* Posts by Charles 9

7189 posts • joined 10 Jun 2009

Apple needs silver bullet to slay App Store's escaped undead – study

Charles 9
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Re: Should be a cardinal rule...

"I would - better that they learn something from their mistakes than live in ignorance. Hell never mind their mistakes, better just that they learn something."

And if they're not in a position to learn?

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Charles 9
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Re: Should be a cardinal rule...

"I am so sick of OS and device vendors thinking they know best. Let me make my own decisions and go to Hell in my own way."

And what of the myriad who outnumber you and don't know better? Would you condemn them to join you in your handbasket?

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Daisy-chained research spells malware worm hell for power plants and other utilities

Charles 9
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Re: The feasibility of a PLC worm

What about a saboteur from within? Remember, STATE-level actors, few things off the table.

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Charles 9
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Re: The feasibility of a PLC worm

So what happens when your critical live system has an in-the-wild exploit and therefore MUST be updated (due to say legal compliance) yet you're told that you CAN'T update it because it cannot be shut down under any circumstances? Now you're caught between Scylla and Charybdis because you're going to be in trouble either way: either you lose compliant because your system's unsafe and prone to sabotage or you break your uptime requirement.

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Intel loses its ARM wrestling match, kicks out Atom mobe chips

Charles 9
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How does that help Microsoft when the normal routine for this kind of world is "buy once, run anywhere," meaning any Android app I buy I can re-download to another Android device and it'll work no problem?

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Charles 9
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Re: thats convergence taking a hit. :-(

There's really no substitute for wires. Physics dictates this. Plus when it comes to storage, the lack of a Micro SD slot is a deal-breaker to many. It certainly is to me.

And I wouldn't mind a step back towards portable bricks if it means I can run the thing flat out and not have to hunt the boonies after an hour or two for a charger or battery pack when I'm forced to travel light. Designers really need to ask people if they're willing to trade in weight for working life without having to resort to bodges.

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US anti-encryption law is so 'braindead' it will outlaw file compression

Charles 9
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Re: Maths v the Law

"That's why we need a new system, the old one has broken (assuming it was ever not-broken)."

Only one problem. EVERY OTHER SYSTEM out there's just as bad if not worse when it comes to controlling the instinctive human potential for corruption. As long as a human's involved, ANY system can be corrupted. We can't even turn it over to machines because at some point along the way, a human has to make the machine.

Put another way, how can you possibly build a rock-solid foundation on which to build the world when all you have to work with is sand (as in not even water, just sand)?

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Charles 9
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Re: Moron politicians

And yet no one's been able to come up with a workable alternative to a bunch of corrupt representatives. Direct voting invites herding of stupid votes, and a minimum educational standard invites corrupting the standard to block voters.

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Hold on a sec. When did HDDs get SSD-style workload rate limits?

Charles 9
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Re: S.M.A.R.T. provides this data, you had to know they'd use it

You should see a modern digital filming session which not only uses at least 6K resolutions with high color gamut but also sometimes film above 48fps AND have to minimize the compression due to the need to minimize generation artifacts during digital editing (if they're allowed to use any at all). So you have the need for high throughput, high capacity, AND high churn all at the same time. From what I hear, the need for high everything basically restricts them to very expensive,very specialized equipment, and forget about transmitting this stuff over even dedicated fiber. Most of the time, a courier with a hard drive is both cheaper and faster for transport during the production stage.

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Charles 9
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Re: Surely an array of redundant flash chips?

You forget that removeable media tends to get the LOWEST quality of Flash chips. They get the leftovers which means they're the lowest in reliability and only intended for occasional use. Odds are greater you'll get multiple concurrent card failure (so you're more likely to lose data). Furthermore, the point about controller failure is that only the controller knows how the chips are arranged, so when it goes, it's a lot like losing your big password: no one else knows how to reconstruct the data. That's why you can't just swap a controller chip or the like when an SSD fails.

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Charles 9
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Re: How are the drives being used?

"Instead of asking ourselves why we've got all this stuff we're just demanding bigger houses to put it in."

Why do we have all this stuff? Because just when you need it the most, the original source up and vanishes without a trace. Many of us have run afoul of this firsthand, so the mindset is "better safe than sorry" and "get it before it's gone." You can always get more storage (if it isn't stacks of hard drives now, it's books of CDs or boxes of floppy discs then). It's a lot harder to resurrect a site that doesn't exist anymore.

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Charles 9
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Re: We need more reliable, not just larger.

Found the article that is the source of that image.

That's an IBM 3390. $250,000 that thing cost. In 1989 dollars. Yup, the thing is a quarter century old and held somewhere up to around 22GB, which doesn't seem much until you realize at the time, 200MB hard drives were just coming on the PC market and were no small change, either. So it kind of solidifies my point, as it's very old and very expensive.

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Charles 9
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Re: We need more reliable, not just larger.

No, there's a limit there, too, as more platters will strain the spindle and the motor. Old drives in the past spun slower, reducing the forces but also lowering the performance. That's why Quantum's brief step back to 5.25" hard drives fell flat. Eventually, as noted in the article, rust is going to run in to the immovable wall of physics AND be pinched by performance demands (I can speak from experience. Mirroring 3TB worth of stuff over USB3 took the better part of a day; transferring lots of data takes an unavoidable amount of time which opens the door for reconstruction failures) that prevent larger but slower solutions.

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Cops deploy StingRay anti-terror tech against $50 chicken-wing thief

Charles 9
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Re: Super conspiracy mode : ON

Search warrants are usually very specific: you're after a specific bit of evidence, nothing more. To do what you say actually requires a SECOND warrant. However, discovering the cocaine in plain sight during a legal search DOES allow the police to detain all persons within (at the least, to prevent evidence tampering) while an officer rushes off (maybe with a quick camera shot as proof) to the judge or magistrate to get a new warrant.

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Charles 9
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I do more than that. I concede the police state as the inevitable end result of human government owing to basic human condition. EVERYTHING becomes a police state eventually. Take it down and another just rises in its place. The alternative is a total breakdown into anarchy...which eventually allows one to rise from the ashes and just create yet another police state.

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The Lonely Pirate MEP's Holocaust copyright stunt backfires

Charles 9
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Re: Pot, kettle...

I think the ever-lengthening terms are just a symptom of a greater, probably intractable problem: the problem being no individual right or protection is really safe against a bully strong enough to either smother you (you bring a gun,they bring Uzis) or change the rules (you sue, they bribe the judges and buy the elections). Screw the laws, I have enough power to change or ignore them. What now?

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Engineer uses binary on voting bumpf to flag up Cali election flaws

Charles 9
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Re: Ahem, everyone voting on (almost) everything does exist....

I recognized there are exceptions to the rule; just noting the broad trend.

"In other parts of the world, different patterns have emerged. The largely Spanish oriented nations of South America have experienced wars between nations and murderous conflicts within nations which to the outside eye seem fairly homogenous;"

Like I said, exceptions to the rule. Up north around Colombia and in Central America, a lot of the violence is gang-related and stemming around the drug trade: hot-leaded competition for a lucrative resource. Towards the center most of the beef is based on political power struggles: again with the top spot at stake things can get heated at times, but they usually don't flare up that often or for that long.

"Pakistan might be seen as more homogenous and also more violent than perhaps India"

As I recall, Pakistan is also organized more tribally than in India. It's less hierarchical, less centralized, and it's one reason it's so difficult to cement a central authority in there or Iraq or plenty of other places as tribal organization tends to be more autonomous than what we're used to in the West. In other words, they're not used to running things Western style. Furthermore, I don't recall many of these tribes to be as homogeneous amongst themselves as we are led to believe, which is why disagreements between them are the norm rather than the exception.

As for the American Civil war, it was both cultural AND societal differences that caused it. The industrial North and agricultural South had diverged significantly since the War for Independence, to the effect each had a uniquely-identifiable culture (which we can still see today, y'all). Throw in a stark political contrast over the distribution of authority and just a smidgen of disagreement over people's rights and it kinda blew up in South Carolina in 1861.

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Charles 9
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Re: Ahem, everyone voting on (almost) everything does exist....

Because Switzerland is much less culturally heterogeneous than in the US. Swiss cultures tend to keep to within well-defined enclaves so interaction is limited enough to keep things well-managed (that was one reason for the design of Hadrian's Wall in England; it controlled cultural interaction). Whereas in the US various ethnic groups are mashed up and scattered all over the map; the end result being culture clashes.

I'd need to look, but it seems a consistent trend that the most peaceful countries also tend to be the most homogeneous.

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Blighty starts pumping out 12-sided quids

Charles 9
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Re: Threepenny Bit?

Thumbing it down doesn't make it less true.

http://www.snickers.com/Resources/images/share/almond.jpg

Been this way since 2000.

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Switch survives three hours of beer spray, fails after twelve

Charles 9
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Re: Football clubs

"These days if you're going to do a seizure order on equipment I'd start with the comms kit (offsite routers and network switches) before moving to the petty stuff such like cash registers. Point of sale terminals don't work very well if they can't connect to the server and you don't have to expose yourself to bar customers who might become hostile when they work out your presence means they can't be sold any more booze."

How long before someone savvy makes it physically impossible to remove the comms equipment without removing the POS equipment first AND makes sure to place key equipment on the sales floor so that any attempt to seize the stuff means you're in plain sight and risk a riot?

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Charles 9
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"When rugby players put on pads and play gridiron, gridiron players start getting extremely badly hurt."

I don't know. Like I said, very rough tackling is frowned upon in rubgy whereas in gridiron it's much more tolerated. The gridiron players have experience and have to run fast and turn sharp corners WITH their gear on. Plus, like I said, there's the issue of weight which contributes to both momentum and inertia.

Unless you can show an actual demonstration, I'll have to disagree with you. Experience and physics seem to advantage the gridiron player in a collision.

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Charles 9
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Re: "Land that thing now, while I'm still in the mood to let you !"

"He moved it next door, so I had all those ports turned off too."

What happened next? Did he move them to the same room as equipment used by someone over your head, meaning you couldn't turn off those ports without having to answer to him/her why they couldn't make the weekend deadline because you cut him/her off just as the deadline was closing?

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Charles 9
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Re: A few splashes?

"Our kit turned out to have been sending alerts for nearly three hours while underwater, which we reckoned was a pretty good stress test."

Yes, and you can be thankful that was fresh water flooding your kit. If it had been salt water, I doubt any kit would've lasted five minutes (salt water is an electrolyte; everything would've earthed through it).

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Charles 9
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Re: Football is football

Don't forget that Australians use the term soccer, too, because they have their own particular brand of "football" that, like Americans, they prefer over "soccer".

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Charles 9
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"Should read "Oswald's a Brit, so when he says “football” he means football... not pansy ass version of rugby with body armour.""

There's nothing pansy about dealing with 300-plus-pound linebackers charging at speed. Trust me, those pads are there for a good reason, because when 300-pound-plus people collide, it can HURT. Rubgy's rules bar rough tackling but Americans consider it standard Sunday procedure. So consider the course before you blame the horse.

PS. It's not just Americans that use the term soccer (and yes, we DO use the term "club" with soccer, like with SC). Australians use the term too to avoid confusing with their own version of "footy".

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Charles 9
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Re: The joys of essential life saving fluids and electronics

"Of course I don't know the differences in formulation between Regular and Cherry"

Actually, that IS rather surprising, given about the only difference between a Cherry Coke and a Regular Coke is the additional cherry syrup added to the Coca-Cola concentrate (which has the sugar and phosphoric acid). Most of the rest is just seltzer water (adding a touch of carbonic acid as well).

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Daft draft anti-car-hack law could put innocent drivers away for life

Charles 9
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Re: Bah

They will once they realize it's the only way to secure their revenue streams. Few things will motivate a business like the very solid threat of lost profits. (What you descrtibe was more a calculated risk; you need to raise that risk to make them pay attention).

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Charles 9
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Re: Preparation for the new laws

Actually, I was thinking something like a heroin shot attached to a life-sign monitor. Soon as death appears inevitable, it kicks in, person dies on a high and all the organs are ruined at the same time.

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Charles 9
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"The United States prison population is something they should be ashamed of not trying to increase."

Nope. America is damn PROUD of being tough on crime. As a native Texas comedian even used as one of his bits, "We have the Death Penalty and we USE it!" As far as they're concerned, this is population control and the price of living in an orderly society.

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Charles 9
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Re: Preparation for the new laws

I wonder if any of that speculative fiction touched on people who knew it was about to happen and so pickled themselves with toxins and so on to render their organs useless for "donation".

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Charles 9
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Re: what of the home mechanic and the professional garage?

I would think the OEMs will be ecstatic Now EVERYTHING has to go through the dealer, with them getting a cut and all.

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Charles 9
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Re: Steal/knick/hot-wire 3 cars

Trouble is, what do they do when the prisons get overcrowded, no one has the stomach to build a new prison (due to tax or NIMBY issues), and the Federal Bureau of Prisons is due to come knocking soon?

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Charles 9
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Re: Precedent

No, if it's made of aluminum, it's aluminum foil. Tin foil MUST be made of tin or it's false advertising (and that's why you never see the term in America--aluminum was basically perfected here in the late 19th century so tin foil never really took root). Besides, like I said, you MUST go tin or bust. ONLY tin blocks the brainwaves according to them.

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Charles 9
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Re: How about, instead...

No, because the executives are rich enough to give acceptable bribes, including bribed to overlook charges of bribery.

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Charles 9
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Re: Summary Execution

Not the first or last example. What you're seeing is termed "Absolute Justice," meaning there is only one punishment, not to mention it makes for great population control. It's all over fiction.

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Charles 9
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Re: Precedent

No, because the armor's made of steel, not tin, which according to conspiracy theorists means it's MORE receptive to brainwaves rather than less. Meanwhile, I wouldn't want to be in that armor in the middle of the summer.

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Trouble at t'spinning rust mill: Disk drive production is about to head south

Charles 9
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Re: The analysis that SSD may save them is probably wrong.

Not just Windows but also with old motherboards that were built before the idea of flash as a separate interface even existed. Boards where the main reason for PCI Express was graphics and thus only had one x16 slot and maybe one or two x1 slots that may well be blocked by a double-height graphics card. Trust me, a Core 2 Quad (especially the 9000-series) still has plenty of legs so those machines still need to be accommodated.

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Samsung sued over 'lackadaisical' Android security updates

Charles 9
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Re: Poor support

"Never understood how a manufacture believes that poor software support encourages you to buy from them again. My Galaxy Note II stopped getting updates 16 months after purchase.

It is not technical reasons that prevents it from getting upgrades, as third-parties offer upgrades to Kit Kat, and shortly to MarshMallow."

Cartel behaviour. ALL the phone makers know they need repeat business to stay alive, so no one rocks the boat. And now, thanks to things like KNOX and SafetyNet and dm-verity, customizing phones is frowned upon as more and more apps become root-aware.

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US govt quietly tweaks rules to let cops, Feds hack computers anywhere, anytime

Charles 9
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Re: Doubly so if it crosses borders

Double-plus-UNgood to invade a nuclear power. Thus why everyone tiptoes around Russia and China.

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Charles 9
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Re: One Possible Solution

But if the target is an agent or other go-between for someone IN Congress, and this form of extraterritorial power becomes de jure, then as the saying goes, it's open season. It's can easily be seen as basically an attack on foreign sovereignty, and so soon after the scandal that is the Panama Papers, sovereignty as a shield is going to face a double whammy.

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Charles 9
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Re: what's changing?

But the plods are aware of VPNs and would find ways to trace through them, wouldn't they?

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Charles 9
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Re: @AC - And our response is?

No, I DON'T think the intelligence agencies know their limits. Remember Snowden? Anyway, the intel agencies frequently collaborate with the police since it's the latter that has to the actual arresting. Therefore I consider them to be one unit.

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Charles 9
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One Possible Solution

All Senator Ron Wyden has to point out is that with this simple change, law enforcement officials could easily be hacking into THEIR computers and perhaps dig up some dirty secrets. Congresspeople have gone to jail in the past, so they're not safe in this case. The point is that this would a potential Executive crimp on the Legislature. Even Republicans would be able to recognize this threat for what it is and this should be enough to set up a quick debate and bill to prevent this. If they get enough bipartisan support, they could even get that rarity of rarities: a veto-proof majority.

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Google risks everything if it doesn’t grab Android round the throat

Charles 9
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Re: Make genuine Android a required user-selectable option

Probably, starting with Marshmallow. There's also the matter of Google Play Services, which is part and parcel with the store with the same requirements. A lot of the Android core functionality is there now, not in the core.

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Samsung's little black box will hot-wire your car to the internet. Eek!

Charles 9
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Re: Work-around

When it gets mandated, it'll probably require professional installation using tamper-evident equipment, registration, and so on. Then it pretty much can't be faked without them noticing. And they can probably find thin plugs and so on to keep them from being accidentally dislodged in cramped settings.

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Charles 9
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Re: OI, Samsung!

Thing is, this is going to get government attention, and you try to screw with government, they can screw you back. You just watch. They' mandate this or prevent your from driving, and if you're far from public transport, you'll basically have to (a) bend over, (b)become dependent on others to get anywhere, or (c) be isolated from the rest of society.

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Charles 9
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Re: it might enable you to get smaller insurance quotes

It's very rare for that to happen, and it usually has to do with congestion. If more accidents are the result of stop-and-go driving than the result of speeding then they'll have a case for speeding things up because slowing down in that case has become counterproductive.

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Line by line, how the US anti-encryption bill will kill our privacy, security

Charles 9
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Re: Awesome article

Then I propose Godwin's Law for Godwin's Law.

1. If you don't believe there's such a useful thing as "reputation," then you don't trust anyone. By definition, you're paranoid.

2. If you don't trust peer review (which includes rivals who would love to shoot down the competition), then you don't trust anyone. By definition, you're paranoid.

3. If you don't place your stock in other countries and their laws which will differ from country and country and may indeed see each other as rivals or even enemies, you believe there is a global conspiracy. Meaning you don't trust anyone. By definition, you're paranoid.

If you aren't willing to back up the claims you make, you're either making a baseless claim or you don't think backing up the claim is possible because the moment you make it everyone will oppose you because you. And if you're that paranoid, why haven't you abandoned the Internet at this point, gone to the mountains, and hidden in your lead bunker waiting for Judgment day?

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Charles 9
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Re: I am visiting Auntie with a cake

But then you have the issue of First Contact. How do you pass the code to the other side without it being intercepted? Indeed, how can Alice know Bob is really Bob and not Mallory or in this case Gene if they've never met before and there's always the chance Trent's been doubled? Not to mention custom codes like this tend to have a limited vocabulary, much like good stego. You can only convey so much information, and it's hard to "wing it" and convey an arbitrary change of plans without giving yourself away.

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Will Comcast's set-box killer murder your data caps? The truth revealed

Charles 9
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Re: Comcast would like to stop cable trimming.

The thing is, Comcast is in a unique position. They have the advantage of vertical integration due to being BOTH a transport AND a source (Comcast owns NBC). It's like a railroad owning a mine or a timber plot. Private property rights now butt up against competition regulation, and everyone has skin in the game one side or the other.

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