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* Posts by Charles 9

3453 posts • joined 10 Jun 2009

Move over, Freeview, just like you promised: You're hogging the 4G bed

Charles 9
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Re: 1800MHz

"1800MHz is just 1800Mhz. When did it become Band III?"

When it was defined as such by the 3GPP. These bands are defined as part of e-UTRA. Wikipedia can provide more information (it's an informational article with plenty of references, so it should be reliable enough).

According to e-UTRA, Band III has an uplink range of 1710 MHz to 1785 MHz and a downlink range of 1805 MHz to 1880 MHz. It's approximate center (and therefore its common nomenclature) is in fact 1800MHz and is recognized as the old Digital Cellular System frequency.

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Charles 9
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"800MHz also has the broadest handset support, as it's expected to be used widely across Europe. GSM Arena lists 51 handsets usable on the new networks, while 48 will work on EE's existing 4G network and 44 run all the way up to 2.6GHz."

It's been my understanding that the most frequently used LTE frequency was 1800MHz (Band III). Study a list of LTE operations and most continents use Band III. Africa, Europe, and the Middle East have settled on it, and Asia keeps the option open. The only holdout are the Americas, mainly because there it's an active military frequency.

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Wii U sales plunge: Nintendo hopes Mario and Zelda will shift some kit

Charles 9
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Goes to show even Nintendo can have a bad day. Reminds me of their N64 days when they tried going out on a limb and got left hanging as a result. Similarly, Nintendo thought their tablet controller would get some traction, but this looks like another rare misfire. It'll be curious to see what happens going forward as Nintendo starts to wind the original Wii down.

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AMD's newest chip: Another step toward 'transformation'

Charles 9
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Re: AMD is focused on all viable revenue streams

I agree. It certainly looks like a classic case of diversification. As the PC market is reaching saturation, AMD have been smart to look at other ways to leverage its experience. That's why they bought ATI: so they'd have a GPU for use in their CPU/GPU combinations. It seems AMD correctly saw ahead because we're seeing plenty of GPU-equipped SoC's. Expanding into ARM? Savvy bet hedging.

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Lingering fingerprint fingering fingered in iOS 7 for NEW iPHONE

Charles 9
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Re: Samaritan mode, anyone?

I just take a Big Brother approach to lending the phone. I'm always within a foot of the person. If they don't want me to overhear the conversation, they don't get to use the phone. I do the dialing and don't pass the phone until I hear ringing. And as soon as the call ends, I politely but firmly request the phone back. To date I haven't had any problems. My home screen has no personal data on it (just apps and a time/weather widget), and I don't allow enough time or opportunity to peek. As for someone trying to run off with the phone, well that's why I keep within a foot of the person.

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FSF passes collection plate for free Android clone Replicant

Charles 9
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Re: Radio stack?

Makes me wonder what would happen if somehow nVidia got ANOTHER federal contract (of equal importance to their DoD contract—perhaps a NASA contract) that REQUIRES open-sourcing, placing nVidia in a contractual clash.

(Doubt it would happen. nVidia would probably be automatically excluded from any such contract due to their DoD contract—it's hard to trump a defense contract in terms of priority.)

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Charles 9
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Joke

Re: Pushing Water Uphill @AC 10:17

"Conserve Air — Breathe Less"

(Seen on an actual sign from the Star Wars spoof Spaceballs.)

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New in Android 4.3: At last we get a grip on privacy-invading crApps

Charles 9
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Re: This is great for the minority of knowledgeable users

No, because the develop may not want to play ball and go back to Apple instead. Consider that the developer doesn't HAVE to release for Android.

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'Wandering Dago' tuck truck ejected from NY race track

Charles 9
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Re: @Charles 9

No, the whoosh was the sound of the basketball court down the road. Your comments weren't ironic ENOUGH. First rule about irony, sarcasm, or some other form of intentional untruth: be prepared to be taken seriously.

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Charles 9
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Re: Deemed offensive to Italian Americans, oddly, not Hispanics

I don't. I just have to remember that what the British consider "chips" deviates from the American concept (which IIRC is the original, as an American chef invented what Americans call the potato chip).

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Charles 9
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"sk, Americans eh? What's wrong with nipping outside to suck on a fag? :)"

Because in America, "fag" an abbreviation for "faggot", which is an even worse epithet to a male homosexual than "queer" (probably because it's supposed to deride the act rather than the appearance that "queer" provokes). So the word's basically an insult to any man (you're either deriding a homosexual or implying a straight man is not).

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Charles 9
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The problem in this case is they're not disparaging their own race the way Blacks and Irish are. They're disparaging Hispanics, too, while they're of Italian descent.

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Only 1 in 5 Americans believe in pure evolution – and that's an upswing

Charles 9
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Re: Logic has nothing to do with it

I'm surprised the religious man didn't immediately reply, "But atheism means believing in NO GODS AT ALL: thus the "a" (none). I may disbelieve millions of gods but I DO believe in ONE, making me a MONOtheist."

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Charles 9
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Re: Situation Normal

"and doing the same thing over and over will eventually have a different result."

When people do the same thing over and over and EXPECT a different result, we call it INSANITY.

BUT

When people do the same thing over and over and ACTUALLY GET a different result, we call it PERSISTENCE.

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Charles 9
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Re: Trouble with all this

"I always get a kick out of some who survive some tragic event thanking God for saving them, but not wondering why that God was so utterly inept as to allow them to get into the mess that they were "saved from" in the first place."

The religious have an answer to that, too: growth by ordeal. What doesn't break you makes you stronger, so the Lord intentionally tests you so you learn from the experience.

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Charles 9
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"If god created the heavens and the earth, where did the material to construct him, or the idea of him come from?"

A proper religious sort would reply, "He didn't come from anywhere. He simply is, was, and will be inside and outside of time. Therefore, God is beyond limits and can't be described in any limiting way, including by time."

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Charles 9
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Re: I believe ...

"So you don't believe in American beers then?"

You can believe in American beers again. Just don't go for the big boys. Stick to honest microbreweries which by now are scattered all over the country.

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Zynga ABANDONS ALL HOPE of opening US gambling operation

Charles 9
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Re: The gold standard for free to play games is Team Fortress 2

Don't you mean the Orange Box? And while it's true that TF2 spent a number of years as a paid game (albeit the price dropped eventually to $10 before a premium pass became optional), the fact that many people actually paid for it says they got something seriously right about it and simply altered the pricing model to better reflect the times (the game went F2P about two years ago).

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Pentagon: Mobe operators want our radio bands? Fine, but it'll cost $3.5bn

Charles 9
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If the military weren't so fixated on this frequency, we could've freed up the DCS bands and allowed the use of LTE Band III, aligning us with most of the civilized world in terms of an open cell frequencies.

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Worldwide tax crackdown planned against tech globocorps

Charles 9
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Re: the tax man cometh.

I figured such a system would result in collateral damage, but your description helps visualize this. The system WOULD be disadvantageous to industries with unavoidably high costs of operation. That's why I qualified my earlier statement. Perhaps not removing the business expense deduction altogether but limiting it to distinguish between honest costs of operation and dodges. But here too will I acknowledge this as a "hard" problem where there may not be a cut-and-dry solution.

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Charles 9
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Re: the tax man cometh.

I understand that corporate income tax is taxed based on net income, but has anyone done a study on the pros and cons of changing it to one based on gross income, removing or limiting the deduction for business expenses?

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Ex-prez Carter: 'America has no functioning democracy' with PRISM

Charles 9
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Re: Spy on the Spies

"The electorate, in an elected position?"

Don't seem to be doing much for the current situation in American government, are they? The trouble with the electorate is that you can't assume they will act rationally, and once a majority of the electorate are acting IRrationally, you can game the system by playing to their emotions. That's what's happening now.

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Charles 9
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Re: Democracy no more

"How can we return to the kindler, gentler world that we would like?"

Two words: WE CAN'T.

We're entering a world where one bad man can ruin the rest of us. Knowledge is power, but now knowledge is cheap, too, because we're in an AGE of information. Meanwhile, humans come in all types of personalities: including the homicidal maniac and the paranoid lunatic. Put one of the latter together with the vast sum of human knowledge, and imagine the possibilities. They probably won't be pretty.

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Charles 9
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Re: He's right

"It is not clear that the 22nd amendment is especially useful or necessary. It was a reaction to FDR's run of four, which was highly situational, arguably appropriate given the circumstances between 1929 and 1945, and quite unlikely to have been repeated soon. By adding it we have established a requirement for change under circumstances when it might be undesirable or could be meaningless (as, for instance, if the current Vice President moves up because the current President is ineligible). In any case, we have term limits as long as elections are relatively free."

The problem was that FDR was gaining increasing support throughout his terms, not the least because of his political clout (boosted by experience), causing something of a feedback loop. Your experience makes you a better choice over the challenger, winning you another term and MORE experience, etc. And it resulted in a president-for-life that lasted longer than probably even the Founding Fathers would've been comfortable with. If FDR had been in better health, there was a fair chance he'd have the leverage to continue being President even after World War II.

You see that these days with some of the most veteran congresspeople. It takes something quite extraordinary on either side to unseat one of them unwillingly.

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Charles 9
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Re: He's right

Term limits wouldn't do a thing.

1. Experience counts, and if it's not the Congressmen themselves, then it'll be the congressional staff that sticks around after the congressman leaves.

2. People aware of term limits can plan for them by grooming proteges.

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Charles 9
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Re: Spy on the Spies

But then, who oversees the overseer? As for the budget, by Constitutional Law, only the House can set the budget, and what do you think they would do to any potential overseer? Nothing short of an Amendment could make this possible, plus even if you give this overseer the budget, who's going to pay for all this ON TOP of everything else Joe American has to pay now?

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Android MasterKey found buried in kiddie cake game on Google Play - report

Charles 9
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Re: @I ain't Spartacus

Think ad-based apps. No internet access means no ads. No ads = no revenue = no reason for the dev to release for Android. See the problem?

And while it's YOUR phone, it's THEIR app. Go their way or go without, and if more people go without, devs again won't see a reason to release for Android, and remember when the security model was first made, Android was the underdog against Apple. They needed a way to attract developers.

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Charles 9
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"Google should have more strict policies about permissions refusing apps asking for unnecessary permissions. I know by direct experience that Apple Appstore does it and I have to admit that is a good thing for end-users (a bit more problematic for me that I had to do more work to fix my app)."

How about this? For each section of access a program seeks, the developer needs to provide a justification for it. These justifications can be evaluated by Google to see if they match up (if something happens outside the listed justification, the application is rejected), then they can be posted to the Play Store as a "Why?", visible to the user, for each permission an app requests.

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Charles 9
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Re: @I ain't Spartacus

"Why can't vanilla Android have a built in application firewall to let you do that? It is not like it would make any odds to Google's profits."

Even if developers feel betrayed by Google and switch back to the Apple Store exclusively? For a good while, many of the best apps went to Apple first, THEN to Android. Might see a rebound of this if devs lose security control.

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Laser-wielding boffins develop ETERNAL MEMORY from quartz

Charles 9
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Give it 20 years and we'll be shuffling 1TB/hr video'/holovideo files on a regular basis and STILL complaining on there not being enough storage to go around. Because when it comes to mass storage, we ALWAYS seem to find way to fill it up.

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Why data storage technology is pretty much PERFECT

Charles 9
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Re: No more powerful code can ever be devised; further research is pointless

I suspect the "further research is pointless" merely points to the fact that we won't be able to find a better error-correcting system overall than Reed-Solomon because they account for physical limitations. You can create something of equal performance, but never better performance. As you've noted, research instead has turned more toward adaptation (the Information Dispersal Algorithm) and specialization (Turbocodes). I sometimes wonder if someone can find a system equal in performance to Reed-Solomon but simpler to implement, but I'm not an expert in those matters.

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Charles 9
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Re: Make those bits work harder?

That's assuming you can accurately read, write, and maintain 2^n different strengths of magnetism less expensively than just partitioning the space into n cells. The readers may be tiny, but they only have to detect on/off, which is a whole lot simpler than a reader that has to distinguish a spread of different strengths. Also consider, these larger cells may be larger but also more sensitive to changes because there are more ways a change can be registered, meaning neighboring fields may be MORE likely to introduce errors, not LESS.

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Charles 9
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Re: Make those bits work harder?

The thing with your idea is that if you can alter polarities more precisely, it would be easier to just use smaller areas to represent the bits, which is what' has been happening steadily with hard drive technology: the surface area of the drive used as the "bit" gets smaller and smaller. Trouble is, we're reaching a point where physics really is getting in the way. Not in the sense that we're down to flipping single molecules but still at the point where the latent magnetic fields of adjacent "bits" could cause the bit you're on to naturally "rot" and spontaneously switch. That's why the current push is for HAMR: Heat-Assisted Magnetic Recording. If the bit can't be changed unless above a certaintemperature, then it's less prone to neighboring fields and can be made even smaller.

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Charles 9
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"*It's violet"

Cute. An advertising falsehood that actually UNDERSTATES the reality. That's something you don't see everyday.

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UK gov's smart meter dream unplugged: A 'colossal waste of cash'

Charles 9
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The thing about household appliances is that they're typically built to last for some time. Sure, planned obsolescence exists to an extent, but the average homeowner expects things like refrigerators, washers, etc. to last for a decade or so at the least (my fridge is going on 20 and only the icemaker's broken). They won't replace the appliance until it breaks, which means if someone's only a few years into an otherwise-inefficient refrigerator, there may be a while before it's replaced with a more-efficient model.

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CONFIRMED: Driverless cars to hit actual British roads by end of year

Charles 9
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You'd be surprised. If the Google cars are any consideration, they'd actually be able to identify the debris on the road (and yes, from a few hundred feet away—only way it wouldn't see it was if it was against a bump, but then YOU couldn't see it, either), size it up, assess traffic to the side in question, and maneuver as needed.

As for dynamic range, computer sensors don't always have to use the visual light range to see. Radar wouldn't be affected by sunrises/sunsets, making them superior to the human eye.

Inclement weather? Again, the computer can see beyond visual light and can use ways to compensate for precipitation (differing radar systems) and road cover (thermal imaging). I'm not too knowledgeable about flooded roads, but I think the car would be able to detect a sizable body of water ahead of it and assume it to be unsafe, stopping the car in the normal manner and requiring manual intervention.

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Charles 9
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Re: We already had them.

The problem with trains was that they had limited flexibility. It was the track or bust. Cars can shift from side to side, allowing the use of lanes which are impractical in trains with their rails. Also, if need be, cars can go off road.

As for the horse, I recall that they had minds of their own, really, which meant they weren't always reliable. For example, it may not be wise to drive a horse in a thunderstorm. Among the list of things that were the bane of any horse driver is the entry "Frightened Runaway Horse".

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Charles 9
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Re: All at once or none at all

But the thing is, when Murphy intervenes, it's going to be from an angle that no one had even had the thought to cover.

For example, would an automated car be able to react well to a low-to-ground obstacle suddenly falling off the back of a truck? What about a child suddenly running out in front from between two cars (thus practically invisible beforehand)? Can the car detect small but significant patches of black ice? How will it react to an accident suddenly starting in front of them? And so on?

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Finally, someone's fixed THAT Android hole. Was it your mobe network? No

Charles 9
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The fact that it can just disable the firewall with a root shell. Even system apps are vulnerable to a root shell. That's why SU apps prompt you before they're given the OK. It's all up to you to make sure what you're allowing does what it's supposed to do because once they get the shell, it's all "caveat utilitor".

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Ubuntu 13.10 to ship with Mir instead of X

Charles 9
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Re: Fragmentation can be a good thing in this case

Nope. It worked live, but once installed it died...every time. And the live is too slow and unreliable to use on a regular basis (the CD drive is crapping out and the USB support is 1.1 only with no boot support).

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Charles 9
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Re: Linux Graphics... is rubbish

" The idea of tying things to the hardware is quite frankly a childish way of thinking that belongs back in the 80s with things like the Atari ST."

Until they rediscovered the simple fact that, when it comes to serious number crunching like 3D graphics, nothing beats dedicated hardware chips, and if you're gonna keep the beast fed, you want as few obstructions between the GPU and the rest of the system. So high-performance 3D drivers strive to be lean and mean and close to the metal: out of necessity. It's like hand-tuned code; sometimes, when speed matters, there's really no substitute.

And while Linux may be a multi-user operating system, a group of 1 is still a group AND the system must recognize that physical displays play by different rules to remote ones.

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Charles 9
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Re: Perhaps..

You want to make a buck in Linux applications? Just sell them commercially. Some companies actually do that, and nothing in the Linux license prevents this, as they're only interested in keeping the KERNEL free. If integral parts of the distro want to be free as well, that's up to them, but binary blobs sold commercially? Entirely possible. Otherwise, Valve wouldn't have dared to try to migrate Steam to Linux. Now, granted, you need a market for your software, but that's more a matter of market research rather than development.

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Charles 9
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Re: Fragmentation can be a good thing in this case

Meanwhile, trying to do the same on an old Dell laptop with Xubuntu has the opposite effect: I need an external monitor just to see the screen because installing it causes the laptop screen to go dark: using both free AND non-free drivers. A check at the logs shows neither driver can recognize the chipset/screen combination and basically falls out. Finally gave up on the whole mess and put XP back on (thanks to the OEM sticker), so depending on your hardware it CAN be hit or miss.

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Dead STEVE JOBS was a CROOK - Judge

Charles 9
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Re: Use the fines to prop up physical book publishers/sellers @Dan Paul

Well, provided it's in a language you understand, dead tree books are remarkably simple and require no external power or artificial illumination if used in daylight, so they're pretty good when you're away from civilization. They also handle getting wet better, so they're better for beach and poolside reading.

That said, in the balance of things, I prefer the compact e-reader to paper books, especially in traveling where weight and volume must be considered. I deal with the ownership issues by obtaining books from legal suppliers that don't lock their books too tightly.

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Charles 9
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Re: Use the fines to prop up physical book publishers/sellers @Dan Paul

Actually, there still IS a compatibility issue with the printed word: LANGUAGE. I imagine the literacy boom of the 12th century wouldn't have turned out so well if there weren't people around able to translate all the Spanish books from Arabic to Latin. One nasty thing about the printed work: they're more difficult in that sense to convert.

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Dear Linus, STOP SHOUTING and play nice - says Linux kernel dev

Charles 9
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The thing is, while all of us us probably agree with Torvalds' REASONS, many of us have a beef about his TONE. If one is competent but lazy, it shouldn't take much more than a, "This code isn't up to snuff. Show us what you can REALLY do." to motivate them: a good punch in their pride. If the contributor really can't cut it, a firm, "Come back when you can really bring something to the project." can put a firm end to the conversation. Tirades can take you over a precipice and actually cause a BACKFIRE. People might take tirades the wrong way and, instead of hunkering down or leaving, decide to declare war on you and start slinging mud BACK. I would think that's the LAST thing you want in a mailing list: lots of off-topic sniping.

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Charles 9
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Re: Passion is one thing

But there's more than one way to get your point across. So what if the Internet doesn't do subtle? Whatever happened to "civil but firm"? Torvalds' rant could easily have been rephrased on the lines of:

"You committed bug-ridden code to the project such that others mistakenly assume it to be stable. In future, warn us beforehand when submitting unstable code. Otherwise, do not submit the code until it is in a stable state."

See? No profanity at all, and no "fake politeness" either. But also pretty cut-and-dry in what's being mentioned and requested: no subtlety at all.

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Be still, my quivering atoms: Here's a new way to count a second

Charles 9
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Trollface

Re: Contrariwise...

Wonder if the note writer considered his sleep cycles (which means dealing with days--considerably shorter than seasons) when writing the note?

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Human error blamed for toxic Russian rocket explosion

Charles 9
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Re: What about pre-flight tests?

Redundancy adds weight, and rockets are VERY weight-sensitive, meaning you run the risk of it being too heavy to fly.

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Are driverless cars the death knell of the motor biz?

Charles 9
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Re: Maintenance cost increase

The average driver may be crap at anticipation but machines are crap at the unexpected. We can break from script if the need arises, such as someone or something suddenly appearing in front of us. How well could an automated system interact to such an event without false alarming?

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