* Posts by Noel Bourke

13 posts • joined 6 Feb 2009

Petrol cars are dead in the water, says Tesla CTO waving numbers on the back of an envelope

Noel Bourke
Coat

Re: One Day at the Pub...

So just to restate your point: in a hypothetical situation where you've been challenged to a 1,100km road race in a pub and you have your large pack of adult diapers ready to go, a car with a longer non-stop range is a better fit. I don't disagree.

Meanwhile in the real world, if your daily mileage fits inside the range of an EV and you don't need to tow a trailer (until the Tesla Model X is launched), an EV is a much better vehicle than an ICE. Cheaper to run, more pleasant to drive and more practical. The average driver here does 32km a day in their vehicle. I do 50,000km a year which averages out to 136km per day. I do that in a 200km range EV.

Rapid charging is what allows occasional longer journeys. I rapid charge on average twice a week, at the weekend, when I tend to do long road trips. All my other charging is just plugging in when I get home. I'm speaking from experience, I've done both Dublin > London and Dublin > Berlin round trips in the last month on rapid charging without an issue. People don't seem to realise, that when averaged out I spend less time waiting for my car to charge than I'd spend fueling at a petrol station because I never have to wait for charging for my daily use. It's just something that happens when I'm not using the car. Meanwhile the guy who just toddles back and forth to work every day in his Golf TDI still has to visit a petrol station regularly, queue to pay and then faces a fuel bill substantially larger than mine (~€20 for over 5000km per month) despite his comparatively tiny mileage. That's before broaching maintenance... my next scheduled service is in January 2017.

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Noel Bourke

Re: ... eventually

WTF did you get 9 hours from? You mean stopping for an hour to recharge, the Model S rapid charges at 135kW peak which means a charge in less than an hour for the largest battery if you entirely empty. Which isn't a problem because you need to stop anyway to grab lunch or take a piss. The experience of Model S owners driving that exact route from Calais (which many people have actually done) is that is takes pretty much the same time as an ICE.

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Noel Bourke

Re: TLDR; Will the shills just shut up?

I'm not a shill. In fact you'll find that most car companies don't want to sell their electric models.

Owners tend to do the job of selling EVs to others. And the enthusiasm is genuine, I'm on my 2nd EV and generally most owners tend to be of the opinion that they will never buy an ICE vehicle again. Try talking to a dealer... they hate selling EVs, you will often be handed off to the youngest sales intern or in some cases practically told to eff off.

I'm motivated to post on the EV topics because they tend to be populated by a lot of people who categorically don't know what they are talking about. If they've never driven or owned an EV and don't know basic information like charger types or rudimentary efficiency numbers they tend to be dismissive and that pisses me off.

As for your questions:

pollution transference (production) - Until you get to the battery, pollution from production is lower than an ICE vehicle. The problem with many of the numbers provided by EV opponents is that they tend to rely on reports into pollution from Li-Ion cell production in China... but most automotive cells are produced in Europe, Japan and the US with better pollution controls and controls over conflict minerals etc (in fact TMK no automotive cells for production EVs sold in Europe are made in China).

pollution transference (power): People often make the initial mistake of counting the total emissions for electricity an EV and only counting the manufacturers sales number for tailpipe emissions for the ICE. So often you'll see number like 300g/kWh for the EV (which is about right given the UK/Ireland grid power mix) and then quote 200-250g/kWh for the ICE when the real number is closer to 1700g/kWh well-to wheel. ICE engines lose more energy to heat than they use to actually move the car. Electric motors are 90-95% efficient. The battery charging is usually 90% efficient and the electricity grid is usually more than 90% efficient. In total around 70% of any kWh produced at the power plant reaches the road with an EV. My comparison with a h2 fuel cell vehicle using electrolysis that number is 19%. The only situation in which an EV might have 5-10% higher total emissions is if 100% of your power came from coal (even in the US the grid is only 38% coal at worst).

time to recharge:

How long a piece of string.... DC rapid charging at 50kW (150kW is possible, 100kW being deployed in Norway ATM) charges the 22kWh battery in my i3 from 0-80% in 15-20 minutes. AC home charging at 32 Amps charges the battery from 0-100% in 3 1/2 hours. Idiots quote the time to charge at 8-10A from a three pin plug (something which few owners do considering a proper charger is Free on grants or €500 without) which can be 12-80 hours depending on your EV. In general you charge on a timer to get the off-peak electricity rates and start with a full battery every morning. DC rapid charging is then used for longer trips. DC charging stops on long journeys are fairly natural. I've driven from Dublin to London/Amsterdam/Berlin with not that much difference in journey time vs my old diesel.

battery life:

The design life (which is not the time to a dead battery, it's the time to 70% capacity) of the i3 battery is 20 year and the Leaf battery is 10 years.Generally the two factors that matter are number of cycles and exposure to heat. A big factor is pack capacity because larger packs tend to be cycled less and the driver notices loss less. The i3 and Model S have active thermal management systems that keep the battery at the right temperature for optimum life. The Leaf and Zoe... don't. Early Nissan Leafs had issues in hot climates, particularly when being rapid charged (a single rapid charge can raise the battery temp by 10C). These issues were fixed from MY2013 forward with an updated battery chemistry (owners refer to this new battery as the lizard battery). UK/Ireland has fairly stable temperatures so it wasn't really a major issue here. My dad's 2014 Leaf has lost 1% of capacity in 54,000km. My i3 has done 18,000km and capacity loss is so low it's not measurable.

Personally I can't understand how anyone who drives less than 30,000-35,000km a year and doesn't need to tow a trailer can justify NOT driving an EV.

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Noel Bourke

Re: Is it really cheaper?

@jonathanb

The battery charging loss is usually 10% at worst not 50%.

Compared to my 2012 diesel Avensis based on fuel consumption data pulled from OBDII my i3 (based on my second meter fitted just before the charger) is five times more efficient per kWh, INCLUDING charger loss.

Including the tax differences on fuel and maintenance costs (and EXCLUDING free charging) the i3 is ten times cheaper to run than the 2.0 D4D (which is a very efficient diesel).

I drive 50,000km a year for basically €15/month of electricity (€30/month if I actually had to pay for public charging). I know Taxi drivers running Leafs with more than 200,000km on the clock, less than 10% battery capacity loss and saving €8,000 a year on fuel.

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Noel Bourke

Re: @Orv @Derpity Still a bit confused

Prius was first manufactured in 1997. There are people who weren't born when the Prius was released who can vote now.

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Noel Bourke

Re: @Derpity Still a bit confused

Why would you need to swap the battery?

The design life of the battery in my i3 is 20 years. The warranty is for 8 years/160,000km.

That's 20 years to 70% capacity... Still perfectly usable as a runabout beyond that with no battery replacement.

And Nissan Leaf's despite having a battery designed for a ten year life are mostly beating the expected battery metrics. Nissan has had three replacements under warranty in five years and forty thousand vehicles sold.

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Kia Soul EV: Nifty Korean 'leccy hatchback has heart and Seoul

Noel Bourke

Where did you get 10 hours from? It takes 15 minutes to rapid charge if you need it. Most people don't do more than a tiny fraction of the 140-160km real world range per day anyway. It costs between eight and ten times less to run than the diesel Soul and it's fully charged and waiting for you every morning.

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The agony and ecstasy of SteamOS: WHERE ARE MY GAMES?

Noel Bourke

Re: still early days

I don't know what he did here. I have the same BRIX platform running SteamOS and I have no graphics issues.

And out of my steam library of nearly 800 games more than 300 run natively on SteamOS. I'm currently play Metro: Last Light.

In my particular setup SteamOS makes a lot of sense. I have a beast of a gaming PC (i7 4970K, 2 X 780 Ti) in a rackmount chassis in the server room. Whatever isn't ported yet (and thats less and less everyday) I can stream at 4K!

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NEW Raspberry Pi B+, NOW with - count them - FOUR USB ports

Noel Bourke

Re: hmm

I don't think I've ever seen anyone using a full size SD with a raspberry pi. Almost everyone uses a microSD in an adapter. Often people want the flexibility to re-use the card from an old phone/tablet or microSD is more easily available.

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Revealed: Full specs on SEAL Team Six multimedia setup

Noel Bourke
Joke

DevGru

It is pitch black. You are likely to be eaten by a DevGru.

...it's like a grue only tier 2!

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Dell slides out svelte, DVD-less notebook

Noel Bourke
Linux

when was the last time you used a DVD/CD drive?

2005...i think

I replaced the Optical Drive in every laptop I've owned since then with a secondary battery.

I'm sick of people insisting that they NEED an optical drive.

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Samsung PB22-J 256GB SSD

Noel Bourke
Unhappy

What the hell?

1 minute 14 seconds, Jesus that's an awful boot time.

I use an OCZ Apex running Ubuntu Jaunty with a custom kernel.

My boot time recorded by bootchart is 8.4 seconds.

Maybe another 2 seconds for X & Gnome Startup and that's it.

No more disk light. Desktop fully usable.

And I use around 10% of my 60GB drive for the OS & Apps.

Only exception with the apps is the 8GB taken up by

Call of Duty 4 and Visio... The only two windows apps I still use.

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HP UK pulls Linux from all new netbooks

Noel Bourke
Unhappy

What the hell?

There go my plans of ordering one.

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