Feeds

* Posts by Charles 9

3591 posts • joined 10 Jun 2009

Target's database raided, 70 MILLION US shoppers at risk of ID theft

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: unencrypted!

That's what I was thinking, based on PCI-DSS rules. From the PIN Pad, the card number should be encrypted by a key provided by the clearinghouse so that no one in between can intercept it. Unless Target is ITSELF a clearinghouse.

0
0

Judge orders Yelp.com to unmask anonymous critics who tore into biz

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: No right of anonymity

And if the complaint is legitimate AND there is a threat of retaliation? That's why the anonymous comment is normally protected speech: to allow for such whistleblowing.

1
0

FCC honcho: Shifting our crusty phone network to IP packets starts now

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: In an all-IP network, a packet is a packet is a packet.

Trouble is, I don't think you CAN set the parameters rationally. The big reason is that some packets will always try to cheat: disguising themselves as higher-profile packets or using encrypted channels where their identity is obscured. So in other words, the moment you try to set a limit, the packet cheaters will tailor themselves to the loophole and ram through it like a runaway lorry.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Power supply

Well, to each his own. Some people prefer the short, sharp shock while others are more comfortable easing in with the slow, deliberate approach.

Another thought arises. If the new IP phone world does use IPv6, there is a strong likelihood that it would be very easy to break the current paradigm of all the phones in a site be bonded to the same line and number. With IPv6 phones, each one could be individually addressable. However, while possible, it may not be desired, so a provision may be needed that allows someone to link phones together so they may act much like the old-style phones. It would be more complicated than this, for sure, since the old style also allowed for such things as easy passover from one phone to the next as well as conference calling/eavesdropping using another phone on the same circuit, you get the point. This is one of those significant changes that would need to be negotiated very carefully, as this kind of transition can get particularly jarring.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Power supply

"In theory, wireline telephone numbers have been disconnected from geography since 1997 when local number portability was mandated."

Yes, but what about the area codes as well? I'm talking about telephone numbers that can follow a person on a global scale. After all, one VOIP packet is not so different from the next. Cell phones come closest now, but due to the network structure, there's the matter of roaming. Perhaps I think a bit too ambitiously since even IPv6 relies on the address to facilitate routing, but something of the sort could at least be looked at.

1
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Power supply

Perhaps that's one of the things that should be brought up: power failover.

If we look at this from the angle of, "We need to update the telephone system. What should we be doing?" I say let give them all the input we can.

- As you mentioned, POTS provides its own DC power which allow phones to operate without need for mains. Perhaps something like this should be preserved.

- How will a switch to IP telephone affect telephone access: numbers, area codes, exchanges, and zoning? Will they be preserved or change to reflect a larger potential access pool? If telephone access need not be tied to geography anymore, could any telephone number, not just a cell number, be portable from place to place?

- While on the subject of fax machines, many consumer and enterprise devices interact with POTS systems, typically by way of an analog modem (faxes use modems, too, just to a different signal spec). Since retrofitting to an all-IP system may be cost-prohibitive, an assurance that analog modems can transit safely could be in order at least in the short term.

- Which version of IP will the new system use? More than likely IPv6 since it would be a relatively clean slate and provide much more room for growth. If all new telephone devices were to be aligned to a single 64-bit network prefix, that still leaves an umpteen number of possible numbers for each device (based on my rough math, about 10,000,000 entries for a population approaching 10 billion). We can figure out the organization as we go, but there's plenty of leeway for it.

- Someone mentioned security in communications vs. government oversight. I don't know if one can make a guaranteed secure communication between Alice and Bob that's proof against Mallory or Gene MITM'ing it. However, we can perhaps at least establish a system by which the average conversation, so far as it is aware, cannot be idly picked out of the air by way of a system like TLS (perhaps in an improved or modified form) to handshake an encrypted link between the parties. My concern about this, however, is that any security protocol weakens over time, and this would create the occasional problem of updating/upgrading devices so as to replace protocols as they age.

That's all off the top of my head. But let's look at this more constructively. If we're going to establish a new telephone system, instead of complaining about conspiracies and the like, why don't we voice constructive comments and so on and and at least try to tell them what we actually want? Whether or not they listen is perhaps beyond us, but at least we'll have honestly voiced ourselves.

3
0

Anatomy of a 22-year-old X Window bug: Get root with newly uncovered flaw

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Careful

Can any user other than root get to-the-metal access (since many modern X systems can use hardware-assisted rendering and need to-the-metal access for performance reasons)?

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Dangerous Arguments

The point is that it becomes a Catch-22. In order to make the X server do what you want, you have to gain the same escalations this exploit is supposedly able to provide. To paraphrase Spike Milligan, you'd be trying to open the box with the crowbar you'll find inside.

Unless you're saying there's a way to insert the malformed BDF AND force the font refresh without any prior privilege escalation or user takeover?

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: When any C/C++ code includes "goto" you know it sucks...

OK, how about this? Only one additional nesting level and a slight inefficiency, but would this do?

int foo(void) {

int rc = EXIT_SUCCESS;

/* Not the most efficient, but this is the time/space tradeoff. */

X* x = malloc(sizeof(*x)));

Y* y = malloc(sizeof(*y)));

Z* z = malloc(sizeof(*Z)));

/* To proceed, none of the three can be null. */

if ((x != NULL) && (y != NULL) && (z != NULL)) {

if ((rc = do_sth(x,y,z)) != EXIT_SUCCESS) {

/* Everything works. Do whatever else here */

}

}

else {

rc = EXIT_FAILURE;

}

/* Do the cleanup here regardless of result */

/* Franlkly, I'm of a mind to do an inline or macro here. */

if (z != NULL) free(z);

if (y != NULL) free(y);

if (y != NULL) free(x);

return rc;

}

1
0

Take off, nuke 'em from orbit: Kill patent trolls NOW, says FTC bigwig

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Patents that simply "Lurk"

You can fix that simply by shortening the terms of such patents. The problem is that in the tech world, product lifecycles are very short, so patents in that field should reflect that. If you knew the patent you got expires in just a couple years, you can't hibernate it. You have to either snap now or lose your asset. Furthermore, you better have a clear-cut case in order to avoid having lengthy court proceedings drag you past the expiration date.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: sorted

OK, how do you stop big companies that can bully both the plaintiff AND the courts? Remember, the little guy can't get the hotshot lawyers who are masters at legalese.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Only one option really...

Why not? If you were the first to something, why not get rewarded for it? I'm just saying that the reward needs to be scaled to its pertinent industry and product lifecycle, which would likely limit an algorithmic patent to just a few years. Also recall, once the algorithm patent expires, it's public domain and open to everyone.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Only one option really...

But there's no time limit on a trademark. Trademarks are PERMANENT. Furthermore, to qualify for a trademark, the company must ACTIVELY use them as an identifying mark of their business (example: the Coca-Cola bottle shape, the UPS logo and color scheme).

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Nice thought, logical ideology, BUT...

Didn't they already pass a law that says that shell companies holding patents must disclose its owners, meaning they have the power to look under the shells?

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Only one option really...

No need to stop them altogether. In fact, I would be more in favor of speeding them up: nonphysical patents can still be allowed, but on a MUCH shorter timeframe: say, three years, long enough to present products using them for a cycle, but then it's not only fair game but open to the public. That's one overlooked aspect of patents--once they expire, they become public domain. So instead of being covered up as trade secrets (because they can't be patented), anyone can take advantage of them after a REASONABLE period.

Because in the end, the problem with software patents has not really been that they're nonphysical but that they last too long relative to their product lifecycles.

18
0

Snowden docs: NSA building encryption-cracking quantum computer

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Rubbish

You forget the data store in Utah that will hold historical data as well. Even if you switch cryptosystems, there's still all the OLD stuff that used the old systems. Maybe they can be used as an inroad to cryptoanalyze the new stuff, maybe they'll just use it as evidence to nail the spies and so on. Point is, it's not just PRESENT data that's vulnerable, but PAST data, too.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: This "leak" is pure BS.

And they spent tons of money and came up with a WORKING stealth fighter AND kept it under wraps for at least two decades. They also put men (even a couple vehicles) on the moon, something no other nation has duplicated for well over 40 years. Can work both ways.

1
1
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: OMFG, spy agency does spying

And in a world where ANYONE can be a threat?

0
3

Connecting Gmail to Google+ is SENSELESS, says Digg founder

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: No forcing google+

They ALSO force you into Google+ if you wish to comment on Android apps. This can be important if you've found a very good or very bad app and wish to make your opinion known.

2
0

T-Mobile US: AT&T's mobe buyout deal is so 'desperate', we'll do it too

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Not enough

T-Mobile comes the closest in that regard, mainly by disconnecting the phone installment plan from the service contract. They've also historically been the friendliest when it comes to unlocking and bringing your own phone. Their big problem until recently was spectrum, but with US LTE spectrum settling, it's less of an issue (AT&T and T-Mobile LTE phones tend to support both bands XVII and IV, respectively, meaning you can switch between them without losing LTE coverage).

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: villandra

There's also the matter that the announcements are coming during the 2014 CES, which is being held right now in America.

Anyway, I'm thinking of moving back to T-Mo myself (currently on an MVNO). It's hard to beat true Visual Voicemail (which no MVNO to my knowledge does), plus there's the benefit of WiFi Calling (Which provides more ways to make calls. Some of the places I go have hotspots but block cell signals). Thing is, it would mean a modest price increase, so I'm waiting to see if they sweeten the deal a little first.

0
0

Haters of lurid supershow CES: The consumer tech market is still SHRINKING

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Misunderestimated Market

"It doesn't make any sense, but Humans rarely do. It certainly isn't something you can plot on a bubble chart (I hate bubble charts) or begin to quantify. It's pure emotional reaction and you can't account for that. Why do you think there are so many products in every category? It sure as fuck isn't about giving the consumer choice. It's throwing everything imaginable at the consumer and trusting in the laws of probabilities that something will stick, eventually."

Thing is, in making so many models, you have to pay for their manufacture. Meaning you're taking a gamble, plus with so many models you run the risk of overextending: making stuff that's not likely to sell and end up getting eaten. Also, things like TVs are tough to make good margins on, especially in a market like this with stiff competition.

As for myself, I seem to be in the minority, as I actually did the research when I bought my last TV (replaced a dying set). Once I decided on a size, I played the field, checked out the different manufacturers, different tiers of features, and so on. I also chose to wait. As it turns out, timing helps when it comes to TVs. It's best to buy a TV around February or March, the end of the model year. At that point, stores need to mark down older TVs to get them out to make room for new ones. This means plenty of bargains, and I eventually made my purchase then: a nice TV I had studied thoroughly.

I suppose there are different levels of X for "I want X". Some like me just say, "I want an X" and work from there; others say, "I want X, Y, Z right now!" I admit sometimes to being tempted by emotion and so on, but perhaps there's a Vulcan streak in me in that I've found myself needing to justify the purchase AND do so with a decent amount of reason; I've actually been able to curb my instincts and walk away from more then a few buys: usually because I learn something that allows me to go, "On second thought..."

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

"4k TVA look absolutely gorgeous so I'd say they are very welcome. The only reason I'd pass on one now is the lack of content that really takes advantage of it."

The trouble is, based on what we've been hearing from the content providers, they've gone into full paranoia mode for 4K content. They want to make sure there's no chance in at least five years or so that anyone can rip 4K content from their media. Sounds to me like they'll develop and patent proprietary everything to cover their bases. Unique media and player devices, new protocols and cabling designs, probably even new TV designs equipped with end-to-end cryptosystems, probably even suicide hardware at the display end to prevent wiretapping. And they've already said flat out, ABSOLUTELY NO general purpose hardware will be allowed anywhere near them.

IOW, if you want to play 4K, it'll be by their rules; otherwise, you go home.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

But one could say the same thing about HDTV vs. SDTV. Is it the high resolutions selling TVs these days or the slimmer designs?

For now, my view is that UHD/4K/whatever sets just aren't needed in the consumer market. I mean, just how high a resolution do you need? Where I see things like this being adopted more is in the professional market, where the tech can be enlarged and be used more for presentations.

0
0

Block The Pirate Bay? Arrr, me hearties, new P2P client could sink that plan

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: It's a question of trust -- @ DrXym

"Of course, another option is for them to switch to another revenue stream, e.g. a bitcoin micropayment and no ads, but presumably it would still suffer many of the same issues and more besides."

You realize they ALREADY accept donations in both Bitcoin and Litecoin.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

But at the same token, how do you target something that's outside legal jurisdiction but is still dangerous (say, a malware site)? Especially when it's being housed by what could be considered a "hostile" power?

0
2
Charles 9
Silver badge

I think the approach is more analogous to Bitcoin than to Freenet. The idea seems to be that everyone syncs up their copy of the torrent list with everyone else. Much like Bitcoin's ledger.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: The problem with this

Well, for P2P DNS solutions like yacy and Namecoin are already popping up.

0
0

Gorilla Glass fights dirty, dirty germs with antimicrobial coating

Charles 9
Silver badge

"And all that would be mostly useless, because we already have one of the best microbial barriers : our skin."

The gloves I can see barring the fact they can cover up cuts through which microbes can directly invade the blood). But wouldn't the fact that orifices provides paths past the skin tell us we should still do masks? Or are they moot by the fact they can slip through gaps and still get in?

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Might be useful

Silver has similar antimicrobial properties. Makes me wonder which one is better (copper or silver) when put head to head.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

AIUI, the action of this glass is closer to that of bleach than that of triclosan: on a raw chemical level that makes it harder to build resistance.

1
0

'BILLION-YEAR DISK' to help FUTURE LIFEFORMS study us

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Additional test results

How stable are oxide crystals? Might they also have properties that would make them unsuitable for a protective layer (for example, you wouldn't want to use quartz since it's piezoelectric--a chance current or lightning bolt could make it crush anything it contained)? Plus, what about their hardness? At 8.5 on the Mohs scale, Silicon Nitride is no slouch (To compare, Quartz is a 7).

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Additional test results

Please note one other important qualification: it has to be TRANSPARENT. So it has to be geologically stable and at least translucent throughout the billion-year timeframe.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Cave Drawings?

True, but their storage capacity is limited. Not to mention we're not certain we're reading these stone media correctly; language gets very inconsistent when it's measured in geologic time. Meanwhile, the sum total of human knowledge appears to be beyond that capacity, so we need a cleverer way. This seems to be an attempt at this: using varying levels of "density" to allow for both compact and human-readable levels of data preservation.

0
0

Hacker backdoors Linksys, Netgear, Cisco and other routers

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Simple solution

"The private key has to be present on the system that's getting the HTTPS requests to be able to authenticate the public key in the router. The next time there's a vulnerability found in the web server software being used, hackers will grab the private key."

Such a server wouldn't have to be sophisticated. Such a setup I would hope to make as simple as possible to limit possible avenues. For example, if I could, I wouldn't use SQL in it. Also, perhaps you can run the process through a closed cryptosystem such that the web server never knows the key but shuttles data through a black box (which the server, and thus the malware) can't otherwise reach.

That just leaves session hijacking, but we're seeing ways to mitigate that.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: ISP backdoors

"A savvy user would give them the reply they expect. ;-)"

Savviness won't help you if you don't know what they're expecting. Besides, depending on the design, there may not be a way to feed the connection false information (if, for example, it triggers a hardware-based check or requests encoded or obfuscated data to test for altered firmware).

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Simple solution

If I wanted to do automated updates, I'd use HTTPS using an unpublished key. The devices would carry the public half of the key. If the hackers obtain it, oh well, because they can't hack the update system without the private key that never leaves the facility. I don't recall there having been many private key thefts of late.

0
0

AT&T takes aim at T-Mobile with $450 cashback lure

Charles 9
Silver badge

Too many suckers in the market. The music companies can make more than enough just on them to care about anything else.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

There's predatory pricing (better known as loss-leading) and then there's dumping (bleeding so as to make your competition bleed itself out). Dumping IS NOT allowed under anti-competition laws AND the SEC already has AT&T under scrutiny because they disapproved of them buying out T-Mobile. If T-Mobile cries foul (especially since THEY were the target of the failed buyout), there's a pretty good chance the SEC would then put AT&T under the microscope for potential anti-competition violations.

2
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Thing is, couldn't that be construed as dumping: selling at a big loss so as to drive out competition? If so, AT&T can't keep the promo up for too long before either they lose too much to keep it up or the SEC starts asking questions (and remember, AT&T already has a strike against it with the SEC for the hand-smack they got for trying to buy out T-Mobile). In either case, T-Mobile need only weather the storm for a short time. T-Mobile's current plans have a longer reach and are paying off already; furthermore, they're playing the image card against AT&T, which can make this "incentive" backfire if it makes AT&T look desperate.

I was once with AT&T (through Cingular), but their rates have never been acceptable for me (not even prepaid). I was happy with T-Mobile for two years, then went to a T-Mobile-based MVNO that gives me unlimited talk and text and 1GB of high-speed data (which is more than enough for me, plus EDGE data is free) for $45 after taxes. I may switch back to T-Mobile if they can present a nice plan that includes Visual Voicemail (plus they properly support short codes), but for now I can wait.

0
0

App to manage Android app permissions

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Open Source FTW

Well, you gotta remember the app permission model was demanded by the app developers. Otherwise, they would never have left the walled garden that is the Apple App Store. Which would you prefer: lots of apps where they call the shots or you get to call the shots but no one wants to play? Sorry, no third option available.

I DO agree, however, with the idea of requiring justifications for each permission to be described.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Anyone see a price anywhere?

The custom ROM I have has a Privacy Guard built into the settings.

1
0

Blame Silicon Valley for the NSA's data slurp... and what to do about it

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: OSS insufficient

"With the latter threat in mind, the more people who are able to load OSS operating systems on stock hardware, e.g. replacing Android with CyanogenMod, or BusyBox based router OSS replacements makes it harder for NSA sponsored mass hardware manufactured vulns to hide."

That still wouldn't do much against a true black bag operation that hides in an ancillary hardware chip (like the radio chip). The chip would be impossible to update, essential for operation, ubiquitous enough to be practically everywhere, and a trade secret to the manufacturer so there will be no useful information on it. No amount of source code inspection will help against it, and since the tech goes into patent-protected grounds, it's not legally feasible to roll our own solutions.

0
0

How the NSA hacks PCs, phones, routers, hard disks 'at speed of light': Spy tech catalog leaks

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: SEASONEDMOTH ?

Yes, they do. Acronyms and initialisms are SOP for the US DoD. For one thing, it reduces chatter. For another, as another poster noted, it makes textual communication more precise. Both objectives are militarily significant.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Pitiful LyingLoser Alarmist much? @Plump & Bleaty

""I can't consider a government to be properly democratic when they build sophisticated and comprehensive interception into the web...." All you are doing is demonstrating that you do not understand what democratic means - it is not a government that reflects the views and actions you alone feel right but the will of the majority, nothing to do with "interception". And it is very clear from the article they are not building interception "into the Web" but into a very small and targeted set of individuals. Try READING the article before bleating."

ANY government made by man will, because of human instinct, repress SOMEONE by virtue of some concentration of power. Even a pure democracy introduces "tyranny of the majority". And as we've seen, republics and other representative governments limit the number of people powerful interests need to corrupt to get things done. Smaller oligarchies magnify that issue, and for a government of one...well, Machiavelli wrote a lot about that. In fact, a lack of government (anarchy) would inevitably result in a "survival of the fittest" scenario: itself repressive.

"".....The people need to have some idea of what's going on so they can choose alternatives....." What you just can't get your noodle round is that your fantasy viewpoint is firmly in the tiny minority, otherwise the irate mobs would be storming Number 10 and Whitehall and demanding GCHQ was burnt to the ground. And as for "some idea of what's going on", the fact is there were plenty of us with a clue (so not including you) that found Snowden's "revelations" as just mildly interesting, having seen plenty of evidence over the years. It's not my fault if you lived with your head in the sand."

Ever heard the phrase "bread and circuses". Sure, some of us are onto the idea, but NOT ENOUGH. It's one smart vote vs. ten dumb votes. The average person lacks the kind of mind capable of CARING about the loss of their own liberties and so on.

"".....this interception is a kind of power and this power will be subverted from 'finding terrorists' to 'finding violent criminals and peedos' to ''finding domestic criminals' to 'trawling for potential criminal behaviour' to 'trawling for political dissent'....." Really? Except the "interceptions" (mainly just metadata collection, actually, not interceptions) have been going on for YEARS and there has not been one single incident of what you are insisting (based solely on your shrieking paranoia) should have been well evident by now. The reason it's not evident is because it only exists in the dim and dark recesses of the tiny minds of easily-led sheeple like you."

Have you ever read 1984? Ever thought that when they want you gone, it won't be a public arrest in the street but rather you just vanish and become among the untold numbers simply "missing"?

"....BTW that's what will happen in our & other western countries...." And your evidence for this is.... Oh, what a surprise, you have SFA evidence to back up that piece of fear-induced fantasy. Get a grip, get a clue, and get over yourself, you're simply not of any interest to ANYONE.

Name ONE country that has maintained the same governmental structure and stability for more than 500 years (no changeovers of power between groups, no dynasty changes or the like). The United States is too young to qualify, England had a brief time without a kind almost 400 years ago, and Russia and China had Communist revolutions just in the last century. Inevitably, the gravitation of power combined with human instinct causes things to tip past the comfort zone. If it tips pretty early, you end up with minor upheavals that require reforms and the like to fix; on the outside, you may end up with something like a regime change. If the discontent builds too high, though, you either collapse into totalitarian regimes that squelch rebellion quick as a rule or breakups and shakeups that result in multiple new lands that split the power and start the cycle again.

0
1

Now THAT'S a sunroof: Solar-powered family car emerges from Ford labs

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: BS

The house gets a good charge since I'm talking putting this concentrator over a solar collector installed on the roof of a house and tied to the house's grid, NOT the car, which could instead tap into a lead coming FROM that collector.

1
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: BS

"Reasonable quality fresnel lenses will go around a hundred bucks for a 10" x 10" so for an average car port of around 15 square metres of roof you will be looking at about $30.000 just for the concentrator, add the price of the horrible hybrid and then try to figure an ROI!"

Are we talking glass or polycarbonate? Linear beam or spot beam? We may also have to allow for quality variances. I mean, it doesn't have to be perfect. Most of the lenses I've been seeing in my research do achieve at least an 8x rating even with minor imperfections. A large linear fresnel lens with a 8-9x power isn't likely to be as expensive as you describe, making it more viable.

1
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Would like to see this tried on a train

I think scale's the big problem. Trying to scale down the D-E train tech down to a car's frame seems to reduce its power too much. Most cars have only two axles whereas the average locomotive has four or six, plus most cars only power one axle (more power axles = more power at the expense of needing more space for the motors). The shape of the car would help determine if you could do two direct-driven power axles as well as how big you can make them (larger motors allow more electromagnetic force, equaling more power).

And that's assuming axle motors (which is what trains use). Individual wheel motors change the math such that you can't rely on train tech as an analogue.

0
0
Charles 9
Silver badge

The problem is that distribution can itself be inefficient. Plus it introduces the points of failure and failure cascades that our current centralized system can bring. The idea behind solar-panel houses is to DEcentralize the grid and allow each unit to be capable of powering itself if need be, plus if any one unit fails, none of the others have to rely on that one, helping to prevent a failure cascade.

0
0

Coming in 2014: Scary super-soldier exoskeleton suits from the US military

Charles 9
Silver badge

Re: Battlefield Realities

That's why such a simple thing as snowshoes work. So the feet need to have a better ground surface area; that could be arranged.

0
0