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* Posts by Charles 9

3472 posts • joined 10 Jun 2009

Samsung plans LTE Advanced version of Galaxy S4

Charles 9
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Re: 1Gbps downloads (up to)

Have you considered that (1) the S4 actually has a 1080p display, and (2) you can buy a dongle that lets you route the phone's display to an HDTV? Plus there are places where it's easier to go wireless than wired.

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Charles 9
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For me, it was the other way around. I'm leery of any phone where I can't open it up, and that was the deal-breaker for me and the HTC One. When it comes to aesthetics, I could care less. Function over form for me, and the S4's bigger screen. I can always pick a bigger battery or add in a Qi charging plate. Options remain pretty wide open for me.

As for TouchWiz, while I found the "Life Companion" thing rather tacky, the nice thing was that I could at least change it to something more utilitarian like a basic clock display. I rather like the simple swipe-to-unlock mechanic that's seemingly exclusive to TouchWiz, though. Plus I'm willing to hack a little which had enabled Google Wallet and kept the Samsung baggage to a minimum.

As for HTC making a comeback, we'll just have to see. I don't expect Samsung to be sitting pretty, either. Will HTC be able to fire back when (not if) Samsung proceeds to develop a Galaxy S5?

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Charles 9
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Re: One question... Why?

Thing is, the technique needed to do voice over LTE is going to depend on the LTE data aspect no matter what. THAT part of LTE is already in place. Once a standard is settled, the implementation's mostly down to software, something Android can send down the pipe relatively easily.

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New material enables 1,000-meter super-skyscrapers

Charles 9
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Re: How about buoyant elevators?

Have these pipes you mentioned possible been build over a kilometer long and at diameters over 2 meters? Furthermore, the pressures of a vertical pipe are very uneven (concentrating at the bottom). Then there's the matter of opernings? How watertight can you make the seals between the pipe, car, and door, so that you don't have a massive failure when the doors open on the ground floor? The ground floor opening has to be able to hold back the weight of the ENTIRE column of water—repeatedly, reliably, rapidly, and non-permanently.

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Charles 9
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Re: Any rope is the problem

"Not according to http://science.howstuffworks.com/science-vs-myth/everyday-myths/question730.htm -- modern failsafe brakes engage the rails in the shaft. An untethered car could use the same system with little modification."

That assumes a power failure or similar problem with the car. But there's another point of failure that hasn't been fully accommodated yet: a break in the rail, particularly one simultaneous with a disaster. Especially for a cable-free design, there needs to be a way for the car to be able to support itself in the event of a single- or possible dual-rail failure (a cable-free setup would probably need four rails for safety and redundancy), because in the system you describe, the safety brake might have nothing to engage: slipping off or jumping the broken rail. That's one reason cables and counterweights are still in use: they are the failsafe against a rail failure. And since they rely on physics, it's a bulky by physically simple design. If an elevator car broke free of the guide rails, the setup would still mean the motor could retard or perhaps direct the movement of the car to a controlled point for extraction.

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Charles 9
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Re: Extra lift.

Mine elevators typically work in pairs. As one car goes down from the top, its partner (at the bottom) goes up in sync. The weight of the partner car going up helps to offset the weight of the car going down, reducing the load on the shaft motor. Many times, the partner car also carries an ore load (most car setups have two or three levels for passengers, then an ore carrier on top), further offsetting the descending weight.

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Charles 9
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Re: A note on elevator safety

Plus, I believe the survivor was (1) a WOMAN, and (2) the attendant for that elevator (this was before self-service cars were the norm). It happened on a foggy night during World War II, and the cables and safeties all failed because a B-25 (blinded by said fog) managed to fly smack into the building and completely sever the shaft from above, disabling all the safeties. Current theories about how the woman, Betty Lou Oliver, survive range from the mass of cable UNDER the car acting like a spring to the tight fit in the shaft producing a cushion of air under the car that pushed back with increasing pressure as the car fell..

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Charles 9
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Re: Any rope is the problem

What about failsafes? The Otis system used the presence of the rope itself to hold back safety bars, more modern systems rely on a governor to engage brake shoes on the rope or motor, and hydraulic elevators use the hydraulic system itself to limit the rate of descent. How would you ensure the safety of untethered elevator cars in the event of a catastrophic failure?

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We want to put a KILL SWITCH into your PHONE, say Feds

Charles 9
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Re: iOS7 killtech is at the OS level, not IMEI

Would this OS-level instruction survive a wipe or factory reset?

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Charles 9
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Re: It woud be OK if...

"A few anti theft apps available to rooted Android phone owners can brick the device if the sim is changed, no signal needed. Avast antitheft has this option if I recall."

But if they work in a radio dead zone, they don't NEED to change the SIM. They just manually install a backup program through ADB or sideload or just manually copy everything of value, then change the SIM and perform a factory wipe on a reboot, before the bricking software can kick in (the feature is part of the Android bootloader itself and doesn't check the SIM at that stage).

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Charles 9
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Re: It woud be OK if...

You'd think anyone nicking a phone wouldn't think to bring a Faraday bag like people use to get nicked clothes out of department stores and the like. If it can't get the kill signal, it can't be killed. And you can't use cell phone reception as a vigilance control. One big blackout or trip to the sticks would kill the phone.

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Nicked unencrypted PC with 6,000 bank details lands council fat fine

Charles 9
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Re: What I don't understand...

You assume the laptop isn't going to a dead zone where there's no Internet to speak of: wired or wireless. They still exist, meaning it's a local copy of the data or bust, because the person handling it MUST go there and MUST have access to the data. As for the drive encryption, suppose free solutions are "not on the approved list", it reacts badly to BitLocker, and the budget doesn't allow for a different laptop.

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Charles 9
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Re: Ban Laptops

"I don't even see the need to have remote access to personal data. Work should get done at the office and home life done at home. If an employee needs to do work at home, there is something wrong with their job classification. Hire another person in the office."

Easy enough to say until accounting tells you there's not enough in the labor budget to retain another worker. That's the big big problem with labor these days: people are expected to be working as much as possible or they'll find someone who works harder than you. It's a race to the bottom to find people who work as hard as possible for as little as possible...if they don't find a foreign worker who can work for what we'd consider a pittance or just turn the job over to an expert system who can work round the clock with virtually no time off.

As for remote access, consider that some places have very poor Internet access. If you have to make a deadline (maybe it's for a contract), you can't stay in the office, and you can't rely on remote access, what options do you have left?

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Charles 9
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Re: Just Sack the Person at the Top

And if it STILL happens? It's not like a government bureau can be dissolved, and a "changing of the guard" could result in a bad-to-worse transition.

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Charles 9
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Re: RDP? What does the ICO do with the money?

And everyone else seems to think the Internet is literally everywhere. What if you need to meet a deadline but you're going to be "out of the loop" for a while? What if your Internet access is notoriously unreliable or hard to secure (you're using a WiFi setup that's not yours)? Then there's the matter of drive-by (hidden in a popular site) rootkit (hidden from detection) malware that can still nick the RDP details.

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REVEALED: The gizmo leaker Snowden used to smuggle out NSA files

Charles 9
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Re: Simple solution

Does your ceramic-embedded epoxy block also defeat acid etching and decapping? Is your system sensitive enough to detect a sniffer listening in via, say, an audio Y cable or some kind of inline reader? Just curious to see how thorough your solution is to physical, side-channel, and in-the-middle attacks.

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Charles 9
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Re: Why not 2?

Because if you can subvert ONE person, how much harder would it be to subvert TWO? One does the deed and the other lies to protect him. Plus as noted, how do you watch a watcher? Especially if you can double the watcher watcher?

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Surprise! Intel smartphone trounces ARM in power trials

Charles 9
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Re: Can you see the LIE

Well, before we well "conspiracy theory," can we get any evidence that these devices were operating at anything other than 3.6V, which is pretty much the standard these days?

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Charles 9
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Re: W = V x I

Don't most of these operate around 3.6V?

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Charles 9
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Re: "secret" benchmark *proves* Intel is superior.

The batteries themselves, yes, but haven't most phone batteries settled on a common voltage of ~3.6V?

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Sony sucker-punches Xbox on price, specs, DRM-free gaming

Charles 9
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Re: Waiting for "Kinect: PRISM"

Or just slap a piece of glass over the eyepiece and duct tape the whole thing? The glass muffles the IR camera while the duct tape covers the visible-light camera.

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Charles 9
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Re: For how long?

IIRC this PS3 "compatibility" is being done through an OnLive-like system. As for bait-and-switch, there's still that NFC-on-the-disc patent...

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Charles 9
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Re: regarding the update in the article...

In the PC sphere, most of the servers are user-owned, so as long as there's interest in the game, someone's going to be maintaining a server for that game. You don't see that with console games unless the games are console-hosted.

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Charles 9
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Re: Pay to Play and no one cares?

Remember, in the console world, they don't allow for user-owned or -rented servers. That's why there's generally no online fees on PCs—the users themselves provide the hosting hardware, not to mention the matchmaking and so on. Those that are left are subscribed (WoW), microtransaction-based (F2Ps), or some combination of the two. Or the servers are sponsored as a means to drive hardware sales and the like.

The console makers don't really trust user-owned servers, seeing them as a possible exploit avenue to penetrate their walled gardens.

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Charles 9
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Re: PS4 also has DRM on used games

Plus there's still the matter of that NFC-on-the-disc patent Sony holds. As reported, this can allow no-resale even without an internet connection.

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Charles 9
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Re: Thank you Sony!

Before I let Sony off the hook about the "no DRM" bit, ask them to explain that patent about NFC-tagged discs. Unless they agree in writing to not implement it in the PS4 (or better, to abandon enforcement of it), there's still the threat they can lock the games down later.

Also, on the matter of resale, what about games that are downloaded from Sony without a disc? And what about the Steam model (which Microsoft is pretty much copying)?

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'Nothing will convince a kid that's never worn glasses to wear them'

Charles 9
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Re: The same could be said of...

The thing about "buffoon" is that it can actually backfire. If someone is totally clueless about the word, they won't get it. But then again, someone may be such a natural clown that he takes it as a compliment and pulls a prank on you or something.

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My bleak tech reality: You can't trust anyone or anything, anymore

Charles 9
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Perhaps, but it's easier for a human to remember ONE big password than 100 of them, so the master password can be as long and complicated as their memory can dare it. Which starts putting a strain on the yottabyte datacenter, which still has two intractable physical limitations: limited time and limited resources. And there are some things even a quantum computer can't readily speed up (such as lattice- or error-correcting-code-based encryption).

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Charles 9
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Re: Simple technique to increase cypher strength

"Establish and maintain data custody at all points where the only person(s) with access are those who the creator of said data authorized explicitly. Any hole that a "bad guy" can slip through, a "good guy gone bad" can get through even more easily."

Which goes to a fundamental and probably intractable problem with data security. In order to be useable, SOMEONE has to have access to the data. As long as someone has access to the data, someone can impersonate them. Given enough resources, Mallory can be indistinguishable from Alice no matter the level of security you apply. Even physical security isn't foolproof: stolen devices and rubber hoses come to mind.

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Tech giants' offshore cash-stashing is only ever a delaying tactic

Charles 9
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Re: Companies don't pay taxes, people do.

But as the article notes, hiding the money in shell companies only goes so far. If the cash stays in the company, it gains value That counts as a capital gain, meaning taxes due when you cash out. Same for dividends. Furthermore, aren't business transactions normally subject to sales or value-added taxes, whether the purchase is for resale or for internal use?

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Charles 9
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Re: US Tax deferral is fraud....

As the article notes, the main thought is that the money never enters the US directly. Instead, Apple will look for foreign locations to build plants and so on. These plants affect the company as a whole, boosting the market cap without directly taxing the increased market value until cashout time. And even there, there are supposedly a few tricks to evade that: such as borrowing against the gains and dying with the debts. This may have changed, but some assets can be re-based when they're inherited, allowing the heirs to pay off the debts by selling out at a reduced tax burden.

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Charles 9
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"Of course, no one ever started a company, practiced a sport or mastered a musical instrument and made lots of money those ways."

All of those involve investment, which means you put in money and likely time to get the return on the investment. The point still stands.

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We're losing the battle with a government seduced by surveillance

Charles 9
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Re: Well said.

So enlighten us. How would the FBI alone take down the entire US population (which BTW outnumbers them by a factor somewhere into the triple digits at least). And while you're at it, go into how the armed forces would be forced to act against their own citizens: potentially against even friends and family?

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Charles 9
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Re: False positives

So let me take the question further. What if it was EVERYONE'S security you were trying to protect? What if one slipped secret basically meant game over: meant your home country and everyone in it was basically doomed. Would your decision stand? Would you (and everyone else) rather die than live under Big Brother?

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Charles 9
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Re: Whack-a-mole

Excuse me. What about the cameras and satellites? Not to mention the eyes on the ground. And I would think at least one pair of eyes will be trained on every pub around: if at the least to be there in case things get rowdy.

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Charles 9
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Re: Whack-a-mole

Wired posted an article about the US supposedly building a facility where they intend to house EVERYTHING that passes through American wires. IOW, even an encrypted comm gets captured and stowed away somewhere for the day they can break it. And IIRC, neither terrorism nor treason have statutes of limitations.

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Charles 9
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Re: it's probably MUCH worse than this

The Android IS is open source, meaning many eyes get to look at it.. And it's based on Linux, which is based on UNIX, which at least has some history of security compartmentalization. If someone can sneak an exploit into Android, why not into the Linux kernel?

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Charles 9
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Re: False positives

I'm not saying that's what *I* believe. I'm saying it's what *THEY* (the US government) believe. And frankly, while I disagree with it, it's hard not to understand the perspective. What happens when you're down to a stark choice between privacy and security with no overlap?

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Charles 9
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Re: it's probably MUCH worse than this

Chips made outside the US? Uncooperative gatekeeper OS (How will it know what to send? Without it, it'll just catch all the network overhead)? Kept out of the loop (airplane mode or simply out of range) too long, unable to retain everything? Sounds like a hardware eavesdropper would be too prone to discovery or other modes of failure.

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Charles 9
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Re: it's probably MUCH worse than this

What about a rooted phone with custom software compiled from source?

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Charles 9
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Re: It's the gagging order that's the problem

Makes me wonder what happens if they're caught BETWEEN two laws. What if a company is required to disclose by law but at the same time forced to NOT disclose by another law of equal priority: damned either way?

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Charles 9
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Re: False positives

But the trouble is they fear the false NEGATIVE over the false positive because they believe the false negative to be an EXISTENTIAL threat and therefore to be snuffed at all costs (when the price of failure is cessation of existence, no price is too high).

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YES, Xbox One DOES need internet, DOES restrict game trading

Charles 9
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Re: I don't see why

IIRC even Sega backpedaled on backwards compatibility. The Power Base IIRC only worked on the original Genesis. The Model 2 Genesis had different hardware that made things quirky and the Model 3 Genesis had no Z80 in it, meaning no 8-bit support. The MasterGear adapter was pretty basic as the Game Gear was merely a souped-up, shrunk-down Master System). Meanwhile, Saturn games couldn't be run on a Dreamcast.

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Charles 9
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Simple: They never sell you the software in the first place, merely subscribe or lease you to it (think Steam and OnLive; both use the same model). You cannot resell what was never legally yours.

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Charles 9
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Re: All sounds good to me

Where does it say the games MUST reside on the internal drive? What happened to external drive support which already exists on the 360?

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Charles 9
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Re: Not to worry

Five pounds gives you ten the authentication connection will be over SSL with the consoles having the public key, meaning faking the authentication will only be possible by stealing the private key. Track records for private key thefts have been historically very low.

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Forget phones, PRISM plan shows internet firms give NSA everything

Charles 9
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Publicity could've been covered up with blackmail: something like, "you wouldn't want this dirty little secret to just suddenly turn up at the New York Times" or the like. Credible threat to the firm, plausible deniability to the government because the dirty secret is at least a stage removed from them (if the firm tries to turn on the government, they'll just turn around the claim the firm is a conspiracy theorist nutcase—what proof do they have).

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Charles 9
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Re: no wonder

Perhaps, but they fear the false negative more than the false positive. No one wants to drop the big one because the big one may just kill them. When the false negative becomes an existential threat, all else is secondary.

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Charles 9
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Re: If such surveillance was either essential or well controlled it could have been done honestly

But what happens when absolute, total surveillance becomes ESSENTIAL to survive? IOW, what happens when it's down to let Big Brother watch us or we die?

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All major UK ISPs prepping network-level porn 'n' violence filters

Charles 9
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Re: not only but also

c) The ISP catches this because you're underutilizing the house DNS system and starts sniffing around. Pretty sure the ToS for such a service will require that the DNS settings not be altered on pain of cutoff.

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