* Posts by Chris Mellor 1

347 posts • joined 10 Jun 2009

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IO, IO, it's profiling we do: Nimble architect talks flash storage tests

Chris Mellor 1

From a Nimble guy

[Entered on behalf of Nimble employee...]

I am a Nimble employee for full disclosure.

Nimble has had variable block from day 1 on our hybrids (and now on All-flash which is the same OS) which came out a number of years prior to Pure releasing their product.

The below statement about our product is 100% false:-

"Side note: Nimble’s data reduction, for example, operates on fixed block sizes that have to be set/tuned on a volume-by-volume basis….in our minds that’s simply not correctly architected for today’s cloud/mixed workload reality."

On a second (and more political) note: Pure proves in their own diagram that very little IO actually happens at 32k... Transactional apps operate at 4-8k blocks and sequential apps happen at larger 64-256k blocks meaning 2 benchmark ranges are representative of real world workloads.

It's intellectually insulting for Pure to insist after showing their numbers that the mean of these is a valid benchmark. I would hope that such a fantastic team of analysts and journalists would call this faulty logic out.

[Obviously not :-) ]

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Seagate scoops a revenue boost off back of its 8TB drives

Chris Mellor 1

(In)significant figures

This comment was posted privately to me, to spare my blushes maybe, but I figured it deserved a public posting anyway:-

"2.7e9 is greater than 2.65e9?

I would like to see another significant figure in that revenue report of $2.7 billion if it is being claimed that it exceeds a prediction of 2.65 billion.

So, a closer look, since I am a little bored and this might be a quick practice problem-

Seagate's Q4 supplemental report shows disk revenues of 2.455 billion (possibly erroneously reported as $2.455m in the article [ since corrected; thanks.] ) plus Flash/other of $0.199 billion, for a total of $2.654 billion. This matches the details of the Q4 report even though their own press release says $2.7 billion.

Technically 2.654 can be reported as 2.7, but I think maybe the opening paragraph is a little misleading? Or optimistic?"

Neat, huh?

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Chris Mellor 1

Posted for on reader's behalf

This comment was sent privately to me, to spare my blushes maybe, but I figured it deserved a public posting - so I could get a public pasting :-)

"2.7e9 is greater than 2.65e9?

I would like to see another significant figure in that revenue report of $2.7 billion if it is being claimed that it exceeds a prediction of 2.65 billion.

So, a closer look, since I am a little bored and this might be a quick practice problem-

Seagate's Q4 supplemental report shows disk revenues of 2.455 billion (possibly erroneously reported as $2.455m in the article - [Corrected - thank you!] ) plus Flash/other of 0.199 billion, for a total of 2.654 billion. This matches the details of the Q4 report even though their own press release says 2.7 billion.

Technically 2.654 can be reported as 2.7, but I think maybe the opening paragraph is a little misleading? Or optimistic?"

Neat, huh?

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Whip out your blades: All-flash Isilon scale-out bruiser coming

Chris Mellor 1

Node = 4 blades

I'm (Chris Mellor) posting this comment for Peter Serocka -

As poster Yaron Haviv pointed out, blades and nodes apparently are mixed up here, with most of the numbers relating to the 4U chassis-nodes, while "400+" relating to blades which will act as the functional nodes of OneFS in the sense how "nodes" are usually operated and counted in OneFS.

NAS Ops rates are least well-defined, so let's have a look at the other figures first, and see what we can figure out from the published information.

8 x 40GbitE frontend + 8 x 40GbitE backend sum up to 16 connectors per "node" and that must be

"chassis" as it would be overkill for any kind of sub-chassis storage "blades" to have 16 connectors on them. Just imaging the cabling...

One the other hand, present OneFS nodes have 2 x Infiniband backend plus 2 x 10GbitE frontend,

both active-active balancing and failover, so a Nitro blade should have at least 2 x 40GbitE

frontend and 2 x 40GbitE backend.

That would mean 4 blades per node.

(Otherwise, 4 x 40GbitE plus 4 x 40GbitE per blade would mean only 2 blades per chassis - barely makes sense, and wouldn't match the performance and capacity figures either, as we'll see below).

So assuming 4 blades per chassis, and that all capital "B"s mean Bytes not bits, and a max cluster size of 400 blades (aka "nodes" in OneFS speak), we might have:

1 Nitro Chassis (4U):

60 x 15 TB = 800 TB

15 GB/s (10 times more throughput ***out of 4U***, compared to one Isilon X410 4U node)

1 Blade:

15 x 15 TB = 225 TB

3.75 GB/s (2.5 times more throughput ***out of a single node*** in traditional sense, compared to X410).

Large Cluster (100 chassis = 400 blades):

100 x 800 TB = 400 x 225 TB = 80 PB (with 100 PB for "400+" blades)

100 x 15 GB/s = 1.5 TB/s (as claimed)

Note that 3.75 GB/s per blade fits nicely with the assumed network connections of dual redundant 40 GbitE for front and backend, respectively.

The picture of the cluster on Chad Sakac's blog site ***shows*** 100 chassis and ***says*** 400+ nodes, another indication that 1 "OneFS node" = 1 Nitro blade, with 4 of them in going in one Nitro chassis.

Fwiw, if we divide a chassis-node's 15GB/s by claimed 250,000 NAS Ops/s that would give

us an *average* NAS operation block size of 60 KB, which kind of makes sense for mixed

workloads (reads/writes at 100+ KB/transfer, and numerous namespace ops with at a few KB/transfer.) Same result when looking a a single blade of course, as dividing both throughput and Ops rates by 4 with cancel out.

With a latency of claimed 1 ms, the NAS queue depth per blade (= OneFS NAS node) would be 1/4 * 250,000/s x 0.001s = 62.5, which also is a reasonable value.

Makes sense?

---------------------

He adds this point: As for the confusion between "nodes" and "nodes":

With the Isilon OneFS software it is very clear what a NODE is: one instance of the OneFS FreeBSD-based operating system, running on a single SMP machine with disks enclosed.

But for the hardware guys "nodes" are those solid pieces of metal that get mounted in racks.

I think with Isilon clusters, one should keep the original OneFS definition of a node, and refer to the new hardware units in a different way. "Brick" hasn't been used with Isilon yet ;-)

Too bad EMC didn't sort out their terminology before making the Nitro pre-announcement, but such confusion arises often with bladed compute clusters, too.

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Chris Mellor 1

Chad Sakac on blades and nodes

Here's an update to Chad Sakac's blog post; "UPDATE: many people have scratched their heads at this – note that nowhere have I explicitly stated the relationships between blades and nodes (how many blades/node). That’s intentional. Lots of time before GA, and through that time, more will become evident. It’s not uncommon for some details to be left blank (sometimes to keep cards close to one’s chest, sometimes because there’s still variations likely in the plan). With Project Nitro we’re keeping some blade details back. In similar pre-GA statements from EMC and from almost everyone, there are some details kept back."

If a node contains more than one blade then working out the numbers could become easier.

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Storage with the speed of memory? XPoint, XPoint, that's our plan

Chris Mellor 1

Re: Hopelessly inaccurate numbers.....

In reply to Dr Bandwidth,

New table uploaded for your minor point. The major points relate to a chart created by Jim Handy of Objective Analysis (http://objective-analysis.com) and meant, in my understanding, as an indicative general table showing the relative values of various memory and storage media in the 2-dimensional space defined by the two axes. I'd suggest you take up the detail questions you have with Jim.Handy (at) Objective-Analysis.com.

Cheers ... Chris.

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Chris Mellor 1

Re: That table again...

Hi Anonymous C .... The table is a much modified version of a source table some one gave me.I would dearly love more accurate numbers.

Re disk seek;. a Toshiba L200 (2.5-inch 5,200rpm) has a 5.56ms seek time so a 10ms seek time as an indicative number for disks doesn't seem that far out. My understanding is that 15,000rpm drives could have 4-5ms seeks, desktop 3.5-inch drives have 9-11ms seek times, and sluggish mobile 2.5-inchers could be as slow as 12ms. Do you have better numbers?

What would you say would be a better number for DAS access, assuming, say, a 10K rpm SATA drive?

Ditto SAN access?

Cheers .... Chris

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Chris Mellor 1

Re: few points

Great comment. Presentation decks are informative. CrossPoint origin note intriguing. DRAM access latency number being checked.

Thank you Bronek,

Chris.

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Pure Storage's coming high-end array: We have the details

Chris Mellor 1

Re: pretty conservative

I'm using Pure's supplied effective capacity figures. RAID and other system overhead has to be deducted from that. This gives me consistency across the table.

Cheers.

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Pure Storage to punt out supersized FlashArray system

Chris Mellor 1

Replying to Vaughn Stewart of Pure

Thanks Vaughn. That's me taken out to the woodshed - as I'm bush league :-)

So there are 20 drives in the coming top-end FlashArray//m-whatever controller enclosure. That would be extra 20 x 8TB = 160TB totalling up to (384 + 160) = 544TB, which makers 1.l5PB usable more achievable, as you say. Lovely system. Also the chart then needs updating.... sigh .... as the new FlashArray would be ahead of the VNXe3200 (500TB) but still behind Kaminario's K2 and its 740TB.

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A tiny Violin plays as EMC tops all-flash array revenue chart

Chris Mellor 1

Re: Aaron got Pure's numbers wrong

Thanks for this. I've sent your revised Pure numbers to Stifel's Aaron Rakers who provided the Pure revenue numbers you disagreed with. Let's see how he responds.

I've run your numbers through my personal spreadsheet and they do as you suggest, depressing Pure's line on the chart. It's still ahead of NetApp and HPE 3PAR but not by as much as before.

Chris.

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Foetuses offered vaginal music streaming service

Chris Mellor 1

Musical vibrator?

Er; a vaginally-inserted bead-speaker works because it transmits sound vibrations. So ... isn't this a musical vibrator?

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Behold, the fantasy of infinite cloud compute elasticity

Chris Mellor 1

Re: so I can't see why this is worth an article?

"Poorly researched rants" - love that insult. Prefer "eruption of common sense" though :-)

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When Michael Dell met Chris Mellor

Chris Mellor 1

Love that apostrophe horror - proof-reading and writing alert!

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Chris Mellor 1

Re: Lovely stuff

I thought so too, after reading your comment. But hard to write CEO character comparison without name-dropping, damn it.

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Chris Mellor 1

Re: ..just a slight typo/auto-correct howler..?

He did ... duh. Getting it fixed and thanks.

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Chris Mellor 1

Re: Chris finds new LOVE ...

Read on in LoveStorage.com to see if fulfilment beckons, or sad loss ... :-)

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Jaguar F-Type: A beautiful British thoroughbred

Chris Mellor 1

Not a Boxster? Pah!

2nd reason to buy it is because it's not a Boxster? Pah!

Chris.

(Boxster owner)

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Drive-making kingpin WD gobbles Skyera... to give to HGST

Chris Mellor 1

Nowhere near $400 million

Sent to me by a reader and posted anonymously:

Skyera at $400M? Not what I'm hearing on the street. They ran out of money, many leaving, forced to sell. I suspect anything close to $400M would have been material enough to require WD to disclose the actual amount as a public company. Since they were a key investor the amount was quite low.

-----------------

I heard it was a low amount from another person too.

Chris.

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An EMC-HP Borg cube will totally ANNIHILATE its storage worlds

Chris Mellor 1

Re: Misunderstanding

Arghh. Typo alert. StoreAll dickhead writer, StoreAll. Getting it fixed.

Thank you!!

Chris.

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How the FLAC do I tell MP3s from lossless audio?

Chris Mellor 1

Yes you can hear the difference

Sent to me and posted here anonymised:

you can tell the difference, like everybody can.

Take your favourite CD, that does not contain metallic rock or other music with a lot of white noise.

More like acoustic instruments, singing etc, without a lot of cymbals and other white noise producing instruments, will do perfectly

rip a MP 3 of that CD

play the CD and the MP3 player simultaneously, so you can alternate between the two, and hear the difference if any.

You *will* hear the difference, on a somewhat reasonable HiFi installation.

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Chris Mellor 1

Canadian double-blind test

(Mailed to me:):

In your article on lossy vs. lossless audio you said, "Everything between sample points is lost." Please read up on the Nyquist–Shannon sampling theorem at Wikipedia, which states in part, "no actual 'information' is lost during the sampling process," given certain sampling conditions. This is scientific truth.

Please read the very long and detailed web page at https://xiph.org/~xiphmont/demo/neil-young.html for more information on lossy audio reproduction.

If you've heard of the placebo effect you will understand why people believe lossless audio reproduction MUST be better than lossy reproduction, and hear it as such. But the Canadian Research Council have conducted extensive double-blind (very important) listening tests. At sampling rates 256 Kbps and above, with a good encoding, only golden-ears individuals (that's not you or me or most people) can hear ANY difference at all.

(Name withheld)

Cheers .... Chris

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Hey Intel – that new Pro 2500 SSD looks awfully familiar

Chris Mellor 1

More from Intel on Pro 1500 Pro 2500 differences

There are a few other differences between the SSD Pro 1500 Series and Pro 2500 Series.

- The Pro 2500 Series is available in the channel (in the 2.5” form factor), while the Pro 1500 Series was not.

- The Pro 2500 Series also includes the Trusted Computing Group’s Opal 2.0 standard (Pro 1500 Series used the 1.0 standard), as well as Microsoft eDrive. -

Lastly, the Pro 2500 Series utilizes a second source of NAND, from SK Hynix. This SSD is the first from Intel to use a second source of NAND.

Chris.

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Chris Mellor 1

Intel says

Intel SSD Pro 2500 Series supports TCG’s latest Opal 2.0 features and is a Microsoft eDrive ready solution while the Intel SSD Pro 1500 supports Opal 1.0 features and does not support Microsoft eDrive. The Intel SSD Pro 2500 Series also supports more Advanced Power Management (APM) with 5 power states and 2 thermal states.

Chris.

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Chris Mellor 1

Extra security & channel availability

Anand Tech editor Kristian Vatto says Pro 2500 differs from Pro 15000 by "TCG Opal 2.0 & eDrive compliant plus the Pro 2500 will be available in the channel as well (1500 was OEM only)"

PIty Intel didn't say that upfront. And, anyway, why not add these retrospectively to Pro 1500?

Chris.

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It's a boxless, super-flash, hyper-converged world: But what'll we do for BULK STORAGE?

Chris Mellor 1

Bay configs wrong maybe

Sent to me and posted here. I;m trying to find out from Storsimple what the actual HW configs are:-

I think those disk capacities are wrong.

The small unit has 10 bays and therefore 5 disk mirrors (assuming your analysis holds). 15TB would be 3TB disks, then. If it's 300GB drives, 1.5TB total storage. Either way - a correction needed I suspect.

The larger unit potentially holds 20 x 4TB drives (10 mirrors @ 40TB) plus SSD.

Chris.

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Alex Bouzari on his big data storage firm: First, we got rid of the VCs

Chris Mellor 1

Good guys

This was mailed to me,

Chris------> I was at NASA Ames' N258 building (virtual wind tunnel) in 1997 when MegaDrive won the bake off against Clarrion and a couple of others. Not too bad- rebranded LSI Logic arrays- but had some bugs in the backplane that caused data corruption. Still, for the time, decent enough.

Decent guys all in all. DDN, which they became, also decent guys, albeit competitors when I was at Xyratex a couple of years ago.

(Name with held)

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Dell mashes up EqualLogic and Compellent: Eat up kids, it's Dell Storage

Chris Mellor 1

EqualLogic and ARM

Surely EqualLogic uses X86 controllers?

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Oh Sony. Have we learned NOTHING from SuperAIT?

Chris Mellor 1

Re: Hmmm... there are appear to be somewhat conflicting opinions on this development at Reg central

News report vs blog opinion....

Chris.

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Pure Storage opens wide, VCs shovel in yet MORE millions of $$$

Chris Mellor 1

Wow Trevor, just wow! An $8 billion- $10 billion valuation is .... well, wow!!

Chris.

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Puff on a hybrid – next thing you know, you're hooked on a public cloud

Chris Mellor 1

Mowing grass

I enjoy mowing grass Trevor :-)

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Cloud storage gateway firm: Selling to end users? Meh. We'll leave it to CSPs, et CTERA

Chris Mellor 1

Additional info

Here's more info from CTERA:

I should note that we support more than what is immediately available on our website… we need to update that :)

Amazon S3, Amplidata, Caringo, Cleversafe, Cloudian, DDN WOS, EMC Atmos, EMC ViPR, Hitachi HCP, IBM GPFS, OpenStack SWIFT, Scality.

With more to follow…

Additionally ... we have our own sync & share client that co-exists with our backup client so customers can manage backup and sync from one central system where the cloud is optionally extended by gateways (that also feature NAS support) - gateways are used when a customer wants LAN-level performance and low latency of data access.

BTW – you might have seen this one this week; Orange Business Services Launches CTERA-based Flexible Cloud Storage.

With 8M business customers at Orange, this is a tremendous validation of the platform.

(All this comes via mail from Jeff Denworth.)

Chris.

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Ancient telly, check. Sonos sound system, check. OMG WOAH

Chris Mellor 1

Education enjoyment

I'm enjoying my education here :-)

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Chris Mellor 1
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Re: prize another £599 from my wallet

Prise and septic tank comment - that was magic!!!

Chris

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Storage weight-loss wonder Actifio slurps $100 million cash pot

Chris Mellor 1

Actifio and IBM SVC

Well, well, well; a couple of Twitter people have pointed out that Actifio and IBM are connected; "The Actifio Protection and Availability Storage (PAS) appliance includes SVC code.[8] The PAS platform spans backup, disaster recovery, and business continuity among other functions." (Wikipedia.)

This webpage, dated Feb 2012, (http://mspmentor.net/managed-storage-services/actifio-ibm-partner-virtualized-storage-target-msps) is entitled "Actifio, IBM Partner On Virtualized Storage, Target MSPs." It says Actifio is producing a turnkey offering in partnership with IBM.

Data here - http://www.actifio.com/products/product-line/ - on Actifio 100T product line.

Chris.

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It's big, it's expensive and it's an audiophile's dream: The Sonos Sub

Chris Mellor 1

Re: We've had to save up our pennies

Sadly not. Though a Playbar might be coming that way...

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Chris Mellor 1

Re: SUBstance abuser

That's mid-range? Sheesh!

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Chris Mellor 1

SUBstance abuser

Loved the comments, especially audiophile = hifi enthusiast with credit card. The whole set of comments has opened doors into music playback fields I didn't know existed. Sort your room out before sorting the audio out - that notion is, well, interesting. Music playing in my house is something we do in a room alongside other things - eating, reading, TV, meeting friends, chilling out and so on. It isn't just a listening room.

But I have got to listen to a high-end audio system to see/hear the difference. Are there demo centres anywhere near Croydon, UK I could visit?

Chris.

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Chris Mellor 1

Well no. But a good wind-up comment.

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Chris Mellor 1

Ah, never realised that matt black version was a time-limited offer. Couldn't see it had ever happened anyway.

Chris.

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Chris Mellor 1

Re: Virtual purchase

Damn right!!!!

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Chris Mellor 1

Re: Well..

Oh. Bach to my sources - sorry.

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Chris Mellor 1

Re: Standard

Pair iof Play:3s. Before that a cheap Sharp surround system. Progression is a wonderful thing.

Chris.

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Chris Mellor 1

Re: Virtual purchase

YES!!!!

Chris.

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Should Seagate offload Xyratex disk array business

Chris Mellor 1

Should Seagate offload Xyratex disk array business

Seagate is buying Xyratex and gaining:-

1. HDD manufacture test equipment business,

2. Storage array disk enclosure business with customers Dell/EqualLogic , HP/3PAR and IBM XIV & StorWize,

3. ClusterStor HPC storage array business.

Seagate spun out its previous disk array business as Xiotech in Nov 2002. It sold its disk-enclosure-focussed Advanced Storage Architectures group to Xiotech in Nov 2007. Now it's back in the storage array OEM and end-use business. Should it be? Should it just offload the disk enclosure business and ClusterStor businesses to X-IO (renamed Xiotech) and I've that form a better growth path for its revenues?

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Evan Powell exits Nexenta as Wyse guy strides in

Chris Mellor 1

Mark Lockareef says

From Mark Lockareef:

Just read your most recent article on Nexenta. As you know, Evan did a great job building the company in the early days but needed to pass the baton onto a leader that could take the company to the next level. I joined Nexenta as our interim CEO in February to help the company find our next permanent CEO. You state that I "departed in pretty short order" but I was actually the interim CEO for 7 months...longer than I expected to find the permanent CEO (I thought my role would last about 3-4 months). Turns out that great CEO candidates in the next-generation storage space are few and far between. We actually got a lot done in those 7 months wrt building the foundation for growth. Now that Tarkan is on board, it will be fun to watch how he continues the story.

Just wanted to make sure you got the straight scoop.

Best,

Mark Lockareff

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Death of the business Desktop

Chris Mellor 1

Death of the business Desktop

The business PC desktop is facing death by a thousand VDI cuts augmented by a BYOD bashing.</p>

<hr class=JumpCut>

<p>Business desktop death pointers:</p>

I know this is repetitious; that’s the point. These aren’t just a few pointers; this is a flood, a veritable tidal wave of systems all focussed on removing pricy and complex-to-manage business desktops with centralised virtual desktop systems.

Some other suppliers with VDI capabilities; Pure Storage, Tegile, Nimble Storage, and Fusion-io. A combination of flash storage and deduplication is making it possible for cost-efficient and storage capacity-efficient VDI set-ups with the responsiveness of actual desktops, or better.

Set this VDI blitzkrieg to one side and consider BYOD - Bring Your Own Device, in which users bring their own notebook computers to the office. This is the guerilla war assaulting the business PC with VDI being a full-on, frontal assault.

The net result could be a multi-year reduction in business PC use with, in some businesses, desktop PCS literally disappearing.

We haven’t any numbers, beyond the general PC annual shipment numbers decline. Our sense of it is that the business desktop is an endangered IT species facing year-on-year shipment declines, wilting under the impact of artillery barrages from the massed ranks of VDI howitzers and BYOD sharpshooters.

In that case there will be a consequent decline in business PC component shipments; hard disk drives, power supplies, DRAM, motherboards and CPUs.

If 200,000 business desktops go away each year for five years that’s a million fewer hard drives shipped. And it could be worse; 500,000 fewer desktops each year means 2.5 million fewer drives over five years.

I think we’re at a VDI/BYOD tipping point and a storm surge of virtual desktop instances is going to wash increasingly unwanted and unloved business desktops right out of the offices they’re anchored to, never to return.

Is this true? Will it happen? Am I smoking pot?

I think not Sherlock.

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Storage Memory

Chris Mellor 1

Storage Memory

The SMART flash DIMM announcement opened up a major server memory redesign period. The idea of packing NAND chips tightly together and accessing them in the same address space as main memory is highly attractive to server manufacturers looking for an edge in running applications faster, faster than PCIe flash for example.

SanDisk has bought SMART and now has a DIMM future (sorry). My understanding is that all the major server suppliers are looking at non-volatile memory DIMMs and designing future servers with storage memory, and not just with NAND but envisaging post-NAND technologies such as Phase Change Memory (PCM), Spin Transfer Torque (STT) RAM or some flavour of Resistive RAM (ReRAM) technology.

This technology transition will make storage memory byte- instead of block-addressable; the programming model would change. There would need to be a software layer, like Memcached, to present storage memory as pseudo-RAM to applications

We could think of X86-populated motherboards populated with storage memory DIMMs.

Cisco’s UCS servers are known for having large amounts of RAM. Building on its Whiptail all-flash array acquisition it would not be surprising if Cisco were to announce storage memory-using servers in 2014. We’re surely going to see Whiptail arrays using UCS servers instead of the Supermicro mills they currently employ.

Dell, IBM, and HP server engineers and designers must be actively looking into the same storage memory technology.

And it’s not just server manufacturers. Storage suppliers with an interest in PCIe flash are also looking at this topic. For example, I’m convinced that WD with its Virident PCIe flash acquisition is looking at the field, as well as Fusion-io. There is a go-to-market issue for the non-server suppliers, as in, who do they sell to?

Do they pursue IEM deals with the server suppliers, or retrofit deals with independent system vendors?

Moving on, in some scenarios a bunch of clustered storage memory DIMM servers with could avoid the need for an external flash array and talk to persistent external storage disk drive arrays for bulk capacity.

I’m seeing storage memory DIMMs as predominantly a server supplier play, and one that limits the applicability of all-flash arrays. Am I smoking pot here? Have my hack’s table napkin-class ideas gone way past reality? Tell me what you think is real here - and if reality bites my ass then I’ve learnt something, which will be good.

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Re-purposing old arrays

Chris Mellor 1

Re-purposing old arrays

A German IBM customer, the Ernst Strüngmann Institute (ESI) for Neuroscience of Frankfurt., has dumped the EMC/Isilon O/S from three 36NL nodes and replaced it with SUSE Linux with IBM's GPFS as a filesystem.

Each node has 36 internal disk drives in a RAID-6 configuration. The InfiniBand adapters involved work with RDMA enabled for native GPFS - version 3.5.0.11 to be precise.

In effect old - 2011 era - not that old - Isilon hardware is being re-used in a 3-node cluster to function as a 55TB filestore using IBM software. Cool.

Are their other examples of storage array re-purpising that beat this in coolness factor terms?

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3D Read/write heads

Chris Mellor 1

3D Read/write heads

Would it be theoretically possible to 3D print a disk drive read:write head?

I think you'd need a 3D printer that could print small numbers of molecules ...

Answers on a postcard ..... to this forum please.

Chris.

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