* Posts by Richard Plinston

1228 posts • joined 27 Apr 2009

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Planning to upgrade your Lumia to Windows 10? NOT SO FAST

Richard Plinston
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Re: Redmond cuts off Arm, fewer legs to stand on...?

> Well, since the update will not come for about a year, any phone would be at least a year old or any owner would be able to know that they bought a phone which might not get an upgrade.

I think that the first part of that is correct, up to the 'or'. Any phone would be a year old because they won't be buying a phone that they don't know if it will get an upgrade. As developers will drop WP8 as a target, moving on to 'universal apps', the app store for WP8 will become static, just as WP7's did when WP8 was announced.

At the time of WP8's announcement many commenters were stating that WP7 would get the upgrade in spite of WP8 requiring dual core, which no WP7 phone had. In the end all they got was some new colours and box sizes with 7.8. an '8.10' may be similar.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: is it because they're ARM?

> Fool me once shame on you (7.1), Fool me twice shame on me (8.1)

There was also the complete deadending of WM6.5. No phones or apps could go to WP7. WP7 and apps were deadened by WP8. Now only some phones will be upgradable to W10.

Also it is unlikely that 'universal apps' will run on WP8 so effectively WP8 phones and apps are dead. Just as WP7 phones went unsold, except in the bargain bins, after WP8 was announced and was not going to be an upgrade, now WP8 phone sales will tank and developers will drop WP8 as a target.

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Free Windows 10 could mean the END for Microsoft and the PC biz

Richard Plinston
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> "You mean I buy the computer now but then I have to pay extra for Windows 10 in a year?"

That has happened before. Some small (8") Intel tablet were being sold a few years ago (2011?). These came as dual boot with Android and Windows 7 but were advertised as 'Windows tablets with Office'. Small print mentioned that Windows and office were _trial_ versions and after some months a full version of both would need to be purchased.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: supported device <> hardware warranty

> How is MS supposed to know when each of our hardware warranties are expired?

By obtaining that from the OEM. In particular it may be that the OEMs will configure the warranty details into new builds, and/or report them to MS to associate with the licence key.

> What if your HW warranty is already expired when you obtain a free Win 10 upgrade?

Excellent question.

> The term "supported" in the context given has something to do with MS and Win 10.

MS did not say 'the supported life of the Operating System', they specifically referred to _device_ support life.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: WTF.....

> 2. For the supported lifetime of the device, you will ALSO get every following versions of windows for free.

That was not said at all. What was said was:

"""once a Windows device is upgraded to Windows 10, Microsoft will continue to keep it* current for the supported lifetime of the device** “at no cost”."""

* 'it' refers to _Windows_10_ (normal pronoun rules). They will keep Windows 10 'current' with updates. New versions you will buy.

** 'supported lifetime of the device' means 'until the warranty expires'. After warranty expires you will pay for updates and new versions.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: - Stealing MS-DOS

> Wasn't it selling MS/PCDOS before they'd actually bought it? (QDOS)

Initially MS licenced SCP-DOS as an OEM for 8086 based computers. It was a breach to sell it on 8088 computers (such as IBM-PC). later the purchased all rights for (allegedly) $50,000 and SCP has the right to sell MS-DOS with a computer for free (ie no payment to MS). When the SCP factory burned down they started selling MS-DOS plus a V20 chip (faster 8088 compatible) and MS had to buy them out of the agreement, allegedly for $1million.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: Triggers broom

> At what point is it no longer the same device?

It was no longer a _supported_ device when the warranty expired. This may have been when the warranty period expired or when you opened the case or when you changed one piece of hardware.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: Triggers broom

> Undercutting Netscape by giving IE away free with their OS,

And not paying Spyglass who wrote it for them.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: This isn't hard. It's just unbelievable.

> I'm willing to bet this is what MS told the manufacturers in advance of these announcements to cool them out. Dell, HP, Lenovo, et. al. are all in on this, because it's supposed to keep them relevant.

What is more likely is that the OEM version of 10 will expire at the end of the warranty period (the _supported_ life of the device) at which time a charge will be required to keep Windows working. The problem that MS have with XP and 7 is that the users of these are no longer sending money to Microsoft or OEMs, and may never do so again.

In the 90s and 2000s MS could rely on most users paying for a new version of Windows every few years. Now they have to enforce that or face declining revenues with the majority staying with XP and 7 as being 'good enough'.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: This isn't hard. It's just unbelievable.

> That clearly means as long as machine is supported by the OEM who shipped it. That's probably longer than the base warranty period.

It does not say "the supported life of the model", it specifically says 'device', singular. When your warranty expires so does this 'no cost'.

It may well mean that if your Windows 7 machine is older than the warranty then you will begin paying immediately.

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Is Windows RT not invited to the Windows 10 upgrade party?

Richard Plinston
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Re: ARM vs ATOM

> When the Surface RT came out a lot of the analysts were saying that MS *had* to have a ARM tablet, Android and Apple devices, running ARM were so popular and making so much money that MS would be a dead company by tomorrow.

It seemed to me that RT was not so much about selling Windows ARM tablets and was more about stopping the OEMs making ARM tablets with some other OS. Following on from the success of killing off Linux Netbooks by threatening to remove all discounts on all MS products if the OEMs did not 'loyally' change to using the regurgitated XP, they could use a similar threat on Dell's Android tablets and HP's WebOS.

And it worked.

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YEAR of the PENGUIN: A Linux mobile in 2015?

Richard Plinston
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Re: Don't write off the desktop

> It's not really the same as an EFB is it.

No, but there are many more pilots than designers. Thus there are many, many, more tablets and other mobile devices than workstations associated with designing, building and flying aircraft.

You seem to be arguing that 'desktops will never die'. 'Desktop' is merely where the device is placed, just as 'mainframe' refers to the structure that supports the electronics (ie the main frame), and does not describe the class of computer except by association. 'Workstations', which are used by designers, architects, and other professionals, happen to now fit on desks and may use the same components, or be the same machines, as 'desktop PCs'.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: Don't write off the desktop

> The desktop remains the place where almost all productive work is done, such as CAD, architecture, large scale mapping, process control - just to name a few. None of these tasks work on your mobile or tablet.

It used to be that those tasks were done on a different class of machine called a 'workstation'. These were often desk sized machines (rather than something small enough to sit on top of a desk). It happens that the desktop toys got more capable. Now workstations and top end desktops are about the same.

With vehicles most productive work is done with trucks, buses, tractors and cranes. None of those tasks work well with cars, yet there are many more cars. That doesn't mean that trucks will disappear and no one has said they will.

> Do you really want to fly on an aeroplane designed by someone shuffling parts about with their fingers and thumbs on a screen the size of a mobile phone.........

Interestingly many, perhaps most, pilots carry a tablet or similar to manage their flight plans, check lists and other procedures.

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Android gives Google a search monopoly? Not so fast, says judge

Richard Plinston
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Re: Choice...

> At the time of The Great Browser War you had to purchase software before you could download anything.

That is not true. FTP was perfectly adequate to download stuff. FTP came with MS-DOS and Windows. You did need to have an ISP and they usually gave out a free copy of the TCP/IP stack plus a browser, usually Netscape or IBM's WebExplorer.

> He specifically identified Netscape's need to sell its browser for its cash flow.

Actually most copies of netscape navigator were free 'beta' versions. Businesses had to pay for navigator but individuals got it free. Netscape made most money from their range of servers and services.

Much free software came on magazine diskettes (later on CDs) or was available for the cost of postage from several places. Mosaic was free too.

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Richard Plinston
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> And what kind of market share do these Google alternatives have?

Almost none and that is not because Google have eliminated competition (as Microsoft did) but because users can, and do, make a choice.

> It was also possible about 15 years ago to buy a desktop running something other than Windows, thus avoiding having IE pushed on you as the default browser... but very unlikely to happen for the average man.

.. because _only_ Windows machines were in the retail shops, OEMs _only_ made Windows machines, or were punished by Microsoft via loss of 'discounts' or 'joint marketing'.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: SEO "against the rules" with Google?

> Back in the day there was effectively, for nearly everyone, no choice other than to buy a Windows PC. Businesses used it, nearly all PCs in a computer store were Windows based.

That was not because Windows was the only operating system but because Microsoft drew up contracts, discounts and 'joint marketing' with OEMs and retailers that eliminated competition. This was done, for example, with 'discounts' that applied to all copies of Windows but were removed if even a small number of machines were offered with another system. Linux Netbooks were eliminated because loss of discounts on all other machines would cost the company millions.

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Richard Plinston
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>> requiring makers of Android smartphones to bundle its search app on their devices.

No it does not. There are plenty of Android devices that do not have nor require Google search installed: Amazon's Kindle, Nokia's X, many small makers.

Certainly manufacturer's can sign up to provide Google's services but they don't have to, Android code is available without these.

"""Alibaba says that several Chinese handset makers have adopted the YunOS and the company is providing financial incentives for smartphone makers to do so. However none of these manufacturers are the major smartphone brands; they’re all budget Chinese handsets catering to the very low end of the market.

In 2012 Alibaba announced what was then called the “Aliyun mobile operating system” (AMOS) a “forked” version of Android. """

> which keeps the prices of smartphones artificially high.

What this seems to be claiming is that Microsoft would _pay_ Android manufacturers to have Bing bundled. That does not mean that prices for the phones would be cheaper, only that a) the manufacturer would make more profit and b) the phone would not sell.

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Microsoft says to expect AWESOME things of Windows 10 in January

Richard Plinston
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Re: High school adjectives for business solutions

> will not only be WAY PAST awesome

Way past having some awe is being full awe.

> This is not the same corporate design team that designed Windows 8, just for the sole purpose of making money.

Windows 8 was designed to overcome the perception of Windows Phone. Consultants reported that WP was not selling because the UI was unfamiliar. Windows 8 was intended to make that UI the most familiar UI on the planet. Then users would _demand_ all their devices have that UI. So much for consultants.

> I'd say 50 bucks or less is a reasonable price for Windows 10.

Before Surface was released the usual clowns were predicting great _cheap_ tablets from Microsoft. The first gen devices only became cheap when MS wrote off nearly a billion dollars and put them in the bargain bin.

So much for the usual clowns' predictions.

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All but full-fat MS Office to be had on iPads, Droidenslabben for NOWT

Richard Plinston
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Re: It's free....

> What's Android for? To lock you into the Google ecosystem

It actually doesn't. Kindle runs Android with no Google, even Nokia's X was Android without Google. Many other phone vendors produce Android phones without Google.

> Even Linux vendors try to lock-in you into their products.

You will have to explain that because it looks like dogma without any foundation. Which Linux vendor does anything to prevent a different vendor's version of Linux being installed ?

> So why MS is evil, and Google is not? Just because MS asks money for its products?

No. That is not the reason that MS is evil.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: It's free....

> Sure, Office formats were not designed for interoperability. Nor Photoshop PSD, Autodesk DWG, or many other application formats nobody complains about...

Actually DWG was complained about for many years. Autodesk also had AutoCAD DXF which _was_ designed for interoperability:

"""AutoCAD DXF (Drawing Interchange Format, or Drawing Exchange Format) is a CAD data file format developed by Autodesk[1] for enabling data interoperability between AutoCAD and other programs."""

> even PDF was not an open standard until 2008 - and not fully. Yet nobody complained about PDF.

Actually PDF _was_ designed for interoperability. It is _Portable_ Document Format and the specification was freely available since 1993.

> Most cameras outputs their own RAW formats,

RAW is a direct dump of the sensor data, of course they are all different, even between models of one brand. But almost all cameras will also produce standard JPEGs, or only JPEGs, or both.

> But now Office formats are fully documented, XML based, and documentation is no scanty at all.

It is certainly not 'scanty'. Bloated is what it is. Several thousand pages because is contains a mishmash of 30 years of ad-hoc development. For example there are three specifications within that of 'tables' because MS Office implements them in 3 different ways.

While the OOXML spec has been around for a while there were many years when MS did not implement it so other programs had to implement the standard _and_ 'what MS does', adding to the complexity.

> Also standard are good, but they also imply a usually slow approval process and risk "design-by-commitee" issues.

While MS Office has followed a completely different path over the years of ad-hoc changes.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: I remember

> Especially because then any non-trivial applicatio required a deep knowledge of the underlying "OS" and hardware, and often access to some documentation not readily available.

Complete nonsense. 'Back then' there were dozens of computer magazines and piles of books aimed at hobby programming. I still have a collection. Apple II, BBC, Atari, Amiga, Amstrad, Sinclair were all catered for extensively with many coding examples in many languages.

The problem came in the 90s when Microsoft convinced schools to teach children to be consumers of computer software, principally Office, rather than teaching computing (including programming). Magazines similarly changed to promote software products rather than programming - advertising was a more important source of revenue than sales to hobbiests.

The Raspberry Pi and Arduino (and similar) are bringing back the days of hobby programming.

> Linux ... the lack of good and easy to use IDEs doesn't help at all.

It may well be that you are completely unaware of the languages, IDEs and many other tools that are available on Linux, but 'lack of good and easy' is not one of its attributes.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: I remember

> For another Office alternative try Kingsoft Office.

Kingsoft Office is now called WPS Office (by Kingsoft) and runs on Windows, Linux, Android and iOS.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: It's free....

> People's complaints about non-Office is that they don't render Office documents properly. I wonder why that is.

The main reason for different renderings is that the fonts are not available and substitutes are used. Another is the differences between printer settings and capability. This can happen between Windows machines even when both are running Office.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: compatible Android tablets

> Actually, if there's something MS does very well is compatibility - especially at the binary level.

Given that the topic is mobile devices then Microsoft has been very poor at compatibility. Windows Mobile 6.x apps were completely killed by Windows Phone 7, which in turn was dead-ended by WP8. Not just binary incompatibility but the complete tool chain.

> While in other OSes unless you can - if you can without extensive changes - recompile your apps you have very little chance to run whatever was written or compiled just a few years ago.

That is just nonsense dogma. I have programs written 20 years ago that still run.

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Snowden, Dotcom, throw bombs into NZ election campaign

Richard Plinston
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Re: False claims: NZ is on the outer with its former Allies.

> Are you really claiming this software was designed before then?

I don't see where he claimed anything about when the software was written. But NZ wasn't 'out' just in the mid-80s, that lasted until 2010.

>the "Non-Aligned Movement" is an actual thing, with actual members, and NZ isn't, and never has been, one?

He didn't say the "Non-Aligned Movement", he said the "non-aligned group".

> As for Key being left of centre, all that really tells us is something about where you (hilariously arbitrarily) consider the "centre" to be.

Key is left of centre when compared to most other countries. In some cases in the past the Labour party has been to the right of the National party. That's what happens when almost everyone is trying to be centrist.

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Richard Plinston
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> Greenwald also denied that he was being paid for his trip to New Zealand.

Greenwald stated on TV that his usual fee of $25,000 was being donated to a charity. So Kim Dotcom is paying the fee and also, presumably, travel and accommodation.

> "The idea that I got on a plane and flew 40 hours ... because I developed a desire to influence the outcome of the election is frivolous,"

His desire is irrelevant. Kim Dotcom has stated he wants to influence the outcome of the election and it is Kim that is paying for all this. Greenwald is a part of this. Actually Greenwald is probably doing this mainly so he sells more books.

> the results of mass surveillance in New Zealand

"the results of mass surveillance _of_ New Zealand" - corrected that for you.

It may well be that traffic originating in New Zealand is monitored and is available to NSA operatives. But that is traffic that is between NZ and other countries and can be collected in those other countries. If I don't want my searches being seen by the NSA then I should not use Google, or Bing, or Yahoo.

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Microsoft boots 1,500 dodgy apps from the Windows Store

Richard Plinston
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> Voice and guesture based commands work just fine too - as per my Xbox One.

In what way is that a "desktop system in an office or home environment".

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Richard Plinston
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Re: Look at the bright side

> the latest Kantar figues

Kantar have very selective figures which do not match up with quarterly total sales.

> 9.9% UK market share for Windows Phone

Which is down from 12%. But even that 9.9% is old news:

http://www.theinquirer.net/inquirer/news/2357938/android-grows-uk-market-share-at-expense-of-ios-and-windows-phone

"""according to the latest statistics from analyst outfit Kantar Worldpanel Comtech:

"""Windows Phone saw its market share slip too, following reports that sales of Lumia handsets are starting to slow. In June, the Microsoft mobile operating system had a 7.5 percent market share, compared to 9.1 percent the previous month and 9.5 percent in June 2013."""

> Nokia never sold any handsets at below parts cost.

You don't know that, they may have. But 'below parts cost' does not represent the only way to 'sell at a loss'. The finished product is _much_ more than a list of parts, it includes assembly, packaging, transport and marketing and maybe more. What is known is that they made massive losses which includes selling off some models at less than FOB:

http://www.statista.com/statistics/273279/nokias-net-profits-by-quarter/

> Nokia ended up paying Microsoft more in license fees than Microsoft paid Nokia in platform support payments.

That would only be true if each licence were around $35 (1billion/30million). As this is about twice what others have said the licence would cost then it is unlikely. Also that is irrelevant. If Nokia had to pay licence fees then that is part of the cost.

> If Windows Phone had always been license free then Nokia would have made a profit.

If it were licence free _and_ MS still paid then a $billion dollars then they _may_ have broken even at least in some quarters, but not all.

> This was to plug the gap between their really basic 3rd world type handsets and the premium Windows Phone range.

While there were some 'premium' models in the WP range most of the sales were in the 'bargain bin' range.

http://www.wpcentral.com/nokia-posts-q1-interim-report-handset-sales-down-30-percent

"""The report also notes a sequential and year-on-year decline in average selling prices for devices, indicating that those who did buy Nokia phones shied away from higher-priced models."""

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Richard Plinston
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Re: Look at the bright side

> You mean the 'arse-end of nowhere' like the UK and the EU top 5 for instance?

There may well have been a spike in sales in a few countries over a short time, but this was primarily because the prices were below cost. Nokia never made a profit from Windows Phones in spite of being given a $billion a year. If products are discounted enough then there will be sales, but doing this long term is unsupportable (which is why Nokia brought out their Android-X phones and sold the loss making division to Microsoft).

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Richard Plinston
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Re: why Microsoft thought it would make sense on a desktop

> and it's growing at ~ 100% per year.

The main problem with apps for Microsoft mobile platforms is the instability. Windows Mobile 6.x was killed dead by WP7. All the WP7 apps were dumped when WP8 was incompatible. Desktop and RT apps were different too. The next round is supposed to be compatible from phone to RT and Win8.x (or 9), but may need to be redeveloped with yet another new SDK.

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Richard Plinston
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> Because touch and gesture based computing are clearly the future on the desktop too

Which is strange because no one seems to want to use these on the desktop.

Just like voice input and voice commands, they are useless on a desktop system in an office or home environment, too much background noise and movement for voice or gesture, screen too far away for touch, fingers too fat for fine enough control of desktop applications.

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Cracking copyright law: How a simian selfie stunt could make a monkey out of Wikipedia

Richard Plinston
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Re: Recent news on Page 2

> If I take a picture of you with your camera after you asked me to take a picture of it I still own the copyright to the said picture.

No you don't. You would be acting as an agent under direction by the person asking you. If you don't like the idea of being a mere agent then refuse to take the picture. If you want to own copyright to a photo then use your own camera.

> You still own the copyright of a picture you took of me illegally.

If you are in a public place then taking a photo of you is not illegal.

The monkey owns the copyright to the picture not the camera owner, or perhaps the owner of the monkey?

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Richard Plinston
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Re: I'm puzzled by this article

> The US Copyright Office is quite clear that he does not. Your wishes have no bearing on the matter.

Your assertion is incorrect. The US Copyright Office refused an application to register the copyright because it is in dispute and registering it would preempt any court case. They do not say that Slater does not own copyright, only that they reject his application.

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Richard Plinston
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> If I work for a company, and I do some video shooting with their equipment, even as part of my job specs (say you are hired as a cameraman) _I_ own the copyright UNLESS there is a SPECIFIC, EXPLICIT contractual language that gives the corporation the copyright. The employment contract (if you are an employee) must state explicitly (like many I've seen) that the employer owns any copyrights in work you have done for them. It must be a SIGNED contract.

Certainly it would be sensible to have a specific contract but, for example, in the USA:

http://www.tms.org/pubs/journals/JOM/matters/matters-9608.html

"""If an employee does not have an employment contract and creates a copyrightable work in the scope of his or her employment. U.S. copyright law includes a statutory provision called the "work made for hire" doctrine, which provides that the employer and not the employee/author is the author of a work prepared by an employee within the scope of his or her employment. Because the employer is considered the "author" of the work, the employer owns the copyright in the work under Section 201. """

"""The Supreme Court stepped into this fray in 1989. The Supreme Court adopted the third approach-an employment relationship was to be determined by applying agency law principles. The court enumerated several factors that are relevant in determining whether the hired party is an employee under the general common law of agency. These factors include the skill required for creating the work; the amount of control the hiring party has over the hired party; where the work is performed; the method of payment of the hired party; and the source of the hired party's tools, office space, and other instrumentalities of doing the job. The court also considered whether the hiring party has the right to assign additional projects, whether the work is part of the hiring party's regular business, whether employee benefits are extended to the hiring party, and the tax treatment of the hired party."""

"""David Radack is a partner in the law firm Eckert Seamans Cherin & Mellott"""

So, in general, your opinion is in conflict with that of lawyers. Note specifically "the source of the hired party's tools".

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Richard Plinston
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> Say I work as a burger flipper at Bobs' Burgers, and the manager hands me a camera and says "Take some photo's of the staff for the staff newsletter", and i do. If the employment contract doesn't EXPLICITLY state that Bob's Burgers owns the copyright to any creative work I do while employed by them, then _I_ am the copyright owner, no matter who owns the equipment.

Wrong. If your employer instructs you, during the hours of your employment, to use his camera and to take specific photographs then you are acting as his agent and have no ownership of copyright.

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Richard Plinston
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> Agency requires a contract! This is true in all Berne convention nations.

> The ONLY time agency is implicit is if

So you claim that a contract is _required_ and then state that it can be implicit. Which is it?

> How can you possibly defend the idea that a random stranger firing the camera falls under an agency agreement?

A random stranger pressing the button may come under one or more situations:

* An implicit contract that they are acting as an agent.

* A trespasser or TWOCer 'stealing' the use of your equipment.

In neither case are they entitled to own the copyright.

For example if you ask someone in the street to take your photo with your camera it does not give them the right to sue you if you show that photo to your parents, or even if it is published (say, on Facepalm). It is implicit that they are acting as an unpaid agent.

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Richard Plinston
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> Ownership of a device doesnt make you a creator.

No, but it is likely that it makes the device owner the owner of the copyright.

Just as a programmer that is an employee writing programming code on the company's equipment does not own the copyright of what he has created so it is with photographs or any other material.

Do you think that in Universal Studios the cameramen can sell the movies ?

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Richard Plinston
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> was to ask who owned the film

Exactly. These days it is 'who owns the SD Card' or similar.

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Richard Plinston
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> Answer: the person who took the picture.

No. That is not true. Many companies have employees and contractors who take photographs or produce graphic or text work that is copyright. If the person is an employee on salary or wages and uses equipment and media belonging to the company then regardless of who 'pushes the button' the copyright belongs to the company. If the person is a contractor who has his own equipment and media then the copyright belongs to him though it may be assigned to the company in the contract, or the company may just have a license for those items.

In the case of Slater vs monkey there is no question of ownership of equipment, thus the monkey was acting as an unpaid employee or volunteer and has no claim to any copyright which belongs to the equipment and media owner.

Nor does your 'total stranger' have any claim. In the absence of any prior or negotiated agreement if they claim ownership of _anything_ related to or derived from that camera or media owned by you then it would theft.

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Richard Plinston
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> the only reason to claim copyright would be that he owned the camera, which is not a valid one.

It is a completely valid reason to claim copyright and one that is used continuously by companies that have employees. If the company supplies the equipment and media to employees then the company owns the copyright.

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UK.gov's Open Source switch WON'T get rid of Microsoft, y'know

Richard Plinston
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> lol, that's utter rubbish

Yet another round of TheVogon misinformation is posted.

> over 25% of their users still had to use Windows

They don't 'use Windows', they sometimes use legacy software which happens to only run on Windows. Most of those 25% only have to do that occasionally and run their Linux most of the time.

> The only independent numbers (from HP)

That report was _not_ independent, it was paid for by Microsoft. It has been discredited on several grounds, one is that they did not talk to Munich but just made up their own numbers, and mainly they included the costs of buying new computers at frequent intervals when Munich did not buy any.

> it has cost them €30 million more

No it hasn't. Munich know exactly what the figures were and there was a significant saving.

> more than upgrading to a current Microsoft stack for a whole world of pain -

There was no world of pain, and probably less than upgrading successively to XP (they were using NT and 2000), then to 7 and then to 8 as well as the upgrades and retraining to Office 2007, then to 2010 and so on.

I am afraid that it is your post that is "utter rubbish", as all your posts are.

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Man FOUND ON MOON denies lunar alien interface

Richard Plinston
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Re: @Richard Plinston

> none of whom can claim a "'right'" to state an opinion

You have completely missed the point: _everyone_ has the 'right' to express whatever opinions they wish to. You are attempting to control others 'rights' while you do not have any superior 'rights' to do that.

> What you don't seem to realize is that science is not some sort of "democratic" process

I didn't even mention science, nor democratic process.

> There are two facts and only two facts in this matter:

That may be your opinion (stated as fact) but there may be other relevant facts, you just don't know of them.

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Richard Plinston
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> Buzz Aldrin may have stood on the surface of the moon, but neither that nor anything else gives him the right to state that as fact. That's pure opinion, conjecture... and the hard evidence is completely against it.

And what is it that you have done to be able to claim a superior 'right' to state your opinion as if it were fact.

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The Windows 8 dilemma: Win 8 or wait for 9?

Richard Plinston
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Re: Time for some truly revolutionary GUIs?

> Why voice control is not the goal of the next level of PC and tablet UI design I don't know

I had an OS/2 box nearly 20 years ago that had voice input as a standard feature.

Microsoft had Speech API (SAPI) since 1995:

"""The first version of SAPI was released in 1995, and was supported on Windows 95 and Windows NT 3.51. """

Voice control was the goal of the _previous_ (x2 or x3) level of PCs.

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Google de-listing of BBC article 'broke UK and Euro public interest laws' - So WHY do it?

Richard Plinston
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Re: not illegal

> removal of links is an attempt to hide certain points of view

Removal of a link does _not_ hide the point of view. The article is still accessible. It can still be found via other search criteria and other links.

> if Google removed the term "Facebook" from its index,

Searching for a person's name, or other content, would still show links to Facebook.

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Microsoft's anti-malware crusade knackers '4 MILLION' No-IP users

Richard Plinston
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> I avoid Windows as much as possible.

> I cannot connect to my home server

Job done!!

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Average chump in 'bank' phone scam is STUNG for £10,000 - study

Richard Plinston
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Re: Nice!

> All cold-callers read from scripts, so are virtually indistinguishable from pre-recorded auto-diallers,

Many years ago (decades) there was an infamous carpet cleaning business in this country that had one of the early auto dial-response systems that made a call then listened for a response, such as may occur if someone actually wanted their services. Whenever they called I put the phone on top of the radio so that it filled up their tape.

I do believe in free speech. Callers are allowed to say what they want for as long as they wish, but I am equally free to not listen to it. They can talk to my desk as long as they are paying for the call. It stops them annoying someone else for a few minutes.

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Freeze, Glasshole! Stop spying on me at the ATM

Richard Plinston
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Re: I prefer the infra-red camera trick

> The most recent key pressed glows brightest.

I have always rested my hand flat on the keypad with all fingers on keys (and my other hand, or wallet, covering). It is then possible to press the appropriate keys with minimum finger movement, and no heat difference.

I do see people using a single finger to poke the keys which makes it easy to read their number from metres away.

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Russian gov to dump x86, bake own 64-bit ARM chips - reports

Richard Plinston
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Re: Don't believe everything you read. OTOH...

> and before that, made the Rolls Royce jet engine as good as anything the USA had.

Partly because many of the USA jet engines* were license built British designs. The Soviets neglected to get a license.

* J31, J33, J42, J65, ...

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Microsoft hopes for FONDLESLAB FRENZY as Surface Pro 3 debuts

Richard Plinston
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Re: proceeded to review their samples based on their normal laptop usage

> then perhaps something like the surface might enable them to have one less device

Actually Microsoft wants you have one _more_ device. They want you to keep your desktop (and buy Win8.1 and Office) _and_ buy a Surface. (and buy a Windows Phone).

That was the point of Win8 Metro: to make the UI 'the most familiar' so that you _demand_ that on your tablet and phone.

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