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* Posts by Chris Wareham

638 posts • joined 1 May 2007

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Video of US journalist 'beheading' pulled from social media

Chris Wareham
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Re: Western morality @Chris W

Arnold, if the Palestinians or Hezbollah in Lebanon give up then the Israeli government will just green light more settlements on the West Bank, more ethnic cleansing of Jerusalem and carry on treating the populace of the Palestinian territories as a source of cheap labour. The wonderful Israeli PM and his cohorts have made it clear that they are not interested in a peace settlement, and will continue stalling as long as the US doles out yet more money to prop up their military.

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Chris Wareham
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Re: Recognise the voice?

It's a London accent, don't they all sound like Michael Caine down there?

Only Sarf of the river.

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Simian selfie stupidity: Macaque snap sparks Wikipedia copyright row

Chris Wareham
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In some parts of the music industry, the owner of the equipment used in a production has part ownership of the end result. Wonder if its similar here?

Never heard of that, and I've had a record contract. Are you getting confused with "points", where sometimes a producer will take a percentage of royalties rather than a fixed payment for working on a recording?

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Facebook wants Linux networking as good as FreeBSD

Chris Wareham
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Re: Simpler Solution?

FreeBSD may have superior network performance, but Linux has superior performance in most other metrics that matter for a kernel.

No it doesn't. Linux is trying to be all things to all people, and just isn't optimised for the some of the key workloads that Facebook has. FreeBSD on the other hand has benefited from being a bit niche, in that companies that use it extensively - such as Yahoo! - have been able to get tweaks into it that do target those workloads.

FreeBSD has also benefited from not having so many developers and commercial entities pulling it in so many directions, nor has it suffered from well meaning developers screwing up performance with things like "O(1) algorithms everywhere" that ignored the bigger picture by creating bottlenecks at higher level abstractions.

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Google pulls Gaza games from Play store

Chris Wareham
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Having his knackers crushed by Vinnie Jones was cruel and unusual punishment as well.

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65 patches later and Java STILL breaks stuff

Chris Wareham
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I don't know enough about Java programming to understand why it's such an aggravation to update, keep older apps working with it, or generally just work

It's usually down to sheer incompetence on the part of the programmer. Java lowered the bar to programming in "enterprise" environments, so despite a lot of work on making Java idiot proof a bad programmer can still bugger things up. The classic example is using non-public APIs (stuff in the com.sun packages), which can render your application non-portable between versions. In the case of this article, it's third party libraries working at a low level and not conforming to the language specification. They relied on behaviour that wasn't guaranteed by the spec, and have now come unstuck as the previous behaviour changed.

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Chris Wareham
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Is it always fives? I'd assumed it was more to do with build numbers, so the skipped ones would be builds internal to Oracle.

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Chris Wareham
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If it breaks that abomination Groovy then it's a good thing.

If that sounds a bit harsh I should explain that I spent a year coding mostly for Groovy on Grails, having been hired as a Java developer. It scarred me.

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Meet Solaris 11.2, where SDN means 'Software-Defined Net profit'

Chris Wareham
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Re: Cobblers

He's into buying islands now. Boats are too small for his ego.

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EE rolls out London bus pay-by-bonk app – only fandoids need apply

Chris Wareham
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Re: NFC really hasn't caught on

UK has always lagged behind in banking tech.

Nope. For example , the first ATM's - designed, built and installed in the UK. If you want archaic banking, then try the US.

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Chris Wareham
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Re: Simple payments...

But London is its own little world.

No, it's just more in line with the rest of Europe where cashless payments for public transport are often the norm. Probably because London still has a largely state owned public transport system rather than one owned by subsidy guzzling, profit driven, multi-millionaire owned private firms.

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Plane grounded so cops can cuff semi-legless passenger

Chris Wareham
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Re: Why?

I can think of dozens of reasons to make an emergency landing, but a one legged woman isn't on that list. If people really felt they were in danger just take her fucking leg. It's not like she's going to pull a runner when you land.

According to the more detailed report I read in a newspaper this morning, her first bit of bad behaviour was to strike the small child in the seat next to her. The use of her prosthetic limb to threaten the cabin crew came on top of that. Not surprised they diverted the plane in order to get shot of her after all that.

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Call off the firing squad: HP grants stay of execution to OpenVMS

Chris Wareham
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Re: The whole 9 yards

Thanks folks - just ordered a copy of the Goldenberg book second hand from Amazon.

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Chris Wareham
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Re: hmm

VMS became POSIX'y enough to be able to run an X Window System - the first time I saw X on a VaxStation I assumed it was running Ultrix (Digital's version of Unix), and was quite surprised to find out it was running VMS. I'd always associated VMS with those little VT320 terminals and console only stuff from when I did an evening course at the local tech college.

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Chris Wareham
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Re: The whole 9 yards

I'd love to know a bit more about VMS internals. I'm a Unix type, so I'm wondering if there are the equivalents of things like Lion's commentary on the Unix source code, Bach's "Design of the Unix Operations System" or the BSD "Design and Implementation" book.

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Chris Wareham
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Re: The whole 9 yards

Even after the reworking to get from VMS to OpenVMS, which was mainly to port it from the Vax architecture, I'd imagine that there's an awful lot of code that would need extensive work to run on an ARM architecture.

Anyone know what languages VMS was principally written in? That could be another hurdle to porting if it's in archaic or non-mainstream languages.

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What's that? A PHP SPECIFICATION? Surely you're joking, Facebook

Chris Wareham
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Re: In my experience...

There isn't a language in existence which can protect you from crap developers.

No, but a well designed one makes it possible to write analysis tools that can point to areas of concern. It can encourage good encapsulation, through contracts (Java interfaces for example) that make refactoring easier. PHP in comparison encourages the writing of unlayered, ball of mud applications that defy cleaning up. Remove some of the restrictions of a language like Java or C#, and you end up with abominations like Groovy on Grails, where they ignore (and the proponents loudly applaud) static typing and decent encapsulation.

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Chris Wareham
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Re: @Robert Long 1

I've used everything from COBOL and C to Java and VB and I can't say that PHP is particularly difficult.

It's not particularly difficult to cobble something together with PHP and have it work, but it'll likely be a maintenance and security nightmare.

In my experience it's a lot easier than Java. We had two teams developing a small project, one in Java and one in PHP. The PHP team finished long before the Java team and I was surprised to find that the PHP solution was as fast and used a lot less machine resource to do it.

For a trivial project such as you describe, then PHP may get you something that just about works in shorter time (although a good Java developer shouldn't take long knocking something up with Spring). But for big projects a properly designed, statically typed language that allows for and has good tooling will always win. That typically means Java or C#.

I agree that there's a lack of consistency but then we have that in human langauges. I found it fairly trivial to remember the exceptions.

Human languages are far more complex and ambiguous than a programming language, so that's no excuse for PHP's awful flaws. As for remembering all or even a reasonable number of the "exceptions" - really? Go read http://phpsadness.com/, http://www.phpwtf.org/ and the "fractal of bad design" page. I suspect you don't even know how flaky the apps you write really are for end users if you think you can remember - and avoid - most of those flaws.

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Chris Wareham
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Re: @Robert Long 1

Er yes, Java - millions of ways of creating and accessing files, not one of which does exactly what you need it to do!

Err, the only way in the standard library that I can think of is the java.io.File class. If you referring to various Apache Commons libraries, then I suggest you stop using them until you've checked the code - most of the Commons stuff is terrible under the hood, and some of it (the Pool library for example) is hideous at the API level as well.

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Nice computers don’t need to go to the toilet, says Barclays

Chris Wareham
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Re: purchasing certain items together.

a Self Service machine can't be impressed, nay, amazed at my awesome combination of ingredients ... That said, nor has any human checkout staff

Except for the nice lady in Asda who, upon seeing that my entire shopping was a bottle of vodka and a tin of cat food, asked "is the vodka to wash away the taste love?".

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Chris Wareham
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Re: Errrr?

Have had all sorts of translations of my Surname. Bayliss is quite common but I've had Bevis from time to time. {no butthead jokes please}.

In my case it's Warren, Warham and - my favourite - Warhead. I can only assume the latter is because some of the people I have to give my name to are really cyborgs with a built in MicroSoft spell checker.

As for the Barclays plan to sack all the staff, I experienced an early trial of this at a branch in Chelsea. Had gone to do cash on collection for an item I'd bought on eBay, and was looking to get some cash out. No cash points, but found a small Barclays branch that looked liked Alistair's hipster shop. All chrome framed furniture, unadorned white walls, two enormous ATM thingummys and a plethora of iPad wielding staff. The super ATM machines were so badly designed that every poor sod using them needed to be walked through the (excruciatingly slow) transaction.

Cut to a month later, and my local branch of Barclays in Enfield close the counter service. No sign of the machines though, as the preliminary trials in places like the Chelsea branch proves they need more staff on hand than they had manning the counters ...

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Israel's Iron Dome missile tech stolen by Chinese hackers

Chris Wareham
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Re: Wonder why..

Because saying anything bad about Israel instantly makes you an anti-Semite.

Made all the more bemusing by the fact that the poor bloody Palestinians are a Semitic people too.

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Mozilla fixes CRITICAL security holes in Firefox, urges v31 upgrade

Chris Wareham
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Re: firefox ESR updated too

probably because you used the default UI for the previous version and not the truly "classic" UI that was obtained by enabling the menus. You know, the actually usable UI? The one without the stupid single "Firefox" pull-down button/menu thing?

Err, no. From the top of the application I have:

- conventional menu bar with 7 menu items

- toolbar with home, back, forward, reload and URL bar

- tabs

- web page

Perhaps you're problem is OS related? Are you using dog shit like Windows 8?

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Chris Wareham
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Re: firefox ESR updated too

No it doesn't. Not without a LOT of fucking around. Even then, you can't get something that's exactly like the true classic theme.

It looks exactly like the previous version here. From memory the only thing I had to change once I'd installed it was the tabs on top to put them beneath the toolbar. Works on my Linux machines and the wife's Windows machine (essential, as even the slightest change to an interface on her PC results in a screaming rage).

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Chris Wareham
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Re: firefox ESR updated too

after that ugly as sin UI change in a recent firefox I converted all my systems to ESR.

Alternatively, install the Classic Theme Restorer extension. It reverts the fucking awful new interface to a usable one.

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KDE releases ice-cream coloured Plasma 5 just in time for summer

Chris Wareham
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Re: Very confusing

What about the Moscovitch? [etc]

They were all shit. Poor design, even the one that was a simplified Fiat, appalling build quality, and no spare part availability (which is why they stopped importing Ladas into the UK, as the EU insists on a certain amount of spares being available). Nothing has changed since the end of the Soviet Union either - if you go to Russia then all the domestic built cars are still about thirty years out of date and fall apart. Not helped by the low quality petrol and terrible state of the roads.

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50,000 sites backdoored through shoddy WordPress plugin

Chris Wareham
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Re: Old news - WordPress is a disaster

The one to watch is October CMS

Or TextPattern. It stagnated for a long while, but has been going through a comprehensive overhaul for several years now.

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Report: American tech firms charge Britons a thumping nationality tax

Chris Wareham
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An acquaintance used to go on regular trips to the US and bring back a couple of vintage US made guitars each time. He never declared them on his return, and promptly sold them for considerably more than he'd bought them for.

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Chris Wareham
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Re: No justification?

I would be curious to examine items imported from the US but through a third-party instead of the OEM.

Difficult for a number of big name brands. See Levis for example - they'll sue you if you try to import their overpriced jeans yourself.

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Cave pits, ideal for human bases, FOUND ON MOON

Chris Wareham
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So I wasn't the only one thinking how pissed off the clangers are going to be when probes start dropping into these craters.

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Banning handheld phone use by drivers had NO effect on accident rate - study

Chris Wareham
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"Banning handheld phone use by drivers had NO effect on handheld phone use by drivers"

There we go, fixed it for you.

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Mozilla and Facebook snip a further five per cent from all JPEGs

Chris Wareham
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Re: everybody wants a faster Web, but everybody wants to stick with the formats they're using now.

On the tablet, where such options don't exist

Only if "the tablet" is an iPad. On my Android tablet I'm running Firefox with Adblock Plus, as well as having the following entries in my hosts file:

# Google Analytics

0.0.0.0 google-analytics.com

0.0.0.0 ssl.google-analytics.com

0.0.0.0 www.google-analytics.com

0.0.0.0 www-google-analytics.l.google.com

0.0.0.0 www.googletagservices.com

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Murdoch calls for ISPs to be liable for users' activities

Chris Wareham
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Re: Fuck you Rupert!

Rupert, you are a class dick. Here in oz - have you actually lived here recently?

Doubt he's been there in a long while. He's a US citizen these days, which is handy as it makes it harder for the UK authorities to extradite the old sod for running, in the words of prosecutor Andrew Edis, "a thoroughly criminal enterprise".

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NEW Raspberry Pi B+, NOW with - count them - FOUR USB ports

Chris Wareham
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Re: Cost

And there i was thinking the PI was to be a ultra cheap device for people to play with.

At 26 smackers it is ultra cheap. In the "hobbyist" space, compare it to something like an Arduino and you get so much more with the new Pi for very little difference in price. Compare it to the typical development boards for embedded ARM stuff, and it's no wonder that the Pi is proving popular in industrial applications.

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Siri, did we just take a hit in that voice-recog patent fight?

Chris Wareham
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Apple purchased them

Nope, they licensed the technology. Talk is that Samsung and several Chinese firms are vying to buy them, which could prove interesting.

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Chris Wareham
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Apple created Siri? The product name maybe, but it's well known in the IVR industry that the software is licensed from a third party.

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'Dread Pirate Roberts' suspect's bid for freedom fails

Chris Wareham
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“The allegations amount to Ulbricht acting as a sort of 'godfather' - determining the territory, the actions which may be undertaken, and the commissions he will retain; disciplining others to stay in line, and generally casting himself as a leader”

No complaints from me that they are pursuing this twat on that basis, but surely the same applies to the senior management at various banks in the run up to 2008. So why aren't they on trial?

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Russian MP fears US Secret Service cuffed his son for Snowden swap

Chris Wareham
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Re: All I ask is his dad is not called a defendant....

If his online "handle" really is Track 2 then it suggests he's interested in payment cards, as that's the name of the data field. And for all the conspiracy theorists - shut the fuck up, as he was initially indicted back in 2011, well before Snowden did a bunk.

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'I don't want to go on the cart' ... OpenSSL revived with survival roadmap

Chris Wareham
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built-in support for POSIX and Win32 multithreading

Hmm, not sure how the support for Win32 multithreading sits with their aim to only target Linux and FreeBSD. Looking at the LibreSSL commits, the need to support MicroSoft's frankly wierd APIs are one of the major reasons the OpenSSL code is such a mess.

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Hey, Marissa Mayer: Flexi working time is now LAW in UK. Yahoo!

Chris Wareham
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Re: why is Marissa Mayer ...

THAT is the question.

Of course the other question is why she's named after a song by the Sex Gang Children.

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Coulson GUILTY of conspiring to hack phones between 2000 and 2006

Chris Wareham
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Re: Brooks is FOUND innocent

She IS innocent.

The jury are instructed that they must be sure of a defendants guilt beyond "all reasonable doubt". My reading of the evidence is that in Brooks' case there was no "smoking gun" in relation to the phone hacking charges, but that the prosecution were arguing there was compelling reasons to assume guilt on the basis of her behaviour. It was alleged that this behaviour amounted to an attempt to pervert the course of justice in collusion with her PA, her husband and the head of security at News International.

I strongly recommend that people check the coverage in Private Eye for a good summary of the evidence presented in court. Personally I found it compelling with regard to the attempt to pervert the course of justice, but that thanks to the arguably botched evidence gathering by the police there was not enough evidence to convict on the phone hacking charges. As an example of how the police actions seem to have been inadequate, on first attempting a search of the NI offices in the aftermath of the Guardian's revelations, they allowed NI staff to intimidate them into leaving without having conducted a thorough search.

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Chris Wareham
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Re: Rebekah Brooks innocent?

I've been following the case as closely as possible via news websites and Private Eye. On that basis I'm not surprised she's been found not guilty of the phone hacking charges, but I'm frankly amazed that she, her husband, PA and the NI head of security were cleared of perverting the course of justice. I wouldn't be surprised if the Crown don't appeal those charges.

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DON’T add me to your social network, I have NO IDEA who you are

Chris Wareham
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Re: Billy 'No Mates' here

You won't find me on the Internet (with my real name that is).

You could also try what a friend of mine did, which was to change his legal name every so often - it was hard work knowing what his current name was if I hadn't seen him for a while. He suddenly disappeared a couple of years ago, and is rumoured to have adopted a completely new identity in another country. He must have been getting *really* annoyed with those Facebook and LinkedIn emails I guess.

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WORLD CUP SHOCK: England declared winner in 2-1 defeat to Italy

Chris Wareham
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Re: Us Italians were too busy.

My wife's from Avola - so nowhere near Casteltermini. Her father was originally from Agrigento though which is getting close, and by coincidence the place we were watching the football in is owned by a family from Casteltermini!

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Chris Wareham
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Re: Us Italians were too busy.

Italy is an hour ahead, and so fewer people would have stayed up for the game.

Judging by the reports from my wife's home town in Sicily the entire population must have been watching the match, as the place erupted in celebration when the final whistle went. There again, night life in that part of the world seems to start and go on later than it does in Northern Europe.

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Microsoft C# chief Hejlsberg: Our open-source Apache pick will clear the FUD

Chris Wareham
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Re: Free the VM two!

What both Java and C# really need is to dump their VMs and instead have a compiler which compiles the source code into a binary for the target platform.

Might be a nice to have for certain niche applications, but it would remove the advantages of runtime optimisation that bytecode on a virtual machine allows. This is why many applications coded in Java or C# can run rings around an equivalent compiled application (written in C++ for example), since the virtual machine can progressively optimise based on actual code usage rather than trying to do it in a "one size fits all" manner up front.

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Chris Wareham
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Re: Thought I was losing my mind..

For instance, Microsoft has demonstrated how Roslyn in a few lines of code can be used to implement style warnings and automate style fixes (such as missing curly braces) in a way that *any* IDE or tool based on Roslyn can pick up and use right away.

That sound like a reusable parser, which is not novel or unusual. Most IDEs nowadays use this approach for syntax highlighting and associated warnings.

BTW - the "core" .NET infrastructure (the CLR and the core libraries) are already open specifications

That's not the same as releasing the blueprints of a sophisticated virtual machine implementation, it's just documenting the bytecode.

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Chris Wareham
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Re: Thought I was losing my mind..

Chances are that the really clever work has gone into the Common Language Runtime, since that's where the JIT magic is. Open sourcing a compiler isn't all that interesting, since it's comparatively trivial to write one that only compiles down to bytecode.

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The cute things they say

Chris Wareham
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Re: Barf

Out of interest, why vodka and not denatured ethanol?

Because the original poster would rather drink vodka than denatured ethanol while waiting for a keyboard to dry?

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Hacker claims PayPal loophole generates FREE MONEY

Chris Wareham
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Re: Or a seller can just scam you on e-bay

All a seller has to do is waste a bit of time

These are common scams that unscrupulous buyers exploit, as well as sellers, to game eBay's protection policy. My rule of thumb is to cancel any transaction I'm involved in if a buyer delays payment or a seller delays shipment for anything more than a couple of days.

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