* Posts by Charles 9

8568 posts • joined 10 Jun 2009

EU ends anonymity and rules open Wi-Fi hotspots need passwords

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Let's step back for a second

A fiver, maybe, but what if it's FIFTY instead? Or more? IOW, it may be crappy, but it still more than pays for itself.

0
0

Adblock Plus blocks Facebook block of Adblock Plus block of Facebook block of Adblock Plus block of Facebook ads

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: There are no whitelists

"They have this “non-intrusive” list..."

That which they call a rose by any other name...

It's still a whitelist. If it allows sites through that would otherwise be blocked, then it's filtering to accept. By definition, that's a whitelist, end of.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

"Until the day that adverts on the internet are at least unobtrusive and guaranteed not to be malicious, I am continuing to use adblockers. Banner ads along the top or sides, such as El Reg uses, are OK to me, as I can tune them out and the site probably wouldn't be here without them."

Then you'll be doing it for the rest of your days, I'm afraid. The main reason ad slingers stopped using them is because people tended to ignore them. It's like with much else ad-based. Eventually, the common man is able to tune it out. Been known for over a century. So the ad people have no choice but to be more ostentatious in order to court a jaded audience.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: I find the best way to avoid adverts on Farcebook...

""And what if the only point of contact you have with someone important (like a member of your family) is through Farcebook because they don't have e-mail or a reliable telephone?"

Just. Say. No!

Offer an alternative if you choose to."

WHAT alternative? SMS is expensive for him, he has no-email, and the Facebook comes with his feature phone (meaning it can't be expanded). He lives in an area with poor standards and shoddy reception, and he's about the only family I have left. Plus Far East traditions demand you keep tabs on your family (Death Before Dishonor). He has no option BUT Facebook, and turning my back on him over that is taboo.

0
0

Bug of the month: Cache flow problem crashes Samsung phone apps

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Self modifying code.

But if there's one place where wringing the most performance still exists, it's something like a console emualtor, and emualting a Wii or PSP counts as pretty much the pinnacle of console emulation for the time being (no one expects anything above those to be feasible anytime soon, as it was around that time that computer performance stopped climbing so rapidly).

1
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: "I think you will find RAM is quite a bit faster than in the days of a PDP8."

" Having the instruction cache manipulated manually by an application as 'workaround' or 'kludge' written all over it (or as we all tend to find out the hard way, "An Accident Waiting To Happen")."

That's why they sometimes call it the bleeding edge. The programs in question are trying to extract every last bit of performance from the CPU (because they're doing something pretty demanding like emulating a CPU and other hardware from less than ten years ago) because raw performance becomes the baseline by which everything else becomes possible for it.

0
0

Australia Post says use blockchain for voting. Expert: you're kidding

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Reminds of a famous quote

"Each box doesn't contain very many ballots relative to the margin of votes, which means a lot of boxes have to be compromised."

A lot of votes are closer than you think. You probably wouldn't need to stuff or switch more than a few boxes to tip the scales.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Voting About People

Because people are corruptible. If voting is about people, then voting is corruptible, and that goes against the democratic principle because without honest votes, people don't get their say: compromising the essence of democracy.

0
0

Google's become an obsessive stalker and you can't get a restraining order

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: You can't say no?

All UNOFFICIAL. More apps won't work in CM because of this. Stock or bust.

0
1
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: It will continue for a while longer

You underestimate the power of an ascended fad: like how we call photocopiers Xerox machines even when they're not. Google's trying for the long game: to capture the market so completely that people can't perceive a world without it: usually by making a world without Google much worse (to quote the Smash Mouth song, "You might as well be walking on the Sun").

4
0

Good luck squeezing saturated market, Euro mobe firms, say Orange, Telefonica

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: "..............their market was based on roaming charges"

"..............their market was based on a captive market and cartel behavior. All the good spectrum's already taken up, so there's no entry path for a potential market disruptor."

There, FTFTFY.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Theres plenty of room...

"We live in a world where people can do price comparisons online."

You assume the average mobile customer is savvy enough to know this. My experience is that most people are stupid and just want to get by their day. They'll listen to word of mouth or (gasp) check out the deals in the windows. And since many people in the upper crust depend on stupid people to maintain their standard of living, stupid people will never go away.

"Its the same with broadband. We all know BTs claim to have the best wifi in the country is bollocks."

No we don't. Remember P. T. Barnum's words: "a sucker born every minute."

"How many of you want to rush out and sign up for BT on the strength of their crappy router?"

More than you think.

"Give me a £50 a month SIM only genuinely unlimited package and im in. No throttling, no peak time bullshit, no tethering restrictions (another bullshit arbitrary restriction) and no fucking about."

They'll never give it. Limited spectrum and cartel behavior guarantee this via a captive market, leaving you with the Hobson's Choice: take it or leave it, and then find yourself in the lurch when you REALLY need to be accessible in the field.

"Also, why not make mobile networks regional rather than national like the energy companies. We'd all be better off that way since operators will be responsible for smaller areas of coverage and wont be tempted to only install infrastructure in 'profitable' areas."

Because spectrum is a NATIONAL resource, controlled by the central government (has to be that way due to other radio functions like weather, television, and especially mandated things like the military, plus it's inherently an interstate/interregional business). Makes it pretty much an all-or-nothing.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Problem is, price tends to drive things more than anything, especially for the large chunk of the population where price is the overriding concern. The problem here is that you and your competition end up bleeding yourself in price wars. This ends up in Pyrrhic Victories. If the only way to keep your precious customers is to bleed money, it can't end well.

1
0

'Inherent risk' to untried and untested 4G emergency services network – NAO

Charles 9
Silver badge

But priorities are all bupkis when it's the TOWER that gets borked. Think "single point of failure". At least most emergency radios can operate independently in a short range: very important in a disaster scenario when there may not be any infrastructure to work with and no time to set up a field station when people are dying all around you.

7
0

End all the 'up to' broadband speed bull. Release proper data – LGA

Charles 9
Silver badge

Being charged based on actual use is still metered, since it essentially means you're being measured and charged based on that measure. Remember back in the dialup and early mobile broadband days? Not only were they metered, but they were overcharged. Do you really want to go back to that?

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Because the alternative is metered Internet, where you get charged by the megabyte (this actually applies upstream, with upper-tier providers that either have to pay their way or agree to a peer exchange and maintain a balanced load). There was a time people were faced with this with their dialup or mobile data plans. Since so much of our lives uses mobile data, it tends to create more headaches than we want, which is why people tend to prefer flat rates, both for Internet and for telephone so that they can set a budget and not have to worry about going over.

1
1
Charles 9
Silver badge

"Maintain a distinction between the two and a lot of these arguments will just vanish, because they don't make sense. It's the provisioning speed we care about in this context, and nothing else."

Nope, because for the customers it's the former they want improved upon, toot sweet. Those who know better are in the minority and don't dish out enough dole to make a difference.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Make them prove it.

What makes you think they wouldn't put up a shill customer?

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

So what happens when a very popular site gets overwhelmed on its end and people start complaining? A lot of times, slowdowns on the Internet are not in the ISP's control. How do they account for this?

4
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

I wouldn't mind terribly if these claims can be controlled by the law in some way. Like testimonials can ONLY display typical (let's say modal to avoid wiggling) results. I will admit that "up to" claims will be hard to control since for some firms that's all they can promise (due to lack of control). But a law that demands as much truth in advertising and as little wiggle room as possible would be nice. But as they say, the devil is in the details.

1
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

"In most cases, the weakest link is the connection to the property."

Depends. If you're connecting around the world, there's plenty of potential for a weak link along the way. If your destination's pretty obscure, you raise the chance for a weak link. There's a lot of factors beyond your control, though I will admit if you're at the mercy of a DSL link in the middle of nowhere, you've got a pretty lousy hand to start with. I wouldn't know; I've had cable modem since about 1998 and wired my own house. With FTTH as the local alternative, the cableco's been steadily improving the service and are now starting to roll out Gigabit service (via DOCSIS 3.1) to counter. I don't trust the max speed, but the data cap that goes with it looks tempting.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

More than that, it's really the best the providers can give because this is literally a case of "Your Mileage May Vary". Internet connections are like a chain: they're only as good as the weakest link, and many times the weak link isn't the ISP but somewhere else along the way. How can ISPs properly account for this?

8
5

VW Dieselgate engineer sings like a canary: Entire design team was in on it – not just a few bad apples, allegedly

Charles 9
Silver badge

So what you tell the owner of one of the affected cars who nonetheless NEEDS it in his/her daily life?

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: green energy

"We will eventualyl HAVE to move on to green energy, and it will be a very painful comedown before we get there. The only reason we have the fuel for this massive blowout we've been enjoying 'recently' is that no one noticed it building up in the bank for the last 100 million years - now its gone in 200 years, like some idiot lottery winner."

What about atomic energy then?

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: @Alan Brown -- Disgusted

"Here in the States, California wrote it's auto emissions rules because of L.A. The Feds took a look at California's laws and mimicked them. And so it goes....."

I think it was more the case that California Emissions were tight out of necessity (due to the L.A. problem) and carried a lot of the auto sales in the country (California's big AND the most populous state in the union) The Feds found it easier to just fold California's rules into their own and give the auto makers a bit of a break by having them adhere to just one tight standard rather than a bunch of different ones. It also headed off some independent streaks from New York (the state is #2 population-wise; the city is itself a pollution hotbed due to its relative density and because of its status has its own independent streak).

4
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

He was trying to get away with it. But now that that's not an option, he opted to spill first.

3
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: They couldn't —but they did

"It's a balance.

Fast.

Clean.

Efficient.

Pick any two.

They have it run fast+efficient on the road, and clean+efficient in the test room. By greatly reducing power output."

But now the standards are trending towards "All or Nothing, toot sweet" because of all the competing and justified demands. Clean because of pollution (eg. asthma) concerns, efficient because the cost of fossil fuels is trending up again (plus the matter of being reliant on unreliable foreign powers), fast because it won't sell otherwise plus you can also say this goes to range--they want enough of a tank so it can go a couple hundred miles at a fill.

0
0

Wait, wait – I got it this time, says FCC as it swings again at rip-off US TV cable boxes

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: We want it Simple.

"Well actually, if you think about it, that is the way it is now. The "module" is the proprietary cable box, and the interface is (if you are lucky) HDMI. Otherwise, component and composite are alternative interfaces."

And the "proprietary" is the key word there. If the boxes could be standardized instead, that would break the stranglehold. Of course, the cablecos don't want their cash cow sacrificed, so they're fighting tooth and nail.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: cut the cord

Perhaps, but then I tend to stick to the specialty channels. Plenty of nature channels and so on. Some things are worth the price if it gives you the chance to KEEP a show you like.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Cable TV -- and the box -- have had their day

But you can't RECORD with it. Every time you want to watch it again, you have to shell out the data usage, and not everyone can afford a generous data cap.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: We're from the government.

Oh? Would you rather it be "The Reap an Rape Your Rear End Multinational Company Who's Cornered the Market" saying they're here to help you?

There ARE things scarier than the government.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: cut the cord

"The only reason to have cable TV at all is live sports. Otherwise, the internet provides far better, watch-anytime, alternatives."

Not if you want to record them and be able to watch them unplugged. Internet stream providers are wise and protect the streams up the wazoo, including many times using Protected Media Path which tends to block screen scrapers and HDMI recorders by invoking HDCP. At least the cable box I use doesn't protect the Component path, meaning I can still record HDTV off of it with a second box (and I used it extensively during the Olympics), all of which comes out unprotected meaning (after a little transcoding), I can watch the end results anytime on any device capable of handling AVC, AAC, and Matroska (thankfully, it's a large and growing list) without any need for a "by your leave" from the upstream provider: see it once, see it for a long time to come, even if the source disappears.

1
0

HP Ink buys Samsung's printer business for a BILLION dollars

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: And tomorrow...

I once had L's but gave up on them after acquiring a 5P and having too many issues with the paper feeder. Since P's have EDO SIMM slots it was possible to upgrade them to handle full-page 600dpi graphics, plus since it used a traditional paper feed system, it was much easier to do a manual duplex.

2
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

I actually called it right. I figured it to be about the size of an office copier (looking at the feet and the touchscreen), and the bottom shot shows I was damn close (a little bigger at most).

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: And tomorrow...

"Dell make some pretty decent printers too"

I believe most of those are rebadged Lexmarks.

15
0

Peccant pwners post 670,000 Pokémon punter MD5 passwords

Charles 9
Silver badge

But I'm talking about who write notes down and forget the notes, tried "correcthorsebatterystaple" and ended up with "donkeyenginepaperclipwrong", forget their ID cards, cell phones, and house keys half the time, and one time even forgot how to spell their own surname. I suspect if they tried your solution, they'll end up forgetting the formula, the codeword, or both.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: @Lee, They DARE to give password advice?!?!

"But it all comes down to one's own personal perceived risk assessment and, as always, a balance between the risks and the inconvenience of any measures to mitigate those risks"

But sometimes those concerns can hit extremes. Take my earlier example: a very bad memory. I mean bad enough that "correcthorsebatterystaple" turns into "donkeyenginepaperclipwrong" the following day. I personally know people whose memory is just that bad, yet they're expected to use the Internet.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Except then you're vulnerable to LOCAL hacking, especially by the janitorial crew and the like. It seems you can't win. You either get hacked locally, hacked remotely, or hacked by both at the same time.

And lastly, I've known people who tried to remember things by writing down notes...only to forget the notes.

2
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

So what do you do if you have a bad memory and no place to store a password safe?

0
0

Rooting your Android phone? Google’s rumbled you again

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: how to root an android phone

1) This sounds like a clickbait site.

2) The point of the article is that more and more Android apps are root-aware and will not work if it's present (some like Android Pay won't work even if it's present but not on). And because of dm-verity being enforced in Marshmallow, many custom ROMs won't work for this purpose anymore unless they submit to formal testing (which many can't due to copyright issues).

0
0

PCI Council wants upgradeable credit card readers ... next year

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Fuzznugets!

"At the moment, that doesn't seem to be a deterrent. It seems to me that most companies look at the costs and decide security isn't important enough to pay for."

In other words, they're gambling they don't get hit and pay a LOT more than the compliance costs as a result. That kind of attitude makes the problem intractable. The only way to make them take notice is to make the threat existential. Only problem is that these companies keep tens of thousands of vulnerable, innocent people employed in a shrinking job market.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Fuzznugets!

""Securing" end terminals when all the recent major breaches have targeted insecure back offices of large companies non-compliant with even tenth of existing PCI standards."

Part of the reason for the push to EMV is to defuse this problem. EMV transactions use one-time codes, meaning if the numbers are nicked, they're still useless.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Why don't they simply have a socketed ROM?

"Restaurant staff have more important things to worry about (like being able to afford next month's rent) than checking for fraudulent seals."

Except if the hack is traced back to them and their seals are found to be wrong, THEY get the blame AND the bill. Forget next month's rent at that point...

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Fuzznugets!

"Actually enforcing PCI DSS and having consequences for ignoring it would be far far bigger result than preventing me to target a grocery store where customers have maybe $10 left on their accounts to nick."

As I understand it, there ARE consequences in place since the beginning of this year. If there's a hack traced to you and you're not EMV compliant, YOU get to foot the bill. Many that don't use it are either in the middle of the lengthy software certification process or are gambling: putting off the upfront costs in hopes they don't get stung.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Disposable credit cards

Many places won't take ephemeral cards because they know they can be easily associated with money laundering. Even gift cards are iffy, as online retailers like Amazon and PayPal have in the past rejected their use in online transactions. The retailers want to see REAL cards, with a real name, real mailing address, and usually something backing it up like a bank or an employer.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Why don't they simply have a socketed ROM?

The seals are tamper-evident and only held by the manufacturer. You'd need an insider to have an identical seal.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Why not ask the l33t h4x0rs

Problem is, if a hack's traced back to them, THEY foot the bill.

0
0

SOHOpeless Seagate NAS boxen become malware distributors

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: It is a really stupid idea for most people to make any SOHO device internet visible.

It may be stupid, but it's what the customers demand, so you can't win. If you don't do it, you don't get any business and someone else just rises up and fills the demand, hook or crook. As a comedian once said, "You can't fix Stupid."

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

If I recall, that's one reason PBS channels started encoding time signals in their VBI area, so that stuff like VCRs could set themselves. Because let's face it, setting the time was similar to setting a digital watch.

1
0

Forums