* Posts by Hollerith 1

635 posts • joined 12 Jun 2009

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Why Box and not SharePoint? 'Everybody doesn't hate us' says Box engineering veep

Hollerith 1
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Sharepoint -- boo ya

I have turned down jobs because Sharepoint was waiting for me if I joined. When I see Sharepoint on the menu, I know there's a CIO who sees it as an easy win -- and who cares for the users of the dam' thing. 'It comes bundled' I actually heard a CIO say to me. £4m of development thrown down that black hole later, the CFO was unamused.

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Cheer up songwriters, there's shedloads of money rolling in

Hollerith 1
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It happened elsewhere

I worked for another agency doing the same sort of work, but not music. They paid the workers pitiful amounts, really shockingly little, but the 'officers' got into a turf war and started paying themselves more, buying hugely expensive office furniture, etc. The Board went along with it (I presume they got money, but don't have the information). We'd have recipients writing with gratitude for £70 or so, and I always wanted to write back to say 'if you saw the percentage of what they took in 'admin fees', you'd be writing a letter that flamed around the edges.' These CEOs etc only work in these sort of agencies because they can't really hack it in a commercial environment. They don't need to do anything important. But these agencies are monopolies and are a law unto themselves.

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The Walton kids are ABSURDLY wealthy – and you're benefitting

Hollerith 1
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Re: Problem?

Totally agree. Smaller charities turn themselves into pretzels to get funding and so kiss their starting principles and purpose goodbye. I saw it happen twice. Left twice. Big charities start seeking to be power-bases. Both Oxfam and WaterAid have decided to put at least a third of their energy (and money) into influencing and educating governments. That is, little in an African country's capital in an air-conditioned office spreading 'talking-money' around in the expectation that the dictator-in-chief* will find his heart touched and help poor people get help -- something these dictators have clearly never, ever been interested in. The charity now can get out of the field, where the work is hard and thankless, but where the local people get direct help, and get to 'walk the corridors of power'.

Every time I see a charity moving into the 'political influence' game, I stop donating to them. I am not interested in donating to a dictator's next swimming pool.

* I am using African countries as my example, as I am referring to Oxfam and WaterAid, who have a big focus there. But it could be anywhere, with any sort of corrupt government that exists.

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Hollerith 1
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Re: brings about greater unhappiness in the general population,

Who is telling them to riot? Give us examples, dates, times. I can't think of the last time I saw Socialist Worker placards held by anyone.

BTW, sychophants are not agitators (or whatever you meant to say), they are suckers-up to people with power or money or both, so why would anyone suck up to unhappy people? What's in it for them? Or do you not know what the word means?

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ICANN urges US, Canada: Help us stop the 'predatory' monster we created ... dot-sucks!

Hollerith 1
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Re: Still trying to work out -- .london

The Evening Standard bought into the .london madness and tried to challenge us Londoners to wear our hearts on our domain names. Wonder how that worked out...

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Hollerith 1
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Re: $185,000?

I will pay even more ffor .dickheads

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To defend offshore finance bods looting developing countries of their tax cash

Hollerith 1
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Re: nice one tim....

Adam Smith himself said that capitalism naturally ends in cartelism (I paraphrase wildly, as I can't lay my hand on his book at the moment).

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Hollerith 1
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Re: jonathan keith Must be like Quantum Mechanics

Will, Mr Bryant, that was certainly both a rational argument and a fact-filled demotion of your enemies.

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Dot-com intimidation forces Indiana to undo hated anti-gay law

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Re: More gas please. My fire's going out...

Being gay myself, I have never felt that I was 'born this way'. I think we are shaped by a constellation of influence from the moment we are born, and by about, say, four or five, we have the personality and tastes and preferences we will carry through life. Studies of infant behaviour seem to show that newborns are sucking in a huge amount of data from the first second, and the complex mix of their own little personalities and the world around them keeps stirring around. Girls in pink...boys encouraged to act out...a parent yelling at the other...rewards for good behaviour as defined by a grandparent...it is all too complicated to parse, and from this maelstrom of input we become ourselves. I think our preference for being a certain type of person are set so early that it feels as if we were born with them, and they might well have been for all we can do to change them. 'Born that way' isn't a good basis for deciding whether something is unjustly being discriminating.

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Hollerith 1
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Re: It's called freedom, folks

'More fruit' -- how awesomely not witty.

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Dino-boffins discover ancient, TOOTHY-CLAWED, four-eyed MONSTER LOBSTER

Hollerith 1
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Is it just me or...

...is the idea of claws with teeth in them a widely-held horror moment? And to think I hiked Marble Canyon as a young'un without realising that monsters lurked.

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HUGE Aussie asteroid impact sent TREMORS towards the EARTH'S CORE

Hollerith 1
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Re: Devonian? @ ~Spartacus

Pottery lasted forever. Forever. Admittedly in shards, but once a pot is made, the shards stay until the earth is no more. Go to any ancient site and you will see. I have walked the acres of Sarai (capitol of the Golden Horde), as an example, and the pottery shards on the surface are like a gravel drive. And that's just the loose stuff. There are Greek sites and Cathagenian sites with the same density, if they've not been dug up and built over.

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EU creative collection agencies want YouTube et al to pay their wages

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Re: Organised crime is in the wrong business

Having worked for one of these collection agencies once, I was paid so little (we all were) to keep the overheads down so that as much money as possible could be paid to our members. Some recipients would have been eating dogfood were it not for our quarterly payments to them. That particular agency had a period where the 'directors' were throwing moneya round, but their chain was soon yanked and everyone was back down to piddlingly small wages. A lot of did the work because we felt it was work worth doing. We liked the idea of creators getting continual reward for works that were still being used.

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Snowden dump details Canadian spies running false flag ops online

Hollerith 1
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Re: Don't wreck the budget there, Canada

As long as it does the job. We Canucks are frugal.

As for being just like our southern neighbours, "Pouvez-vous dire cela en français, eh, good buddy?"

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US threatened Berlin with intel blackout over Snowden asylum: report

Hollerith 1
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Re: Sir

I think 'throwing your toys out the the pram' means a stupid temper tantrum, and you don't really care about who or what it hurts.

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Big Data shocker: Over 6 million Americans have reached the age of 112

Hollerith 1
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Re: Or, just *maybe*

Yes, they are alive and standing in front of me in the shopping queue, each with six items at a five-items-or-less till.

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Mattel urged to scrap Wi-Fi mic Barbie after Register investigation

Hollerith 1
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Re: WHY??

Given that this is supposed to be a 'friend' to little girls, and they are who will be paying attention, I guess these little girls should ignore the voice and go for the breasts? Or did you not realise that some of the commentards you are addressing were female? But when I see quiptard posts such as this, I think 'another chap who has difficulties with the laydeez.'

A nice little ad hominem attack and I feel better!

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Hollerith 1
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Indeed...

It's using the recordings for research purposes: voice recognition of and for children. A nice cheap way of getting data.

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Would YOU touch-type on this chunk-tastic keyboard?

Hollerith 1
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Um...BlackBerry?

I have a nifty little mobile with a great, small keyboard that fits in my pocket. Surely job is done? No, it thumb-type, not touch-type, but as I am a two-finger typist anyway, I am just as fast on my BlackBerry Classic.

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The secret of Warren Buffett's success at Berkshire Hathaway

Hollerith 1
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Re: What about other insurance companies?

They are> Insurance is a great way to make money. Some firms get too stuck in on insurance that is hard to make profitable -- car insurance was mentioned in the article - but B2B insurance is a great way to make the dosh.

Having worked for a huge insurance company, I can say that they get terribly complacent and waste mountansn of money on internal 'projects' and practices, because it's so easy to come buy and so easy to spend. I watched a few million $ walk out the door on mere changing of reporting lines within divisions. Also, teams not helping the bottom line (HR, Comms, etc) tend to blossom into toxic blooms, because money is practically lying on the ground waiting to be picked up, and there's a certain sort of leech who can sniff it out.

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UK Supreme Court waves through indiscriminate police surveillance

Hollerith 1
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What does 'unwanted' mean?

If I go over to the neighbours and ask politely for the tenth time if they can turn their music down, because they keep me and the rest of the street up all night every night, and the neighbours decide that my requests are unwanted and irritating and - hey - harassment, will I get a Protection from Harassment letter? Will I then be 'known to the police' because I complained about noise? Apparently I will.

This is where the preemptive cringe begins -- staying silent, not acting, not protesting, not drawing attention to oneself, for fear that attention will ultimately be harmful to having your own life.

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MENOPAUSAL KILLER WHALES are wise old birds, trick-cyclists claim

Hollerith 1
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Grandparents have evolved

Seems humans have grandparents to (1) pass on widsom on how to survive (2) help with child rearing, so that the young and fit, e.g. younger men and women, can gather and hunt. One of my grandfathers taught me how to fish, the other, to paint. One grandmother showed me how to scramble eggs, the other, how to do long division. I think we'd all agree that these are essential survival skills.

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Hollerith 1
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Re: Short fuse, oh dear.

I say: go Sarah! It doesn't matter which side of the m-divide she's on.

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Canadian bloke refuses to hand over phone password, gets cuffed

Hollerith 1
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Re: CAN$25,000 (US$19,900)

Canada was a Dominion until the British North America Act was patriated to canada from the UK Parliament about 20 years ago. Although I think beaver pelts (with martin and coyote and bison and bear) would make an awesome currency. if bulky.

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'Hi, I'm from Microsoft and I am GOING TO KILL YOU'

Hollerith 1
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This has been a modest winner:

I have had a couple of these, as well as similar scam calls, and I always start 'Yes, I'd be glad of your assistance, but first I'd like to talk with you about my personal Saviour, Jesus.' So far I have never been speaking to a devoted Christian, so have not offended. If they don't hang up immediately, I can go on witnessing to my personal faith for an amazing length of time. At the end, I feel cleansed and renewed, so it's all good.

(I am a non-believer, so I can sound uber-sincere with an untroubled conscience.)

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Broadband routers: SOHOpeless and vendors don't care

Hollerith 1
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Re: an unknown ganghad ...

Yes, I noted that and thought 'a fun new unknown word to use coolly on chat threads!' and I also thought of adding -had' to many other words in order to describe deliberate, dedicated, unremitting effort, e.g. ''pizzahad' or 'beerhad'.

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Sick of Chrome vs Firefox? Check out these 3 NEW browsers

Hollerith 1
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Re: SeaMonkey: it just works....

I tried SeaMonkey for a while, but there were a few user-unfriendly things that finally drove me back (reluctantly) to FF. I didn't see why they couldn't make tabbing an easier thing to do. But I am interested in Pale Moon: sounds like what I have been looking for. I can't wait to ditch FF. I dread being pestered for an update, then having to fight it to stop doing all the things I hate. I do NOT like my browser (or anything else) to 'anticipate' for me what I might want to look at. Stop it. Stop it now.

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Inside GOV.UK: 'CHAOS' and 'NIGHTMARE' as trendy Cabinet Office wrecked govt websites

Hollerith 1
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Agree--new BBC is a heart-sinker

I had a gander at the new BC site and noticed, amonst many other stupidities, that you can no longer go down to a 'Technology' or 'Science' area and see those stories, but have to sift through the jumble of news to spot the little tags that say 'science'. So more work for the uder! I already hate the section 'The Explainers' -- could this be more condenscending?

The new move to a gigantic image at the top of the page, which forces you to scroll at once to find somehing to do, is sweeping the interent. Websites that are one long, long scrolling page, with sections you jump to when you use the menu, are another seriosu pain. I guess this is good for phones and tablets? I am a user-interface person, but from the old school, where the first question one asks is: who uses this site and how can it be made best for them? The pretty layout comes after.

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Violin-fiddling boffins learn that 'F-HOLES' are secret to Stradivarius' SUPERIOR sound

Hollerith 1
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Yo-Ya Ma's cello

Yo-Yo ma has a Strad cello and, while he says it is a prvilege and honour to own it, he doesn't regularly play it, because even Strads, restored and protected, have a life-span. Modern instruments are now as good or better than Strads, but it will take a few hundred years for these makes to earn the same reputation.

Strads Amatis etc are beautiful instruments to look at. I am always sad when I see one behind glass in a museum, but I do think their playing days are fading.

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Interstellar sci-fi WORMS its way into spinning black hole science FACT

Hollerith 1
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Re: I don't understand

Image looks comfortingly like a row of airplane windows. 'Look outside, Johhny, isn't that a pretty view?'

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Nunslinger, Yosemite For Dummies and Life Inside The Fall

Hollerith 1
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Re: Oh, that Yosemite

Yes, I thought 'Tips on how to view geysers! Rare creeks not to miss! Expert trails!'

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Jaguar F-Type: A beautiful British thoroughbred

Hollerith 1
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How wide is it?

If it is 'deceptively wide' then it is a narrow car, just as house that is 'deceptively small' means a house is large.

But a gorgeous-looking car. Please, oh goddess of the lottery, please.

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Show me the money, America! It's time to learn how to pronounce 'Xiaomi'

Hollerith 1
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Coat

Xiaomi...

...the money.

yes, that's my coat.

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KUSHINIKIZA! Google Translate SAVES BABY in Irish roadside birth

Hollerith 1
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I hope they stick with 'Brigid'

It would be a very fitting memory of the land of the child's birth. And a great story for her to tell.

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Microsoft makes 'business case' for marriage equality

Hollerith 1
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Re: MS going for the niche markets!

You don't have to agree to any agenda. How does it hurt you if Microsoft makes this statement? What lobbying are they pandering to? This 'gay lobby' things is always trotted out and it's boring now.

BTW, 'bipolar' is a mental disease. The idea of describing a complicated cultural phenomenon (equal rights for gay people) as an either/or where one side as vilified is both simiplistic and vilifies the other side.

In other words, calm down. Nobody is making you say what you don't want to say. All we ask is that you say it politely.

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Satya Nadella, Year One: Has Microsoft's new CEO cut the mustard?

Hollerith 1
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Re: Let the horse have its head

'full rein' (nicely caught, BTW) is still not right. It is 'free rein' or 'tight rein' or 'loose rein' or other ways of allowing or disallowing comtrol to the horse. But because we are no longer a horsey culture, 'rein' is being slowly but inexorably forgotten. We Punctilious Pedants mourn...

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Your gran and her cronies are 'embracing online banking' – study

Hollerith 1
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Re: Bankers for anyone...

Perhaps he was hoping that they would realise that they are dealing with a customer with disabilities and think of a way of serving him appropriately. Ramps and induction loops are not the only sort of customer service.

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Snowden reveals LEVITATION technique of Canada’s spies

Hollerith 1
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airport wifi?

What is the point of monitoring airport wifi traffic/downloads? Is Johnny Terrorist really going to download the Top Secret Bomb Tips at the last minute, right after getting his boarding pass?

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Google Translate MEAT GRINDER turns gay into 'faggot', 'poof', 'queen'

Hollerith 1
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Better that than the other

'Bulldyke' is actually the less offensive version of 'bulldagger'. If you call yourself one or the other, you are either heavily ironic (I know a petite beauty who calls herself a BD, to general hilarity) or heavily tattooed and studded.

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Hollerith 1
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Re: Unnecessary, overspecific words - 'Bulldyke'

'Bulldyke' borders on being a dangerous word. Those women who don't feel it describes them will be pissed off if called by it, while the (very tough and scary) women who really are BDs shouldn't be addressed with anything other than the most respectful terms, so as not to get a thump across the earhole or your neck stomped on.

There are words communities use that outsiders cannot use without risking censure or life and limb. The N word is an example. Similarly, the F word (fairy) is jokingly used within the community, but not by an outsider, not as a neutral term.

It would be nice, as another commentard has said, if 'slur' terms could be flagged up as such, as do dictionaries. I'd rather that than words being removed.

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'Shadow IT' gradually sapping power and budget from CIOs

Hollerith 1
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Re: @Hollerith 1 - Obstacle or Enabler?

I hired and trained my team (a small one) and I always listed and reported to the IT department once a year, asking them to help me replace a 'temporary' work-around with a better solution. I said if I screwed anything up I would fall on my sword. But IT were like 'well...it's low-level and it's working so...' I was not the only one downloading Chrome (huge IT risk there...) and I worked hard to give reasonably intelligent solutions to managers who really were going to instal crapware, solutions I paid for and had licences to and all of that. Yes, I was a security risk, yes, I didn't want to do it, but I wasn't paid to tell senior people 'there's no solution out there' when there was one. I've worked with great IT team-mates and we all had a 'can-do' attitude, but when I've run into the Dead Walking, my loyalties are with the profit-centres and not the IT dept. So far, I have moved from job to job with good references and rising levels of pay and I have never heard -- once -- that anything I left behind caused an iota of risk or damage. So far, so good.

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Hollerith 1
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Re: Obstacle or Enabler?

I raise my hand as a bad Circumventer. My IT is so locked down that nothing can get done. They gave me a CMS (I'm the web person) that didn't work in the company browser, but I was forbidden to download a browser where it would work. Well...I did it anyway. They couldn't allow me to do this, that and the other, even after I had pointed out that I had done upteen security checks and it did not even cross the firewall yadda yadda, so I did it anyway, delighted a bunch of senior managers, became known as the 'go-to' guy and I can't even pretend to weep crocodile tears. Guys in their 50s with a world-view from 2003 have to catch up or be left behind. I would love to work within a safe, sensible, security environment, but since I don't have one, I have to meet business needs the best way I know how.

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Is there ANOTHER UNIVERSE headed BACKWARDS IN TIME?

Hollerith 1
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Re: Ah!

Trevor, you are now as a god to me.

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Post-pub nosh neckfiller: The fantastical Francesinha

Hollerith 1
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Re: I bow to the master

Who could forget? All the proof you need that There Is A God.

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Hollerith 1
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I bow to the master

Coming from the land of Poutine, I thought I could look any heart-attack-inducing cuisine in the eye with pride, but recently I saw a macaroni-and-cheese-stuffed glazed doughnut from the USA and now this -- THIS -- from Portugal. Portugal wins, because the Frenchie, unlike the mac-and-cheese doughnut, looks awesomely delicious.

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How HAPPY am I on a scale of 1 to 10? Where do I click PISSED OFF?

Hollerith 1
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My knife and I...

...I forgot my little penknife and went through four different Canadian and USA airports, until finally caught on my way back to the UK. It was taken off me--a sad loss, as it was a great little knife. I am now carrying a small ceramic folding knife, as I regularly forget I have one on me as I approach airports.

On other surveys: I see on eBay and other selling sites that vendors beg to be scored the top mak (5 out of 5, usually) if they have delivered the correct goods on time. Anything less than 100% is market death. They also ask that if you are not perfectly satisfied, then not to report at all, but to contact them, presumably so that they can ritually apologise and appease you. I always thought that a 3 or 4 meant: order was fine, thanks. and that a 5 meant 'they were bloody brilliant, it came the next day and they threw in a freebie' or something like that. As it is, these 'ratings' are now as bollocks as any other feedback.

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'We're having panic attacks' ... Sony staff and families now threatened in emails

Hollerith 1
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Cojones...

Sony needed some testicular courage if it was going to face up to Loeb. He gets them to make themselves look mean and lean and then cashes out -- why heed anyone who is in it to make a quick killing? What does he know of about a well-run business, or how to build one?

That being said, Sony is clearly a mess, and now a disembowelled mess.

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Whitehall at war: Govt’s webocrats trash vital digital VAT site

Hollerith 1
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Re: Small business are packing up because of it!

My wife ditto -- plans to sell kniting patterns in Europe as well as around the world and thinking this will be a serious headache. A small yarn business is offering a "we'll handle your VAT payments for a fee" service and will probably clean up.

I note that the report dismissed as 'sniffy' in this article mentions that the site was tested on four people. That rings a tiny alarm-bell for me.

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Google kills CAPTCHAs: Are we human or are we spammer?

Hollerith 1
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Has anyone read a Google digitised book?

I have had the unfortunate experience, and have found that the quality is cr*p. They clearly went into their stooges' libraries (that is, academic libraries with custodians too stupid to get what what going to happen) and shoved books through scanners so fast that whole pages could be lost or distorted, and text turned into confetti or gobbedygook stays that way. I had to abandon them and never go near them any more.

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Double hammer blow to ICANN and pals' internet power grab bid

Hollerith 1
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Written in haste?

Or does nobody proofread before posting?

But this article is very cheering. Those guys give me the creeps.

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