Feeds

* Posts by Nigel 11

2344 posts • joined 10 Jun 2009

Battery vendors push ultracapacitor wrappers to give Li-ions more bite

Nigel 11
Silver badge

Re: fire power

so we are wrapping a small fire bomb in a detonator?

No - there's no mechanism that could cause the ultracapacitor voltage to exceed that of the battery (other than the battery spontaneously developing an internal short-circuit, which is almost certain to result in it catching fire shortly afterwards, ultracapacitor or no)

I am slightly concerned that this device might be useful to a terrorist, i.e. the power surge which it needs to cope with being the power draw of a detonator on a bomb when its timer reaches zero. However, I guess they could buy a separate ultracapacitor, and wire it in parallel with a battery.

Advantage of integrating the battery and ultracapacitor? Packaging, I'd guess. No dead space between two separate components.

1
0

Blurred lines: Android e-ink mobe claims TWO-WEEK battery life

Nigel 11
Silver badge

Re: It's not the radio

There are plenty of (dumb) mobiles out there where the battery will last a week or longer. that despite the battery being a lot smaller than on a smartphone. It's the display and the high-power smartphone CPU and software that eats the battery faster than the radio, with one caveat. That is, you're in a good mobile signal area. Moving from a 4-bar area to a one-bar area cuts the battery life of my dumb phone from about a week to around a day, and that's before I use it as a phone.

4
0

Hey doc, what's the PC's prognosis? A. Long-term growth below zero

Nigel 11
Silver badge

Re: We're losing more than what most realise...

Microsoft shut the door on hobbyist programming a long time ago. They wanted users clueless and brainwashed to buy MS. The accomplished the first part, something went wrong for them with the second :-)

These days your best discovery device is an old (or ancient, or even new) PC running Linux if you are happy with pure software, or a Rasberry Pi if you want to hack hardware. When I learned to hack hardware, the box I was hacking cost about ten times a Rasberry Pi, and a pound was worth more back then!

1
0
Nigel 11
Silver badge

Re: The real trend

So why aren't they making/ selling PCs that don't take 3 minutes to start? It's not hard. You just replace the HD with an SSD. (120Gb is plenty, and for folks who need more, just plug in a USB3 Terabyte or two).

Once you've done that, get rid of all the fans (passive-cooling) so it's silent, and you then don't have to boot it except after major software upgrades or power cuts. You just turn off the monitor and let it go to sleep. Whenever you want, press a key and turn on the monitor. It's ready in a few seconds.

I've built myself such a system around a Gigabyte GA-C1037UN-EU board. Yes, it's a "slow" CPU, but quite fast enough for everything I use except a few games (for which I have a second PC). Can I buy a similar system without DIY assembly? I don't think so.

Lack of imagination at the hardware vendors is a part of their problem. What I can't do is integrate the passively-cooled PC into the monitor (which has a conveniently large area for a heatsink on the back), thereby saving a power supply and a lot of wires. Possibly also throw in a TV tuner, if TV tuners are as cheap as I think they might be.

I could get started on the state of laptops ... where can I buy a PC laptop with a 15in high-res screen, without taking out a second mortgage? The screens exist - you can buy a small TV with such a screen, for not a lot of money.

0
0

Dark matter killed the dinosaurs, boffins suggest

Nigel 11
Silver badge

Dinosaurs are still with us

Er ... are there some flying feathered creatures outside your window, chirping or even singing?

Those are dinosaurs.

Yes, they didn't all die out. The small mobile feathered ones survived, evolved, and today we call them birds. One or two remain velociraptor-scary (ask someone who's narrowly survived a hostile encounter with a Casawary).

0
0
Nigel 11
Silver badge

Re: And thus Nemisis is reborn...

Can the simplest hypothesis be ruled out?

That Nemesis isn't one body gravitationally bound to Sol. But that multiple Nemesises have existed: other ordinary stars in their own orbits around the galactic core, which have wandered close enough to Sol to disturb its Oort cloud.

The evidence for 35My periodicity is pretty weak, but weak periodicity is what one might expect. The chance of a significantly close encounter with another star rises as Sol passes through the parts of the galaxy with a higher density of stars.

0
0
Nigel 11
Silver badge

Re: Dark Matter?

Good summary of this hypothetical entity.

A few days ago, a 3.5keV emission line was detected by X-ray astronomers, seemingly being faintly emitted by all galaxies they have looked at so far. There is no ordinary matter (atomic) emission line that can account for it.

If it isn't found to be an observational error or statistical deviation, it may prove to be the first sign that dark matter exists.

1
0

Hundreds of folks ready to sue Bitcoin exchange MtGox

Nigel 11
Silver badge

Re: Horses and Stable Doors...

Also can we stop referring to Bitcoins as a currency, they are not, they are a commodity. If anything they could be used to back a currency like Gold was/is but you can't suddenly print more Bitcoins when you feel like it.

I thought forgery was a crime.

Oh, but of course, the government minting the currency makes the laws, and exempts itself from that one.

What a definition: it can only be a currency if it can be debased!

0
0
Nigel 11
Silver badge

Re: They have assets....

Indeed. When a body animate dies, the vultures turn up. When a body corporate dies, the lawyers turn up. They perform the same function in different realms.

0
0
Nigel 11
Silver badge

Just because some people accept them doesn't mean that it is a currency. It's a way of paying for a small number of goods, yes, but as it is not widely accepted, by definition it is not a currency.

Hmmm. Is the Kyrgyzstani som a currency? (I had to look it up, but I haven't made it up). If you were offered bitcoins or som to the value of £200 at current quoted exchange rate, which would you take?

I'm not sure "currency" has any official definition, and in any case all forms of money conflate at least two separable functions. (1) A common medium of exchange. (2) A store of value. The first requires liquidity and fungibility, but value needs to be preserved only in the short term (long enough to spend or convert your earnings without suffering an unacceptable loss during the days you hold them). Stores of value can be non-fungible (e.g. works of art) and illiquid (e.g. works of art, houses in a buyer's market).

0
2
Nigel 11
Silver badge

The people lost their money the instant they turned it into bitcoin

No, they converted one currency into another. Bitcoins are still out there and still have an exchange value. Less than it once was ... but currency fluctuations are nothing new. One pound sterling was once worth exactly the same as one gold sovereign. Until a day came, when the UK went off the gold standard.

Their real mistake was allowing MtGOX to look after their bitcoins, rather than holding them in their own digital wallets. Someone broke into the bank and stole their gold, sorry, bitcoins. Now someone else has all the bitcoins, which are worth a fair bit to the thief even at today's exchange rate. MtGOX is doubtless legally liable, but I don't suppose it's got enough assets left to make it worth suing.

1
0

Cisco kicks off $300k Internet of Things security competition

Nigel 11
Silver badge

Bring back the write-protect switch!

It won't solve all the problems. But it will solve a lot of them. If there's no way for a bad guy to change the thing's non-volatile settings, it'll mean that power-cycling the thing restores it to whatever state you stored in it by using the write-protect switch. Note: it must be true hardware protection, that's completely impossible to alter by any sort of software exploit.

0
0

German freemail firms defend AdBlock-nobbling campaign

Nigel 11
Silver badge

Advertisers, watch out!

You know, blocking adverts isn't the worst a plug-in could do to you, not by a long way.

How about downloading every advert to the bit-bucket and then generating an auto-click on it, with the resulting page also sent to the bit-bucket? Or even heuristically locating your sign-up page and automatically filling it with garbage and submitting?

Then the site that makes money out of serving ads gets extra revenue, and the advertiser spends money serving bits into buckets with no human eyeballs involved. Those of us with unlimited high-bandwidth broadband probably wouldn't notice any overhead. Eventually the advertisers will notice that the effectiveness of "push" advertising is approaching zero.

Annoy us too much and someone will actually write that plug-in. (Or maybe they have, and I've just not yet been annoyed sufficiently to go and find it?. Adblock-plus will do for now).

My personal attitude is that I'm a buyer, not a sellee. If I want something I'll use Google and suchlike to find out where I can obtain it, what consumers think of it, etc. So instead of pushing adverts that we ignore one way or another, how about spending the money on making your product (a) easier to locate when we look for it, and (b) better?

14
0

We test Intel's 730 480GB SSD Skulltrail scorcher

Nigel 11
Silver badge

Not overclocked

Sorry to nit-pick, but over-clocked means operated at an un-blessed clock rate above the manufacturer's specification (and crossing one's fingers). In this case Intel has re-engineered or simply revalidated its own chip for a higher clock rate than previously used. They do the same thing with their CPUs from time to time.

3
1

In spinning rust we TRUST: HGST slips out screamingly fast ... HDD

Nigel 11
Silver badge

Re: Price?

Should also last longer than SSD

Depends on how it's being used. In a write-mostly and intensely-accessed environment an SSD will "wear out" in less than the several years that a mechanical drive can be relied on. In one where reads are more frequent or where there is 16 hours/day near-idle, there may be 10, 15, more years of write traffic needed to wear out the SSD, and in that case I'd expect the MTBF of an SSD to be higher than an HD. Expect, because SSDs haven't existed for long enough to be certain about their long-term ageing characteristics.

1
0
Nigel 11
Silver badge

Price?

Would be nice to know what it costs.

(Obvious comparison, 512Gb SSDs. Can't win on performance, so has to be significantly cheaper).

0
0
Nigel 11
Silver badge

Re: Am i the only one

You shouldn't be able to hear any rotational noise at all - if it's whining, it's dying!

What you hear much more on datacenter disks than on home ones is head seek noise. There's a tradeoff between minimising acoustic noise and minimising head repositioning time. In a datacentre, noise usually doesn't matter (it's dominated by lots and lots of fans moving air around, often making it hard to be heard without shouting).

3
0

Apple's Windows XP moment: OS X Snow Leopard left to DIE

Nigel 11
Silver badge

Also in Microsoft's favour, they don't sell hardware (mouses and suchlike aside). If your hardware prevents you from moving off XP to Windows 7, it's probably not Microsoft's fault, but that of whatever company is refusing to write modern drivers for its older hardware.

Can't think of anything we're being forced to throw away with XP's demise, that was made in 2007 or after.

1
0
Nigel 11
Silver badge

Re: 2007 hardware obsolete?

If it's not welded or glued shut, assembled by highly trained octopi, or otherwise artificially rendered impossible to upgrade, you can get a whole new lease of life out of an old laptop by removing the hard disk and installing a solid-state disk. The speed of the CPU is frequently irrelelevant, whereas reducing the hard disk seek time to effective zero can make a 5-year-old laptop feel faster than most new ones without SSD.

Same for desktops used for running Office and suchlike, by the way.

0
0

Intel, Sun vet births fast, inexpensive 3D chip-stacking breakthrough

Nigel 11
Silver badge

Re: Core temperature

It's not necessarily a problem. An actively cooled CPU can dissipate ~100W emanating from a square centimeter of silicon. So if the chips you want to stack generate 1W each, you can stack them 100 deep before the problem's much harder than a CPU. (Somewhat harder because you need thermally conductive glue between the layers, and thermal stresses must not destroy the assembly or the individual chips).

0
0

HP busts out new ProLiant rack mount based on Intel's new top o' line server chippery

Nigel 11
Silver badge

Re: Obviously not

There's at least one problem class where all-local RAM helps. Big sparse matrix calculations, as often encountered in engineering modelling. Wonder what HP *does* charge for maximum RAM? We once got a quote for an HP system thart could support 1Tb RAM, but the price for that configuration was so exorbitant that our scientists went for two commodity HPC servers maxed out with 0.5Tb RAM each ... and quite a lot of change.

0
0

Sanity now: Gnome 3.12 looking sensible - at least in beta

Nigel 11
Silver badge
Flame

Re: Linux is a fractured mess

In what way is the sudden arrival of Gnome 3 on an experienced Gnome 2 user's desktop, different to the sudden arrival of Windows 8.0 on an experienced Windows XP user's desktop?

It'll tell you the difference. There's a way out of Gnome 3 if you don't like it. Indeed, there are several different ways out, including choosing not to upgrade at all (apart from security patches) for the next five years at least.

The reason that the Gnome programmers were vilified when they shipped "3" wasn't that half of us thought it was crap. It was that they'd decided to write it as an upgrade (like Microsoft call Windows 8 + TIFKAM an upgrade). Meaning they had denied us the right to install Gnome 2 alongside Gnome 3 on the same system, just like Microsoft. Luckily they only control Gnome, not Linux.

Why is it that there are so many folks who still think like Soviet State Planners in the 1980s, that there there is One True Way, and that it will inevitably succeed? Oh yes, it's the brainwashing. The CCCP was very good at brainwashing. So is Microsoft. They should note, it didn't do the CCCP much good. The trouble is that you're more likely to believe your own propaganda, than the rest of us.

Linux folks know that "world domination" (Linus) was a joke. But on the other hand "First they ignore you, then they laugh at you, then they fight you, then you win." (Ghandi). We've reached stage 3.... we've won inside the DVD players and the cars ... we've won the tablets in a Googly sort of way ....

11
0
Nigel 11
Silver badge
Flame

Re: Amazing what a bit of competition can do

Define "real work".

What do you think is used to make a movie? To design a new drug (or car, or airliner)? To build a million-user web-site?

Chances are high that the creative stuff, without which none of the other w**kers in the organisation would have jobs, is done partly using Linux and partly using Macs, with Windows in third place and there only because (a) some customers(*) and (b) the abovementioned real w**kers insist on it.

(*) customers are always right even when they are wrong. Unless you work for Microsoft.

16
0
Nigel 11
Silver badge

"Start" menu

Am I reading it right? Having taken away a menu that you accessed with a left-click, they've now given back a menu except you have to access it with a right-click?

5
0

Antarctic glacier 'melted JUST as fast LONG before human carbon emissions'

Nigel 11
Silver badge

I thought this was well-understood?

Recent geological history reveals several very rapid thaws followed by much slower re-cooling.

I thought the mechanism was well-understood: runaway global warming caused by methane released from methane hydrates in permafrost (and/or ocean floors).

The warning to the human race is obvious. Cause a small amount of global warning and it could become a runaway process. There are VAST amounts of methane trapped in permafrost in the Canadian and Russian tundra. Thaw the ice around the edges of that zone and the methane escapes, which causes more global warming, which causes more thawing ... a positive feedback loop.

When you know avalanches have happened before without human intervention, perhaps it's still best to avoid going off-piste?

5
0

Alliance for Wireless Power to pursue new 50W standard

Nigel 11
Silver badge

Re: 50? What? Dell?

What's the electric car slogan: "range anxiety?" What would the laptop equivalent be?

Worrying that its power runs out before it's banished the extra-dimensional horror that's got its tentacles around your neck?

0
0
Nigel 11
Silver badge

A toothbrush isn't "wireless power", it's just a transformer with the primary in the "charger" and the secondary in the toothbrush.

I can't help thinking, why bother? (in the case of the toothbrush, the principal reason is to make it all but impossible to create an electrical circuit from mains through a fault and thence through mouth, heart and other hand of an id10t(*) to earth.

(*) or victim. or autodarwinator.

0
0

Seagate's LaCie touts a 25TB (not a typo) box o' disks for your DESK

Nigel 11
Silver badge

RAID1, odd number of disks?

You can do RAID1 on an odd number of disks just as long as your operating system or controller lets you split the disks into partitions (most simply, two equal-size partitions per disk). You then make a RAID0 of RAID1s, should you want to view the whole assemblage as a single volume.

It's actually a slightly enhanced RAID10 that never(?) acquired its own number.

0
0
Nigel 11
Silver badge

Depends what you mean by a "drive" and how much space you've got inside. Look up "SATA port multiplier", and how Backblaze make their 146Tb storage pods (mostly) out of commodity hardware.

0
0
Nigel 11
Silver badge

Re: I have my doubts..

Well, to grab a linux command: rsync.

The first rsync will take many hours, maybe days. Just carry on using it while that completes.

Once done, stop modifying it, and repeat the Rsync command. The second pass will copy only the data that has been changed since the first pass, so quite possibly only a few minutes.

The same approach doubtless exists under other names. Back in the days of tape, they were called full and incremental backups.

1
0

Office Online rises from ashes of 'confusing' Office Web Apps

Nigel 11
Silver badge

Re: Exactly

Which is why Donald Knuth created TeX in the first place

Which has been followed by LyX and kin, offering WYSISYM (what you see is what you MEAN) rather than WYSIWYG.

Actually I think the first WYSIWYM I ever saw was something whose name I have forgotten, running on an Acorn Archimedes. Shame it didn't catch on with the rest of the world.

0
1

Reg HPC man relives 0-day rootkit GROUNDHOG DAY

Nigel 11
Silver badge

Standalone scanners needed

A rootkit cannot hide, while it is just data on a disk. In other words, trying to detect a rootkitted O/S using the same rootkitted OS is hopeless. You need to boot a standalone scanner (preferably off CD or DVD because they're not writeable after being checksum-protected and mastered).

Of course, this means some completely-downtime for the infected system.

Why does Windows go out of its way to make this form of security difficult or impossible?

2
1

My smelly Valentine: Europe's perfumers wake to V-Day nightmare

Nigel 11
Silver badge

Re: I can see the point

Me too.

I normally put up with it, unless the perfumed one makes any comments about me sneezing my germs in her vicinity, in which case I've been known to tell her what I *really* think of her perfume and her manners!

1
0
Nigel 11
Silver badge

Re: "banning cheese next, followed closely by nuts."

"May contain nuts" means that it might contain a stray nut or fragment from another production line in the same factory. The allergic consumer knows whether that could mean rapid death. With a less serious allergy he'll probably chance "may" whereas plain "contains nuts" is a definite no-no.

The only really silly one is seeing "may contain nuts" on packets of nuts! (Though thinking about it, perhaps they mean "may contain other sorts of nuts"?

Glad my allergies lie elsewhere, and I can eat all the nuts I like.

1
0

No, pesky lawyers, particle colliders WON'T destroy the Earth

Nigel 11
Silver badge

Re: So How do they stop nature recreating the same experiments...

the densest matter we have in the story here is the pesky lawyers

Not dense. Just highly successful parasites. Ever met a poor lawyer?

2
0
Nigel 11
Silver badge

Re: Huh?

What you have to do is explain why, if the doomsday preconditions are correct, it hasn't happened already. Because Nature is bombarding the Earth with cosmic rays millions of times more energetic than anything we can make in our experiments. The Earth is a large target. The Sun is a much bigger one. Both are still here despite having been bombarded for the last century at least. If you accept that the last century is not special in cosmological terms, one can assume the same bombardment over the entire multi-billion-year life of the Sun. Either way, if strangelets could destroy us, it would already have happened.

3
1

The UNTOLD SUCCESS of Microsoft: Yes, it's Windows 7

Nigel 11
Silver badge

Re: New Wheeze

You may not understand, that under the hood, XP is now really obsolete

So what?

the Linux kernel that first supported XFCE was obsolete very many years ago. (Many would say the same of XFCE). Buf if XFCE floats your boat, you can still run it atop the latest kernel. Why couldn't Microsoft let us run the XP user interface atop a windows 8.1 kernel?

Could it be that their programmers are so crap they've got no proper software modularity and the GUI is all tangled up with the kernel and with the applications? Or is it to railroad as many folks as possible into giving as much money as possible to Microsoft? Or do they just enjoy playing god (of the capricious variety from the Greek pantheon)?

8
4
Nigel 11
Silver badge

Re: What the hell did they expect?

Linux offers CHOICE!

Personally, I use Gnome 2, Mate, or Cinnamon, which offer a conventional start menu. You add frequently-used apps to your task-bar or desktop. I find the menu paradigm perfect for locating one from the many programs that I use infrequently.

But you don't have to be like me. You can install your window manager of choice, and select which window manager you want to use at login time.

I'd have had no complaint with Windows 8 if it had come with an option when I logged in to see the familiar Windows 7 (or even better, XP) manager. But it doesn't, and I hate it.

8
1

WD My Cloud EX4 four-bay NAS

Nigel 11
Silver badge

Strange

When it gets to the end of this process, a blood-chilling grinding noise emanates from the EX4

Very odd. I've always recommended WD "Red" drives as the quietest server-grade drives I've encountered, and possibly the quietest outright. I just can't imagine them making such a noise, not even with four of them working on it together.

0
0

Hear that, Sigourney? Common names 'may not constitute personal data'

Nigel 11
Silver badge

Re: Paranoia?

the bank would probably detect that and inform the police

If you don't admit to your true name, yes. But it is not against the law to go by any name you choose if there is no intent to deceive. So what happens should you go to a bank and say that you'd like to open a bank account in a fairly common name by which you wish to be known to strangers, while showing them your passport in your legal name as required by law? (I'm assuming it would be illegal for a bank to sell on the fact that you have an account "Sigourney Whatever known as Susan Smith")

Companies do this all the time: XYZ ltd. trading as "Whatever we want to trade as today".

2
0
Nigel 11
Silver badge

Paranoia?

I was once told that 90% of Chinese share just eight family names. The speculation was that this was a case of Darwinian selection, in the world's longest-running (almost) continuous civilisation. Those with unusual names were easier for the empire to trace and tax to the full. So they were poorer. So their mortality rate in the next famine was greater.

Perhaps we should all change our names to John Smith or suchlike, so that we may engage in internet commerce without having our easily identified "anonymous" data trafficked and tracked? How long before someone can prove that "John Smith" gets offered different (better? )prices than Sigourney Efidom for one's first purchase from a random etailer?

Is it still possible to open a bank account under a pseudonym, and to require and expect the bank to keep one's legal and legally required name strictly confidential?

2
0

Open MPI hits milestone with FORTRAN-ready 1.7.4 release

Nigel 11
Silver badge

Re: Fortran, indeed

Whilst I'd never write anything completely new in Fortran one of it's big advantages is that there are masses of very-well debugged programs/routines that are readily available to use & modify.

True

What's less-well known is that the Fortran language gives a compiler greater scope for generating optimal number-crunching code, because arrays are fundamental entities in the language, not just pointers to data. This was true even with Fortran-77, but subsequent iterations of the language picked up that ball and really ran with it. (Whole-array arithmentic without any explicit loops, slicing, WHERE statements, .... )

And the advantage grows, as computers can no longer have faster cores, but can have more and more of them, with SIMD instructions adding to the fun.

1
0
Nigel 11
Silver badge

Implied do loops

Hmmm. Whats wrong with a clear syntax that avoids several extra lines of code, that lets you access data files that aren't in the natural order for the program in one concise line? e.g.

READ( 10,*) (A(I), B(I), I=N, 1, -1)

where you've got quantity N data pairs and you want them in two arrays in the opposite order to how some other program stored them?

A similar concept, properly generalised, was fairly recently added to Python. ("List Comprehensions")

0
0

For Windows guest - KVM or XEN and which distro for host?

Nigel 11
Silver badge

If there's no space for a two-box solution, what about a two- or more-disk solution? Most BIOSes allow one to press F10 or similar to select the boot device. All but the smallest desktop cases can accomodate two 3.5 inch or 4 2.5 inch drives. Most motherboards support at least 4 x SATA, many support six or more.

(I deliberately don't suggest external USB drives even though USB3 is fast enough and most motherboards boot USB these days. My experience suggests that if a drive tests as low quality, it gets sold in a USB box. It's a good way to experiment with different multi-boot configurations, though. )

0
0

WHEEE... CRUNCH! iPad Mini tops list of most breakable slabs, mobes

Nigel 11
Silver badge

Industry Standard "vulture" drop test

Since there doesn't appear to be any industry standard, may I suggest that "The Register" creates one. Something like:

Vulture drop test grade 1: survives being dropped six feet onto concrete ten times starting in specified orientations. (Panasonic "Toughbook" territory).

Vulture drop test grade 2: survives the same from six feet onto vinyl flooring.

And invite manufacturers to submit devices for certification, if they dare!

0
1

Life support's ABOUT to be switched off, but XP's suddenly COOL again

Nigel 11
Silver badge

Re: "none of them have had any security problems"

tell that to Iranian Nuclear scientists.

Just the point I was making to someone who thought a PC not connected to a network was secure "by definition".

I offered to make it secure by removing its CD drive and filling its USB slots and Ethernet jacks with epoxy glue (as used to be done at certain MoD sites) but he declined. He needed to get data in and out of it, and wouldn't see that it would soon become a "Typhoid Mary" spreading USB-based malware.

2
1

El Reg BuzzFelch: 10 Electrical Connectors You CAN'T LIVE WITHOUT!

Nigel 11
Silver badge

Re: What about the legend that is IEEE-488 (GPIB)?

You're maligning it. It was faster than USB (USB-1, that is).

True, the connector did tend to be the tail wagging the dog. The same problem recurs with a SCART connector and cable on a modern Digibox.

0
0
Nigel 11
Silver badge

Re: Showing my age ..

For added points, name the other signals on a full D25 modem cable. For Guru-hood, work out why the full 25-pin modem won't talk to the full 25-pin modem connector on the mainframe.

1
0
Nigel 11
Silver badge

Re: Anderson connectors

Along those lines, does the 1000-amp-plus 12V car battery connector have a name? The modern one that goes around the post and tightens with a wrench? (It works). Or the ancient Lucas twelve-clawed one that was supposed to push on and tighten with a thumbwheel on top, which would corrode itself into an unfortunate combination of immovability and high resistance within a year of fitting a new battery?

0
0
Nigel 11
Silver badge

The ultimate evil connector....

No-one has yet mentioned the ultimate in evil connectors, which is not only current but hell-bent on conquering the EU housing market.

GU10 lightbulb connector.

For which you need a plastic suction cup to manipulate the bulb into place, or risk having glass splinters embedded in your fingertips.

AAAAARGH!

0
0