay that WOULDN'T be on your blacklist because you never heard of it until now.

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Your next storage will be invisible (for a while)

Charles 9
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Re: DIY ad hoc storage is not for production use...period

"There is really no reason to start with junk servers unless you need to prove the concept before you get the funding you need to do it right."

As noted in the article. These things usually get thrown up for third-string stuff that was just handy to have and tend to grow organically into the organization.

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Charles 9
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Re: An ogoing problem for over 30 years

Now, gradual flash chip failure is actually pretty easy to detect and then negotiate (lock the drive to read-only, copy what you can to a new unit, use recovery tools for the rest if needed). But IINM Flash SSDs also suffer from a higher-than-normal rate of controller failures, and controller failures are sudden catastrophic failures: fine one moment, hard-bricked the next, so these need to be taken into consideration as well.

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Charles 9
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Re: An ogoing problem for over 30 years

That may affect rust, but I think solid-state will have a big edge in that regard given I doubt we've hit top end on solid-state bus speeds, which in turn will cut the rebuild times and thus the margins of error.

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Charles 9
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Re: An ogoing problem for over 30 years

"...but we are going to collide with limits sooner rather than later."

What kind of hard limits do you think we'll hit given that rust capacity has managed to continue climbing in spite of scares while solid-state capacity is still growing and still has several big shifts left in the tank?

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FAA's 'drone smash risk to aircraft' is plane crazy

Charles 9
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Think Prohibition. Ornerous laws can become unenforceable if enough people balk on them. Think the black market and why AK-47s still come into the country. Demand draws supply through hook or crook. Meaning the law can ring hollow.

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For $800 you can buy internet engineers' answer to US government spying

Charles 9
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Re: FIPS 140-2 (Was Cheap)

But can you think of one better?

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Charles 9
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Re: And if I'm paranoid enough, or my data is sensitive enough

But what's to stop the foundry from being doubled?

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EU Net Neutrality debate heats up as Tim Berners-Lee weighs in

Charles 9
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But centralization is NATURAL, part of the human condition, and therefore inevitable. Put it this way. The Gilded Age got that way not because governments coddled big businesses but the other way around, because businesses got SO big they could stand OVER the governments and dictate terms or simply buy the governments out. Same today with transnational businesses like big oil. Why don't governments strip big oil subsidies? Because big oil threatens to pull out and take their revenues with them to other, more "friendly" countries. That brings up a turn of phrase: Better 10% of something than 100% of nothing.

PS. As for regulation that WORKED, what about the US taking over the rail network during World War I and standardizing the rail gauges and so on, such that when World War II came around, they found they didn't have to do anything else to get the rail companies on board the war effort that time around?

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Charles 9
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Spectrum, however, is a limited resource, with an absolute limit to its utility (Nyquist’s theorem). This puts the onus on the State to regulate it to ensure it's being used to best improve the lot of the people (under capitalism, there can be incentive to hoard, wait out the competition, and then monopolize).

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Charles 9
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Re: Message to the Telcos - Be proactive

Infrastructure is a huge upfront cost while the RoI is iffy. "Extra infrastructure" doesn't really sell with customers, especially at the consumer end, plus the competition can weasel their way to stay competitive with those who actually plunk down. Unless there is an absolute truth in advertising law, that won't change.

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Ad blockers responsible for rise in upfront TV ad sales, claims report

Charles 9
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Re: even on footy

Since so many people are getting skilled with channel-surfing, they synchronize breaks so that no matter which channel you turn, you see a commercial. Meanwhile, inline ads are the last bastion: embedded right into the broadcast, part and parcel and inseparable, forcing you into the ultimate "Take It or Leave It" situation: ads and all or not at all. Not even hidebound traditionalist events like Test Cricket are immune (sure the uniforms are clean, but you can't say that about the field). And since the sports themselves need the ad revenues to keep things going (otherwise they have to raise ticket prices beyond the tolerance point), you start to wonder how it will all end...

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Charles 9
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Re: Some of the web players are getting bad

"illegally inspecting my PC"

It's not illegal. It's entirely possible to detect ad-blockers completely server-side simply by seeing if the ad videos get called up or not. If they won't let you see the video without requiring the ad be served first, that's basically your problem as they've made the ad the price of admission. It's done with their equipment so their rules apply, and it's all legal. You either bend over, hope and pray for something like a torrent (and the networks know about it and can send out fake torrents), or just go without that episode.

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Charles 9
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Re: The more the money men smell blood in the water

"It's actually illegal to probe my system for plugins. Against the law. Yet you think it is acceptable."

One, under what law?

And two, what's to stop a server from detecting a blocker by, you know, noticing you're not calling up ads? That's entirely server-side and impossible to ban without stepping on Constitutional toes.

"I'm stopping making music, I'm giving up computers and I'm disconnecting off the net."

Then why are you still here?

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Charles 9
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"On the TV Ads that show up before a video, I mute the sound and minimize the window for however long the ad runs and then I restart the video."

You just watch. Next thing you'll know they'll detect the ad is not visible and PAUSE it as long as it's covered, only restarting it when you switch back.

After that, it'll be ads for things for which there is no alternative (the market is captive), meaning the only option is to go without, which may involve Walking on the Sun...

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Charles 9
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Re: What the eye doesn't see, the heart doesn't grieve over.

"If I see an advert for product X, then when I want to but something in that product category, Product X is removed from the list of possible suppliers."

So what do you do when it's the ONLY supplier? Or when ALL the possible suppliers display ads? Do you go without?

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Silently clicking on porn ads you can't even see – this could be you...

Charles 9
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Re: PORN-A-CHU, I CHOOSE YOU!!!

Odd. Most people in search of stuff like that tend to search in other channels such as Rule 34 sites and sites that specialize in adult and underground anime (since Pokemon is is Japanese in origin so gets grouped with anime).

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Charles 9
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Re: PORN-A-CHU, I CHOOSE YOU!!!

"Disturbingly, Pika-porn (poke-porn) has existed for a lot longer the current go-poke-fad."

Longer than even pony-porn IIRC. Just remember Rule 34, and Pokemon has been around for nearly 20 years.

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UK gov says new Home Sec will have powers to ban end-to-end encryption

Charles 9
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Re: Utter anti-security nonsense

You better also use home-built hardware as well that has guaranteed verifiable traces and so on, lest we forget the State is interested in subverting communications at the hardware level, beyond any userland level of detection, prevention, or intervention.

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Charles 9
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Re: An apt comparison

But if you "Deny by default" then YOU dictate the pace of the Internet in your area, meaning it can never be faster than the pace YOU can inspect it.

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Since you love Flash so much, Adobe now has TWO versions for you

Charles 9
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Re: Oh, JFC...

"Amortisation is the practice of reducing the value of assets to reflect their reduced worth over time."

No, that's depreciation.

Amortization is the practice of smoothing out financial shocks (such as a large one-off like a capital investment) over time by splitting the large single payment over the expected useful life of the investment. It's still been paid for, but by spreading the cost in the books, it helps provide a better long-term view of its impact on the business (of course, if something happens to cause a write-off, the balance has to be immediately applied).

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Charles 9
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Re: Oh, JFC...

"Can't we just put the stupid package to permanent death already."

Not as long as there are very expensive pieces of kit that require Flash to operate. Since the costs are sunk and being actively amortized, they cannot be replaced. Since they already exist, they cannot be forced to be replaced by legal means (because they're currently legal, they can't be made illegal retroactively).

So IOW, SUAUI (Shut Up And Use It).

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Coup-Tube: Turkey blocks social networks amid military takeover

Charles 9
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Re: if you can read this you are probably one of the lucky ones

What's the common unit for this chart?

And how about you compare them to their median cost of living as well, since where you are can determine how far you can stretch your cash.

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