* Posts by Tom 13

6832 posts • joined 10 Jun 2009

Robo-car wars: Delphi's near crash, prang, wallop with Google DENIED!

Tom 13
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Re: Yep, that's my understanding of events

You also have to wonder a bit if they're fudging a bit on "what it's supposed to do". By definition the car should be following all the rules of the road including following other vehicles at an appropriate distance, watching for turn signals, signalling, checking lanes before you switch, etc.

Now while I'd like to follow all those rules all the time, the simple fact of the matter is that given where I live and drive, I can't. Everybody else on the road here seems to define "safe following distance" as aligning your front bumper at about the midpoint of the rear quarter panel of the car next to you. Give them any more distance than that and they will cut you off with an unsignalled lane change. Speaking of which, turn signals were obviously meant to be optional equipment not mandatory. If you can't tell by the positioning of the car that he's about to change lanes, too bad sucker. One of my favorite moves is the Maryland Double. In this maneuver you turn from the second lane on a multilane highway through the right lane before executing your actual turn onto the exit ramp. All within about 50 yards of the hard separation of the exit lane. The other day I had the pleasure of watching someone execute the Quadruple Maryland. (And people wonder why our car insurance rates are so high here.)

So if they've had to adapt their programming to take care of real world problems yeah, I can see a near miss on a lane change. And in a certain sense, it still is "doing what it's supposed to do."

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Google helps Brit crims polish their image – but what about the innocent

Tom 13
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Re: it looks like just more game playing from Google.

Nope. What we have here is a failure to appreciate cultural differences. In the US, you don't take a chance on a lawsuit. Even if you win, it costs too damn much in lawyers fees. Which is why your court ruling is so absurd. There's no way to avoid the risk of being sued. If you don't wipe the record, the perp sues. If you do wipe the record, the source sues. Either way you damn Europeans are going to sue Google just because you don't like how successful they've been.

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Tom 13
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Re: For crimes that have a strong knee-kerk emotive link to them

Difficult to say. There are sever problems on both sides of those types of crimes. The two obvious US cases which illustrate both sides are:

Childcare center out near Pittsburgh Pennsylvania. Attorney General made a made for himself convicting the owners of a childcare company of pedophilia charges against kids under 10. When one of the kids was finally old enough to actually understand the case, he told the new AG the testimony was coached and he/she had never been sexually assaulted. On further investigation all the other "victims" confirmed the testimony was coached.

Jerry Sandusky pedophilia case. Sandusky was able to continue to abuse teenage boys for 14 years beyond the first police reports. First reported case was in 1998, police investigated but because of his standing in the community and some fast footwork, no charges were filed. The next set of allegations occurred in 2002, but this was investigated only by the Penn State University and no real action was taken. Charges were finally filed on Nov 5, 2011; 40 counts with 7 victims identified.

There's a lot of damage done in both cases. Public scrutiny seems to be required. The problem is that it needs to be scrutiny of a judicial temperament until the verdict is rendered. Only then can the parental temperament kick in.

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Tom 13
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Re: Rape victims not a great example

As you Brits are so fond of pointing out when the shoe is on the other foot: UK =/= EU | World.

In the US, the nominal guarantee of anonymity is under 18. If you're a 19 YO rape victim, you're legally fair game for reporting.

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Gates: Renewable energy can't do the job. Gov should switch green subsidies into R&D

Tom 13
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@ dagnew

Your first clue should be that the only sources you can link to that say Exxon isn't paying taxes are all Progressive agitation centers posing as news organizations.

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Tom 13
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Re: Subsidies

Meh. It depends. If the "tax break" is structured in such a way that it is only possible for one company (or a small handful) to get it, it's a subsidy. If it's the sort of tax break generally available to any business, it's not.

Personally I'd rather we did away with ALL business tax breaks and just gave them a lower flat rate. But we'll never get that past the busybodies who want to engineer the economy form the Congress/Parliament.

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Tom 13
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Re: Nukes....

The problem wasn't so much the Duck and Cover generation. It was their kids Marty! Something has to be done about their kids. You know, the ones who practically ODed on Hanoi Jane in China Syndrome.

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Tom 13
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Re: Why don't we change tack on this issue ?

Those are pure Progressive lies. The terrorists are the ones who are well off. Just look at OBL.

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Tom 13
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Re: Tell developing nations they have to control their stack emissions

There's a simple, easy way to implement the core of that idea without going as far as you did:

Impose an import tariff on all good manufactured in a country that doesn't meet your standards to buy real offsets for the pollution. Provide the manufacturer with the option of voluntarily meeting your standards and having one of your inspectors check the plant to avoid the tax.

I don't think you'd even need a treaty to effect the change, just a simple law passed wherever you happen to live. Everybody would benefit.

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As the US realises it's been PWNED, when will OPM heads roll?

Tom 13
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Re: then why are they grilling this woman?

Written like the ignorant power slut you are.

They're grilling her for the same reason they should have been allowed to grill $Hrillary over Benghazi: Congress has oversight responsibilities for everybody in the Executive Branch (including 0bozo).

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Tom 13
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Re: this is a result of an "eGovernment" undertaking begun

Nah, that was just the last time it got rebranded. It's been going on for longer than that.

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Tom 13
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Re: hoist by her own petard, and man, is that funny.

No, it's not.

Granted it would be if she was the only one being hoist. But she's taking a lot of other people with her, and at least a few of them are actually trying to be competent at their jobs.

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Tom 13
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Re: exclamation mark is part of the password.

EPIC FAIL!

You didn't include the quote marks.

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Tom 13
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Re: Last I heard Congress are the ones who control the purse strings

You haven't been paying attention. The 0bamaphiles in the Republican party who go by the names of McConnell and Bohner actually handed control of the purse to The Big 0 as their first act after the elections but before the new class was sworn in. All agencies were fully funded for the next two years. So in order to cut funding, they need to pass legislation that the President would have to sign off on.

But that's okay, we've accepted our fate. Yesterday SCOTUS drove a stake through the heart of the Constitution. If the plain language of a law cannot be counted on as the meaning of the law, particularly when that would be the normal legal reading of a law, the foundations of ordered liberty are dead.

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Tom 13
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Mushroom

included the theft of Standard Form 86, essentially a biography

You haven't been keeping up/paying attention. Admittedly they were real coy about the way they slipped it in, but it's even worse than the bad guys just getting the Standard Form 86. But how could it possibly be worse than handing over your personal biography?

Well it seems they also made off with the files the FBI puts together to VERIFY your Standard Form 86. And that's even bigger than your SF86. And it probably contains enough information to steal the identities of the people you supplied as references or asked to vouch for you.

Yeah, heads are going to roll on this one. Almost certainly too few and not necessarily the right ones, but heads will roll.

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The Great Windows Server 2003 migration: How to plan your trip

Tom 13
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"The Nimon speaks of many things. He speaks of the great journey of life migration from Windows Server 2003"

"How many Nimon have you seen today?"

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"HOW MANY?!!!?"

"Three."

I have no idea why that scene from Dr. Who popped into my head when I saw the headline on this story. None whatsoever.

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Apple pulls Civil War games in Confederate flag takedown

Tom 13
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Re: The response to another mass shooting is to ban.....

"Never let a crisis go to waste. It is an opportunity to do something that would otherwise be impossible to accomplish."

Spoken by a modern racist. He just happens to hate white people instead of blacks.

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Tom 13
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Re: All the balls have left the bar

Listen up boy! You deserved that. And probably a good beating as well.

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Tom 13
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Re: What fault of law allowed this mental defective to have a gun?

No fault of law. There is the fault of people who think that by outlawing guns they will make the world safe. This has proven to be ineffective wherever tried, even Britain.

Had even a few of the people in that church been properly armed, the "mental defect" would not have killed so many people.

I will also note that to a great extent the "mental defect" was radicalized by none other than The Big 0 himself. Hate speech directed at others on the basis of the color of their skin is always likely to set his type off.

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Tom 13
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Re: A bit as if Germany had gone from 1939 to 1945

More like 1928 to 1942, except replace Jews with whites, especially southerners.

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Tom 13
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Re: Revisionism is far more dangerous than any flag.

Yours more than most you hateful bigot.

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Tom 13
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Re: Nope, as any scholar of American History will tell you.

Incorrect. Some of them will, some of them claim it stands for racism. Granted the ones who claim it stands for racism put their politics in front of their scholarship, but they are still titled as scholars. And who can blame them when Southern Loyalists are as willing to spin history as they are?

Lincoln didn't have the authority to free slaves in the US. He did have the authority to do it in the conquered territories. Freeing them required a Constitutional amendment (several actually as each was used to address a specific point. Funny how they didn't pull this omnibus crap back then) which was taken up as soon as the war was over and passed quite quickly thereafter (a mere 8 months, lightning fast for the time given it need approval from both houses of Congress plus 3/4 of the states).

As a Pennsylvanian I was quite aware that slaves were not merely bought and sold across the whole of the US from colonial times, I learned about the trade triangle (rum and goods to Africa, Slaves to the Americas especially Jamaica and Cuba, and sugar to New England) which quite obviously was as evil if not more as owning the slaves. However it was equally true that by the time of the Civil War not only had owning slaves fallen out of favor in the North, many if not most of them had amended their constitutions so that slavery within their borders was illegal. In fact, that was the whole point of the Dred Scott case. Scott lived for 4 years in a territory where it was illegal to be a slave. On that basis he sued to be permanently freed. Then a racist Chief Justice rewrote the laws of the States from the bench. It's a blow from which our court system has never really recovered. Now it's blase for justices at all levels of the courts to rewrite laws to fit their political views.

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Tom 13
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Re: BTW, it's good, IMO, that the flag is pulled from State capitols, etc...

So by you it is good to not honor war dead by displaying their regimental colors?

Because that's what it is/was doing in South Carolina. It wasn't flying over the capital where Democrat Fritz Hollings hoisted it as governor. It was moved from there years ago under a Republican governor and instead flies/flew at the memorial honoring SC's dead civil war soldiers.

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Bank of England CIO: ‘Beware of the cloud, beware of vendors’

Tom 13
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Re: as you can't control the screw-ups of your providers.

Yes and no. You can control their screw ups through your contract. The catch is, the contract has to specify it. And how do you specify the controls when you don't know what/how they're handling the data?

Possible, but tricky. I expect most places aren't up to the challenge. And a bank is the last place I'd want experimenting with it.

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Tom 13
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Re: The Cloud is a fantasy

No, it's not a fantasy. What it is, is the latest marketing term that's been over-hyped. Truth is, it's been around since mainframes. They've just rebranded it.

While he may be a bit too knee-jerky in rejecting it, for a bank it's not a bad posture. The key to handling it is actually in his statement about needing to understand everything. That's going to apply to your cloud facilities as well, and that may get a bit more complicated than if you run it yourself. Chances are your cloud provider is doing some stuff he regards as proprietary/trade secret and he's not going to want to discuss that. And he's going to push that he's accepting all the risks associated with meeting the SLA so all you have to worry about is the SLA. While there is some truth there, there's also truth in needing to understand his processes so you can asses for yourself whether he can meet the promised SLA.

Properly handled the cloud may be a good thing. Badly handled, it's as bad as anything you can fuck up internally.

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Tom 13
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Re: Sounds like a bigoted, stereotyping git to me @Jimmy

Please take a quaalude, maybe even three.

He's making a joke and contrasting one stereotype against another. It's what people do when they want to punctuate a point. And if he's working to undo a monoculture of three piece suite types, it's exactly the counterpoint that gives the most contrast.

Yes, I am a geek and I'm weird. I wouldn't have it any other way. If you're ashamed of being weird, change. I don't care if you go full mundane or just lose the 'tude, but change.

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Tom 13
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Really bad headline

“Make sure you understand where your data resides, make sure you understand the details of your contract, make sure you understand the security, and make sure you stay in control,” he said.

As I read that statement the first thought that I have is "are you sure he's management?" Because never were truer words spoken about building a good system from start to finish. It applies to The Cloud even more than it applies to stuff you're running internally. On stuff you're running, management might on occasion glide over some obscure details because their IT staff will have to learn it to make it work, or their IT security people will pick it up as part of a routine review. If it's in The Cloud, it's got to be spelled out in the contract, so no glossing over anything.

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Microsoft U-turns on 'free' Windows 10 upgrade promise for ALL previewers

Tom 13
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Re: The Embalmer's last victim was his own!

Definitely the Windows 10 team did the best they could to cobble together something that no longer makes the average end-user freak out.

I can't agree with that. The thing that most makes the average Windows user freak out they continue to appear to be trying to force us to subscription/cloud platforms. That's exactly what we DON'T want. This brouhaha only highlight the fact that they haven't figured that out yet.

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Tom 13
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Re: At least go to Windows 7

If he is one of the lucky few who managed to get Vista to work, why should he shell out for another operating system that doesn't have much support left in it?

When Windows 10 is released those of us still running Windows 7 will once again face the option of going along with the tyrant's dictates, moving to the walled garden of Apple, or switching to open source. Given the changes in my gaming habits (only casual games and nothing that requires high end graphics), I may finally be ready to take the leap to open source after my Windows 7 PC dies/is no longer supported with updates.

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Indiana Jones whips Bond in greatest movie character poll

Tom 13
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I'll mark this as an F'ed up poll by saying

Huh. While I'll admit that I think Adam West did a great job with the roll, I thought on that opinion even amongst outliers I'm somewhat of an outlier.

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Why is it that women are consistently paid less than men?

Tom 13
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Re: take the family as an economic unit"

Another seemingly common sense idea that in our current environment actually raises more questions than you'd think it would. I'd like to think of myself as an outlier. I'm single, live with my landlord in an undivided townhouse. Neither of us have children but we split household duties and rather unequally. We certainly aren't a family in the traditional sense. But am I really that much of an outlier in current society?

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Tom 13
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Re: for the benefit of women

He may well be bitter. But while your points about the biological constraints are correct, they are short-lived compared to time over which his criticism is made.

Might not be quite as bad in the UK as it is in the US, but if you're a married man with a kid, the wife pretty much owns you until the kid is 18. And if she decides you are an unfit parent even though you meet pretty much everybody else's World's Best Dad definition, you're still going to lose in court. It's not pretty. It is real. I knew a fellow about 25 years back, three beautiful kids, loved his wife. She lost interest in him, divorced him, sued him for child support. Her PARENTS supported him over her. Judge ruled for her. She met a guy, moved in with him, which was also away from the guy I knew. At which point the judge's original order for joint custody was modified and he effectively lost visitation.

One of the outcomes of the radical feminist movement is that although individual members of society may attempt to reject it through their actions, in a court of law the male is a sperm donor and an ATM.

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Tom 13
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Re: someone has been dragging goalposts around.

If it was just the goal posts we might make some sense of it. Problem is the landscape is also chocked full of fox holes, barbed wire, and shell wholes. So much so that it sort of looks like a WWI battlefield.

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Tom 13
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Re: Yes, women spend more of a family's disposable income than men do.

Not true. I think it is very rare for the wife by herself to decide to buy a new house/where to rent or a new car. Likewise I doubt many of them replace any of the major appliances like fridges, washing machines, dryers, ovens, stoves, heater systems, water heaters, etc. So usually at least 70% of the budget is spend before she gets her hands on the "disposable" portion of the income.

My dad on the other hand bought pretty much every power tool that came into the house without consulting her. At least one of them ran about $5000.

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Tom 13
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Re: I think the argument about shorter life expectancy for men

You might FEEL that way, but you haven't thought about it and you certainly haven't done an even rudimentary check. The Social Security Administration for the US has actual data about this:

http://www.ssa.gov/oact/STATS/table4c6.html

Even at age 1, 140 more men die than women per 1000 born. The number get progressive worse from there.

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Tom 13
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Re: running joke back in the 70's here in States

You forgot Jewish.

The joke has been updated for the twenty-teens. She now also needs to be lesbian. Super Extra Bonus if she's transgendered.

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Tom 13
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@Graham Dawson

Actually, you have the training part reversed. There's not a great deal of skill in bricklaying. You trowel the mortar on the brick, press it down/slide it over the correct amount, and move to the next brick. For the secretary you have to learn to type, spell, a whole bunch of grammar, run phone systems, keep calendars, and multi-task in a way a bricklayer never has to.

Now the bricklayer is pretty much hard labor whereas the secretary is not. And usually the secretary's job is fairly safe from physical harm whereas the bricklayer usually runs at least the risk of broken limbs and sometimes even death. Bricklaying may also have some seasonality to it.

I know I'd want more money for the bricklaying work than the secretary. Although if I were a secretary, I'd also want stock options.

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Tom 13
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@AC-Re: He's got a point.

Did you ever actually run the financials for her staying fully employed?

I'm not married and have no kids so haven't experienced it from that angle. I'm also in the US, not the UK. But I do recall quite a number of conversations with my mother about the topic. When I was born she paid for babysitters and kept her job. When my brother kept doing the same but had to keep shifting babysitters which was a lot of work. Eventually she sat down with my dad and they ran the financials. My dad was in a high income tax bracket because he was in sales and she was low to moderate because she was a secretary (what admin assistants were called back then) even if it was a medical secretary. Between what taxes took our of her check, the cost of babysitters, the cost of transportation, and the extra cost of doctors because of all that socializing at babysitters they decided she was adding $20/month to net family income. So she quit and became a stay at home mom.

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Tom 13
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Re: Equal pay for the same work

Except that when the econometric studies are done, they invariably show equal or better pay for women than they do for men when all variables are considered. Tim does a very good job of dancing around this point to support the fully debunked 77% statistic. The number only arises when you aggregate ALL women vs ALL men and ignore actual hours worked and years in the field variables.

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THIS TIME we really are ALL DOOMED, famous doomsayer prof says

Tom 13
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Re: he omitted the piece about our rate of consumption outstripping supply

Commenting without reading again I see. Tim addressed precisely this point when he noted that as current "supplies" diminish the price goes up. Increasing prices coupled with increasing creativity yield increased production which replenishes supplies.

I believe Tim's money quote was that just in the ocean we have more supplies of the supposedly limited resources than we could consume at 10 times our current population. What we don't have at the moment is an economical way to separate them out.

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Tom 13
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@Roland6

No, even his population projections are wrong by an order of magnitude. The problem with his predictions, one frequently made by futurists of all stripes, is one of project continuously without inflection points. On population he ignored evidence that as you develop a population that can feed itself and cure disease the birthrate drops precipitously for 8-12 per family to 2 or lower.

His projections about food production were likewise completely backwards and even more inexplicable given his population prediction. Following a straight line projection on food would have significantly altered his "The End is Near/Back off man I'm a scientist" schtick.

No, the reason we haven't seen the massive extinction of species in the rainforests is that like the AWG alarmists, those so-called scientists didn't have any clue about real biology either.

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Tom 13
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Re: Apparently...

His, no. Put AC who managed to post first is sadly correct. Some other schlub will take his place, just as he replaced Malthus.

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Tom 13
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Re: Ehrlich ?

If I've understood Lovecraft correctly, Ehrlich is as far as it is possible to get from Eldritch. The Eldritch are supposed to understand how everything really works. The only thing Ehrlich seems to understand is how to fleece a paycheck from a publisher. Not even sure he actually understood how to get tenure. That seems to be something he lucked into.

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Tom 13
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Re: Bing Professor?

Not at all. It means he uses Microsoft's search engine to perform all his academic research.

...

Which probably explains quite a bit about his theories.

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Verizon promised to wire up NYC with fiber... and failed miserably – audit

Tom 13
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Re: real failure is on the part of the city authorities

No, the real failure here is the failure to comprehend that DeBlasio is a commie crook who hates businesses and will say and do anything to destroy as many of them as he can. Unless of course they're contributing to his campaign coffers.

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Tom 13
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Re: does the store charge you for their rent?

Yes, they do or they go out of business.

Verizon specified they did not have the "right of way" which means it is completely unrelated to the cost of the connection. Sounds more like your landlord was trying to gouge Verizon for something he should have provided for free.

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Tom 13
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Re: Fine them

You'd lose when Verizon challenged it in court. And for precisely the reasons that they laid out in their rebuttal. They'll produce all the paperwork showing they have cabled the streets and the roadblocks are either the shared buildings or NYC government itself cutting the red tape lengthwise to stop Verizon from meeting their contract. At which point the citizens of NYC would likely also out the cost of the court case plus the fees for Verizon's lawyers.

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Tom 13
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Re: Third World City?

Verizon? Probably. Whether or not any of them were assigned to this project is another question.

NYC? Not a chance.

Given the answer about NYC, the odds on the second part of the Verizon answer are greatly diminished.

While I have no great love of Verizon, the most annoying thing about their rebuttal (or at least the parts El Reg printed) is that it is 100% true.

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FBI says in secret that secret spy Cessnas aren't secret

Tom 13
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Re: here are no good reasons for that at all.

Sure there is and anybody claiming otherwise is talking out their ass.

Operational security is affected by the bad guys knowing what you are/can do. The number of planes sets a limit on what you are/can do. While "how much does it cost" doesn't give you as accurate data as a property report saying the FBI has 115 Cessna planes, after taking into account personnel costs, fuel, and maintenance, it gives you a pretty good idea of how many planes they have. Maybe you'll think they have 110 or 120 instead of the proper 115, but it's still enough to adjust your planning.

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It's OK – this was an entirely NEW type of cockup, says RBS

Tom 13
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Re: Quite how anyone can, with a straight face

While that is obviously the problem, the solution is not quite so easy as it might seem. The problem when you have a group of highly skilled people working in a specialized area is that once you lose them (in this case from firing them) you can never reassemble the team. Each of them has had to go and find new work. And even if you did approach them and offered them their old salary plus inflation with full reinstatement of seniority plus a 10% signing bonus, they'd have to be nuts to trust you again. So you now have to build that expertise from scratch even if you insource the work.

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