* Posts by Richard Plinston

1301 posts • joined 27 Apr 2009

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Sysadmins, patch now: HTTP 'pings of death' are spewing across web to kill Windows servers

Richard Plinston
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> The Altair BASIC is a VERY skilled piece of code,

It is interesting that you claim this. The source code has never been released in spite of Bill saying that he would. So how are you able to make this claim? Bill's word ?

Bill worked on DEC machines at Harvard, including writing BASIC programs. It has been alleged that Bill had access to the source code of a public domain BASIC interpreter. The Intel 8080 development tools ran on DEC and it may be that Bill used the PD interpreter as the basis for Altair BASIC (and derivatives). Bill also never paid for the development time he used on DEC machines.

MIT also thought that they had purchased the interpreter but MS continued to resell it, or derivatives, to others.

> early Windows versions like 1.0 and 2.0 were pretty impressive on the crap PC hardware of the time.

But not as good as GEM which preceded those.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: Raise your hand...

> it's Apache that's been trending downwards for a number of years.

The slow decline in Apache's share is mirrored by Nginx's rise. In many cases this is because there is a performance incentive in using Nginx as a front-end proxy server to an Apache server farm where Nginx can satisfy simple page requests and load-balance requests back to the heavy lifting Apache servers. As Nginx is the front-end for the domain that is what is counted in the stats. There is no actual decline in Apache usage.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: Raise your hand...

> rather than placeholder pages held by domain speculators).

It has been claimed that Microsoft are 'buying' these placeholder sites by, at least, giving hosting sites free hardware and software to host those inactive domain names to boost the statistics. They may also be paying the host for this. The implication is that IIS is perfect for sites that have no content and no traffic.

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The Internet of things is great until it blows up your house

Richard Plinston
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> it becomes very appealing.

You misspelled 'appalling'.

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WHAT did GOOGLE do SO WRONG to get a slapping from the EU?

Richard Plinston
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Re: Microsoft was different

> You went to the wrong shops. I went to shops, bought hardware and built my own. No Windows tax there.

So did I, but that is not what 99% of people who wanted computers were capable of, or wanted to do.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: Microsoft was different

> Nobody was forced with a gun to buy a Windows PC

If you went into a shop the only products available were Windows PCs (maybe a few Apples at high prices). While you weren't forced to buy one, it was almost impossible to buy anything else.

This was because of several things:

Contracts: OEMs could buy Windows at a discount as long as they were 'loyal' and all computers of a particular model were built with Windows only. 'Per Box Pricing' was a variety of this, MS was paid even if a machine was made with another OS and no MS software at all. These made other systems more expensive.

Profit: Shops put on the shelf what made the most profit. Apple has a big markup. Windows machines gave opportunities for much profitable add-ons, plus upgrades and replacements.

Anti-competitive: Per box pricing was one. DR-DOS was killed because MS announced 'Advanced Server' and said that Novell Netware might not be supported in the next MS-DOS/Windows. Novell bought DRI so that it could offer DR-DOS clients for Netware if MS-DOS failed to work with Netware. MS 'conceded' by continuing to support it if Novell killed DR-DOS (and also DRI's Multiuser-DOS).

The reason that Linux, and derivitives ChromeOS and Android, have survived is that MS could not just buy them and kill them.

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Richard Plinston
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> The billions of desktops don't know how or don't desire to switch engines tomorrow, that's the problem!

Type "Search engine" into Google and it lists heir competitors. Wiki is top of the list then DuckDuckGo, Bing is 4th. They don't _desire_ to change because Google does a good enough job without being annoying and they don't care about your dogma.

> I know someone who, instead of putting in company name and adding a .com to the end will fire up Google and put in company name in there, every single time.

Not all company web sites are company.com. They may be .co.uk, or any of the many other .co or .com or even newer top levels. They may even not be 'company' but some combination. Google works this out and saves trying several arbitrary combinations which fail.

> Have you actually tried to write a competitor site and then tried to actually get it promoted?

Type "Search engine" into Google. Do they block competitors ?

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Cram my freebies into Android phones and get a royalty discount, says Microsoft (allegedly)

Richard Plinston
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> Maybe Google should have worried a bit about patents before convincing all the equipment manufacturers to pile in to Android. If they had, Microsoft would not have this leverage.

It was the manufacturers, and their customers, that decided to 'pile in to Android', Google just made it available. For example Amazon, Barnes and Noble, many smaller companies and even Nokia made Android phones that avoid Google and use their own services.

Barnes & Noble challenged Microsoft over the 'patents' and got a $300,000 'investment' from MS, apparently because they did not want them tested in court. The main 'patent' is on FAT32 long filenames which runs out soon. If an SD card is included it seems that it is easier for the manufacturer to pay a couple of dollars.

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Radio 4 and Dr K on programming languages: Full of Java Kool-Aid

Richard Plinston
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Re: C should have been described

> But making claims about "dominant" programming languages is nearly as bad.

Statistics about language 'popularity' are rather shonky. For example one set measures web accesses to language tutorials. They are measuring the 'popularity' based on the number of people who _don't_know_ the language. Another counts the number of adverts for programmers of particular languages. This bases 'popularity' on the number of empty desks.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: “Goto statement considred harmful”

> Any statement that can cause premature exit from a basic block complicates program flow of control, both for determining things like data flow, and for a human reader studying the code.

Exiting early from a block (return, continue, break) is relatively easy to understand in terms of logic flow, in exactly the same way that an if .. else .. divides code into bits being done and bits not being done, the limits of which are _within_ the block being examined.

The problem with a label is that the logic flow may be from any number of other blocks outside the blocks being examined. These may even have a bad effect on the stack.

> then you have longjmp.

The only time that I ever had to use this was when calling a file handling subroutine (part of a COBOL system that I think you were familiar with) from a C program. The subroutine managed to screw up the stack so I had to surround the call with a routine that did a longjmp back to itself.

> Unfortunately, not always true, due to the complex semantics of PERFORM in some conforming COBOL implementations. That's why we in fact recommend always putting PERFORMed code in a separate SECTION, rather than simply making it a paragraph - SECTION has stronger control-flow requirements.

In my experience having PERFOMs of SECTIONs is always a bad thing. From the late 60s when SECTIONs were used to overlay code the PERFORM could reload the overlay which resulted in very bad performance. The _only_ reason for PERFORMing a SECTION (or worse, using THRU) is to allow the use of GO TO. If GO TO is not allowed than there is no need for any procedure label to be a SECTION. This means that certain errors can be eliminated by using grep to ensure that there are no SECTION (in PD), no GO, no THRU. By reducing the range of constructs allowed reduces the complexity of understanding the code and reduces errors (by eliminating whole classes of errors).

> But that works precisely because it becomes an idiom and a reader can expect and recognize it.

What is more easily understood is what you are used to. The problem with idioms is that they may be skipped over because a casual glance may meet expectations, but there may be a subtle error. For example in COBOL with PERFORMed SECTIONs it is typical that they have an XX-EXIT label at the end to which an early exit is GO TO XX-EXIT. I have seen code where the wrong XX was used in an error condition that very rarely happened. In particular this was to the XX-EXIT above the SECTION so the code dropped back into the section read the next record and the program continued normally. Because it was an idiom no one had bothered to check if it was correct.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: “Goto statement considred harmful”

> GOTOs complicate the programmer's task by obscuring the logical structure of a program.

No. It is not the goto that complicates the program. When studying some program code the effect of a goto is perfectly obvious. It is clear what will happen. The problem is not there, but the goto requires a label as the target and that is where the problem lies.

When examining some code and there is a label it is not obvious at all where the logic paths lie. It is necessary to examine all the code within that label's scope to determine the logic that will access this label. This is especially a problem in COBOL where there are section labels and paragraph labels and these may be dropped through, performed and performed thru, or be subject to a goto in various combinations. In other languages, such as C, procedures and functions are different types of labels that cannot be dropped through or subject of a goto. Also, in languages like C, a label's scope is local to the function or procedure.

With COBOL, if there are gotos (actually GO) in the program code then, when examining a part of the code, every label must be searched for in the whole program to check whether it is the subject of a perform, a thru, or a go, or is within the range of a perform and is dropped through. By eliminating GO, PERFORM THRU, and SECTION labels the only constructs for accessing code out-of-line is the PERFORM and the CALL. This eliminates the complexity of determining the logic flow of the code, paragraph labels can be treated as if they were procedures (functions in C) with the only entry from a PERFORM and the return to that at the end of paragraph.

In some ways it is possible to evaluate the complexity of program code by counting the number of labels and the number of ways each label can be accessed. With C, a function name can only be accessed by invoking it so each name has a complexity of 1. With labels (including case labels) they can be accessed by a goto or from a switch or by being dropped into (because of there being no break before it), therefore every label adds a complexity factor of 2.

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Microsoft dumps ARM for Atom with cut-price Surface 3 fondleslab

Richard Plinston
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Re: The usual

> Rare is part of Microsoft.

Rare is _now_ part of Microsoft because they bought them to get the software.

> Link for the claimed 1970s "Hololens" invention? Or it didn't happen.

"Hololens" is just the latest iteration of technology that started to be developed and used in the 1970s. Being able to see the real world while having an image projected into a local space via goggles and having a computer keep track of your movement and hand gestures has been around since then. It was just horrifically expensive.

"""What you see isn't a holograph or a hologram; it's a projection - but it's being projected onto holographically printed lenses, which lets Microsoft produce very cheaply the extremely complex lenses that turn the projection into the 3D image you see. """

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Richard Plinston
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Re: The usual

>> "Pretty much everything Microsoft does now is late, not quite finished, derivative - albeit with the odd good idea, and an expensive copy of something better already out there."

> Like HoloLens for instance? Or Kinect?

I am not sure if you are supporting the original poster or attempting to provide counter examples.

Kinect is a product licencesd from an Israeli company with software written by Rare in the UK. I remember from New Scientist in the 70s reading about headsets that projected 3D images that merged with reality. In that particular article it was used to study computer generated images of blood flow around heart valves. Obviously the technology has improved over the 30 years or so but Hololens is just another step.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: MS is trapped

> On seeing what was going on, the idiot then in charge at DEC (Bob Palmer), let MS get away with it,

Microsoft paid DEC a settlement of 65 to 100 million.

""" "Why the Fastest Chip Didn't Win" (Business Week, April 28, 1997) states that when Digital engineers noticed the similarities between VMS and NT, they brought their observations to senior management. Rather than suing, Digital cut a deal with Microsoft. In the summer of 1995, Digital announced Affinity for OpenVMS, a program that required Microsoft to help train Digital NT technicians, help promote NT and Open-VMS as two pieces of a three-tiered client/server networking solution, and promise to maintain NT support for the Alpha processor. Microsoft also paid Digital between 65 million and 100 million dollars."""

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Richard Plinston
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Re: @h4rm0ny - @h4rm0ny - Great news!

> MS is not preventing manufacturers from selling ARM devices with undisablable Secure Boot anywhere I'm aware of

Your lack of awareness is not relevant. Microsoft imposed a requirement on ARM based Windows RT that it have secure boot without the ability to turn it off.

"""However, ARM machines don't have this same stipulation. In fact, they do the reverse; Secure Boot is mandatory and permanent on ARM machines, including Surface."""

> a Windows version for Rasberry Pi

It is an 'Internet of Things' version of Windows 10. This is not really 'Windows'. While some form of 'Universal Apps' may run later the primary API of IoT is the Arduino Wiin API. There will be a subset of Win32. The current IoT version does not have a UI nor any display.

It is unlikely that the Pi will have a 'secure boot' for IoT.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: Wintel4evah?

> I guess nobody told the Raspberry Pi Foundation, eh?

Windows 10 for the Pi2 is just the IoT (Internet of Things) version.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: MS is trapped

> And when it did run, it was ported by the manufacturers of those other architectures, not by MS.

Actually Windows NT was initially written on and for MIPS (after i860 was evaluated and discarded) and was ported to x86. At the time the best x86 was the 386 and was probably 20MHz - too slow to be any use in development.

It is likely that manufacturers had a high involvement in porting to their chips but Microsoft was heavily involved.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: MS is trapped

> Surface Rt can actually be used to DO stuff on, not just view funny cat videos.

I am not sure why you think that iPads (and Androids) can't be used to "DO stuff". It must be because you know nothing about what is available for those. There are plenty of office apps (see especially WPS), code editors, even complete IDEs. What languages can you code, develop and run _on_ a Surface RT ? There are several for iPad and Android tablets.

Please do provide _evidence_ for your snear, list what you can DO on Surface RT that can't be done on iPad and Androids.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: MS is trapped

>> "Layers upon layers of ossified x86 code doomed any exit for Microsoft from the Intel platform a long time ago."

> You do realize that 99.9% of Windows code is C/C++ etc., not x86 assembly language, don't you?

That is not what was referred to. NT ran on many different architectures: MIPS, Alpha, Itanium, .. but that didn't solve the problem which is the thousands of applications that are locked to x86/x86-64.

> None of that makes any sense.

Your inability to make sense of it is not a constraint.

> Windows server made it on to several other architectures - MIPS, DEC Alpha, Power PC, Itanium.

But the applications did not. Office ran on Alpha in x86 emulation mode. Users don't buy machines to run the OS, they buy them to run their applications. Even in C/C++ it can be hard to get running on a different processor, and of course if the application is not open source (or in-house) then converting and recompiling is not even an option.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: MS is trapped

> MS didn't produce a feature-complete Windows for ARM. That might have been due to ARM's reduced power vs Intel, but it was a mistake.

It seems to me that RT/Windows On ARM achieved its objectives. At the time HP were about to release the ARM tablets running WebOS and Dell had ARM Android tablets. MS controls its OEMs via 'loyalty' discounts. If the go too far away from MS they get their discounts on all products removed. It worked for Netbooks when XP was brought back from the dead - Vista was never going to run.

With WOA MS could wave 'discounts' at WebOS and make it go away, and at Dell to kill their Android projects. Job done so now RT can fade away.

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Android lands on Microsoft's money-machine island fortress

Richard Plinston
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Re: No License Fee?

> If it is Android then Microsoft will still want its license fee, for all those "patent infringements".

The only significant 'patent' is for FAT32 long file names. This is only used when SD cards are required to be compatible with other devices. No SD card, no 'patent', no payment to MS. (which is why Nexus devices don't have SD slots).

> In fact it will probably cost more than the free Windows 10.

The 'free' Windows 10 does not apply to businesses. They will still pay for Software Assurance and could get Windows 10 through that. It is also only 'free' for the _supported_ life of the _device_ (after the first year). If the device is out of warranty than it is no longer a supported device and is no longer 'free'. It also does not apply to XP, let alone any Embedded versions.

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Is this what Windows XP's death throes look like?

Richard Plinston
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Re: @Cristopher Lane

> Vendors MD 'also, we cannot sell them other high margin products, like office, which is where we make most of our money'

Exactly. Nor do they bring the Linux computers back after several months complaining that they run now dead slow so that they can be sold re-installation, upgrades, or faster replacements.

Retailers and support make far more money selling Windows machines. They also get a higher margin and more revenue from Apple sales.

Sell a Linux computer and the purchaser won't be seen for several years. Sell Windows and there will be repeat business and much profit ( = cost to the user).

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Richard Plinston
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Re: He who laughs last, laughs best.

> For March, StatCounter recorded 124 countries with GNU/Linux exceeding Vista in data for all OSs they track..

It should be noted that StatCounter does not record 'site visits' as such it records browsers that allow Statcounter's JavaScript to gather user information, log it, and send the data to the collection site.

https://statcounter.com/how-it-works/

I run NoScript and thus none of my Linux machines are recorded in the stats. It seems likely that Linux users are more likely to block these types of recorders and to visit sites that do not run statcounter, while the average Windows user will not even know what Javascript is let alone that their site visits are being monitored.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: Windows 365?

> Do some research Peter. This is public domain information and you are, once again, utterly wrong.

What you seem to ignore is the parts of the announcements that qualify the 'free' with 'for the supported life of the device' or perhaps just the word 'supported'. You are eager to equate this to 'forever' or to 'the life of the OS'.

Microsoft haven't explained this qualification yet, and have stated they will do so sometime in the future. It seems likely that 'the _supported_ life of the _device_' equates to the manufacturer's warranty period.

Microsoft have also stated that 'versions' will become a thing of the past as they move to 'Windows as a service' with continual feature enhancements along with updates. The 'as a service' implies very strongly a subscription model like 'Office as a service 365'.

After the first year after release it may well be that machines outside their warranty will require annual subscriptions to keep it running.

Doing some research shows that Microsoft acknowledges that they haven't explained what will happen nor the phrases they have used. You have made up your mind what Microsoft will do in spite of them not deciding it yet, or at least not telling us.

Were you the one that was insisting that Windows Phone 7 phones would get an upgrade to WP8 ? or that Surface tablets would be cheap ?

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Richard Plinston
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Re: Oh wow...

> The cause, a new GPU. The BIOS had mapped the GPU into a 64-address space

So you swapped the video card, the BIOS misconfigured it and Linux had nowhere to output a visible message !

Would Windows have done a better job of this ?

"Regular users" don't usually swap around the guts of the machine.

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Google takes ARC Welder to Android, grafts on Windows, OS X

Richard Plinston
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Re: This is VERY good and important

> I'd have preferred it if it worked on the desktop myself.

www.bluestacks.com/

Or the AMD derivative of this:

http://community.amd.com/community/amd-blogs/amd/blog/2012/09/27/announcing-amd-appzone-player-powered-by-bluestacks

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Richard Plinston
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Re: Yawn

> Is there a single phone app I'd like on my PC? Android or iOS? Can't think of one.

Your admitted inability to think is not a constraint on others.

> How long until <strikeout>Google</strikeout> Microsoft* sinks too much effort into these crap app ecosystems and falls into irrelevancy?

*reference to WP6.x, WP7, WP8, Metro, Windows RT, ... app ecosystems.

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Richard Plinston
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> It's Dalvik on Android 4.4.

http://www.cultofandroid.com/52210/enable-art-android-4-4-kitkat/

"""In Android 4.4 KitKat, Google has introduced a new experimental runtime — ART a.k.a Android Run Time. Being in nascent stages, Google did not replace Android’s current runtime — Dalvik — with ART. Instead, it has hidden it under Settings for developers and tinkerers to play around with and probably get some feedback. """

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South Korea to NUKE Microsoft ActiveX

Richard Plinston
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Re: If you thought the browser wars didn't really matter...

> Oh come on. Netscape lost because it was a) much more expensive than "free"

Netscape was available for free to most users. Businesses were expected to pay for it. Many Windows OEMs loaded Netscape, along with other software, onto their machine - until Microsoft gave an extra $5 discount for _not_ loading it.

IE was 'free' at Spyglass's expense. When Microsoft asked Spyglass to write a browser for them (which became IE) they were to be paid for doing so by a cut of $5 for every copy _sold_. By giving it away for 'free' (though it was part of the price for Windows) they avoided paying Spyglass. Spyglass sued and won a small settlement but had meanwhile gone broke.

Microsoft kills their 'partners' as well as their competition.

> and b) it became increasingly shit as the iterations went on. Communicator was dire.

Microsoft paid sites to incorporate incompatibilities into their pages. They bought Frontpage and then 'enhanced' it to produce Microsoftisms that only worked well in IE. It wasn't Netscape that went 'shit' it was web sites. Now users are paying for that by being still locked into old versions of IE.

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Microsoft's Project Spartan browser is HERE (unless you build apps or run VMs, that is)

Richard Plinston
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Re: Poor compliance with web standards

> Really? I don't remember anything being locked down (if you could remember a URL).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MSN

The original issue of Win95 did not include a general purpose browser but a set of apps which only accessed MSN. (though OEMs did include 3rd party software).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Microsoft_Plus!

"""This was the first version of Plus! and included Space Cadet Pinball, the Internet Jumpstart Kit (which was the introduction of Internet Explorer 1.0) ..."""

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Richard Plinston
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Re: Poor compliance with web standards

>> "To get access to the internet the later !Plus Pack was required (or 3rd party networking)."

> That is incorrect. It depended which version of Windows 95 was installed. The standard OEM version I purchased on release from a distributor for our self-built kit contained Mosaic and stack. Crude full Internet/WWW right out of box without MSN or Plus Pack.

In what way is 'Mosaic and stack' not "3rd party" ? It may be that the OEM added these to Win95 for you but they were not from Microsoft. OEMs often include additional software, called shovelware. There is no 'standard OEM', they get a master from Microsoft and then create their own CD install/recovery disks and include additional software.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: Poor compliance with web standards

> IE was, for many years, the web standard. Compliance was good by definition. You might not like that web standard. Many people didn't, which is why they created new web standards which specifically were different than the existing web standard (IE).

You obviously have no idea about history.

The World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) was founded in 1994 and produced a set of standards. IE was released in late 1995 when there there were several other browsers in use.

Microsoft was a late comer to the internet and tried to ignore it. With Windows 95 they included access to the (original) MSN which was a closed network only for Windows 95 users. To get access to the internet the later !Plus Pack was required (or 3rd party networking).

IE always had non-standard 'features' and was never 'the standard'.

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Metro app meets Windows 10. A Microsoft win? Maybe after a little improvement

Richard Plinston
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Re: Only techies care about phone OS

> I don't. However, when they don't write them

MS has full control over their app store for WP. While Microsoft has apps on Google's Play Store (which you claimed wouldn't happen) it is less likely the MS would allow Google to put apps on WP app store. MS has already banned any other browser.

> and MS write them instead and then Google disbarr the MS app from their APIs, something is going on. Did MS's app "break the terms of service"? Yes, because it did not include Youtube ads because Google refused to allow MS access to their ad API.

Yes, what is going on is that MS want to piggy back on YouTube without ads - without the ads that pay for the service. WP users can still access using a browser (the only one allowed) and can even get a YouTube app that drives that.

> Not that you ever admit it, but this did actually happen with the Youtube app. Twice.

I don't know why you think that I have to 'admit' it. It is what _I_ said. The MS app was not barred because it was Microsoft (which was your claim) but because it broke the terms of service.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: Only techies care about phone OS

> Google won't even supply a WP version of Youtube,

I don't know why you think that Google should write Windows Phone apps.

WP phones and RT can access Youtube quite well - using a browser. What happened is MS wrote a Youtube app for WP that broke the Youtube terms of service, so, like every other user that disobeyed the terms of service, using that app was banned. But they can still access with the browser. MS could change its app to conform to the terms.

It seems that there still is a Youtube app for Windows Phone that is not banned, though it seems to view them in the browser.

http://www.windowsphone.com/en-us/store/app/youtube/dcbb1ac6-a89a-df11-a490-00237de2db9e

> let alone allow MS to use their app store.

MS _is_ using the app store. They have several apps available there such as Office, OneNote, Outlook, OneDrive, Lync, ...

What you probably meant is that Windows Phones can't access the app store (why would they at the moment). They certainly could do if they contracted with Google to install Google services on the phones. WP users _can_ access Play Store (and Google Earth and maps etc) using a browser.

So your assertions are simply wrong.

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Richard Plinston
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> The idea of identical code working on all platforms has been tried so often and just doesn't work. Pick the example of your choice, HTML and the web? Java? CP/M? Unix?

I have written COBOL systems that ran unchanged on CP/M (MP/M actually it was multiuser), DOS/Windows, Unix, Linux, and OS/2.

I have written Python/Glade/SQLite applications that ran unchanged on Windows, Linux and Nokia 800/850 (tablet/phone) several years ago.

> But this is about three (or four, counting the XBone) platforms that MS have absolute control over.

Which is nowhere near _all_ platforms. I suspect that many will be dissuaded from using this _because_ "MS have absolute control".

> That hasn't been done before.

... to your knowledge.

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Richard Plinston
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> a single project that runs on all supported platforms, which will include Windows 10 PCs, tablets, phones, Xbox One and Windows 10 IoT (Internet of Things).

Is the 'Windows 10' transitive ? It seems that these apps will not run on Windows 8 phones, nor on Windows RT (which won't get Windows 10 update). While some Windows Phone 8 phones may be able to update to Windows 10 (phone) it has been said that not all will do so. This means that, yet again, [some] Windows Phones will be left behind as new apps will not run on their devices*.

* WM6.x could not run WP7 apps, WP7 could not run WP8 apps.

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Microsoft and Oracle are 'not your trusted friends', public sector bods

Richard Plinston
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Re: So give them the boot - use open source

> Nope - they both built MS based systems in house that successfully met the design specs and were used for some time. And they both worked well bar a couple of 'network' failures.

While it is true that they had network failures with the Windows servers, it is not true that they 'met the design specs':

"""He claimed that Windows typically has larger latency times than that of Linux, and noted that in 2009, the London Stock Exchange tried and abandoned Windows servers."""

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Richard Plinston
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> To produce a custom OS clearly cost IBM bundles,

IBM spend millions on software development every year. They produce many products, not just one OS or one project.

> it took OVER TEN YEARS for Munich to migrate so it would clearly have cost Munich bundles more to migrate than it would to upgrade

That is your uninformed assertion, but your world is not one that reality invades. Given they were on NT then they would have faced several migrations: to XP, to Vista, to Windows 7, to 8 and 10; to Office 2003, 2007, 2010, 2012, ...

> and Munich continue to have to run 2 environments at a significant on-going cost.

Yes, they still have to run archaic legacy applications that, because they are closed source propriety, require to be replaced.

Your notion that just one platform is the solution to all problems shows that you are naive.

> Munich are investigating to options to reverse course upgrade to current Microsoft products.

One new deputy major was 'investigating'.

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Richard Plinston
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> For instance Munich Council spent itro €50 million (subsidised by IBM) just getting a working Open Source stack. Then about €12 million migrating (more than the cost of updating their original licences!).

More of Richto/TheVogon/AC unsupported nonsense.

There is _no_ support for the claim that IBM spent 50million (previously it was claimed to be 30million) on Munich. It may be that IBM has spent 30 or 50million in total on developing open source and Linux for all uses, such as developing it for their mainframes, and having their other software run on it (WebSphere, etc). But they make billions in revenue from having done that. You are attempting to conflate all that development to just one project.

The claim of 12million for migrating comes from a report by HP paid for by Microsoft and has been shown to be complete nonsense. For example it includes costs for new machines every 3 years or so when the reality is that Munich reused the machines that it originally ran NT on. For example it adds costs for re-training to use Linux and ignores any retraining costs to go from NT to XP to Vista to Win7 to Win8 and also to go from Office 2003 to 2007, 2010.

There was _no_ reference to the _actual_ costs that Munich paid, they just invented stuff and claimed it cost more.

> 20% of their stuff - so now have to support both environments.

There are some legacy applications which occasionally need to used. These cannot be converted because they are propriety and the developers either have gone out of business or will not convert them. An excellent example of why closed source applications should be replaced to avoid lock in.

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Hey, Microsoft, we can call Windows 10 apps anything we like – you're NOT OUR REAL MOM

Richard Plinston
Silver badge

Re: Please, please market it this way MS

> our new world of confusion and non compatability,

It is not a 'new world'. Windows Mobile 6.5 apps (and devices) were killed off by Windows Phone 7. WP7 apps (and devices) were mostly killed off by WP8 (though there was some conversion which may have worked). Now 'Windows apps' are different again.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: Terminology

> 'Script' had to wait for the 80's...

Before that they were job card packs.

> Didn't right many 'programs'..

It that recovering a program that went 'belly up' ?

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ARM plans to win 20 per cent of the server market by the year 2020

Richard Plinston
Silver badge

Re: The problem is still the lack of a decent common hardware plattform

> Windows already runs on Arm though,

Windows CE, Windows Phone, Windows RT run on ARM. Not quite server grade are they. But that is not particularly important, what MS would need is MS-SQL Server, IIS, Active Directory and much else to run on ARM.

With Linux it is already there.

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NZ used XKEYSCORE to spy on World Trade Org election emails

Richard Plinston
Silver badge

> World Trade Organisation elections ... Wellington intercepted emails

And was able to do this because all emails in the world are routed via a couple of lumps of rock in the South Pacific.

It seems more likely that an American government organization intercepted the emails as they went through the network in USA and made them available to other countries. Whether those emails were actually intercepted and whether NZ GCSB viewed them seems to be entirely speculative.

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PIRATES and THIEVES to get Windows 10 as BOOTY

Richard Plinston
Silver badge

Re: "It is free for the _supported_ lifetime of the device"

I am unsurprised that you posted this anonymously.

> the sheer mangling of the English language in an attempt to make an announcement look sinister

The 'mangling' was adding back the word that Microsoft had deliberately used but was dropped by posters. If it looks 'sinister' then that is what was in the Microsoft statement.

> swollen, self-appointed authoritas

And then you, as a "swollen, self-appointed authoritas", make a definitive statement as if you have a direct brain-feed from Gates. In fact there has been a statement from Microsoft about this:

"""Microsoft's Jim Alkove reiterated the free upgrade for consumers, but a set of guiding asterisks (**) led to the following clarification:

**Details on our device’ supported lifetime policy will be shared at a later time.

"""

http://winsupersite.com/windows-10/microsoft-not-yet-ready-describe-what-supported-lifetime-device-means-windows-10

> There is no subscription model.

Microsoft does have subscription models: 'Software Assurance', 'Office 365'. The question is whether Microsoft's statement that the business plan is 'Windows as a service' will require subscriptions in the same way as 'Office as a service' does.

"""Myerson made it semi-clear in a statement on the Windows blog yesterday…

We'll deliver new features when they're ready, not waiting for the next major release. We think of Windows as a Service -- in fact, one could reasonably think of Windows in the next couple of years as one of the largest Internet services on the planet. And just like any Internet service, the idea of asking 'What version are you on?' will cease to make sense." """

http://winsupersite.com/windows-10/windows-service-windows-10-versionless-windows#comment-740411

Microsoft appear to be changing their revenue model from charging for new versions of Windows every few years to a service model where the increments are small and frequent, and the revenue will also be small and frequent.

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Richard Plinston
Silver badge

Re: "It is free for the _supported_ lifetime of the device"

> I'm still supporting a 386, and 486,

You won't be worrying about what the Windows 10 supported lifetime is for those.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: Warning

> you'll have to find another hooky copy of win7.

And all the documents that you wrote with Office 2016 will not open in the hooky copy of Office 2007.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: What kind of free is this?

> it's free for the lifetime of the device.

What Microsoft said is: "It is free for the _supported_ lifetime of the device".

The device is supported by the manufacturer during its warranty period. Once the warranty has expired then it will no longer be free and, most likely, a subscription will be required.

> Most consumers get Windows for 'free' anyway, with their purchase of hardware

Completely wrong. It may be bundled into the price of the computer but it is _not_ free. Except for recent small devices the OEM cost of Windows is part of the cost of building the computer and this increases the selling price.

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IDC downgrades sales outlook for PCs AND tablets

Richard Plinston
Silver badge

>> a fair indication that Microsoft want everyone to be on some sort of 'Software Assurance' plan with an annual, or monthly, fee. What else would 'WAAS' be?

> An attempt to reduce their support base by having run _one_ version of Windows.

... with a monthly or annual fee.

> And your Secure Boot FUD is littered everywhere and provably false. You keep posting it though.

Don't just make vague assertions, get an actual quote and _prove_ it is false.

As the last comment that I made mentioning secure boot was over a year ago (I checked) I don't know where you got the 'keep posting it'. And that one certainly was not 'provably false', nor are any others.

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Richard Plinston
Silver badge

>> 'Free update' does _NOT_ apply to businesses

> Yes it does. It just doesn't apply to Enterprise editions.

So, you do agree that your blanket 'free in first year, even from Win7 ' was not correct, it is not everyone.

Also, existing Software Assurance customers will still continue to pay and will get the upgrade within that "outside of this offer".

> Also, I don't believe you about "weasel words".

I seems to me that: "Myerson also branded Windows 10 as a "Windows-As-A-Service" platform" is a fair indication that Microsoft want everyone to be on some sort of 'Software Assurance' plan with an annual, or monthly, fee. What else would 'WAAS' be?

> making up lies ... I can easily go find examples from these very forums if necessary.

Fine, do so. They may be things that you don't like, that doesn't make them lies.

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Pathetic PC sales just cost us a BILLION dollars, cries Intel

Richard Plinston
Silver badge

Re: Mobile and Communications segment saw its revenues plummet by 85.3 per cent.

> Intel HAS an ARM licence.

Intel _used_ to have an ARM licence when they bought XScale, but they sold XScale to Marvel.

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