Feeds

* Posts by Chris Wareham

609 posts • joined 1 May 2007

Page:

Cave pits, ideal for human bases, FOUND ON MOON

Chris Wareham
Bronze badge

So I wasn't the only one thinking how pissed off the clangers are going to be when probes start dropping into these craters.

4
0

Banning handheld phone use by drivers had NO effect on accident rate - study

Chris Wareham
Bronze badge

"Banning handheld phone use by drivers had NO effect on handheld phone use by drivers"

There we go, fixed it for you.

56
1

Mozilla and Facebook snip a further five per cent from all JPEGs

Chris Wareham
Bronze badge

Re: everybody wants a faster Web, but everybody wants to stick with the formats they're using now.

On the tablet, where such options don't exist

Only if "the tablet" is an iPad. On my Android tablet I'm running Firefox with Adblock Plus, as well as having the following entries in my hosts file:

# Google Analytics

0.0.0.0 google-analytics.com

0.0.0.0 ssl.google-analytics.com

0.0.0.0 www.google-analytics.com

0.0.0.0 www-google-analytics.l.google.com

0.0.0.0 www.googletagservices.com

2
0

Murdoch calls for ISPs to be liable for users' activities

Chris Wareham
Bronze badge

Re: Fuck you Rupert!

Rupert, you are a class dick. Here in oz - have you actually lived here recently?

Doubt he's been there in a long while. He's a US citizen these days, which is handy as it makes it harder for the UK authorities to extradite the old sod for running, in the words of prosecutor Andrew Edis, "a thoroughly criminal enterprise".

11
1

NEW Raspberry Pi B+, NOW with - count them - FOUR USB ports

Chris Wareham
Bronze badge

Re: Cost

And there i was thinking the PI was to be a ultra cheap device for people to play with.

At 26 smackers it is ultra cheap. In the "hobbyist" space, compare it to something like an Arduino and you get so much more with the new Pi for very little difference in price. Compare it to the typical development boards for embedded ARM stuff, and it's no wonder that the Pi is proving popular in industrial applications.

15
0

Siri, did we just take a hit in that voice-recog patent fight?

Chris Wareham
Bronze badge

Apple purchased them

Nope, they licensed the technology. Talk is that Samsung and several Chinese firms are vying to buy them, which could prove interesting.

1
0
Chris Wareham
Bronze badge

Apple created Siri? The product name maybe, but it's well known in the IVR industry that the software is licensed from a third party.

8
0

'Dread Pirate Roberts' suspect's bid for freedom fails

Chris Wareham
Bronze badge

“The allegations amount to Ulbricht acting as a sort of 'godfather' - determining the territory, the actions which may be undertaken, and the commissions he will retain; disciplining others to stay in line, and generally casting himself as a leader”

No complaints from me that they are pursuing this twat on that basis, but surely the same applies to the senior management at various banks in the run up to 2008. So why aren't they on trial?

6
3

Russian MP fears US Secret Service cuffed his son for Snowden swap

Chris Wareham
Bronze badge

Re: All I ask is his dad is not called a defendant....

If his online "handle" really is Track 2 then it suggests he's interested in payment cards, as that's the name of the data field. And for all the conspiracy theorists - shut the fuck up, as he was initially indicted back in 2011, well before Snowden did a bunk.

4
0

'I don't want to go on the cart' ... OpenSSL revived with survival roadmap

Chris Wareham
Bronze badge

built-in support for POSIX and Win32 multithreading

Hmm, not sure how the support for Win32 multithreading sits with their aim to only target Linux and FreeBSD. Looking at the LibreSSL commits, the need to support MicroSoft's frankly wierd APIs are one of the major reasons the OpenSSL code is such a mess.

3
2

Hey, Marissa Mayer: Flexi working time is now LAW in UK. Yahoo!

Chris Wareham
Bronze badge

Re: why is Marissa Mayer ...

THAT is the question.

Of course the other question is why she's named after a song by the Sex Gang Children.

2
0

Coulson GUILTY of conspiring to hack phones between 2000 and 2006

Chris Wareham
Bronze badge

Re: Brooks is FOUND innocent

She IS innocent.

The jury are instructed that they must be sure of a defendants guilt beyond "all reasonable doubt". My reading of the evidence is that in Brooks' case there was no "smoking gun" in relation to the phone hacking charges, but that the prosecution were arguing there was compelling reasons to assume guilt on the basis of her behaviour. It was alleged that this behaviour amounted to an attempt to pervert the course of justice in collusion with her PA, her husband and the head of security at News International.

I strongly recommend that people check the coverage in Private Eye for a good summary of the evidence presented in court. Personally I found it compelling with regard to the attempt to pervert the course of justice, but that thanks to the arguably botched evidence gathering by the police there was not enough evidence to convict on the phone hacking charges. As an example of how the police actions seem to have been inadequate, on first attempting a search of the NI offices in the aftermath of the Guardian's revelations, they allowed NI staff to intimidate them into leaving without having conducted a thorough search.

3
0
Chris Wareham
Bronze badge

Re: Rebekah Brooks innocent?

I've been following the case as closely as possible via news websites and Private Eye. On that basis I'm not surprised she's been found not guilty of the phone hacking charges, but I'm frankly amazed that she, her husband, PA and the NI head of security were cleared of perverting the course of justice. I wouldn't be surprised if the Crown don't appeal those charges.

10
0

DON’T add me to your social network, I have NO IDEA who you are

Chris Wareham
Bronze badge

Re: Billy 'No Mates' here

You won't find me on the Internet (with my real name that is).

You could also try what a friend of mine did, which was to change his legal name every so often - it was hard work knowing what his current name was if I hadn't seen him for a while. He suddenly disappeared a couple of years ago, and is rumoured to have adopted a completely new identity in another country. He must have been getting *really* annoyed with those Facebook and LinkedIn emails I guess.

1
0

WORLD CUP SHOCK: England declared winner in 2-1 defeat to Italy

Chris Wareham
Bronze badge

Re: Us Italians were too busy.

My wife's from Avola - so nowhere near Casteltermini. Her father was originally from Agrigento though which is getting close, and by coincidence the place we were watching the football in is owned by a family from Casteltermini!

0
0
Chris Wareham
Bronze badge

Re: Us Italians were too busy.

Italy is an hour ahead, and so fewer people would have stayed up for the game.

Judging by the reports from my wife's home town in Sicily the entire population must have been watching the match, as the place erupted in celebration when the final whistle went. There again, night life in that part of the world seems to start and go on later than it does in Northern Europe.

0
0

Microsoft C# chief Hejlsberg: Our open-source Apache pick will clear the FUD

Chris Wareham
Bronze badge

Re: Free the VM two!

What both Java and C# really need is to dump their VMs and instead have a compiler which compiles the source code into a binary for the target platform.

Might be a nice to have for certain niche applications, but it would remove the advantages of runtime optimisation that bytecode on a virtual machine allows. This is why many applications coded in Java or C# can run rings around an equivalent compiled application (written in C++ for example), since the virtual machine can progressively optimise based on actual code usage rather than trying to do it in a "one size fits all" manner up front.

0
0
Chris Wareham
Bronze badge

Re: Thought I was losing my mind..

For instance, Microsoft has demonstrated how Roslyn in a few lines of code can be used to implement style warnings and automate style fixes (such as missing curly braces) in a way that *any* IDE or tool based on Roslyn can pick up and use right away.

That sound like a reusable parser, which is not novel or unusual. Most IDEs nowadays use this approach for syntax highlighting and associated warnings.

BTW - the "core" .NET infrastructure (the CLR and the core libraries) are already open specifications

That's not the same as releasing the blueprints of a sophisticated virtual machine implementation, it's just documenting the bytecode.

3
0
Chris Wareham
Bronze badge

Re: Thought I was losing my mind..

Chances are that the really clever work has gone into the Common Language Runtime, since that's where the JIT magic is. Open sourcing a compiler isn't all that interesting, since it's comparatively trivial to write one that only compiles down to bytecode.

1
0

The cute things they say

Chris Wareham
Bronze badge

Re: Barf

Out of interest, why vodka and not denatured ethanol?

Because the original poster would rather drink vodka than denatured ethanol while waiting for a keyboard to dry?

2
0

Hacker claims PayPal loophole generates FREE MONEY

Chris Wareham
Bronze badge

Re: Or a seller can just scam you on e-bay

All a seller has to do is waste a bit of time

These are common scams that unscrupulous buyers exploit, as well as sellers, to game eBay's protection policy. My rule of thumb is to cancel any transaction I'm involved in if a buyer delays payment or a seller delays shipment for anything more than a couple of days.

1
0

Microsoft poised to take Web server crown from Apache

Chris Wareham
Bronze badge

Errm - you mean like the market #1 - Sharepoint Server?

No, that would be WordPress with over 60 million installations on the web alone (figures from 2012). MicroSoft sold just 35 million licenses 2006 - 2012, but I suspect that not all of those licenses are still in use. As to the question from the original poster, I've yet to meet someone who regards SharePoint as "popular" in the sense that people like it. It's an absolute dog, with content disappearing into it never to be found again, mainly due to the piss poor indexing (that's when it actually bothers to index things - often it doesn't).

3
0
Chris Wareham
Bronze badge

Re: Chris Wareham

I said nothing about the security of a typical installation, regardless of the HTTP server or operating system it's running on. I commented on the figures and caveats from Netcraft's report. Although I doubt that a monumental pr*t like you even clicked through to read the report before submitting your typical trollish comment.

8
0
Chris Wareham
Bronze badge

From the Netcraft report:

"... most of this [IIS] growth is attributable to new sites hosted by Nobis Technology Group."

That's a company that hosts TeamSpeak servers - one per team. Not much of a win for MicroSoft then if the vast majority of the growth is inactive Teamspeak servers, and the Netcraft figures also show a drop in active IIS sites.

12
2

DOCX disaster recovery: How I rescued my wife from XM-HELL

Chris Wareham
Bronze badge

Re: MS Word is not immune to this either

I have PhD students compiling documents with tables and images from all types of sources and very often Word throws a wobbly and loses something,

Then insist they use a real document formatting system like LaTeX, rather than a piss poor desktop publishing application.

20
0
Chris Wareham
Bronze badge

Re: Which is why...

At which point you've so lost much functionality, you might as well use Wordpad.

Which for almost all the documents I see a word processor used for would be perfectly fine. RTF is actually a very nice format - easily parsed, human readable, compresses well and quite feature rich.

11
0

Thanks for nothing, OpenSSL, grumbles stonewalled De Raadt

Chris Wareham
Bronze badge

Re: What law/legal requirement

if aforementioned BSD person had done this he would have seen these changes and be professional enough to enquire about details

He (actually they) shouldn't have to. It's crap like this from people like the OpenSSL team that make me believe that the only responsible disclosure is immediate disclosure when you cannot rely on the maintainers (open or closed source) to not act like arseholes.

2
1
Chris Wareham
Bronze badge

Re: What law/legal requirement

As the article clearly points out, they have an ethical requirement to tell the OpenBSD project. This appears to be what happened to other major projects that rely on OpenSSL, as evidenced by the release of updates from other projects or platforms similar to OpenBSD that were simultaneous with the security announcement.

As for those people questioning the need to fork OpenSSL, I suggest they take a look at the commit logs for LibreSSL and various blog postings from the likes of TedU (most of which predate the decision to fork). These clearly show that the quality of the OpenSSL code is shocking with no apparent code reviews for third party submissions leading to a maintenance nightmare - code duplication, no consistency in error handling, dead code all over the place, bogus comments, etc. There is also the unwillingness of the OpenSSL developers to incorporate any but the most critical bug fixes from third parties, leading to a slew of fixes being left ignored in the OpenSSL bug tracker for years. Sure, they'll blindly accept third party submissions of entire subsystems or implementations of specific features - with no attempt to cleanly integrate them into the existing codebase - but once they're in the developers seem to be completely disinterested or incapable of applying third party improvements or fixes.

7
1

TrueCrypt hooked to life support in Switzerland: 'It must not die' say pair

Chris Wareham
Bronze badge

Re: What about LibreCrypt?

LibreCrypt would also follow in the footsteps of LibreSSL, the fork of OpenSSL that is undergong a massive amount of refactoring and bug fixing.

1
0

Piketty thinks the 1% should cough up 80%. Discuss

Chris Wareham
Bronze badge

Re: @ Tom 13

The difference between the US and UK is that in comparison we have a very high density of population. As a result, the entire South East of England has average house prices approaching that of London, and the "commuter belt" is constantly expanding as people have to live further afield but still need to travel to the capital since that's where so much employment is. This isn't helped by the last thirty years of British governments betting that the bulk of our economy can be based on financial services. Despite this lunatic policy, which has included a deliberate attempt to keep Sterling high valued to the detriment of exports, we do still have some industries producing real goods. But boy do they struggle. That struggle will become even harder if the swivel eyed loons of UKIP succeed in getting the main political parties to remove us from the EU, making trade with our biggest export markets even more difficult. Economic common sense says that we should join the Euro and focus on reforming the EC rather than leaving it. Even the majority of anti-EU Tory politicians favour this, but in the current political climate dictated by massive media exposure of a political party with no elected members of parliament that's not a vote winner.

0
1
Chris Wareham
Bronze badge

Which averages? Have you chosen median or mean?

Median for salary, can't find clarification on the house prices.

Also, I believe that Rightmove report asking prices, not actual selling prices.

Again, can't find clarification. However, even if it's the asking price rather than the selling price, the likely difference is around 5% on a property of 550,000GBP. Assuming Rightmove do report asking prices then that makes the average house price in london 562,400GBP. Sounds about right to me based on personal experience of buying a house in North London.

Average incomes have been falling since 2005. I'd love to see some good figures that measure disposable income after taxes, bills and housing for the last 40 years.

I can only find figures for disposable income after tax that don't take into account housing costs. They show an almost continous rise in disposable income between 1979 and 2008. However, it has been continually falling ever since 2008. The figures I can find on housing costs (from the Department of Work and Pensions) suggest they have risen continually from roughly 10% in 1979 to 40% of disposable income in 2013 - with no fall since 2008.

2
0
Chris Wareham
Bronze badge

Wealth inequality is only a problem if you suffer from spite or envy.

Really? Try buying a place to live in London on the average salary of 27,800GBP [1] then. Average house price is just over 592,000GBP [2].

[1] Office for National Statistics, average London salary (17,000 - 21,000GBP for the rest of the country).

[2] Rightmove

6
7
Chris Wareham
Bronze badge

Re: Politics of Envy

No it's not the politics of envy. In 1965 there was almost full employment, and the average median wage was roughly twenty times less than the highest paid executives. Today, the median wage is roughly 140 times that of the highest paid executives. Income was much more progressively taxed as well, and loopholes less easy to exploit (the top rate was either sixty or seventy percent in the 1970s from what I recall). This resulted in far less disparity between those at the top and the majority than we see today. Some countries still manage to have much less disparity and are also booming (Finland for example), but our politicians in the UK are in thrall to the city and the multi-nationals.

Yes, we need wage disparity to drive a considerable part of people's ambition and to reward acheivement. What we don't need is the current disparity that's causing problems such as the impossibility for many first timers to buy a home in the South East. We also need to get away from the short termism of politicians, where they flog off public services under the false claims that it will improve quality and lower cost (in almost no case has it done either). As soon as a service is contracted out or sold into private hands the results are a race to the bottom in terms of quality as shareholder interests take over, not helped by the fact that most executives have their salaries padded out with massive share incentives.

16
7
Chris Wareham
Bronze badge

Re: NHS air ambulances

The coastguards are a government body.

There's a proposal to flog them off.

1
0

The fresh Mint of dwell there: This is a story all about how 17 is here for a while

Chris Wareham
Bronze badge

Yeaah remove the only way to multi-task using a mouse, great idea for the GNOME devs

Well, it would be a good idea if they also stopped making applications occupy the whole desktop with no way to resize them (see the file browser and document viewer in upcoming versions of GNOME and then weep). This frankly shit feature is at its most laughable with the disc burning feature of Files, where it has a label saying "drag and drop files to create a CD/DVD". How to drag and drop when you can no longer tile or overlap windows seems to have escaped the developers ...

3
1
Chris Wareham
Bronze badge

"The top left hot corner has been disabled by default in this release because, according the developers, it was often triggered by accident by people who weren't familiar with it."

If only the GNOME developers would do the same.

5
1

ASUS launches 5-in-1 Android Windows Phone laptop tablet (breathe)

Chris Wareham
Bronze badge

"glorify your distinguished professionalism and taste.”

I want that on a T-shirt.

5
0

Multiplayer Elite to debut on May 30th

Chris Wareham
Bronze badge

Or track down the faithful recreation from a few years back. Some guy reverse engineered it by decompiling the version that ran on the BBC home micro and working from there. Braben threw his toys out of the pram and got the author to take it down, despite Ian Bell having given it his blessing. I still have a copy of the source code, and have patched it to run on modern versions of the libraries it uses on Linux.

1
0

Users folder vanished after OS X 10.9.3 update? Here's a fix

Chris Wareham
Bronze badge

Re: Dear Tim Cook, what's on the desk is still not an oversize hand-held "i"device.

Upon each reboot, the permissions for the /Users and /Users/Shared directories would be set to world-writable

That's astonishingly incompetent and should have been the headline to the article - even worse that it was caused not by a system update, but by an application one.

0
0

Locking it down: Steps to Oracle database security

Chris Wareham
Bronze badge

"Locking it down: Steps to Oracle database security"

1. Remove Oracle DB

2. Install PostgreSQL

(Only semi-serious, although many places running Oracle could be at least as productive running Postgres and save a serious amount of money).

5
0

FSF slams Mozilla for 'shocking' Firefox DRM ankle-grab

Chris Wareham
Bronze badge

Re: Stallman

Not sure why he's so bothered. IIRC doesn't he read websites by using SSH?

He gets others to email him the text content of web pages he wants to read. The man's so dogmatic that he's fast tracking the Free Software Foundation and GNU Project into irrelevance. Take the GNU Compiler Collection for example, where it is deliberately architected to make it difficult to create things like optimisers in a modular way. The intent is to make it hard for others to develop commercial extensions, but in practice it encourages bad programming practices, difficulty in developing or testing new features and - contrary to the supposed philosophy of Free Software - hard to share code amongst different projects. Hence things like LLVM and Clang getting serious traction. Then there's the funding of pointless projects or mismanagement of them (Gnash is an example of the latter), and the toleration of terrible project leaders (Glibc is the classic example here).

6
4
Chris Wareham
Bronze badge

Re: A partnership with Adobe

There are Adobe and Gnash swf plug-ins for Firefox

Bad example, since Gnash doesn't work and development of it ground to a halt ages ago. (Didn't help that the main developers seemed mostly interested in using it a playground to try out myriad different graphic and niche boost libraries).

4
0

Shazam! Record labels shovel $9m into name-that-song app

Chris Wareham
Bronze badge

Re: not very useful...however...

Tried Shazam a couple of times. The first time was in the early days when it failed to recognise anything I played it (stuff like Throbbing Gristle, Einsturzende Neubaten and The Jesus And Mary Chain). Tried it again last week in the hope that it would recognise a song from a YouTube compilation that had no track listing. It failed again, so I retried Throbbing Gristle and that still failed as well.

0
0

HALF of London has outdated Wi-Fi security, says roving World of War, er, BIKER

Chris Wareham
Bronze badge

Had to downgrade my wireless security at home, as the brand new Internet enabled TV I bought for my wife to watch in bed while convalescing only supports WEP!

7
1

Today's bugs have BRANDS? Be still my bleeding heart [logo]

Chris Wareham
Bronze badge

Re: D & E

It makes it clear (more so than the main C++ book) where Stroustrup was coming from with C++, and why it is as it is.

Along with the "Effective C++" and "Exceptional C++" series of books it also make it clear that C++ should be avoided at all costs. A language implemented by a lunatic who has attracted other lunatics, Alexandrescu in particular, to further his evil.

3
2
Chris Wareham
Bronze badge

Re: And another thing...

Utter Bollox... How else do youy get TRUE and FALSE in C?

By using a version of C that's less than fifteen years old? That's how long the language has supported a boolean type, making Verity appear a bit foolish when she wrote:

He didn't even bother to change the return type of his function to bool... oh wait, he's writing in C, so he couldn't. Bummer.

Also, her slagging off goto statements only highlights her background as a Pascal programmer, since it's an elegant way to do error cleanup in C if used carefully.

1
4

Oracle melds its 'cloud OS' with OpenStack in Solaris 11.2 release

Chris Wareham
Bronze badge

Re: Oracle and cloud?

Erm - but the majority of them move to Wintel - and only some to Linux. Sun and IBM might hope otherwise, but the trend is clear. IBMs revenue have been dropping off a cliff because of betting on Linux.

Nice troll, but nowhere near the truth. IBM's overall revenue has fallen due to lacklustre hardware sales, but their software and services revenue has consistently grown. Just to make that clear, most of their software and services revenue come from Linux related stuff, with a smaller chunk from AIX and the like.

4
0

Firefox, is that you? Version 29 looks rather like a certain shiny rival

Chris Wareham
Bronze badge

Re: Nearly

I prefer Firefox, but now it seems I don't have much of a choice.

Mozilla, if I liked the look and feel of Chrome, I would have downloaded Chrome, not get a new skin for Firefox!"

Install an extension called "Classic Theme Restorer". It turns Firefox 29 back into a usable web browser.

20
1

Oracle accused of breaking US competition law over Solaris support

Chris Wareham
Bronze badge

Re: IBM or Redhat funding Terix to attack Oracle?

I doubt that RedHat or IBM give a sh*t about Solaris. It was a great operating system, but it has pretty much stagnated under Oracle and that's shown by the market share it now has.

5
3

Brain surgery? Would sir care for a CHOC-ICE with that?

Chris Wareham
Bronze badge

Re: Stalemate

Why should we train staff if they'e going to ask for more money or leave for another company?

That's the usual attitude, even after you've been promised training "as part of the package" when you accept the job. There's also the misunderstanding amongst management, where they think any programmer can maintain their systems and then refuse to give the existing staff pay rises. The existing staff then go elsewhere taking their intimate knowledge of the systems with them, and the replacements end up bodging the systems to oblivion because management vetoed spending time documenting them ...

8
0

Page: