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* Posts by Pete 2

2351 posts • joined 10 Jun 2009

OK, forget the 3D telly fiasco: 4K is gonna blow you away - say tech giants

Pete 2
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Don't judge a book by its cover

In this case the cover is the TV. Whether it is 4K, 3D, 625 lines (yikes!) or even in colour.

The "book", however is the content: the programmes, video games, films and is (hopefully) the reason why we bought the telly, in the first place. To watch them, not to dribble lovingly at the sight of an enormous screen.

Now, it does seem that with every new revision of the "cutting edge", the technology improves but the programmes (and other stuff) do not. So we end up spending £100's or £1000s on spiffy new kit, only to turn it on and watch 40 year-old episodes of Dad's Army.

Unless there's something completely immersive about 4K, and there is sufficient content made available specifically for it then there seems little point in upgrading - at least until the currrent telly has worn out.

There does seem to be one aspect of 4K that would make it a "must buy": the ability to get three or four ordinary TV programmes running as P-i-P at the same time. Then we might stand a chance of finding something decent to watch. Provided the picture quality isn't compressed to hell and back, just to get a number of channels down the satellite link.

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LOHAN cops a faceful of smutronyms

Pete 2
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Fuel to the flames

> So, those of you who've not yet entered the competition ...

You *know* this is just going to be a platform for the smutsters to take another bite of the cherry ... Hmmm, cherry ... CHERRI

Computerised High-altitude Emergency Rockblock Release Initiator

Contrived? Moi?

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Boffinry breakthrough OF THE DECADE: Teens 'influenced' by friends

Pete 2
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Does it matter what you do at 15?

Ans: only if you're still doing it at 40, or 50, or 60.

So teenies smoke. It's no big deal - they'll soon grow out of it. 15 years after you stop, almost all of your health risks are the same as someone who's never smoked. In fact there is some evidence that TV campaigns, such as for nicotine patches can INCREASE the number of young and stupid smokers - on the basis that these make it easier to stop later, once they realise how nasty (and costly) it is.

So from a health PoV, stopping in time is as good as never starting. Although during those intervening, all important to social acceptance and getting lurve years, you'll still stink of tobacco smoke.

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Give us a break: Next Android version to be called 'KitKat'

Pete 2
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Re: Why Not. Here's why

Is it really a good move to name a software release after something that breaks so easily?

Or that melts when it gets warm?

I suppose some people will give it the finger (or 4).

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10,000 app devs SLEEP together in four-day code-chat-drink tech orgy camp

Pete 2
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A working definition of hell?

> four days of motivational speeches

Apart from being stuck in an enclosed space with 10,000 (other) geeks.

Which would be worse: if the sanitation failed, or if the internet connectivity failed?

and which would be noticed first?

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Torched £30 server switch costs phone firm millions in lost sales

Pete 2
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Non technical alternative

One place I was employed was going through the risk-assessment process. The finance guys were (as usual) baulking at the cost of it all and suggested that it would be cheaper to insure against the loss, rather than prevent it through technical / architectural means.

This view gained a lot of traction and would have been a hell of a lot simpler to implement: just sign a larger cheque to the corporate insurance people, than any of the proposed IT solutions (which in truth, nobody really understood - least of all the technical architects who were proposing it). However, that plan fell apart when someone from tthe legal dept. piped up that there was a statutory reqiurement to have archives, backups, DR, plans and provisions in place that could be audited.

It does make you wonder whether this particular phone compmany could / would / did claim any of those losses back off their fire insurance? If so, was it really their loss, at all?

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WIN a RockBLOCK Iridium satellite comms module

Pete 2
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Named as it does

Detachable

Radio

Operated

Personnel

Safety

Yanker

or:

Special

Purpose

Long-range

Altitude

Termination

P.S. <gift horse>Does the winner have to pay the £8+VAT/month line rental, or is this thrown in for free?</gift horse>

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iPad classes for DOGS offered in New York

Pete 2
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Lesson: the first

> So what does she train the dogs to do with the iPad?

You'd kinda hope that a high priority would be to teach them not to cock a leg up to it. Everything after that should be considered a bonus.

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Met Police spaffs £250m keeping 'ineffective' IT systems running - report

Pete 2
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The report sounds as confused as the existing IT

> tech it believes the police should be using but isn't – such as mobile apps, social media and the cloud. ... national rollout of 41,000 devices between 2008 and 2011 sucked up £71m while achieving very little.

So which is it? The Met should spend a ton of hard-paid community charge and taxes on tens of thousands of hand-held devices, or not do it because they've been shown to be ineffective?

It does appear that there's a total leadership vacuum at the top of the Met, so far as IT is concerned. No ordinary business could ever justify having 70% of it's (obsolete) IT kit as redundant. Assuming their meaning of "redundant" is the same as everybody else's and this isn't just a political football being kicked resolutely towards one's own goal.

As with a lot of these things, the blame lies firmly with the top echelons. The IT management for not spending their budget wisely, and the Met's top brass for keeping them on and allowing this situation to arise. Maybe the time has come to outsource the whole mess to a foreign call centre. Then they'll really learn a thing or two about "having to re-enter the same information in ten different systems"

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Behind the candelabra: Power cut sends Britain’s boxes back to the '70s

Pete 2
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Re: Not so much

> UPSs? That's why we've got laptops!

But UPSs are for so much more than computers!

They also run LCD/LED TVs, Sky boxes, lights, WiFi+routers and most other things that don't have switch-on surges or excessive power requirements. Plus, they generally have spike/surge protection, so they keep your precious gear safe from the nasties that can happen when the power does come back, or only fails for a second or two.

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Pete 2
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Not so much

> a freelance technology tart

Any self-respecting technology tart would have UPSs to handle all this (though admittedly not on the cooker or uWave).

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Dopey dope-growing dope smoked out by own dope dope-growing vid

Pete 2
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Re: Please stop with the "Growing plants" thing

> Last lot who argued with him got turned into a pillar of salt

Actually it was Lot's wife who got turned into a pillar of salt. But in Deuteronomy and other books, people got stoned.

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Pete 2
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Promotional incarceration

So basically the guy paid $500 to be introduced to a large number of potential clients and given 8 months to cultivate the contacts and relationships he'll need when he gets released, to distribute his crop and grow the business.

And the judge who gave him this opportunity said he wasn't smart.

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Women in IT: ‘If you want to be taken seriously, dress like a man’

Pete 2
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Honking your horn

> If you don’t toot your own horn, who is going to do it for you

And there we have it! The secret to success: not just in IT, but in any career in any country, for anyone of any gender.

If you want a pay rise, you have to ask for it. If you want a promotion you need to go out and GET IT. Sitting at your desk waiting for muggin's turn to finally favour you gets you nowhere. However, grabbing the bull by the balls is a trait that is more often seen in a certain type of (usually, but not exclusively) man - generally the ones who make a lot of noise, attract (management) attention, are a pain on the arse around the office and let people know (loudly and often) about their successes. If you think that demurely saying "yes, maybe I would be willing to take on a little more responsibility" or "I do think I've grown into the job" at your annual appraisal is all it takes, think again - everyone. It may not appear "seemly" or "feminine" but - if you don't ask, you don't get.

You need to take the initiative (and not as an ex-subordinate did when I gave him his review: [Me] "You don't use your initiative" [Him] "you never asked me to") and be one step ahead. Tell you boss that you think "X" is going to be an opportunity and you'd like to try making it work - don't wait for the honour to be bestowed on someone else.

I have to say that this seems to me, in large lart at least, to explain why women so often get paid less than men and/or don't rise so fast and so high. Simply because they don't ask for pay rises or promotions; they take what is offered. Similarly when applying for a new job, the tendency is to not rock the boat and accept the salary being offered, rather than haggling for an extra grand or two.

So get that horn and start honkin'

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Pimoroni PiGlow: Rainbow LED swirls for the Raspberry Pi

Pete 2
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LED strips

If you want some serious LED flashing, have a look at the WS2812 based RGB LED strips.

Like this product, they are controllable from a serial bus and can be got either as strips up to 4m long (at 60 LEDs per metre, each one RGB with a built in controller chip) or the more interesting-looking 16x16 squares.

Though given the Amperage these could suck, you'll need a much better power supply to drive them.

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Boffins force Skype to look you in the eye

Pete 2
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I'm up here

It doesn't sound as if this will stop (presumably bottle-fed as babies) adolescents from staring at the cleavage of women they are skyping with. It just means the other parties won't see it.

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UK gov call-centre serfs told: Fondle your button for HAPPINESS

Pete 2
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Online Power of Attorney

> allows someone to log on and nominate someone to make decisions on their behalf.

Presumably most people where phoning in to ask why the gummint was wasting so much money, when simply giving the "someone" your password would achieve the same result.

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The 'third era' of app development will be fast, simple, and compact

Pete 2
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Add another one to the pile

I'm sure I've heard this rhetoric, wrapped around different "developments" every few year for the last few decades.

Whether it was said about high-level languages, application generators, 3G and 4G languages, Object-Orientated, Agile, Multi-threading or whatever fad is getting taught in tertiary education these days.

The point is, that adding more layers just hides the underlying stuff. It's still there: in all it's flawed implementations, assumptions and incompatibilities.

Programming is hard. Mainly because people who do it don't have complete familiarity with the tools they are using, place showing off their intelligence above writing clear code, only have a vague idea of what the final goal should look like, haven't been given the time to do a proper job of keep getting new and conflicting changes added to whatever specifications they started with. None of these problems is helped by having a new programming fashion, toolset or language foisted on them every few year (or university generation: the time between a new intake and them graduating).

Simply coming up with a new set of buzzwords and more hoopla won't fix the underlying difficulties. It certainly won't help inexperienced and time-pressured programmers make better applications.

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'Silent' staff stood by as £100m BBC IT project tanked – DG

Pete 2
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Programs and programmes

The same inability to spot the turkey in the BBC's IT is also apparent in it's broadcast choices.

It takes a brave (or foolhardy, or someone on the verge of retirement) to casually mention that the database has no clothes, or that the new production starring every luvvie under the sun is a total stinker.

Even when they do: whether as a TV critic, programmer who's unable to control the laughter (having seen the design docuemt) - or the tears, or simply an interested outsider who has seen a few disasters (both televisual and computerised) - nobody at a decision making level is prepared to listen.

It's this arrogance within the Beeb that is the basic problem, compounded by the BBC Trust being either purposely toothless, professionally indolent or far too close to the "establishment" (and probably all three) to crack the whip.

What the corporation needs is both transparentcy and a root and branch purge. Decisions should have named individuals identified (no more committee decisions and meetings - which is the usual way of muddying the water so it becomes impossible to discren who decided what) as being responsible and those decisions should be out in the open were we; their employers can scrutinise them.

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Google testing 'Helpouts' video support service

Pete 2
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Flocking to join

> Google thinks Helpouts could be handy for “teachers, counselors, doctors, home repair experts, personal trainers, hobby enthusiasts and more.”

So if the "more" does refer to all the sex workers who will be the first to populate an online service where money changes hands, that might be just what Google+ needs to kick it into high gear.

I bet Youtube wish they'd thought of that!

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New use for old iPhones: Watch your house get robbed in REAL-TIME

Pete 2
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Daytime use only?

> it can record any crimes that do take place

So long as the baddie in question is obliging enough to turn on the lights in the room and not just shine a torch around.

(Plus, isn't a movement activated wifi camera a perv's dream come true?)

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UK mulls ban on tiny mobiles to block prison smugglers

Pete 2
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Jammin'

> prison officials confiscated 7,000 phones and SIM cards from prisoners

What's so hard about installing electronic jamming equipment to make whatever phones do find their way in, useless?

We know from the prevalence of drugs in chokey that it's impossible to stop people (whether vistors, guards or other workers) from bringing in illicit goods, or even tossing them over the walls. So surely a better solution - assuming the authorities want one that works, rather than one which merely placates the whiners - would be to remove the service that the phones rely on.

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Marissa Mayer causes controversy after KEEPING HER KIT ON

Pete 2
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A tech woman's worst enemy? Other women.

> Mayer does not look so much passive as she does rigid and brittle,... and a set of straps on her Yves Saint Laurent stiletto shoes

IT is a creative industry. As such people within it will judge their peers (and betters) by their achievements and what they have produced. That's what wins respect.

However as soon as an IT woman gets publicity, it seems that all that the women columnists care about are her looks. her colour scheme and what she's wearing. Whether it's Mayer, Whitman or Rometty (HP and IBM) there are more column inches written about their clothes than about their skills.

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Google goes dark for 2 minutes, kills 40% of world's net traffic

Pete 2
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It's alive!

So Google has finally achieved sentience.

I guess we all just sit back and wait for it to take over the wor !*(£^&"~~

NO CARRIER

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Facebook keeps company with misery say boffins

Pete 2
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One man's survey is another man's flaw

> offering participants a link to an online survey

It sounds like the results were only drawn from the self-selected participants who then chose to fill in the survey. What about the moods of those who didn't? (and doesn't getting continuously harangued to fill in surveys tend to be depressing, too?)

Although this was only about FB - presumably to grab the attention of FB users and those in the media, I would hazard a guess that the same effect - if there actually is one - would be seen with all social media and forums.

Though you do have to ask: why would people continue to do something they didn't have to, if it made them unhappy?

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PEAK Apple: Cupertino's hopes died with Steve Jobs, says Larry Ellison

Pete 2
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Re: It's all gone a bit Princess Di

> does taking a lot of other products and combining the features in an easy to use way count as invention?

If done right, it's a lot more useful than mere invention. The key thing is not necessarily to invent new things but to find new ways of using and combining existing stuff. Jobs' genius was to get to the essence of a device and combine that with a clear vision for the design and how it would be used. He (or rather, the team he built) was able to clear a lot of the clutter from existing "stuff" and make products that just worked.

Sure, there was / is the evil side to Apple: patents, restrictions on use and interoperability. However that doesn't take away SJ's biggest contribution which gave us a better quality and higher expectations.

Oh, and from a horticultural point of view, doesn't Peak Apple occur just before it falls off the tree?

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Violent Hamlet 'bard' by British Library Wi-Fi filters

Pete 2
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Re: Excellent

> We must protect the children from culture!

Well, you might want to "protect" then from Titus Andronicus. Death, rape, killing the rape victim for being raped, cooking and eating one of the character's children and most of the cast meet a gory and violent end.

"Culture", like the maturity of people (not just children) covers a very, very wide spectrum. And what is fit and proper for one individual may be completely unacceptable to another (whether older or younger).

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Netflix dares UK freetards: Watch new Breaking Bad NOW or torrent it?

Pete 2
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Skip the middle man

> Otherwise the freetards will just prove all the networks were right

And if it does work, the logical question that the programme makers will start to ask is: who needs cable TV at all?

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Pete 2
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Re: I must be getting old

> I am still gobsmacked that it was never aired in the UK

To be fair, the trailers (from what I recall) were of some middle aged guy running around in his underpants. Even if the programme was better than that, it was a big turn off chez moi, hence never made it onto the list of "must see's"

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Tell me, professor, what is big data?

Pete 2
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Re: Signal to noise

> Dave, the ooo-arr-35 inside the combine blades is about to fail, I suggest you pop down and take a look

Gives a whole new meaning to getting bailed baled out

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Pete 2
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Signal to noise

The primary characteristic of big data is that for any particular problem you wish to apply to it, the proportion of interesting information compared to the amount of garbage you have to sift through is very, very small. With old-fashioned databases, designed when storage was expensive, the intended use was to focus on a small number of very well defined questions: where does account number 8892784237 live? How many months in arrears are they? What was their latest purchase?

While we're getting better at storing big data, which just increases the volume of stuff we collect, we're still in the infancy of extracting relevant, accurate and causally-linked intelligence from it (just ask the NSA or GCHQ). Sure, you can use it to foretell failures, a la HAL in 2001 - so long as your computer doesn't have an agenda of its own - but the number of false positives is very high. There is also the danger with BD of treating everyone as if they were Mr. or Mrs. Average and not designing enough flexibility into its reporting to allow for the possibility that maybe some people are different, or purposely give odd answers.

So while BD probably has some advantages in industrial processes, can feed back failure modes to manufacturers to design-out faults from products - it also leads to an increasing homogenisation when applied to people. Until we can advance the data selection processes to match the data collection abilities there will always be the wrong attributes applied to the wrong people, just because we accidentally triggered something while buying granny's incontinence pants on Amazon.

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100,000+ Earthlings star in 'reality TV contest' for ONE-WAY ticket to MARS

Pete 2
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They *all* sound like ideal candidates

> go to Mars and never, ever come back

The sorts of people who are willing to demean themselves on reality TV are just the sort of individuals this planet would be better off without. Either we could start a global lottery to fund sending them all, or we could persuade them to sell all their assets (since they wouldn't need them on Mars) to pay for the trip themselves.

I'm sure D.A. would approve if we called their spaceship the B Ark.

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Tax dodging? It's harder to do - and rarer - than you think

Pete 2
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It was never about tax

All this talk about paying "fair" tax is merely a sop to the sound-bite addicted millions of people in the country who can't do sums.

Even if all the companies involved in "scams" coughed at the same level that the average wage-earner does, it would still make bugger all difference to the government's expenditure plans. Raising a few billion, or a few tens of billions by grabbing these companies nuts and squeezing "until the pips squeak" is a drop in the pot compared to the half a TRILLION or more of revenue the government rakes in - and duly spends again - every year.

Sure, an extra bil or two would allow someone to employ another 50,000 nurses, or policemen or paperclip benders(!), but unless that can be shown to have a tangible effect on anything except the paperclips it would not benefit the country as a whole. Specifically: would it do more good than the damage caused by having a bunch of multinationals pulling out and causing probably the same number of redundancies, as they leave the UK and go elsewhere?

It does however, make an exceedingly good headline (provided the readers don't immediately go: Hmmm, and reach for their calculators - which, lets face it, the sorts of rabble who are so easily roused are hardly likely to do). And that's really all it was intended to do.

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Top Brit biz giants love to outsource IT so much, they're gonna do it more

Pete 2
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Admission of failure

Outsourcing a part of your business is admitting that someone else can do it cheaper, if not better than you can. Although that's what successful businesses do: focus on their strengths and buy in goods and services from outside (after all, no business makes everything it owns or uses - that would be silly), the question that needs to be asked is whether IT is a core part of your business or simply a necessary evil.

Given how much all modern businesses rely on their IT to survive it seems short-sighted to hand over total day-to-day control of it to the lowest bidder.

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Bloke in shed starts own DAB radio station - with Ofcom's blessing

Pete 2
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More stations than listeners?

> a Raspberry Pi could have filled that role

'cept that the RPi doesn't have an audio input - hence the need to generate the stream elsewhere and pipe it in using IP.

But really? DAB - does anyone care?

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Sergey Brin's 'test-tube burger' cooked, eaten, declared meat-like

Pete 2
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Condiments

> What was consistently different was flavour

Which is exactly why we invented hot chilli sauce (and beer). Enough of either of those and you really won't care whether it tastes like meat. As many a burger van owner will attest.

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Jimbo Wales: ISP smut blocking systems simply 'ridiculous'

Pete 2
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What we need is a confusion filter

Jimbo's right: the software won't work AND it won't deter people who choose to opt in (though it will give the government a nice list of "the usual suspects" to haul in every time someone suspects a single man might be having naughty thoughts.

However, it should also be recognised that this filter was never meant to STOP anything - except the continual whining and muttering by the "I'm against everything" brigade. Since none of them can decide what pornography actually is, they won't ever know when they've succeeded in filtering it - but I suspect the issue is more about wielding power, than making progress. Even recent articles on this site have confused nudity with pornography: not to mention the difference between skimpy clothing and wearing _no_ clothing, which seems to be another area where the tutting busybodies go into overdrive (maybe we should ban swimwear and shorts too - or ban the display of ankles and everything above, just to be "safe"?)

Before anyone starts banning, filtering and marginalising anything, the first thing that should happen is that whoever is pressuring for this added censorship should be asked: "What is it you actually want (as opposed to being against)?" Then, if they can come up with a coherent response, there may be something to base a national debate on.

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Upgraded 3D printed rifle shoots 14 times before breaking

Pete 2
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Re: whats the point?

> Find the root of the problem and cure that instead of trying to cure the symptoms.

The root of the problem is that there are too many afraid americans who think that having a gun will make them safer AND too many saddo's who think that having a gun is a suitable substitute for "character", or could somehow make them into a "man".

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Pete 2
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Do ya feel lucky?

"I know what you're thinking, punk. You're thinking "did he fire six shots or only five fourteen shots or only thirteen?" Now to tell you the truth I forgot myself in all this excitement. But being this is an unreliable piece of plastic prototype junk that cost a few dollars to make you've gotta ask yourself a question: "Do I feel lucky?" Well, do ya, punk?"

That spinning sound is Dirty Harry¹ at the prospect of having his "my that's a big one" .44 Magnum replaced by something that you'd expect to get in a box of cereal.

[1] Yes, I know Clint's not dead, but I doubt the character would have a very long life expectancy, given how he conducted himself

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Buy a household 3D printer, it'll pay for itself in MONTHS!

Pete 2
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A modern day laser

In the early 1960's LASERs were touted as a solution looking for a problem. It appears that whoever came up with this advertisement article has created a problem, or a whole set of problems to fit the solution. (And to be fair to 3D printing, maybe in 20 - 30 years it will evolve into something worth doing, too)

There are a few issues however. You don't need to buy this printer to get the tat it produces - you just need someone in the neighbourhood to sell this junk at a car boot sale. Second is that once you've produced your ration of cheap, plasticky garbage you don't need the printer any more - so off it goes to eBay, or FREEGLE if it still works. So the second hand market for these things should be quite bouyant (provided you can wait the few months for these to trickle through).

Finally, if you're producing all these things yourself, what is little Jonny going to bring home from his/her/its woodworking class? Maybe schools need to adapt and move with the times.

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Terror cops swoop on couple who Googled 'backpacks' and 'pressure cooker'

Pete 2
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Re: If you want a picture of the future, imagine a boot stamping on a human face—forever.

> I wonder how long it will be before the sheeple get pissed off & demand changes

Probably never.

The great thing about our mass-media, always-on world is that we can be shown the "results" of terror attacks live on TV, and then over and over again. Positive reinforcement is a wonderful thing and imprints certain "facts" on the public. Like every time you see a plane fly into an office block it reinforces the view that the threat is current and as real today as it was ten or twelve years ago. After that, it's just a case of sitting back and letting public opinion paranoia do the rest.

The worst outcome a terror attack can have (for the perpetrators) is not that it fails, it's that nobody talks about it.

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HALF of air passengers leave phones on ... yet STILL no DEATH PLUNGE

Pete 2
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Re: You don't have to turn you phone off

> these same 'stupid rules' may have been ncecessarily correct 30 years ago

Possibly (though it's more likely that a 1980's mobile phone's battery would have caught fire than the R.F. would cause interference). The problem with stupid rules that everyone ignores is that they are indistinguishable from the sensible rules that only a complete fool would ignore. So once people start ignoring the ones they consider dumb - generally judged only by the level of inconvenience the rule causes them combined with the lack of immediate tangible benefit they see) they are more likely to start ignoring the "good" rules, too.

Stupid laws have the same corrosive effect. They reduce the credibility of the law as a whole and also reduce our respect for the people who try to enforce those laws: the "the law is the law" types.

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Pete 2
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Blanky

> 27 per cent said they couldn't cope without a switched-on phone and nine per cent said...

It does appear that a significant proportion of the (presumably adult) sample regard their phones as a sort of good-luck charm, or talisman - in the same way that insecure children will cling on to their favourite object / toy / blanket to comfort themselves.

I guess in the past, this role would have been fulfilled by a St. Christopher medal, prayer beads or some other quasi-religious artefact. And now those same, impressionable and insecure types just worship at the altar of Nokia, Samsung and Apple instead..

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Apple FINGERED our personal packages every day, claim shop staff

Pete 2
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Don't drag the bag

> they are fed up with out-of-hours bag searches

... and yet they still insist on taking bags to work with them (or more significantly: trying to take them out, afterwards). Slow learners, or what?

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Intel's homage to Raspberry Pi: The much pricier Minnowboard

Pete 2
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Refreshing the parts other SBCs can't reach

> Why would potential customers be interested in x86, if they're not tied to Windows?

Well that's the key, isn't it? Say you're an OEM making annunciators for trains, or portable ATMs, or things that trundle round warehouses following lines on the floor. If your *current* products are based on WinTel technology and you want better, faster, cheaper, more reliable, more power and a board that hasn't recently gone out of production then yes: this could be for you.

If you're upgrading an existing product or giving it a mid-life boost you don't want to spend vast amounts of developer time (and time to market) redeveloping stuff, checking if drivers will still work and integrating peripherals, USB thingies and so forth. You just want to drop in a new "heart" to the machine and get it out the door.

However if you're building a mass-market product where space, power consumption and unit-price are more important and you're writing all the software from scratch anyway, then you probably wouldn't consider this board.

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Pete 2
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Re: Devil's advocate

Yes, this product is obviously not aimed at the RPi buyers and seems to be intended for the "big boy" embedded systems manufacturers (who will no doubt get some juicy discounts) who produce products for corporations, not hobbyists on a budget.

For them, the Pi is a nice starter board and other products like the BBB (also made by CircuitCo I believe), or the Olimex Linux boards (some with wifi or SATA on board) are much more capable as Linux hosts and a great deal cheaper.

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UK economy to lose £198m if BBC and pals lose EPG slots - Ministry of Fun

Pete 2
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Award to reward

> Other channels also commission UK-created content, but to a much lesser degree

So just award the primo slots to those broadcasters who screen the most hours of original drama, current affairs, sport, light ents and factual programming. If there really is a link between EPG pole position and audience figures, that would incentivise the content creators and reward them with larger audiences and therefore greater advertising revenue. Review every year.

Though I suspect that the "big 5" channels would stay in their current positions, more or less and everyone else would be right down at the bottom.

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Typical! Google's wonder-dongle is a solution looking for a problem

Pete 2
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Going back to basics

> Google simply doesn't have the material today that drives any significant demand

And what is the single biggest driver? Yup, porn.

Maybe that's what Google needs to dip it's dongle into. If they're smart they could spin it as "look: we're taking all the porn off the internet searches and only making it available through our specialised hardware (that only 18+s can buy)"

The best part about that is that apart from satisfying all the prudes in the universe it would make all the other search engines look bad if they didn't follow suit. But without a dongle of their own, they'd be stuffed.

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Selfridges dreaming of a snot-themed Christmas

Pete 2
Silver badge

Hit and miss

> "Every object is original and unique,"

Is that just a polite way to say that 3D printers can't reproduce models accurately?

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Crumbs, we're going to lose that public sector bid - Jeeves, send for the lawyers

Pete 2
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Failure is not an option ... it's a distinct possibility

> For example, businesses will complain about the procurement strategy that public sector body is following if they think that strategy favours their competitor

Remarkable! You'd expect people or companies who felt they were being discriminated against to just sit quietly and let it go.

I wonder if the Cabinet Office, who investigate these complaints could ever come to the conclusion that most of them (In 19 per cent of the cases investigated no serious concerns were found) - the other 81% - DO actually have merit and the fault could simply be that the officials responsible for drafting the bids are a bunch of clueless bureaucrats who have no idea about what they want, how business works or even what is technically possible.

It could also help to explain why so many government projects are so utterly flawed.

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