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* Posts by Richard Plinston

1188 posts • joined 27 Apr 2009

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UK.gov's Open Source switch WON'T get rid of Microsoft, y'know

Richard Plinston
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> lol, that's utter rubbish

Yet another round of TheVogon misinformation is posted.

> over 25% of their users still had to use Windows

They don't 'use Windows', they sometimes use legacy software which happens to only run on Windows. Most of those 25% only have to do that occasionally and run their Linux most of the time.

> The only independent numbers (from HP)

That report was _not_ independent, it was paid for by Microsoft. It has been discredited on several grounds, one is that they did not talk to Munich but just made up their own numbers, and mainly they included the costs of buying new computers at frequent intervals when Munich did not buy any.

> it has cost them €30 million more

No it hasn't. Munich know exactly what the figures were and there was a significant saving.

> more than upgrading to a current Microsoft stack for a whole world of pain -

There was no world of pain, and probably less than upgrading successively to XP (they were using NT and 2000), then to 7 and then to 8 as well as the upgrades and retraining to Office 2007, then to 2010 and so on.

I am afraid that it is your post that is "utter rubbish", as all your posts are.

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Man FOUND ON MOON denies lunar alien interface

Richard Plinston
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Re: @Richard Plinston

> none of whom can claim a "'right'" to state an opinion

You have completely missed the point: _everyone_ has the 'right' to express whatever opinions they wish to. You are attempting to control others 'rights' while you do not have any superior 'rights' to do that.

> What you don't seem to realize is that science is not some sort of "democratic" process

I didn't even mention science, nor democratic process.

> There are two facts and only two facts in this matter:

That may be your opinion (stated as fact) but there may be other relevant facts, you just don't know of them.

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Richard Plinston
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> Buzz Aldrin may have stood on the surface of the moon, but neither that nor anything else gives him the right to state that as fact. That's pure opinion, conjecture... and the hard evidence is completely against it.

And what is it that you have done to be able to claim a superior 'right' to state your opinion as if it were fact.

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The Windows 8 dilemma: Win 8 or wait for 9?

Richard Plinston
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Re: Time for some truly revolutionary GUIs?

> Why voice control is not the goal of the next level of PC and tablet UI design I don't know

I had an OS/2 box nearly 20 years ago that had voice input as a standard feature.

Microsoft had Speech API (SAPI) since 1995:

"""The first version of SAPI was released in 1995, and was supported on Windows 95 and Windows NT 3.51. """

Voice control was the goal of the _previous_ (x2 or x3) level of PCs.

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Google de-listing of BBC article 'broke UK and Euro public interest laws' - So WHY do it?

Richard Plinston
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Re: not illegal

> removal of links is an attempt to hide certain points of view

Removal of a link does _not_ hide the point of view. The article is still accessible. It can still be found via other search criteria and other links.

> if Google removed the term "Facebook" from its index,

Searching for a person's name, or other content, would still show links to Facebook.

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Microsoft's anti-malware crusade knackers '4 MILLION' No-IP users

Richard Plinston
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> I avoid Windows as much as possible.

> I cannot connect to my home server

Job done!!

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Average chump in 'bank' phone scam is STUNG for £10,000 - study

Richard Plinston
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Re: Nice!

> All cold-callers read from scripts, so are virtually indistinguishable from pre-recorded auto-diallers,

Many years ago (decades) there was an infamous carpet cleaning business in this country that had one of the early auto dial-response systems that made a call then listened for a response, such as may occur if someone actually wanted their services. Whenever they called I put the phone on top of the radio so that it filled up their tape.

I do believe in free speech. Callers are allowed to say what they want for as long as they wish, but I am equally free to not listen to it. They can talk to my desk as long as they are paying for the call. It stops them annoying someone else for a few minutes.

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Freeze, Glasshole! Stop spying on me at the ATM

Richard Plinston
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Re: I prefer the infra-red camera trick

> The most recent key pressed glows brightest.

I have always rested my hand flat on the keypad with all fingers on keys (and my other hand, or wallet, covering). It is then possible to press the appropriate keys with minimum finger movement, and no heat difference.

I do see people using a single finger to poke the keys which makes it easy to read their number from metres away.

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Russian gov to dump x86, bake own 64-bit ARM chips - reports

Richard Plinston
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Re: Don't believe everything you read. OTOH...

> and before that, made the Rolls Royce jet engine as good as anything the USA had.

Partly because many of the USA jet engines* were license built British designs. The Soviets neglected to get a license.

* J31, J33, J42, J65, ...

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Microsoft hopes for FONDLESLAB FRENZY as Surface Pro 3 debuts

Richard Plinston
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Re: proceeded to review their samples based on their normal laptop usage

> then perhaps something like the surface might enable them to have one less device

Actually Microsoft wants you have one _more_ device. They want you to keep your desktop (and buy Win8.1 and Office) _and_ buy a Surface. (and buy a Windows Phone).

That was the point of Win8 Metro: to make the UI 'the most familiar' so that you _demand_ that on your tablet and phone.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: 3rd Time Lucky for MS?

> I remember hearing this in the 1990s from an ICL marketing colleague about the PC-TV.

The origin of those was that Bill Gates had seen a survey that had most houses have the TV and the computer in the same room and concluded that people wanted a combined device.

Actually the reason for having them in the same room is that they didn't have a 22 room mansion like Gates had.

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Microsoft poised to take Web server crown from Apache

Richard Plinston
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Re: Dick Plinston John Sanders Richard Plinston Levent Zillyboy Chris Wareham

> So, it's a webserver, just not an ordinary 'general purpose' webserver. And you said that before? No. You claimed it was a webserver. So now it's a special webserver that doesn't serve webpages unless it generates them itself?

That is correct, it serves webpages that it generates all by itself, it serves them directly back to the client. It is a 'specialized' webserver. One that does one particular job with a particular set of pages that it does not allow to be changed, such as may occur if they were disk files that could be edited. It does not do anything that is unrelated to Samba, it leaves that to other programs.

It is not "special". Your misreading and misrepresentation shows up your lack of language skills, or perhaps you just don't know the difference. It is not 'special' (it is specialized) because there are dozens or hundreds of programs that are webservers in their own right and don't need Apache or port 80 to serve web pages. I can write one in a few minutes.

> BTW, you do realise that DHTML is a group of technologies that produces the dynamic webpages,

"DHTML" is merely a collection of languages and ways of using them, it is not a server. It is not the _only_ way of having dynamic webpages, it can be dynamic _without_ specifically being DHTML.

From : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dynamic_HTML

"""By contrast, a dynamic web page is a broader concept, covering any web page generated differently for each user, load occurrence, or specific variable values."""

> usually by scripting in something like JavaScript, but doesn't include the tech to serve them to clients.

SWAT is probably written in C. Javascript is usually on the client side rather than the server. SWAT _does_ include the program code to send the pages to the client, it is not hard to do. It does not require any other program to do that for it. But then I doubt that you could recognise the difference.

> No webserver and no presentation of the dynamic pages.

It is a webserver. It does present the pages to the user.

> 'special' ones to go with the 'special' webserver?

'Specialised', do try and learn something, even if it just the ability to read some words without changing them.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: Dick Plinston John Sanders Richard Plinston Levent Zillyboy Chris Wareham

> ".....SWAT _is_ a webserver ....." No it is not. Create an HTML page such as index.html in the same path as the SWAT executable, kill your webserver, then go to your client and try accessing it with say http://servername:901/usr/local/samba/swat/index.html - it will not work.

You are a complete fuckwit.

SWAT does not send static html pages (such as files containing html), it sends dynamic html pages that it generates itself. It does not need to be a general purpose webserver to be an actual webserver.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: Dick Plinston John Sanders Richard Plinston Levent Zillyboy Chris Wareham

> The whole process is run as a webpage (<= big hint there) over http by httpd.

The whole process is run as a webpage over http by WHICHEVER WEBSERVER you connect to. SWAT _is_ a webserver and does not need, nor use, any other httpd server or webserver.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: Dick Plinston John Sanders Richard Plinston Levent Zillyboy Chris Wareham

> ".....Webmin will listen on port 10000 for http requests...." Webmin? LOL! Go have a look, buried in the menus of Webmin you will find - tada! - SWAT!

You will find a _link_ to swat, if it is installed. That link will contain the swat port number. so when that link is clicked in the browser the connection goes directly to swat (via xinetd and given the config allows it). It does _NOT_ go via port 80, 'httpd' or webmin.

> you still need a webserver of some form to handle the http requests,

SWAT _is_ a webserver (on port 901)

Webmin _is_ a webserver (on port 10000)

CUPS _is_ a webserver (on port 631)

You _do_not_need_ a webserver on port 80, nor 'httpd', to access those webservers. There is no need to run a general purpose webserver, such as Apache, in order to run those specialised webservers.

> and for Linux it is Apache that is the most popular choice, therefore it is Apache which will unquestioningly send requests on to port 901

_NO_IT_DOES_NOT_. Xinetd sends the requests to swat on port 901.

> and the potential security hole of SWAT if you haven't got your security sorted.

Only if is _deliberately_ installed AND _deliberately_ configured to be a) active, b) open to other machines, c) set so non-root users logins can write (if that is actually possible).

> That is handled at the setup stage by http, on port 80 (or whatever port your deluded AC buddy wants to set for http) and THEN handed over to port 901 for the transfer of data.

_NO_IT_IS_NOT_. An http request on port 901 _DOES_NOT_ go to port 80. Xinetd sends it to the webserver configured on port 901, swat is that webserver.

What you are confused by is that any webserver, or indeed any server, on any port will respond to a *connection request* by assigning an _unused_ port number to continue the conversation on until the request is completed.

So, for example, Apache will get a *connection request* on port 80 and then may assign, say, port 56382 to that conversation which will then be used while all the parts of the web pages are sent.

Swat will get *connection requests* on port 901 (without Apache, httpd, or port 80 involved at all) and will also assign an unused port to the conversation, maybe 41307.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: AC Dick Plinston John Sanders Richard Plinston Levent Zillyboy Chris Wareham

> "....That's why you can configure web servers to listen for http on port 9999 if you wanted to, and nothing on port 80, and if you specify http://domain.org:9999 then you'll get web pages." Only if your web service is running, you moron. No httpd and it doesn't matter what port you have specified.

No. You are completely _wrong_. You do not need anything listening on port 80, nor do you need 'httpd' nor Apache. I can write a program, or configure one, to listen on port 9999 and have that serve 'web pages' (or anything else that I wish) in response to http requests made on port 9999 _without_ there being any httpd program in the system.

And that is because xinetd does the work, not Apache.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: Dick Plinston John Sanders Richard Plinston Levent Zillyboy Chris Wareham

> if I turn off my webserver it doesn't matter what port you add on the end of the URL in a browser, you will not see any webpages, because there is nothing on port 80 to answer the request and push the connection to port 901.

That is completely and absolutely untrue. SWAT, for example, will listen on port 901 and respond to that regardless of the presence or absence of 'httpd'. Putting the port number on the URL _DOES_NOT_ send the request on port 80, nor does it send it to 'httpd', Xinetd routes it based on /etc/services (and depending on limitations in the appropriate firewall and config files) directly to the service, which in this case is swat.

Yes, I have been confused by your claims, but that is because I understand how it actually works, and not some mish-mash of your half-learned misunderstandings.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: Dick Plinston John Sanders Richard Plinston Levent Zillyboy Chris Wareham

> You do realise that all webservers, by default, listen on port 80 for http requests and then pass the request to any port you add on the end if the URL? Oh, you didn't? Please do point out the process you think is able to handle the http requests other than the process httpd?

Yes, a webserver, such as Apache or Nginx or many others, will listen on port 80 and usually also on port 443. You then confuse this with _all_ possible http servers. CUPS will listen on port 631 for http requests, Webmin will listen on port 10000 for http requests. These are all servers and will respond to http requests on the ports they listen to.

If a port number is added to an http request (such as https://localhost:10000) is _DOES_NOT_ go to port 80, nor to Apache, it goes to Webmin server directly (if it is running) or goes nowhere (if no server is listening on port 10000), it does not go to Apache or Nginx.

You have a fundamental misunderstanding of how http works. It is not 'http' that directs connections to a particular webserver, it is the port number. It is the browser that adds the default port numbers of 80 and 443 (for http and https) if no port is added. If a port number is added to the URL and Apache is not listening on that port then Apache does not see it. Apache is _not_ doing the routing.

If you were to actually look at an /etc/service file (which apparently you had not even heard of before) you would see the list of possible services where the port number is matched to service. This is _not_ handled by Apache, but by a lower level service: inetd or xinetd.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xinetd.

> Please do point out the process you think is able to handle the http requests other than the process httpd?

Xinetd handles all connection requests and passes them out, as defined in the /etc/services and xinetd.d files to the appropriate server. This may be Apache for port 80 or CUPS for port 631 or ftpd for port 21.

How hard is that ?

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Richard Plinston
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Re: Dick Plinston John Sanders Richard Plinston Levent Zillyboy Chris Wareham

> ".....Apache _never_ exposes port 901...." No, web requests via http are never handled by Apache.... DUH! If you go read the Linux (and many UNIX) pages on setting up SWAT you will often see a line 'add and entry for swat in /etc/services

You are obviously unaware that different services are handled by different programs and you have never even looked at /etc/services. Connections on ports 80 and 443 are passed to Apache (if installed and activated), port 21 is passed to the ftp server (if installed and activated), port 3306 goes to MySQL, etc.

That is _why_ there are different ports, because there are different services provided by different programs. inetd is the program that receives the connections and passes them to the services based on the /etc/services configuration and on the various matching xinetd.d configuration files.

It happens that connections on port 901 are _not_ passed to Apache but go to SWAT if it has been installed _and_enabled_.

If you can't even understand this fundamental level of networking then you should not be posting at all.

> but several Linux distributions do not install SWAT by default ... several Linux distros DO install it by default?

1) SWAT is only ever installed _if_Samba_is_installed_. So when Samba is installed if may, or may not, install SWAT as well (which is the point made by the Samba team). So to prove your point you need to find out if Samba is installed _by_default_ and then determine if this also installs SWAT _by_default_.

2) NONE of them _activate_ it by default, which was your claim.

3-5) NONE of them configure it in demo-mode, open to the web, or able to write without a non-root login, which were also your claims.

You are _way_ out of your depth.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: Richard Plinston Levent Zillyboy Chris Wareham

> "....The Red Mist is blocking your reading skills...." The penguin feathers are blocking yours. Wise up - no OS is free of security issues, not even Linux. Blind denial only helps those trying to crack your systems.

I have never denied that OSes have security issues. I am denying that your claims about Apache and port 901, about 'SWAT active by default', about 'no password login by default', are completely untrue.

>As you admitted, you had to go check a server you set up for a client

I did check the server, but it was _not_ one that I set up, there was never the implication that I had done so. In fact I mentioned 'the installer' as a third party.

> as you didn't know if the proper security for SWAT had been set - not exactly a ringing endorsement.

It did not need to be 'set'. It was inactive by default in spite of your bogus claims.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: Richard Plinston Levent Zillyboy Chris Wareham

> You asked for distros with it bundled. And it was both bundled and active by default in older versions, as I showed with RHEL AS4, which you were unable to disprove

You do not seem to understand that there is a distinction between 'in the repository' and 'installed and active by default'. Here is actually what I asked:

"""So are some games "bundled into distros". Show me the distros that install SAMBA and SWAT "by default". Show me which distros enable these "by default"."""

I did disprove your claim that it was 'active by default'. More to the point you have not established _any_ of your claims at all, especially where you conflate Apache and SWAT. The configuration file was 'as installed' as shown by the file date/time. Whether the selection box for installing it was clicked by the installer or was already clicked would require me to go through the install process, which you obviously have never done.

> (on a client's box you admit you didn't even know the security profile of for a very well-known security issue - not reassuring as to your admin credentials). Yet you want to insist you have disproven the point? Male bovine manure.

It is not a machine that I administer, nor do I administer _any_ Samba sites , nor is Samba active on any machine that I do administer, so the 'issue' is of no concern to me or the client.

> ".....SWAT is _not_ part of Apache...." I never said it was,

Yes you did, you frequently conflated Apache and SWAT: you claimed: """ and the fact that activating Apache exposes port 901 """. Port 901 is the port for SWAT. AND """(b) turning on Apache without checking DOES leave port 901 open for an attack if the right SWAT security steps have not been taken. """ AND """ Many admins do not realise that leaving the default Apache install running allows anyone with the IP address of the system the ability to go directly to that [Samba] configuration file,"""

> As you admitted, you had to go check a server you set up for a client as you didn't know if the proper security for SWAT had been set - not exactly a ringing endorsement.

It is called 'gathering evidence', something that you seem unfamiliar with.

> And you're still trying to deny (a) it is an extensively documented issue,

What _is_ 'extensively documented', even in the one link that you supplied, is that SWAT is _NOT_ activated by default, despite your repeated bogus claims.

> and (b) turning on Apache without checking DOES leave port 901 open for an attack if the right SWAT security steps have not been taken.

Once again you conflate Apache with SWAT when they have no connection. Apache _never_ opens port 901 (unless explicitly configured for some unknown reason).

> I said it was common for admins to leave the Apache web service running without realising the possible security holes, including the SWAT/SAMBA issue.

And again your attribute Apache as somehow installing and activating Samba and SWAT when they are unrelated products (that both happen to be independently accessed by a browser).

> ".....SWAT is related to Apache (not true, but you continue to claim it)...." Stop lying just because you lost the argument. I never said that at all,

Yes you did, and repeatedly claimed it again, see your (b) above.

> You couldn't even prove this for RH AS4, let alone all the other even older distros, but you want to claim you have proven otherwise?

You have repeatedly made the claim, it is for you to prove. You are just waving aside the evidence, even the evidence in the link that you did provide.

> "....* SWAT, by default, requires no logging in (not true)...." Another lie, please post to where I said that.

Here it is: """ ".....SWAT requires logging in....." Only if you configure it to. """ and here: """On SAMBA (Linux and UNIX) the smb.conf file is presented out to the World as a web page on TCP port 901 via the SWAT without any protecting login mechanism and with permissions allowing anyone to edit the file."""

> "......SWAT, by default, can be accessed from other machines (not true)...." Not what I said, not even close. What I said was an insecure configuration of SWAT would allow any system with LAN access to the target server to go to the SWAT web page on port 901 and edit the SAMBA config.

What you said was: """the smb.conf file is presented out to the World as a web page on TCP port 901 via the SWAT without any protecting login mechanism and with permissions allowing anyone to edit the file.""". Which is and always was completely untrue.

And here, from that message, is another example of your conflating Apache and SWAT: """ I'm guessing by your response you did not realise what toys get exposed as soon as you turn on Apache?"""

If you want your rantings to be accepted then you need to _prove_ that in some distant past SWAT was installed by default, activate by default, in demo mode by default, was accessible beyond the localhost by default, and in any way was part of Apache. Good luck with _any_ of that.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: John Sanders Richard Plinston Levent Zillyboy Chris Wareham

> and the fact that activating Apache exposes port 901

Apache _never_ exposes port 901 (unless someone explicity adds it to the config). You appear to be unable to distinguish between the http protocol and Apache as a web server for ports 80 and 443. There are many ports and each may have its own distinct server program.

> (http://www.samba.org/samba/history/security.html).

An actual link. Wonder of wonders!!

However, NONE of that support _any_ of your claims. They do refer to 'Clickjacking' and 'Cross-Site Request Forgery' which are the result of security issues in the _browser_client_, such as Internet Explorer.

If you had actually read any of the reports you may have LEARNED SOMETHING because you would have found:

""" Note that SWAT must be enabled in order for this

== vulnerability to be exploitable. By default, SWAT

== is *not* enabled on a Samba install.

"""

So even the links that you offer as support show your claims are wrong.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: Richard Plinston Levent Zillyboy Chris Wareham

> So first you admit SWAT and SAMBA are in the distros, even though you said they never were....

You appear to be unable to distinguish between your claim of "being installed and enabled by default" (which I said didn't happen) and being "in the distros".

> so either they came with it by default OR their admins were not as skilled as you the Linux community likes to think they are,

It is entirely possible that an admin (probably a click and pray Windows admin) could incompetently configure SWAT and/or deliberately put it into demo mode. That is whole lot different than your bogus claim that merely having Apache installed opens port 901 so that anyone on the net can change the Samba configuration - which is several layers completely wrong.

> So you can't say if it was bundled and enabled by default,

Your reading skills are lacking. I _did_ say it wasn't enabled by default.

> but then you can say xinetd.conf hasn't been configured since install (how?) - more than a little denial going on, it seems.

The /etc/xinetd.d/swat file - which is the appropriate configuration file has the date and time of the install, and is the same as all the other config files created during install and not edited since.

> more than a little denial going on, it seems.

There may be denial going on, but it is on your part, you seem unable to accept that your are clueless about the subject even to the point of mixing up Apache and SWAT.

> you're just adding to my argument that (a) the Apache webserver exposes security holes many Linux admins don't even know about

SWAT is _not_ part of Apache, nor does it normally run under Apache, they are completely products with different installs and different configurations. If you cant even get this right then you shouldn't be allowed near a computer.

> (you yourself don't even know if your RHEL4 client was so configured, you had to go check - not good security practice),

The Red Mist is blocking your reading skills. It is my client's RHEL4 server, not my machine. I always look for _evidence_ to back up my statements which you seem to fail to do, merely saying 'Google for it' or claiming 'denial' for not accepting your unsupported assertions.

As for claiming that 'checking is not good security practice' I am sure that the rest of the forum will have a good laugh over that one.

> I suggest YOU go do some Web reading on SAMBA

And once again you merely wave the 'go and search' because, presumably, you can't actually find an actual reference that supports your claims yet again.

The layers that you have to show are your bogus claims:

* SWAT is related to Apache (not true, but you continue to claim it)

* SWAT is installed _and_enabled_ by default (not true)

* SWAT, by default, requires no logging in (not true)

* SWAT, by default, can be accessed from other machines (not true)

* SWAT allows non-root login to change the Samba config (it does not)

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Richard Plinston
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Re: Richard Plinston Levent Zillyboy Chris Wareham

>> ".....Show me the distros that install SAMBA and SWAT "by default"....

> there are plenty of distros still containing both by default

Many distros have Samba and SWAT in their repos, your claim was that they _installed_ and _enabled_ these "by default", and that this allowed them to be accessed from the internet without a login.

> Yahoogle of "linux distro swat samba"

And if you had done that you would not have found anything to back up your claims. For example for Ubuntu Server is tells you that to get Samba and SWAT it is necessary to:

sudo apt-get instal samba smbfs samba-doc swat xinetd

sudo update-inetd --enable 'swat'

sudo dpkg-reconfigure xinetd

and then enter of change the configuration. How does this match your _bogus_ "by default" ?

> And if I recall correctly, both SAMBA and SWAT were bundled in and active when deployed in even enterprise distros at least as late as RHEL AS 4

As it happens I have a client that still runs a RHEL4 box or two that I can access from my desk. They do not use Samba or SWAT but it is installed. Whether this was 'by default' or was selected from the installation list I can't say but it definitely is _not_ active. The xinet.d config file is exactly as installed and has 'disable = yes' and 'only_from = localhost' so it is _not_ active and even if it was activated it is not accessible from outside that machine. Your uninformed claims are completely bogus.

You may also note, if you read anything about the product, that logging in as anything other than root will limit the facilities and _prevent_ updating the Samba configuration. The plain text password issue is easily overcome by using stunnel (or running under Apache with https). As the default is localhost only then this is not an issue.

>>> Many admins do not realise that leaving the default Apache install running allows anyone with the IP address of the system the ability to go directly to that configuration file

That is completely uninformed and bogus. Apache does _not_ install SWAT or v.v. they are completely independent unless deliberately configured.

>>> you did not realise what toys get exposed as soon as you turn on Apache?

Not only bogus and misleading, but also a bare-faced lie.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: Richard Plinston Levent Zillyboy Chris Wareham

> ".....SWAT requires logging in....." Only if you configure it to.

I just did a clean install from the repo and this is the config file as installed. First SWAT is disabled by default, then it will only run from the localhost, it will not allow connection from any other machine.

The only way to avoid it asking for a logon is to change to demo mode using a runtime option:

Usage: swat [OPTION...]

-a, --disable-authentication Disable authentication (demo mode)

# default: off

# description: SWAT is the Samba Web Admin Tool. Use swat \

# to configure your Samba server. To use SWAT, \

# connect to port 901 with your favorite web browser.

service swat

{

port = 901

socket_type = stream

wait = no

only_from = 127.0.0.1

user = root

server = /usr/sbin/swat

log_on_failure += USERID

disable = yes

}

> ".....SWAT has little to do with Apache....." True, it is just the two are often bundled into distros and installed (and enabled) by default.

So are some games "bundled into distros". Show me the distros that install SAMBA and SWAT "by default". Show me which distros enable these "by default".

The Ubuntu documentation shows that neither SAMBA nor SWAT are installed by default and must be installed by sudo apt-get. SWAT is not enabled and must, at least, have the 'disable = yes' changed to 'no'.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: Levent Zillyboy Chris Wareham

> SWAT without any protecting login mechanism

SWAT requires logging in.

"""Access to SWAT will prompt for a logon. If you log onto SWAT as any non-root user, the only permission allowed is to view certain aspects of configuration """

> leaving the default Apache install running ... as soon as you turn on Apache?

SWAT has little to do with Apache. It does not need to use Apache or vice versa. It is possible to configure Apache to run SWAT as a cgi but this is unnecessary and is not normal on Linux or Unix. If this is done then it doesn't use port 901.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: Nick Kew Deja vu again

> many IIS servers run on corporate intranets and therefore are not visible on the Web at all, making IIS's real share of the webserver market even larger than the Netcraft survey suggest.

All my corporate clients run Apache on Red Hat for their internal web servers and for the web facing server.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: Majority has decided what is the eb server of choice....

> ... for parked domains

Exactly. If you want a web server for sites with no content and no traffic then IIS is perfect. You can also, apparently, get it paid for by MS.

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Microsoft C# chief Hejlsberg: Our open-source Apache pick will clear the FUD

Richard Plinston
Silver badge

Re: It is not a cancer

IDC says: "adoption of its OS was up 91 per cent, with global share rising from 2.6 per cent to 3.3 per cent last year."

Exactly. That was last year Q3. Since then it has dropped to 2.9% and then to 2.0%.

> Primarily of Asha and other legacy OS devices.

Yes, but also WP.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: It is not a cancer

> Actually there is no month Year on Year in the last 24 months where WP wasn't the fastest growing mobile platform.

And yet Lumia (at least 90% of WP) has had a _falling_ market share.

"""Lumia sales Q3 of 2013 . . . . . 8.8 M units . . . . 3.3% market share of all smarpthones

Lumia sales Q4 of 2013 . . . . . 8.2 M units . . . . 2.9% market share of all smartphones

Lumia sales Q1 of 2014 . . . . . 5.6 M units . . . . 2.0% market share of all smartphones

Source: TomiAhonen Consulting Analysis 3 June 2014, based on manufacturer and industry data"""

Even Nokia admit to falling sales:

http://www.wpcentral.com/nokia-posts-q1-interim-report-handset-sales-down-30-percent

> Nokia already paid it back and the license fees

"""However with the increase in Lumia sales (4.4 Million) the tides have turned, seeing that the amount of software royalties Nokia has to pay has for the first time exceeded the 250 Million quarterly payout by Microsoft''''

This implies that the fees were $55.00 per phone. Others say that it was $15.00.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: It is not a cancer - Microsoft is the real cancer

> Ignorance. In reality C# use is ahead of C and Python:

> https://sites.google.com/site/pydatalog/pypl/PyPL-PopularitY-of-Programming-Language

"""created by analyzing how often language tutorials are searched on Google"""

So it is ahead on a scale that is measured by counting accesses by people who don't know it.

Note this access of tutorials does not include those that are taught formally, such as in courses. It does not include those that have already learned the language. It does not cater for tutorials that are poor or incomplete which would have those being discarded and another search being made.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: Like Linux....

> ... you do realize the MSFT was one of the largest contributors to the Linux kernel at one point?*

It _was_ a top contributor for one month a few years ago. All on the 'contributions' were related to Microsoft virtualization so that Linux could run on Windows or vv.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: It is not a cancer

> Windows Phone is already ahead of IOS in 25 countries.

That happened in _one_ month when Nokia _shipped_ more phones than Apple to those countries because a) Apple did not ship to those countries or b) it was the month before Apple announced their new phone and shipments were delayed until the new production was up and running.

> And is still the fastest growing mobile platform year on year.

It was for _one_ quarter many months ago (2012Q3 - 2013Q3) and that was because in 2012Q3 WP7 had been killed dead and WP8 wasn't in production. Since 2013Q3 WP has been in decline and 2014Q1 unit figures were below 2013Q1.

> With the imminent release of the Lumia 930 - which imo is their first really comparable high end platform - and the recent reduction in license cost to zero, I think that's near certain to continue...

Most of Windows Phone has effectively been zero cost, or indeed negative, with MS paying a $billion per year to Nokia to cover licence fees. Nokia never sold enough to pay that back.

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'Hashtag' added to the OED – but # isn't a hash, pound, nor number sign

Richard Plinston
Silver badge

Re: Pound sign

> The current most accepted theory is that it was originally "steorling" (Old English meaning roughly "a thing of a star") and comes from the AngloNorman coin which had a star on it.

"""The British numismatist Philip Grierson points out that the stars appeared on Norman pennies only for the single three-year issue from 1077-1080 (the Normans changed coin designs every three years), and that the star-theory thus fails on linguistic grounds:"""

While you, and others, may claim 'most accepted', it is most likely a convergence of both explanations.

The 92.5% silver purity is exactly that of the Easterlings (or Osterlings) coins used by the Hanse (or Hanseatic League). As this was much more widely used, and for far longer, many centuries, it is likely that this brought the term into much more widespread use than the earlier more limited one.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: Pound sign

> one tower pound (approx 350g) of Sterling Silver pennies.

And the 'Sterling' in silver comes from 'easterling' ie the trader men from the east (the Baltic), the Hanseatic League, this was the most reliable source of quality silver (and steel).

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Richard Plinston
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Re: Pound sign

> an older symbol used for the pound weight measure.

The symbol used for pound weight seems to have originated from a stylized lb* written in chalk. The octothorpe is only an approximation of this but seems to have been adopted for convenience, probably when typewriters started including it.

> swaps position with the sterling £

The best explanation for the use of 'sterling' for money or silver seems to originate as 'easterling' referring to traders from the east, ie the Hansa League in the Baltic, who had the best reputation for quality and reliability as well as the best steel, money and silver.

* lb is abbreviation for libra pondo

2
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Missed it? Here's the latest on Microsoft's mobile strategy

Richard Plinston
Silver badge

> Windows Phone year on year market share % is still growing faster than any other platform.

You continue to peddle this. While it was true for one quarter many months ago*, since then the unit sales and market share are in decline, as acknowledged by Nokia themselves.

The latest figures for 2014Q1 at http://communities-dominate.blogs.com/ have:

3 (3) . . Windows Phone . . 6.2 M . . . 2.2 % . . . . . ( 2.9 %) . . . . . . Samsung, Nokia

Where the bracketed figure is previous quarter. The unit sales is less than 2013Q1.

The most interesting figure is that Nokia smartphones unit sales (_not_ including Asha) is greater than the WP figure. This apparently is Android X phones of around 1 million. Even this doesn't leave many WP from the other makers.

10 (9) . Nokia (Microsoft) . 7.1 M . . . 2.5% . . . . . . . ( 2.9% ) . . . . . . Windows, Android

* Your claim is probably the single 2012Q3 to 2013Q3 gain than shows growth because in 2012Q3 WP7 had just been dumped and the WP8 phones were not available so the numbers were very low, while in 2013Q3 they were flogging off the last of the unsold WP7s and were offering the 520 at less than cost price.

But you will still repeat your nonsense claims and will not update to reality.

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Swiftkey: We just want to be free - Apple didn't bump us

Richard Plinston
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Re: Commentard Fail

> at least it keeps 'em off the streets

You do understand the concept of 'mobile' don't you ?

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Apple is KILLING OFF BONKING, cries mobe research dude

Richard Plinston
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Re: Re. Sync per Bonk

> One possible use would be ...

Panasonic use NFC to connect an Android phone to their latest cameras over WiFi so the phone acts as a remote control and/or can send photos directly to a PC or to an internet site (Facebook or a cloud service).

I am also looking at using NFC in a client's warehouse for recording worker and job activities.

0
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Jellybean dominates Play, still seated atop rising KitKat

Richard Plinston
Silver badge

> the consequences of Samsung phones no longer being Android phones should be fairly self-evident in terms of Android sales.

We have an actual example of a company relying on the brand name and switching the OS wholesale, there is no need to draw imaginary conclusions from speculation.

Previously, "the vast majority of consumers either [bought] an iPhone or a [Nokia] phone". Nokia changed the OS and went from number one to almost out of the top ten.

In the unlikely case that Samsung changed suddenly from mainly Android to mainly Tizen without an Android compatibility layer (ie could not run Android apps) then the most likely outcome is that it would have little to no effect on Android sales, buyers would just change to another of the many brands.

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Microsoft's NEW OS now runs on HALF of ALL desktop PCs

Richard Plinston
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Re: Cue...

> All *nix are more or less POSIX compliant systems. Sure, there are some differences among them - but they want to be POSIX compliant. That's mean they have a lot of similar API. The same way Linux is not Unix but looks very much alike. And BSD is another Unix clone.

You are confused. There are various 'BSDs' but they originate from the actual AT&T UNIX codebase and, in fact, much code developed by Berkeley was incorporated into AT&T Unix. It is not a 'clone'.

POSIX defines the _Application_Programming_Interface_ (plus other stuff), not the 'kernel interface'. In practice this means that a set of C libraries can provide the API for the system to be compliant and yet the OS kernels can be completely different. Even Windows NT/2000 could claim to be POSIX compliant.

This does not mean that it would be easy for Google to replace Linux with Windows, or even with one of the BSDs, especially as Android does not rely on or claim POSIX compliance and only implements a subset via the Bionic C library.

Your claim that Google could do something (that you have never done) easier than doing something else (which you have also not done) is completely spurious:

"""it would be easier for Google to replace say the Linux kernel with a *BSD one, that replacing the Java VM with something else"""

Especially as you rely, incompetently, on POSIX and that Google a) never used a 'Java VM' it used Dalvik and b) it _is_ replacing Dalvik with ART.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: Cue...

> It's funny that you say Android is Linux, but Dalvik is not Java. Something is something only when you like it?

Do try and read what I wrote instead of incompetently making up what you prefer to use as an argument.

Android is 'based on Linux', Android is a 'Linux OS', Android is a 'Linux distro'. It is you who wants to conflate 'Linux' (the kernel) with 'Android' (the OS) and then argue that it is not. I have not seen anyone claim that Android is _only_ Linux.

You may also note, if you care to read more closely, that I said that the 'Dalvik VM' is not a 'Java VM'. This is obviously a technical issue that is quite beyond you. That the Java language can be compiled to produce byte code for the Dalvik VM does not make Dalvik a 'Java VM'. Many languages can be used to create byte code for either.

> Everything could be compiled into Java byte code.

It could be, but then it could be compiled into Python byte code, or (as some Java language compilers do) directly into machine code. In fact the main difference between Dalvik and ART is that Dalvik runs the JIT compiler at run time as required and ART runs it at install time and thus the 'VM' actually only sees machine code.

> When I wrote "services" I meant OS services. Not all OS services are implemented at the kernel level. It's funny, for example, that Linux fanboys still complain that Windows moved the GUI "services" from user mode to kernel mode. Not everything an OS offers is in the kernel, and an OS is far more than its kernel. But probably you never wrote an OS so you can't understand, especially if you've been brainwashed by Linux worshippers.

I am not sure that it is "Linux fanboys" that 'complain' about the GUI services being moved into kernel mode, it is more likely that security experts did, or Windows users. It does make it more difficult to change the GUI to something that they might prefer.

> an OS is far more than its kernel

I am not sure what your point is, I certainly didn't say it wasn't. But an OS does not have to encompass a specific set of services. Many of the largest computers do not have a GUI. In fact even Windows Server can be installed without a GUI. It happens that the Linux kernel does not include GUI services so that the user can choose which they want, or none if just a text interface, or no UI, is required. That means that applications access the GUI services via libraries, such as GTK or Qt, or via the API provided by Android, or Mono, or .NET.

In fact with most languages services are almost always accessed via libraries that are layered on top of the kernel.

> Windows RT and Win32 are both built on the same kernel, sure - but that doesn't mean they are the same OS.

And that means they are both 'Windows OSes' that have different GUIs (and some other services), just as, say, Android and Ubuntu are both 'Linux OSes' that have different GUIs (and other services). Actually, in some cases, you can run a version of Ubuntu on an Android base, using just the one kernel, and have both GUIs.

"""Both Ubuntu and Android run at the same time on the mobile device, without emulation or virtualization, and without the need to reboot. This is possible because both Ubuntu and Android share the same kernel (Linux).[2]"""

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Richard Plinston
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Re: Cue...

> You got used to call "Linux" whatever use a Linux as a kernel,

Where did you get that from ? I call the kernel 'Linux' and if is is a complete OS (plus lots of other stuff) I call it a 'Linux distro'. Android is a 'Linux distro'.

> but that doesn't make an OS "Linux"

The kernel makes it a 'Linux OS' when other stuff is added. Android adds that other stuff, Fedora adds that other stuff.

> As I wrote, it would be easier for Google to replace say the Linux kernel with a *BSD one, that replacing the Java VM with something else - and most Android "services" needs you to call the Java API, not the kernel one.

You are confused even more. BSD has a different interface. While, say, KDE runs on both Linux distros and on various BSD distros that does not mean that the Linux KDE, or any other Linux program, will just run on BSD, a compatibility layer is required.

Android does not run a 'Java VM', it runs a completely different 'Dalvik VM'. It may happen that Java code can be compiled to run on the Dalvik VM. But then Scala code can also be compiled to run on the Dalvik VM. There is no reason that other languages can also run, eg Python, Lua, Javascript run on my Androids.

Contrary to your claim there _is_ a new VM developed by Google that can replace the current "Java VM" [sic] on Android 4. It is called ART (Android run Time).

> and most Android "services" needs you to call the Java API, not the kernel one.

Of course the services are not in the kernel. That is like using MS Office as a service is done by calling the Office API and not the Windows kernel. Similar Google services may also run on other OSes, such as Windows, and again they are not accessed by calling the Windows kernel.

On Android the Google services are optional and are not part of the OS. For example Amazon has Android (though with a different name) but no Google Services, though they could be added by the user.

> Win32 API and WinRT API are enough different to make them two different operating systems - just sharing a name because the maker is the same.

And yet both Win 8 and Win RT are said by MS to be built on the same kernel, just as Android and Fedora are built on the same Linux kernel.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: I'm not sure they'll care!

> Both Windows 7 and Windows 8 help the MS bottom line

While the revenue to MS from _new_ machines may be similar it is less likely that Win7 users will provide additional revenue to MS in the near future. The plan for Win8 is to get users to buy from Windows store for both Windows applications and Metro apps, to _demand_ Metro UI on their phones and tablets and to move to a new world domination by MS.

It always has been that the biggest threat to MS revenues is old versions of Windows (except Vista of course).

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Richard Plinston
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Re: Its not suprising..(Just use Classic Shell!)

> It will make everything look and feel like Windows 7

Then there is no point in spending the money to buy, test, validate all the applications (and buy new versions) and install Win8 only to change it to be like 7.

Just stay with 7.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: Its not suprising..

>> "Oh, and driving a manual vehicle

> it is however more of an intellectual challenge than clicking on big square icons instead of little square icons.

In this country one can get a driving license for automatic gearbox cars or a different one that covers all cars (but the test must be sat in a manual car). The reason is that to drive a manual car requires _training_ that is different from automatics.

And that is the point, Windows 8 will require _training_, or time for self-training. Not only because it looks different but because all the automatic muscle reactions that have been learned now cause confusion and new ones must be relearned. This is time and cost.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: Windows 8, the triumph of marketing over common sence.

> in order to leverage that dominance they decided to totally change the GUI and make the desktop GUI like their new phone GUI. How does that even begin to make sense?

Windows Phone was not selling and consultants told them that the reason was because the WP UI was 'unfamiliar'. They put Metro on Windows 8, without the option, in order to make Metro 'the most familiar UI'. Then, according to the consultants, users would be _demanding_ phones and tablets with that familiar UI. Once more they would be back on the path to world domination.

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Richard Plinston
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Re: Cue...

>> Android is not Linux

> An OS is not the kernel alone.

You are confused, mainly about what 'Linus' is. Linux is the kernel that is used by all 'Linux' distros. Android has a Linux kernel, SUSE has a Linux kernel, Fedora has a Linux kernel, .. and they are all the same kernel. So Android _is_ a Linux distro (plus a lot of other stuff), exactly the same as Ubuntu is Linux plus a lot of other stuff.

Android happens to run a Dalvik VM but it is not the only way of running apps. For example there is C4droid which provdies C and C++ and a GNU environment.

The difference is much the same as, say, Windows 7 and Windows RT. If you think they are both 'Windows' then Android and Ubuntu and both 'Linux'.

6
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Google: Grab our TOOL if you want your search query quashed

Richard Plinston
Silver badge

Searchable ?

Is Google going to make these requests searchable ?

Web sites may want to know who is requesting removal of their search results.

0
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The British are coming! The British are coming! And they're buying Surface fondleslabs

Richard Plinston
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Re: Shipments

> I stopped reading when it mentioned shipments.

When MS took a $900million writedown on its stock of Surface last year it was said that this was at $150 per unit. So they had 6 million units left over that weren't selling. At the time they were not selling these through distributors, now they are. It may be that this growth in _shipments_ is a mix of original and generation 2 Surface into distributors at knock-down prices in order to get headlines.

Much like the unrepeated 'WP beats Apple in 25 countries' was _shipments_, mostly to places that Apple didn't ship to, and when Apple was 'between products' with a new one due.

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