* Posts by Richard Plinston

1800 posts • joined 27 Apr 2009

Intel loses its ARM wrestling match, kicks out Atom mobe chips

Richard Plinston
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> But a phone which does Continuum for x86 Win32 programs would have sold truckloads,

Which is one reason why Microsoft does not want to do that. MS wants you to buy a PC _and_ an XBox _and_ a laptop _and_ a phone, plus several IoT devices - as long as they all run Windows and buy from their app stores.

Buying just one device that runs Win32 programs (mostly not by Microsoft) is not an option in MS's revenue plans.

Note that Continuum is currently ARM and only runs UWPs which must be bought from MS store (with a 30% cut for MS).

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Richard Plinston
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Re: Don't see Intel succeeding at IoTs.

>IoT is not even a thing, even conceptually it is not developed yet.

Actually it is. There are several companies that offer complete systems that interface your phone to many different things such as lights, heating, garage doors, Video cameras, and do so over the internet. And they have done so for many years.

The hype about IoT is where software companies, such as Microsoft, want to grab the action, and the revenue, and promote their IoT efforts linked to their services. As they don't make hardware they are trying to ride on the back of RPi and others and trying to get users and developers to write software that will be tied to MS services.

You are wrong that 'it doesn't exist', it is just that MS tries to ignore what does exist and will promote whatever they do as 'the standard' and 'innovative' when it is neither (yet again).

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Miguel de Icaza on his journey from open source to Microsoft: 'It's a different company'

Richard Plinston
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Re: He's right about one thing...

> Dalvik was Java.

Dalvik is not "Java". Java is a language, Dalvik is a runtime VM. It may well be that programs written in the Java language can be compiled and converted to run on the Dalvik VM, or the ART VM. Dalik does not run the same byte code as the Java JRE runtime VM.

> Google used them just to attempt to avoid to license Java,

Factually incorrect. The Java and OpenJava JDK are freely licenced to anyone. Sun conformed that. They, nor the customers do not need JRE licences because Android runs Dalvik or ART.

> while still being able to use Java tools and libraries to make Android work. Nobody says Android development is not made in Java.

Android apps may well be written in the Java language, but the licences are freely available to any developer, or indeed to anyone. The OpenJava libraries, and may others are FOSS.

> MS licensed Java but tried to add Windows-only extensions.

MS tried to extend Java in breach of the licence that they had.

> Google stole the whole Java design without even getting a license,

Factually incorrect. There was no 'stealing'. What Google used was freely licenced to them as confirmed by Sun at the time.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: Java

> I would have liked some explanation following his statement

Isn't it obvious ? Java is the problem preventing Microsoft's world domination of all computing.

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NZ Pastafarians joined in noodly wedlock

Richard Plinston
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Re: Bunch of tosspots

> it is because societies have tended to function reasonably well and flourish under Christianity.

The 'flourishing' is primarily because they slaughtered everyone who wasn't their own brand of religion.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: >something to tell the grandchildren (Dr Mouse)

> I'm interested whether it's a "fact" or just an assumption.

or dogma.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: >something to tell the grandchildren

> The point of the gold rings and so on is permanence and untarnished endurance. Pasta is no viable substitute. It mocks, it tastes great, but it doesn't last.

Statistics show that church weddings are __so__ much more permanent.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: Magnanimity in Voctory

> demonstrates that religion is no longer calling the shots in New Zealand

It hasn't for several decades, if it ever did here. Non-religious weddings in any location are normal here. My own wedding in the 70s was in the back garden of my parent home.

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Intel shows budget Android phone powering big-screen Linux

Richard Plinston
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Re: Nope...

> Yes, Ubuntu and Mint are different OSes.

By the same means then Windows NT 3.1, 3.5, 3.5 Server, 4, 2000, Server 2000, XP Home, XP Starter, XP Pro, XP Ultimate, Server 2003, ... are all different OSes. By your measure then XP SP1, SP2, SP3 (multiplied by Starter, Home, Netbook, Pro, Ultimate) would also be 15 different OSes.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: "The concept is broadly similar to Microsoft's Continuum for Windows 10 Mobile..."

> Not really, there's no MS Office suite for Linux

This is about 'mobile'. There is MS Office for Android, which is said to be better than the one for Windows Phone 8.x.

There are many Office suites for Android and/or Linux including WPS, LibreOffice, Google Office. If you require MS Office then use whatever works for you. Others don't need it or want it.

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Texas Attorney General charged in 32-bit 'eco-friendly server scam'

Richard Plinston
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Re: God doesn't want me to take your money

> religious belief kills brain cells?

Correlation does not imply causation, it may be the other way around.

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BlackBerry boss mulls mid-range Androids

Richard Plinston
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Re: Just can't make it work?

> Nokia and Maemo, HP and Palm, MS and Windows Phone

Nokia had Maemo working well. I still have my N800. Meego took a bit longer but the N9 seemed to be a good phone, I would have liked a N950. This was killed by the contract with Microsoft along with Melemi, and eventually the phone division itself.

It seemed to me that WebOS was more killed by WOA (Windows on ARM) that eventually arrived as Windows RT. It is likely that Microsoft waved WOA and 'loyalty discounts' on _all_ products to kill WebOS.

As for Windows Phone, it was killed by Microsoft dumping developers and customers by changing everything from WM6.x to WP7 then WP8 and now W10M.

So we can blame Microsoft for all 3 of your examples. Google and Android, Apple and iPod/iPhone/iPad are counter examples where big tech companies did make it work. Avoiding Microsoft seems to be the clue there.

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Microsoft rethinks the Windows application platform one more time

Richard Plinston
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Re: Richard Plinston

> Thanks for quoting me out of context.

You had not specified any particular context, your assertions were global in nature. You made bold statements which were uniformed and untrue.

> Did you think I was ignorant of the server and corporate based Windows offerings?

Yes.

> but don't put words into my mouth.

There was nothing put in your mouth by anyone other than you. You made unqualified assertions without limitations that were patently false. You are now attempting to add qualifications and claiming it is other's fault that you were 'misunderstood'.

You can go blue in the face and stamp your little feet but some copies of Windows 10 are being paid for with subscriptions and others pay for Windows 10. In neither case is it 'always free'. Microsoft have stated the the 'free upgrade for existing W7, and W8.1 users (with exclusions)' would only last for one year. _Nobody_, not even Microsoft, knows for sure what will happen after that year ends, regardless of your claims.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: Be afraid!

> Windows 10 will not go "subscription".

It already is. Enterprises already pay an annual subscription for Windows and that includes Windows 10. They don't stop paying when they install 10.

> Windows 10 will always be free.

Windows 10 is only 'free' for a limited time to a limited group of existing customers. It is not free to Windows XP customers or to buyers of new computers or to enterprise customers.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: Although 97% of desktop computer users prefer non-Apple OSs

> Actually according to Forrester, there are now over 2 billion PCs - which is somewhat more that the size of the Smartphone market (~1.8 billion). And >90% of those PCs run a version of Windows.

The 'market' is the sales. According to IDC there were 276 million PCs sold in 2015.

"""

2015 FULL YEAR SMARTPHONE SALES STATISTICS

...

TOTAL . . . . . . . .1,437.3 M

Source: TomiAhonen Almanac 2016

"""

As for 'installed base' there are more smartphones than PCs.

"""

INSTALLED BASE OF SMARTPHONES BY OPERATING SYSTEM AS OF 31 DECEMBER 2015

...

TOTAL Installed Base . 2,475 M smartphones in use at end of Q4, 2015

Source: TomiAhonen Almanac 2016

"""

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Richard Plinston
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Re: Although 97% of desktop computer users prefer non-Apple OSs

> Apple and Linux are dismal examples of marketing.

That must be why iOS and Android/Linux are only 98% of the smartphone market, which is 3 to 4 times the size of the PC market.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: Starting to see sense

> 404 Not Found

Windows 10 has it configured wrong.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: Learning or just trying a different push??

> there are 99 Windows customers for every Linux customer.

Did you use Excel to calculate that 'statistic'?

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Nest's bricking of Revolv serves as wake-up call to industry

Richard Plinston
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Re: @Richard Plinston - What sort of wake-up call?

> Use of the hardware by vendors to lock you onto their services is ... now being brought to PCs by Windows 10.

Which is why I have avoided Microsoft products for the last couple of decades.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: @Richard Plinston - What sort of wake-up call?

> a free user can't be monetized properly.

a free user, properly, can't be monetized.

ftfy

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Richard Plinston
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Re: @Richard Plinston - What sort of wake-up call?

> there can be no open source software on closed, proprietary hardware.

And yet I seem to be running CentOS and Ubuntu on Intel and AMD based systems (and on ARM) which I don't have the masks and circuits for.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: What sort of wake-up call?

> Open Source won't solve this.

It would if Nest released the source code as open source and it is modified by the community to access different cloud services and can use other protocols.

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Richard Plinston
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Both customers

"Both customers ..."

Well, if there are only 2 then I can see why they closed down the business.

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Zombie SCO rises from the grave again

Richard Plinston
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Re: Jam yesterday, jam tomorrow........

> My guess would be that the remains of SCO is totally in hock to its lawyers, who won't get paid unless they win. As soon as they admit defeat, they'll have to take a monumental writedown and quite possibly go bust[1] themselves.

You don't have to guess, Google can be your friend.

TSCOG is not 'in hock' to the lawyers, they paid an upfront amount to persue this case. That contract is still in force and so the lawyers need to keep persuing or they will themselves be in breach and will be sued for the money that they failed to recover from IBM and the rest of the world.

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Richard Plinston
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NOT the Santa Cruz Organisation (SCO)

Apart from NOT being the "Santa Cruz Organisation (SCO)" it is also NOT the 'Santa Cruz Operation' which was the original 'SCO'. SCO sold their Unix business (not Unix itself) to Caldera who renamed themselves "The SCO Group".

The litigation rights arising (allegedly) from TSCOG have been onsold to some other scumbags who are the ones raising this appeal.

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Mud sticks: Microsoft, Windows 10 and reputational damage

Richard Plinston
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Re: The author misunderstands Microsoft completely

> Older tools won't support new language constructs (say, latest C++), may generate worse code

Your claim was that developing for older OS would become "harder and harder". Here you claim "may generate worse code". NO IT WON'T. Older tools will continue to work in exactly the same way with the same level of 'hardness' and will generate exactly the same 'goodness' of code that they always did.

Whether newer tools are easier or better is entirely a different issue and was not your claim.

> and will not build code for latest Microsoft OS forcing one to rely on compatibility

And yet 'backwards compatibility' is often claimed as one of Windows best features. Your claim was about developing for older OSes, now you are trying to extend that to say developing for newer ones is harder, because it requires changes to suit the ever changing Microsoft OS, such as rewriting everything for UWP (after rewriting for .NET, for Silverlight, for Win8, for many other ...).

> Just take a look at those projects which refused to upgrade GCC

List some if you can.

Your claim was that Microsoft dropped support for older operating system versions in the new tools and that made developing for those older systems 'harder'. OSS tools generally don't drop support for older OS versions, so your example is completely spurious.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: The author misunderstands Microsoft completely

> One must note also that developing for old OS is becoming harder and harder.

Do you think that the old tools stop working?, or that it becomes more difficult to find things in their menus? Developing for the 'old OS' is exactly the same as it always was.

Your 'becoming harder and harder' is simply FUD.

> But it will make a lot of money for MS and whichever OEM will host the cloud.

Only until MS decides that it wants the revenue that the OEM has.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: The author misunderstands Microsoft completely

> Lose money on the short-term in order to try to gain long-term

They did that with Windows Phone: they gave a billion a year to Nokia and Nokia phone division still lost money every quarter. That loss is still continuing and does not look to ending.

> so that eventually users have to upgrade in order to run new software

Or will just keep running the old software that works (eg XP or 7).

> An app written to the new W8 UI will hardly run fine on W7, and eventually, ...

and an app written to W10 UWP will hardly run on W7 or W8.x. Eventually the developers will get pissed off with having to redevelop all their apps for every change in MS direction and will move on. Or will continue to develop stuff that runs on XP and W7 (and Win10).

Users buy computers to run applications not operating systems.

> The other answer is to move your products to the cloud,

At which point the 'PCs' are just terminals to the 'mainframes' which is what led to the Apple II, IBM-PC, and Mac being _Personal_ computers. The new 'PCs' fit in your pocket and outsold the old 'PCs' 300% last year.

> Microsoft will have worse Windows sales, but this hardly threaten their marketshare.

It threatens the OEMs. They will decide that their loyalty lies elsewhere.

> it gains a much more reliable revenue stream,

Or putting it another way: the customers gain another cost stream. They moved to PCs to save costs, they will move to the next 'PC' to save costs again. With Raspberry Pi and similar costing the price of a bottle of good wine, why pay that every month to MS for the subscriptions?

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Richard Plinston
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> what's up with intel only supporting W10 with their new processors?

You have that the wrong way around. Microsoft will only support Itel's new CPU features with Windows 10, and will not update Win7, 8 or 8.1 to take advantage of the new CPU features. Those will still run on the new CPUs, just not use the new bits.

Other operating systems: Linux, BSD, etc probably already support these.

It is Microsoft attempting FUD to claim that "only Windows 10" will run on those CPUs.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: Feed this into MS' Agile development methodology...

> "That and linux is copying Windows more and more closely all the time.

> Fixed that for you...

Thank you for clearing that up, I now realise, thanks to your correction, that such things like 'virtual screens' that I been using for a dozen years or more were originally copied from Windows 10.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: @ AC: "It works scarily well..." @ paply

>> "not too long after the Model T,

> had SWEET FA to do with the Model T's incarnation.

That is why he said: AFTER the Model T

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Richard Plinston
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Re: I'm a bit confused

> Windows 7, 8, 8.1 and 10 were killing the PC industry ... now Microsoft is making their own PCs ... screw-um

Microsoft has a policy of increasing its revenue by 'stealing' it from its 'partners'. It seems that it was trying to create an 'XPC' back in the early 00s. This was to have been a .NET based PowerPC (as the XBox was) that would dispense with the need to have OEMs taking all that hardware revenue. This failed to work correctly so they had to throw together Vista to have something to push out the door.

Yes, I think MS plan to have more hardware and become more like Apple with walled garden. They also want to be more like Google with collecting and selling data and advertising.

The OEMs will work out that their loyalty should not be tied entirely to Microsoft and will diversify to avoid being part of the 'death of the PC'.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: What screwed

> if they wanted to use a new UI, why not offer it as an option

MS asked some consultants why Windows Phone 7/8 was not selling as well as IDC analysts had said it would (overtake Apple phone by 2014). They reported that it was because the WP UI was 'unfamiliar'. The solution to that was to make that UI 'the most familiar on the planet' by forcing all Windows users to become familiar with it. Then they would _demand_ that same UI on their phones, laptops, tablets, IoT devices, TVs, watches, and everything else that Microsoft wanted to control.

The flaw in that plan was that WP sales weren't failing because of 'unfamiliarity', it was because MS kept dumping developers (WM6.x, WP7, Silverlight, and now WP8 ->'UWP') and so there were few 'killer' apps that were worth bragging about. WP couldn't find a market position that gave them any volume, and certainly not any profit. They didn't have the style, bling, or apps to take on the high end, they didn't have 'street cred' to be mid-range. They wound up in the bargain bin where they were 'good enough' to be just phones.

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2015 was the Year of the Linux Phone ... Nah, we're messing with you

Richard Plinston
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Re: All of this talk of Z80 programming...

> 1802 ... And it went into space!

Every one that was ever made should have gone there! ;-)

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Oracle v Google: Big Red wants $9.3bn in Java copyright damages

Richard Plinston
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Re: Obligatory Linux angle

> the entity holding the copyright for Unix would be able to shut Linux down. It is not entirely clear who that is at the moment - either Micro Focus International, or our old friends SCO.

You are quite wrong about that on many levels.

The SCO versus Novell case found that Novell did not pass any copyrights to SCO.

Whether Novell holds _any_ protectable copyrights in Unix has not been tested. Some versions of Unix were never registered when this was a requirement. Some versions of Unix were released to the public domain (v32). Much of the Unix code was developed by third parties who may, or may not, retain copyright over their own code, many of whom are probably not contactable.

And mainly: there is no Unix code in Linux.

As for the POSIX API, this is explicity allowed to be used, so no action there is possible.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: Java property of Oracle

> yet books are.

The 'API' of a book is: "Frontispiece, Dedication, Contents, Preface, Introduction, ... Index, Appendix" is that copyrightable to the extent of one publisher suing another for using those ?

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Richard Plinston
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Re: Java property of Oracle

> they are property of the first that made them

Things like println, substring, toString, toUpperCase, toLowerCase, trim existed before Java so Oracle should be sued for using those.

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Microsoft will rest its jackboot on Windows 7, 8.1's throat on new Intel CPUs in 2018 – not 2017

Richard Plinston
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Re: "One solution is to boot a Linux USB stick ..."

> What was Linux adoption rate 20 years ago? Less than 2%, 10 years ago? less than 2%, now that MSFT has literally turned their OS into spyware? Drumroll....less than 2%.

Linux was the core of more than a billion of the most personal of computers last year. This is about 3 time the total of PCs and laptops combined.

Rank . . OS . . . . . . . . . 2015 units . . share . . .2014 units . . share . . 2013 units . . share

1 (1) . . Android . . . . 1,168.8 M . . . . 81.3% . . 1,062 M . . . . . 78% . . . 767 M . . . . . 65%

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Flying Scotsman attacked by drone

Richard Plinston
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Re: It's science!

> Similarly, its Coanda that describes airflow over the convex top of a wing, not Bernoulli.

Actually both do. Coanda explains why the airflow follows the wing surface, until it breaks away. Bernoulli explains the air pressure distributions. Newton explains why the aircraft doesn't fall out of the sky.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: It's science!

> The Bernoulli equations are only applicable to flows of an incompressible fluid, i.e. water, and are not applicable compressible fluids such as air or other gasses.

You are confused.

It is not "incompressible fluid" but 'incompressible FLOW' that the Bernoulli equations apply to. The fluid may well be 'compressible', such as air, for the equations, and effects, to apply, but the simple equations only give correct answers when the fluid maintains the same density, or the change is very small.

Derivations work for compressible fluids where the density change is to be taken into account.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bernoulli%27s_principle

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Richard Plinston
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Re: Exkeewws me

> What exactly is a 'long ton'?

It is what they divide up into 'long weights' so that you can send the apprentice down to stores to get one.

or: 12% more than a short ton.

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Get lost, Windows 10 and Phone fans: No maps HERE on Microsoft's OS

Richard Plinston
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No longer work

"""This means the HERE apps will no longer work on devices running Windows 10 mobile after June 30, 2016."""

Which raises the question: 'What else won't work?'

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Hey Windows 10, weren't you supposed to help PC sales?

Richard Plinston
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Re: Improve PC Specs

> AFAIK the new CPUs will have instructions that require Win 10+ and won't run without it.

You are confused, but that may be because MS deliberately made you so. What is actually true is that the new CPUs will have extra instructions. Win10+ will use those extra instructions, but older Windows (or other OS) will run on the CPU without using the extra instructions.

The statement 'Windows 7, 8 won't support the new CPUs', means it won't support the new features, not that it won't run.

Intel would be insane to make incompatible CPUs that won't run as normal x86-64.

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Microsoft SQL Server for Linux is a brilliant and logical idea

Richard Plinston
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Re: Why

> Why not Maria or My? They're a couple of steps off toy databases,

Google runs on MySQL, it is hardly a toy.

No, wait, it converted to MariaDB after, and because of, Oracle bought My.

http://readwrite.com/2013/09/14/google-waves-goodbye-to-mysql-in-favor-of-mariadb

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Richard Plinston
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Re: You're forgetting one thing...

> MS SQL server will be available in 2017

Which is how you spell 'vaporware' ...

> with *limited* set of features.

and 'bait and switch'.

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Don't fear PC-pocalypse, Chromebooks, two-in-ones 'will save us'

Richard Plinston
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Re: "Do you think that keyboard/covers are not available for iPads (or Androids)?"

> But I'm not comparing to a Surface, I'm comparing to an MBA, a Thinkpad, or even a Chromebook.

Notebooks are crap for using where table surfaces or seats are unavailable or inappropriate. Device choice should match the usage requirements. You need to enter lots of data and centre your choices around that, others have different needs and don't need you to dictate what they should choose.

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Steve Ballmer: Get the Facts. I 'love' SQL Server on Linux

Richard Plinston
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Re: Windows on Linux next?

> Microsoft could have released a Linux distro ages ago. After all, they had Xenix.

When Microsoft sold Xenix to Santa Cruz Operation the deal included a 'no compete' clause which restricted MS to not releasing another *NIX operating system. Now that the descendants of SCO are finally dead they may be free of that contractual obligation*.

* not that it stopped them in the past.

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Behold, Microsoft SQL Server on Linux – and a firm screw-you to Oracle

Richard Plinston
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Re: PostgreSQL a better choice for transition from Oracle

> Postgre has been trying to take down Oracle since forever.

In what way? Has PostgreSQL been sending out trojans to Oracle sites?, running DOS attacks? Advertising heavily? Paying for 'grass roots' FUDsters? Firing torpedoes at catamarans?

I thought not.

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Microsoft adds 'non-security updates' to security patches

Richard Plinston
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Re: @ Richard Plinston -- Horse has left the barn on that one!

> one could reasonably argue that this is not a patent issue

No, it is a patent issue. Microsoft have the VFAT patent which is primarily about the forming of both long names and short names for, say, SD cards, and is the foundation for extorting fees from Android.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: Horse has left the barn on that one!

> Micros~1

Microsoft own patents on creating short names, in order to use Microsoft's technology you are required to purchase a licence.

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