* Posts by Charles 9

6887 posts • joined 10 Jun 2009

Rooting your Android phone? Google’s rumbled you again

Charles 9
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Re: No problem here

That's entirely up to them since they can always check the Agent tag. Then again, it becomes a case of pick your poison: open yourself to hacking or starve yourself of practically your entire clientele.

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T-Mobile USA’s BingeOn is a smash hit. So what now?

Charles 9
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Ever thought Google and YouTube refuse to participate because there are strings attached?

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Charles 9
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Re: "Throttling" is the "nice" word for it

It's simple. No picking winners. You handle all data equally, regardless of what anyone else says. If you run out of space, you split the difference evenly across all contenders. That's the only way to be fair, and if your data model doesn't like it, tough shakes and get in the queue. It's the ONLY way to be honestly fair.

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Charles 9
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Re: unfair hybrid charging

People don't want their data to be the same...until it's the other guy's data that's the winner. Since you can't pick winners without complaints, the only way to be fair is to pick no winner at all. That way, at worst, everyone complains but at least they're on the same boat.

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Charles 9
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Re: "Throttling" is the "nice" word for it

Just curious. As someone noted, without some kind of vetting (which then breaks neutrality), you could have people cheating. How do you stay neutral AND simultaneously guard against cheating?

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Charles 9
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Re: The moral of the story

Bandwidth is a limited resource, especially wireless (which raises physical limitations). You either ration ALL or ration NONE; otherwise, you're picking winners which isn't fair.

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Charles 9
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The main reason for the complaints has been that BingeOn picks winners. It says these servers are free while the rest eat into your data allowance. That's discrimination and against Net Neutrality.

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Intel's SGX security extensions: Secure until you look at the detail

Charles 9
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That said, the situation does appear to be an intractable problem of "Whom do you trust?" If a program can secure its own enclave, absolutely nothing will prevent a malware from doing the same thing, thus bunkering itself beyond hope of extrication. If you trust any other party (be it Intel or whatever), Trent gets a big fat target on his back.

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State Department finds 22 classified emails in Hillary’s server, denies wrongdoing

Charles 9
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Re: Thursday's lunch menu

I would think it DOES matter since if they were classified AFTER they were received, then ex post facto kicks in and no one can be at fault for handling stuff that was only classified after the fact. Unless the material was classified in some way BEFORE it was put on a non-classified machine, there's no standing.

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Charles 9
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Re: Thursday's lunch menu

But here's the big question. Were the e-mails in question classified BEFORE or AFTER they ended up on the server?

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Charles 9
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Here's a very honest and serious question.

The article notes that some of the e-mails won't be released, even redacted, because they're part of Special Access Programs, basically "deny it even exists" clearance even above "top secret".

Here's the question. Given the nature of security, is it even possible for unclassified data to be reclassified, especially to SAP level, after it was previously disseminated in an unclassified level? It's sort of like a "genie out of the bottle" situation in that you can declassify something to a lower level but you can't classify something from a lower level to a higher level. The material has to originate at the higher level from the beginning. I know a bit about it because I had family in the military who had to deal with classification levels, and I've personally seen military media carrying things like green "Unclassified" designations.

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Why a detachable cabin probably won’t save your life in a plane crash

Charles 9
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I don't think it was the loo. Rather it was one of the flight attendants in the backwards-facing attendant's seat all the way in the back of the plane (which broke up in mid-flight) and landed upside-down, meaning she didn't get the full brunt of the impact. The top crumpled, taking most of the impact while she (strapped in) didn't fall the rest of the way.

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Charles 9
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Re: I'll tell you one thing...

I think the problem is that CFIT sensors can be fooled, throw false alarms, or be overridden. As long as there is meat in the cockpit, there's always the risk of a CFIT. Also, many CFITs occur during the already-dangerous landing phase, where planes are supposed to be close to the ground, rendering a CFIT sensor useless.

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Charles 9
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Re: Looks as though it requires a high-wing aircraft configuration.

"I've actually wondered whether it would be feasible to have a plane where you can basically slide the entire passenger deck out of the actual plane into a gate area so you can have passengers leaving and boarding over the entire length of the plane instead of through a limited number of doors, then having to get past other people who have seats closer to the door you came in through."

Airlines are looking into the concept. However, the logistics behind such a change would be so radical compared to today that any consideration into the detachable passenger cabin is considered long-term at best. Plus there's the matter of maintaining the craft's structural integrity with such an idea.

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Charles 9
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Re: 'Without life rafts'

Perhaps, but usually when such a situation occurs, search craft start tracing the plane's flight path to look for something nice, bright, and large like the escape chute life raft. Once it's located, they can coordinate with other craft to drop supplies as needed and/or contact nearby shipping. The only reason crash searches have taken so long lately is because, like I said, the crashes were not of a survivable nature and the end result was a traceless crash: no life rafts or the like to find.

I may be wrong, but don't most life rafts also carry EPIRB that start broadcasting when they're deployed, allowing for a quicker search (and again, weren't deployed with all the sea crashes to date)?

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Charles 9
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Re: Really?

"without liferafts, etc."

You do know those escape slides double as life rafts in the event of a water landing. The main reason you don't hear of sea rescues after aircraft crashes are because, AFAWK, none were survivable. When an aircraft loses control at high altitude, it either regains control before long and then diverts or just continues on down at such speed you might as well be crashing into a wall at that point in terms of physical ability to survive.

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Charles 9
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Re: Pointless Idea

There's also the matter of the infamous CFIT (controlled flight into terrain), where the pilots think they're flying through the air but then suddenly go CRUNCH. CFITs typically have zero warning and are already at ground level while going above takeoff speed, meaning physics dictates everyone's pretty much screwed.

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Charles 9
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Re: Reminds me of something Spike Milligan once said:

I guess this was before that one time when an aircraft suddenly depressurized in mid-flight, knocking everyone out and probably causing all aboard to die of hypoxia before the plane finally ran out of fuel and crashed into a mountain hours later.

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Most of the world still dependent on cash

Charles 9
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But how do they charge their phones in an area with no electricity?

PS. Reminds me of the short where Paddington tried to sell a vacuum cleaner to a man on gas.

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Charles 9
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Re: nowt wrong with cash

Those negative interest rates typically only apply to savings accounts (checking accounts are frequently non-interest or at best tiny-interest) so as to discourage hoarding, plus banks always need an incentive for people to put money in with them so they can lend it out, so that puts competitive pressure on the banks to keep a positive savings rate.

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Charles 9
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Re: Eh?

With an online order, you can order it before you even arrive and have it ready for you when you walk in the door. That may be less practical for quick-turnaround stuff like beer, but for something like dinner or takeout that removes the waiting in line, saving time (and by the equation money).

Inside bars and the like, maybe you can request something at something like a Ziosk without having to signal for a bartender.

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Charles 9
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Re: There's a good and a bad side to this

Plus what if they switched to high-valued barter like gold or jewels?

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Charles 9
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Re: IBAN

Probably because they don't want to be beholden to a foreign power. They'll take their chances with Western Union and MoneyGram and PayPal, thank you, unless you can force the issue.

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Charles 9
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Re: nowt wrong with cash

They figure the money gets spent eventually (otherwise you wouldn't have taken it out, due to inflation "cash in the mattress" loses value over time) AND they figure you'll have spent it in the general area. Give time and increased facial recognition, cash serial number tracking (Where's George?) and even cash will be functionally traceable and the only way to operate completely tracelessly will be in barter of self-made perishable goods.

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AI no longer needs to fake it. Just don't try talking to your robots

Charles 9
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Re: @Nifty always something else next

"we also need to provide alternatives to work which are not self destructive."

The problem being ANY alternative to work is likely to be self-destructive because it becomes all "give" and no "take" unlike work which has both. Without something to balance the equation in terms of greater good, things will get ugly; this is why Utopian Communism doesn't work in real life.

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Charles 9
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Re: @Nifty always something else next

I was noting that. The primary reason humans are kept around is because they usually have some role to fill in the greater machine of society. Take that role away, and some difficult questions need to be answered. If we go by the well-oiled machine of Mother Nature, the cold solution is to reduce the population down (removing the unemplyables) to where those jobs that still need a human to do them remain. Trouble is that humans don't react to well to such a scenario, which is why stories like "The Cold Equations" make us uncomfortable. Sure, it sounds nice that people could do like the Federation and just have a basic income, but it all breaks down when you start asking who's going to PAY for all that.

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Charles 9
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Japanese Medical AI...reminds me of an anime movie I watched once on the subject, called "Roujin Z". It's thought-provoking (it also touched on the matter of an increasingly-elderly population) but also decently funny.

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Cops hate encryption but the NSA loves it when you use PGP

Charles 9
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Internet must be awfully slow for you (TOR is slow enough with, what, three proxies). Plus if the plods REALLY wanted you, they'll just trace your proxies then pwn the first link in the chain to trace back to you.

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Charles 9
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Re: So the next logical question...

You're basically asking how to mail a letter without an address: barring telepathy, no. SOMEONE has to be able to know where the letter's going, and that alone can be exploited by the plods. About the only way you can avoid this is to go there in person using only private transportation (public will find a way to log you), and even then they may note something by your absence.

RE: "NAT at the ISP level is not widespread and not an obstacle if you are the local intelligence agency."

That's not the case in Asia, where they have billions of people and not enough addresses to go around, thus they were among the first to do carrier-grade NAT. Unless you're saying the plods were one-step ahead and mandated identifiable traces on all computer hardware before they were even sold.

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Charles 9
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Re: An old but solved problem

What kind of data would be illegal for an automated mangler to alter such that it wasn't illegal already, thus putting the onus on the uploader?

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Charles 9
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Re: Oh really

That's why, if they're REALLY interested in you, they'll spear-fish, drive-by, or use any and all means to pwn you at the endpoint: outside any encryption of obfuscation envelopes (because, at the end, the content MUST be decrypted for you to be able to employ it, seeing as we're not in Ghost in the Shell levels of technology where we keep cryptochips in our bodies as of yet.

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Charles 9
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Re: constant traffic component of OpSec

How do you reconcile that with a low bandwidth cap?

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Charles 9
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Re: An old but solved problem

Plus what if the server routinely alters uploaded pictures, potentially mangling most stego?

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Charles 9
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Re: No catch yer with Captcha

But they can still snag you when you're trying to set up that code. First Contact is always the most vulnerable phase.

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VirusTotal bashes bad BIOSes with forensic firmware fossicker

Charles 9
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The point is that the option will always remain open, which is something the EEPROMers may not have seen as necessary in a less-security-conscious world. Sure, there's the risk of flashing dodgy bits, but the point is that you don't end up like with those MacBooks: locked out. Worst comes to worst, you can always RE-flash. As for scenario #1, you're talking about someone able to subvert at the hardware level, meaning probably state-level adversaries. That's pretty much "bend over because you're screwed" territory because that's subversion at the physical level: the Nineteen Eighty-Four Panopticon. At that point, you're in DTA Mode because nothing is safe anymore.

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Charles 9
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Sounds like what's needed is some kind of fallback, built directly into the hardware so it can never be overridden, that allows you to reflash a firmware from some other source. Needs to be mandatory as a security measure.

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US still lagging on broadband but FCC promises change is coming

Charles 9
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Re: Nothing new here ...

One problem. Thailand is also much SMALLER. Now if you can show a place like Canada (which is larger than the US with fewer people) with universal high speed Internet even as far as Nunavut, then you might have an excuse.

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Charles 9
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Re: Politics

It's a political issue because Republicans are generally of the opinion that if you want it badly enough, PAY FOR IT—and most Republicans are of a high-enough income bracket that they can. You can't afford it? Tough, better luck next life...

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Charles 9
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Does all this talk of broadband rollout take into account the vast area the United States encompasses?

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31 nations sign data-sharing pact to tax multinationals

Charles 9
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Here comes the big problem. How do you tackle corporate money shuffling without violating sovereignty?

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Intel and Micron's XPoint: Is it PCM? We think it is

Charles 9
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Re: Duck

How about a miniature goose with a duck call?

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Open source plugin aims to defeat link rot

Charles 9
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Re: Hosts

Windows has it where it is due to it being the location of the TCP/IP stack. No such thing as /etc here.

As for protection, find one that's not only free but simple: turnkey simple, or Joe Ordinary won't get it.

PS. Why not use localhost? It resolves instantly, never goes out on the wire, and can be handled to your tastes, unlike any other number you can think of.

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Death to clunky, creaky rip-off cable boxes – here's how it will happen

Charles 9
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Re: Interesting

The reason DSL doesn't work too well in America mainly falls to two things: (lack of) population density and the historic wiring of telephone lines. DSL bandwidth falls off over distance, so if the local telephone exchange is too far away (due to being in a rural setting or because the old telephone wiring was too convoluted), then you're SOL. I should know, I looked into DSL back when home broadband was in its infancy, and the telephone company (who BTW is usually as much a local monopoly as the cable company) said I was in the extreme range of the technology, meaning I was likely to have issues).

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Charles 9
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Re: Are those CableCARD ports

The VESA Feature Connector. That was intended for the likes of MPEG-2 decoder cards (that were needed in the late 90's to let computers watch DVDs at a watchable rate) and 3D Accelerator cards. The Feature Connector meant they could hook up to the graphics memory without having to go through the computer bus. I think that faded because bus standard kept changing and it became easier to just use the VGA piggyback method. Some like the 3dfx Voodoos simply switched between the base card and it, others (usually DVD decoders) used chroma-keying.

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Charles 9
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Re: Interesting

The only difference in the US being that baseline channels, for historical reasons, are sent in analog in the clear, meaning cable-ready analog TVs didn't need the box at all. It's only when you get to digital cable that the boxes are a necessity, and the cable companies played it cagey by making sure, except for the local channels until recently, again for historical reasons, all the channels were encrypted. In other words, it's closer to your situation now but there are still legacy traces.

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Charles 9
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Re: A First Step

Actually, there's a roadblock to that. They proposed something like that called the Downloadable Conditional Access System (DCAS). Only problem was the FCC had already demanded that the control module be transportable, meaning it can't be part of a TV for fear of lock-in. So it was CableCARD or bust.

Meanwhile, the FCC is trying to work on a successor to CableCARD called AllVid. I believe Cox's Contour system is at least partially based on AllVid.

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Charles 9
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CableCARD's been on a bumpy ride, plus there's the matter of finding a third-party box capable of using it, particularly the V2 cards that allow you to do Video On Demand.

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Charles 9
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Re: Death to cable(and sat) box

Unless like me you're in a bad reception area. All the local channels break up in my area, so it's another supplier or no TV, period.

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Charles 9
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Re: This is LONG overdue but they missed one thing.

The reason the cable companies were able to lobby to turn off ClearQAM is because they can (fair enough) claim unfair treatment versus digital satellite (DirectTV and Dish), who HAVE to encrypt their channels due to their signals transmitting nationwide yet not every channel is allowed nationwide due to local network restrictions which are actually mandated by the FCC (due to them originating in OTA broadcast which the FCC regulates). Unlike satellite, cable companies, being capable of operating in local clusters, are capable of tailoring their channel lineups per area to deal with the local channels without too much interference.

So you see, it's kind of a no-win situation unless the FCC takes the bold step to declare that cable and satellite are too different to be seen as subject to the same regulations.

PS. Even before the ClearQAM shutoff, ONLY local channels were transmitted in the clear; fair enough, as all the other channels are paywalled while the local channels were being sent in the clear OTA anyway. I loved that capability since it let me record NBC during the Olympics (I have an alternate system set up in time for Rio).

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Charles 9
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Thing is, since the cable companies settled on DOCSIS, cable internet has seen steady progress, and with DOCSIS 3.1 1Gbps over copper coax is tantalizingly close. So that's saying something. I think most of the push for DOCSIS came from the likes of Motorola and company (IOW, the cable modem makers) who weren't too pleased with having to tune their cable modems for different ISPs.

Now, there is a CableCARD standard out there to allow for a third-party STB to interact with a cable company. Look at the back of a cable STB and you just may find the CableCARD slot secured with a CARD in it. Problem is, for whatever reason, those boxes aren't available to the average consumer. Then there's the matter of the rental fees for those CARDs: usually almost as high as the boxen: at those rates, why bother?

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