* Posts by Mayhem

271 posts • joined 3 Feb 2009

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Viagra makes it HARD for malaria, bug-boffins discover

Mayhem

A good secondary use

Along with the existing one of moderating or preventing High Altitude Pulmonary Oedema, where you get fluid buildup in the lungs when mountaineering over 2500m.

A friend of mine was attempting a first ascent on a peak in the Himalaya a decade or so ago, and shocked hell out of the local pharmacist when he presented a prescription for six hundred tablets - it was the supply for his whole party for two months.

I'm not sure what her first thought was, but Sex Fiend had to be pretty high up there.

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Mildly successful flying car crashes - in mildly successful test flight

Mayhem

Re: It may not sound very clever. But...

Not to mention that it is still a car - so long as it doesn't actually get stuck on a building, it can be towed or driven away quickly.

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Australia cracks tech giants' tax dodge code

Mayhem

Re: Wait and see

Err... You want to tax _outgoings_ rather than profits?

Not quite.

What I'm saying is that for almost all countries, the current tax system for businesses was designed in a time when all businesses were local, and some exported or imported overseas.

Today most countries are being exploited by multinationals, that take advantage of legal fictions and loopholes to avoid paying what they should in the countries that they operate in. Starbucks. Google. Amazon. Apple. it really doesn't matter who, BigCorp is a good enough name.

The key is that they and their subsidiaries really are the same company, in spite of the legal fiction that they aren't. In that there is one overall management team that controls pricing and what is happening at every subsidiary, and has shareholders that it reports to. The subsidiaries usually only have one shareholder - the parent company.

And as someone else pointed out, if you or I tried this, we'd be held liable for every scrap of tax owed, but BigCorp gets away with it, because they have the money to buy the right politicians. Financial transfers to related entities attract tax. So do royalty payments. But the "Licence Fees" are allocated as expenses, so can be used to offset profits.

So what I say is the "licencing fees" that BigCorp(AU) pays to BigCorp should be taxed at the same rate that profits or royalty payments should have been - because they really are.

Take the rate Starbucks pays for beans, or Amazon pays Luxembourg for the use of the name in the UK. They are fake costs done for accountancy purposes and everyone knows it.

Being able to make an iThing for x and sell it for 500x is fine. Its when the company "sells" it internally to a subsidiary for 500x-1 that things go wrong. If BigCorp really is two separate companies, then the supplier should be able to sell your iThing at 200x wholesale to a competitor. If they aren't willing to compete, then the two entities are related, and should be taxed accordingly.

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Mayhem

Re: Wait and see

Nonsense.

The problem is that the "market rate" is a polite fiction - BigCorp is a monopoly supplier of their products, so the "market rate" is set to whatever it needs to be to cost more than the profits generated. After all, every country is a different market right?

BigCorp Australia is a separate legal entity, which pays fees for the use of the name and rights to sell BigCorp products. So tax the fees when the money is remitted out of the country.

Say you then declare that the amount of tax owed is (wholesale price *15%) or whatever the tax rate is. This then instantly makes the BigCorp product 15% more expensive in your territory, as it is the customers who will pay. So some will parallel import BigCorp products if they are physical, paying import duties. Others will switch to MidCorp's almost as good but cheaper product. And BigCorp will either have less sales, or will reduce their charges to match MidCorp.

And your internal markets become properly competitive as all players are on the same base.

You don't have to ban international trade, you just have to change the laws to apply matching taxes on the flow of money as it leaves the country. And remove any taxes on the flows of money *entering* the country - you don't tax it twice.

It isn't like you're hurting the little guy here - anyone big enough to have legally independent subsidiaries in different tax territories is big enough to pay their fair dues, the trick is collecting it.

Despite what they say, they will not stop doing business in your country because of it - unless you happen to be tiny - because the money generated will outweigh the tax costs and the market *wants* them there.

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Free markets aren't rubbish – in fact, they solve our rubbish woes

Mayhem

Re: When I was a kid

In Germany today there is a 25c deposit on all plastic drink bottles, which means a bunch of extremely efficient scavengers are permanently installed just outside Security in all the airports, gratefully taking your bottle off you before you go through. With an average of 150ppl per Easyjet flight, that's a lot of bottles coming through.

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So how should we tax these BASTARD COMPANIES, then?

Mayhem

Re: "The things that actually seem to work in making the poor richer."

We don't have low wage poverty in the UK, not judging by the Living Wage we don't, we have tax poverty. And the answer to that is simple, stop bloody taxing poor people. And by doing so we instantly convert the minimum wage into the Living Wage.

Yep, that's one of the simplest and easiest changes for a government to do to raise the quality of life for everyone.

The basic personal allowance is £10600, the minimum wage is approx £11800.

That £1200 is a heck of a lot of cash at that level of income, which will be directly funnelled straight back into the economy via the Vimes boot theory of economics.

Make it a universal change, and every taxpayer benefits, as they have more disposable income, and the money is just as fake as the QE.

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The data centre design that lets you cool down – and save electrons

Mayhem

Re: Fitted racks

How did they attach the servers to the wooden racks?

Are we talking wooden frames with metal inserts for traditional cage nuts, or pure timber?

I would have thought that the weight of a piece of equipment or laden shelf which only attaches at the front would cause undue stress on the frame.

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Graphic designs: Six speedy 17-inch gaming laptops

Mayhem

Clevo laptops

The other trick if you are in the market for a gaming laptop - do it yourself.

Clevo is a Taiwanese company that specialises in designer laptops, that are rebadged and sold through OEM partners like Sager, Schenker or Eurocomm.

You can literally specify what hardware you want in the chassis size you like, and prices are surprisingly reasonable, probably due to the order and then they build it philosophy.

It is also a good source if you are looking for a high res matte screen on a business laptop, instead of the lousy glossy 1440x900 rubbish we tend to see today.

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Welcome to the FUTURE: Maine cops pay Bitcoin ransom to end office hostage drama

Mayhem

The key is offline backups - ransomware can spread and corrupt your online ones, at which point you turn and go "why did we stop using tape again".

Fire, flood, theft - these all affect one site only, and a mirror set, hot site or live backup will quickly restore data.

Accidental deletion is usually reported relatively rapidly.

What this style of malware does is deliberate corruption of all your data, and if it happens at the end of the day just before your file sync kicks off ... you're screwed.

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Australia finds $1 BEELLION to replace No-SQL DATABASE

Mayhem

While IBM *as a vendor* is out of the running, IBM *as a hardware platform* is a pretty strong contender because there will be a logical and reasonably well established migration path from the current hardware and database to wherever they want to go. The key part will be migrating all the customisations that have been put in place over decades, and *noone* will want to be writing them again from scratch.

I expect that one of the major domestic IBM shops will take on the work with their own experienced engineers, along with various warm bodies contracted in from around the world for specific expertise.

Upgrading a core system like this should be relatively straightforward, although I doubt that the people in charge have really thought out what they want done.

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Can you recover your data if disaster strikes? Sure?

Mayhem

Version Control is really important too

As Bloakey mentions above, Cryptolocker and its ransomware ilk are getting increasingly common, bringing us full circle back to the destructive child viruses of the 90s, which would corrupt everything.

We recently redid our whole company backup solution, because while it provided wonderful protection against hardware failure, physical disaster, and accidental deletion, it noticeably wasn't good enough to 100% protect us against deliberate sabotage. And our daily/weekly/monthly backup times were set to be minimally disruptive to staff, which meant a problem that hit us on the last Thursday of a month if not spotted on Friday could be too late to recover from by Monday.

You need to make sure you have air gaps in your backup scheme, whether that be physical gaps of backing up to tape, or virtual gaps like changing the underlying platform to limit the spread.

Version control means you can effectively ignore the impact to roll back to before it hit.

Cryptowall spreads across any mapped network drive or attached USB drive, so if your servers are set with permanently mapped connections, it *will* use them. I know other variants will use commercial exploit kits to search for open shares and spread there. And while AV may run on servers, it probably isn't running on your NAS.

One of our clients got hit pretty badly a couple of weeks back, so it's something I'm very aware of at the moment.

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Snowden dump details Canadian spies running false flag ops online

Mayhem

Re: They drink beer and whisky, just like us

Puerto Rico also has no voting rights, being full of alien races according to the law.

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Ransomware holds schools hostage: 'Now give us Bitcoin worth $129k, er, $124k, wait ...'

Mayhem

One of our customers was hit with this last week

I'd expect the initial ransom was $500 in bitcoin - that is the standard message displayed by Cryptowall 3.0 which is a right bastard of a product.

Our antivirus caught it on the PC, so it only screwed the initial user's profile, but it does a basic network traversal using mapped drives, so completely bollixed the NAS shares which the user had full access to.Since it took them a couple of days to alert us that the infection had taken place, the weekly syncs had taken place and overwritten their secondary NAS as well.

(Edit: They only pay for ad hoc assistance, not for realtime monitoring. We set up protection against hardware failure, not across-the-board data corruption. Suprisingly the XP machines running NAV were left alone, only the w7 machines were targeted across the network)

Our customer only had a backup on USB from December, but were happy to work from that as most of their work is online.

However be aware - it will traverse mapped network drives, and that includes synced cloud folders like dropbox. Not every cloud provider supports versioning, especially for SMB users.

The ONLY safe mechanism against this attack is an offline copy of the data, which for small shops I would suggest at least every 3 months. And since they use commercial exploit kits to deliver the payload, it is very hard to completely defend against, even with IT knowledge.

It's a real change in risk profile, from accidental damage or hardware failure to deliberate trashing of the data. It's almost like the early DOS viruses again, which were designed to paralyse what was infected instead of spreading.

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NZ used XKEYSCORE to spy on World Trade Org election emails

Mayhem

Unsurprising

To be fair to NZ, all of their internet traffic is monitored at the far end by either the US via Hawaii or Australia - they only have two significant undersea cables out of the country, and one primary terrestrial ring domestically.

It's really in their best interest to join the 5 eyes club as at least that way they can share in the monitoring.

Of course, this kind of underhanded trick is completely typical of how governments today act - and of course it is totally different to the governments in the past that all wanted to but didn't have the capability.

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Is the DNS' security protocol a waste of everyone's time and money?

Mayhem

Re: DNS Sec isn't the problem

@Jamie

That makes more sense. I didn't realise it was that easy to replicate the ISP service - most DNS server howtos only relates to lookups on internal servers, not internet ones. I might look into spinning up a DNS server over the weekend then - up until the last round of poor performance I hadn't really thought about it - DNS is one of those fundamental things you only consider when it breaks.

As a better writeup on the situation than I can do from work, which put me on the path of figuring out why my youtube performance had gone down the toilet (again), have a read of

https://jackpearce.com/virgin-media-why-are-you-manipulating-my-traffic/

As best as can be determined, Virgin (and several other ISPs) are effectively proxying all Google services in the UK - most likely to reduce bandwidth costs for all parties concerned. Which is what I meant by ISPs diverting my traffic, and that I can understand - I'm technical enough to work around it, but the masses won't be. The problem is the CDNs are heavily congested, so the cure is worse than the disease for users.

The big issue I have is that there appears to be some form of agreement between GoogleDNS, OpenDNS and the ISPs to subvert what is marketed as open and reliable information into the same CDN networks that I'm using them to avoid.

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Mayhem

Re: DNS Sec isn't the problem

I am not an expert in networking, however as I understand it, unless I set my recursive DNS server to generate my own cache of queries by using the primary authoritative sources for every request, then at some point I have to trust the information coming to me via intermediaries is legitimate.

And if I have to do that, then why bother replicating someone else's work unless I have to?

After all, the major peering networks need to have this information, and they have lots of people employed to ensure that it is correct. At the end of the day the situation always comes down to the cost/benefits of who should you trust.

What I object to in my example above is the unadvertised corruption of the DNS information being passed on to me by sources that are marketed as "trustworthy". My ISP diverting traffic to its own services is one thing - that is expected, and I can bypass it by specifying an external DNS source. Google DNS or OpenDNS diverting my traffic back to my ISP instead of to the public internet or to their own services is quite another. Especially since OpenDNS markets itself as a trusted independent supplier of DNS information, yet has clearly entered into commercial agreements with ISPs to support their traffic management.

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Mayhem

DNS Sec isn't the problem

Legitimate tieups between ISPs, commercial suppliers and the DNS providers is.

For example, Virgin Media now masquerades as all Google services via their caching network, and both GoogleDNS and OpenDNS will point you at the cache servers instead of the real overseas addresses.

Which is fine, until Virgin cocks up their caching (again) and you can't watch a simple youtube video because it stutters constantly.

After chatting with one of their engineers, I now use Level3 as DNS provider, because at least they seem to be neutral and resolves addresses to their public IPs..They are also slightly more trustworthy than most other public free DNS providers.

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UK spaceport, phase two: Now where do we PUT the bleeding thing?

Mayhem

Re: Where to put it?

I seem to recall Peter F Hamilton having floating runways anchored offshore in the Atlantic which had spaceflight capability. That would seem logical enough - and it means you can launch in any direction by just turning the ship around or sailing it south for equatorial launches.

Pykrete might be a plausible base, or just build it like a scaled up oil platform out of a number of segments.

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Biltong, braais, being an 'IT bitch': A UK woman on working in Africa

Mayhem

Re: If I met a woman at a bar..

Heh, the big one for me was learning the difference between now, just now and now now.

Now now means as soon as I can, definitely today at least.

Just now means in the next day or so.

Now means eventually. Maybe. Possibly never.

"Sure, I'll do that now" literally meant it wasn't going to happen.

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Crap mobile coverage costs UK biz £30m a week, reckons survey

Mayhem

Femtocells

They can do as much research as they like - unless someone manages to force a change through OFCOM, mobile repeaters are illegal in the UK except when provided by the mobile operators. Broad spectrum repeaters are completely banned.

Unless one happens to be the Olympics, which is the only instance of mast and network sharing between operators I can think of in recent history.

The Vodafone Suresignals are crap, as are most of the other equivalents unless one only needs to cover a small office of half a dozen employees. You can't easily use more than one nearby, because they don't hand calls between each other, so if you walk into stronger signal range of the next unit, your active call will drop.

We also looked into the serious commercial offerings from the operators - at an average of £5000 per year per access point, and the average building floor needing 6, it gets real expensive real fast. Fine if you happen to be backed by Arab oil wealth, for the rest of us though, not so much.

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Bond villains lament as Wicked Lasers withdraw death ray

Mayhem

It's pretty obvious they've had to do this because more and more developed countries are cracking down on the sale of Class II and above lasers, so they simply can't sell them any more.

This way they can attempt to remove the automatic sales stigma of Wicked Lasers = Dangerous, which might have been useful in building the brand, but is now a hindrance internationally.

After all, few enough customers have the spare cash to splash on a fancy light with not many real practical uses.

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GCHQ and Cable and Wireless teamed as Masters of the Internet™

Mayhem

Re: Ahhh

Exactly what I thought.

£5 says that a close inspection of the tax records revealed an unusually large entry from government accounts, which was buried asap.

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Virgin Media struck dumb by NATIONWIDE packet loss balls-up

Mayhem

Google DNS in London

We had a weird issue last night - we completely lost access to anything Google related - bing worked fine, yahoo worked fine, but google.co.uk and google dns dropped off the net and we lost all packets routed via their networks.

Redirecting our router DNS to the automatic Virgin provided ones brought everything back up.

I plan to revert the change when I get in tonight, but it was probably related to this.

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DAY ZERO, and COUNTING: EVIL 'UNICORN' all-Windows vuln - are YOU patched?

Mayhem

Re: Doesn't Affect Me

Ahh, you see, half the delight of the box was being able to source genuine parts, so an original 486, SB16, intel nic etc, which meant that almost every app has the correct drivers.

I did a dualboot with 3.11 to simplify copying files onto the drive, and then dos for the games.

The biggest headache, as anyone could have predicted, was memory management.

God it has been a LONG time since I had to remember half of that, and playing with EMM386 and QEMM reminded me why we were so glad to get rid of it.

Still, worth hanging onto for nostalgias sake.

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Mayhem

Re: Doesn't Affect Me

I just recently reinstalled 3.11 to simplify getting networking up and running on an old dos box to fire up a few old games again.

Jeez, that was substantially harder than I expected - it is surprisingly difficult to create a DOS boot disk that is an older version than the one present on your system.

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Virgin Media CUTS OFF weekend 'net surfers after embarrassing smut-filtering snafu

Mayhem

unfiltered web feeds

Well I have a range of 100mb circuits from Colt, Level3, TDK and Orange scattered around Europe, and all of them at some stage have passed on polite little notes from the relevant local RIAA affiliate to complain about guests downloading movies*. So it really doesn't matter what tier your ISP is, the Powers That Be will get to them in time.

*To be fair, they don't do anything else, just pass them on. We have a quiet chuckle, and pass them on in turn to the short term storage device aka Recycle Bin.

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UK smart meters arrive in 2020. Hackers have ALREADY found a flaw

Mayhem
Joke

Re: The questions of communications

Don't be silly - they'll use power line networking. After all, noone complains about that sort of transmission.

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Hey, YouTube lovers! How about you pay us, we start paying for STUFF? - Google

Mayhem

Re: Sharing the winnings?

Now, consider Psy. A classic one hit wonder. A bit like Chesney Hawkes. They delivered the goods briefly, without really having showing any previous form.

To be fair, Gangnam Style came off his sixth album, and he was regularly topping the charts domestically in South Korea. So while he is a one hit wonder internationally, I think the no previous form is a little harsh.

Kind of like a solid domestic league footballer having a stunner of a game in the champions league before breaking himself and being relegated.

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IT JOB OUTSOURCING: Will it ever END?

Mayhem

Re: Relative

Turns a very pretty shade of pink in fact

Typical english - gets sunburn the moment you put it outside!

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Boffins who stare at goats: I do believe they’re SHRINKING

Mayhem

Re: survive harsh winters & global warming?

Of course they get smaller when it is warm - they dry out and shrink!

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Sophos to offshore American support operations

Mayhem

As Despair puts it so well

A company that will go to the ends of the Earth for its people will find it can hire them for about 10% of the cost of Americans.

http://www.despair.com/discovery.html

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Revealed: Malware that forces weak ATMs to spit out 'ALL THE CASH'

Mayhem

Re: "32-bit Windows-powered ATM"

@AC

You must have been looking at a different brand of ATM to mine.

Mine definitely had no A/V - they basically booted a very stripped down Windows then went straight to the app. From memory it was all about the old tech - they didn't even support usb mice & keyboards, only PS2.

IIRC they only had 512Mb -1GB of ram - there wouldn't have been enough memory to run much else - every so often they'd lock up with a memory leak and the bank would need to flip the power switch for the whole unit. Thinking back, half of them were still Windows 95 too.

We would run occasionally run A/V on the unit, but only back at home base where we would be running diagnostics for the controller PC or replacing faulty components. Usually we would just yank and reimage the drive from master, guaranteed it would be clean.

I only dealt with the larger hole in the wall style or the big 1m2 4bin free standing ones though, not the little 2bin pocket atms you see today wedged in everywhere in the UK.

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Mayhem

Re: "32-bit Windows-powered ATM"

Bod is right - AV software is not installed as the machines aren't internet accessible, it is a private network between bank and terminals, and half the time it is via a dial up modem. Like any bank would trust a third party product *monitoring their system* without signoffs up the wazoo.

A standard ATM controlling PC is literally a swap out and replace component, any repair tech will have 2-3 in the boot of the car. The security guard standing next to you while you do it is expensive, so the faster you do the job the happier the bank is. You spend around 5 min running through the basic config and you're out of there. Often the cash bins are refilled at the same time since it saves paying for the security guy to come out twice, plus you probably spent 10min cleaning torn fragments of notes out of the distribution mechanisms as part of the spot check.

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Mayhem

So I don't know about NCR machines like in the screenshot, but I do know that last time I was in one, the Wincor Nixdorf ran a version of XP embedded on their beetles - the ATMs used extremely primitive interfaces, so you needed ISA slots.

That being said - the upper part of the machine has a separate key to the lower cash bins, and access to it in the countries I was in required the tech to be met by a security guard from the cash company, who had access to the bins. Generally local bank staff didn't have access to either section, unless they were a particularly large branch who refilled their own bins.

The physical access is the key point - the malware users are most likely to have to have compromised a staff member somewhere along the line - we had a large keyring as the ATMs didn't have that many common keys. I don't remember if it was different per branch or machine, only that it was bloody heavy!

But once you have physical access to the inside, you don't even need malware to dispense from the bins. The internal software will let you do it. What they've done is managed to avoid the logging aspect of the system so that they can hit the same machines over again, and more importantly using a cheap mule from the front panel, which is usually locked down to a very small subset of functionality.

I'm pretty sure it will turn out to be a class of machines affected, and all they needed to do was suitable bribe or extort one of the support techs to install the malware as part of a regular checkup. It is almost always the human element that is the weak link, especially in countries like Mexico.

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Behind the Facebook DRAG QUEEN CRACKDOWN: 'Anonymity soon!'

Mayhem

Oh I see you wish to be anonymous

Please choose from the following list of reasons why you wish to be anonymous?

* abusive spouse

* illegal activity

* don't trust the man

* actually care about privacy

* other

You have chosen Illegal Activity.

Please specify the type of illegal activity you are involved with

* drugs

* sex

* financial

* immoral behaviour

Thank you.

You are now Anonymous. We will not provide any information to third parties about your activity.*

*except for governments and registered multinationals who might wish to do business with you.

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Titan falls! Blizzard cancels World of Warcraft successor

Mayhem

Its all Destiny's fault

The quiet insider word is that it all comes down to Titan ending up looking and playing too much like Bungie's new MMO Destiny, which they learned the details of when Activision set up the publishing deal with Bungie. So back in 2010 they started trying to redesign to differentiate themselves in the market, but now have apparently given that up as a dead loss.

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Your chance to WIN the WORLD'S ONLY HANDHELD ZX SPECTRUM

Mayhem

Re: Android ZX Spectrum emulator

No crashes, but it does have a tendency to get on your nerves by complaining all the time.

Seems a bit on the paranoid side too by all the permissions it asks for ;)

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Oracle's Larry Ellison quits as CEO – new bosses are Hurd'n'Catz

Mayhem

Re: Love article title, Herding Cats

While I worked for EDS I loved those ads, especially the airplanes in the sky one - taking off with no idea of a destination, frantically putting things together at the last minute, and expecting the tech staff to wing it to a plan ... yep, that was EDS.

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Snowden, Dotcom, throw bombs into NZ election campaign

Mayhem

Re: Of course they haven't conducted mass surveillance of their people...

Yes, I noticed Key being extremely specific about the GCSB never conducting any surveillance, same script as for Cameron and Obama when they were asked about the reciprocal nature of US-UK data capture.

I expect NZ is spied upon by the ASD, and we return the favour. Makes for perfect deniability.

As for the Southern Cross bugging - given the nature of what we've seen of atlantic cable taps, I wouldn't put it past the NSA to have already tapped the Hawaii end. I expect they want the NZ end for error correction on the bugging mechanisms.

Heck, I still remember being in a call centre the day that some muppet unplugged half the fibres in Takapuna by mistake on a Saturday afternoon in 2005 and broke most internet connectivity for NZ for 8-9 hours while they respliced them all. There are a lot of substantial service degradations that don't make it into the headlines that would have been perfect opportunities to install "upgrades"

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Heavy VPN users are probably pirates, says BBC

Mayhem

Re: what's the difference?

What's the difference between being 'labeled a pirate' and being 'considered suspicious'?

Oh there are a whole bunch of use cases for the idea of Suspicious for a overarching monitoring service which wants to quietly expand its remit to grow the business.

For example, if you don't fall under the simple idea of Pirate then they can bump you up to the wonderfully evocative potential child porn trader or all the way to resembles known host of criminal sites.

That's what all the comment about burden of proof are about, and why under rule of law it should be the accuser's job. It is much harder to prove a negative, so making you prove that you aren't using the VPN for piracy merely removes you from the list of potential pirates. It says nothing about the other lists of potential criminals ... unless of course, you have nothing to hide ... at which point they get to ask "Why do you need a VPN" ... both exposing their lack of understanding of basic security protocols, and inviting you to bend over to all and sundry ...

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Mayhem

Or you use a UK located server to restream to yourself

I have a Plex server in London.

That has a iplayer channel that I can access from any of my registered devices wherever I am while travelling in Europe, and since iplayer is streaming to London and the Plex server is streaming to me, I can happily watch anything. Should work equally well in Australia, although I haven't tested that yet to determine performance.

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Cryptolocker flogged on YouTube

Mayhem

Re: Malware served through ads? Oh dear...

@ammabamma

So a related question - assuming the virus writers are operating under an expectation of many of the above being present ... could this become a silent infection mechanism of a more savvy user?

After all, being used to not seeing ads means the user becomes complacent in terms of what is rendering on the page. The primary defences on a windows platform are 1/2/4 above.

Yet Adblock relies on a (relatively) trusted third party list which means what is blocked is known, and could in theory be worked around. To be fair, the vector above relies on a trusted ad delivery mechanism, so should be blocked at the source as I understand it. But if they are tailoring their exploits to language/platform/browser, then they are already being selective in terms of target, so it isn't a huge stretch to extrapolate further.

Inquiring minds would like to know.

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Cops baffled by riddle of CHICKEN who crossed ROAD

Mayhem
Thumb Up

Re: possums

Yep, but the key to possums is to hit em with the back wheel so the mess sprays out behind you, rather than under the vehicle. Even more fun on the gravel back roads.

Cue the mandatory rally ad

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xaoAkoLT274

On the other hand, Aussies learn early to swerve round wombats, which are pretty much indestructible mobile traffic islands...

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BOFH: The Great Backup BACKDOWN

Mayhem

Re: Flaming external usb drives

Ahh, the classic I have a mirror therefore I have a backup idea.

Until it is pointed out firmly that all a mirror means is you will happily duplicate the missing file.

Or worse as I found many years ago, you duplicate the corrupted Master File Table, and lose everything on both disks.

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Israel's Iron Dome missile tech stolen by Chinese hackers

Mayhem

Mirage

Given Israel's history of industrial espionage, especially Mossad stealing all 200,000 original blueprints of the Mirage V from the French (including the engine plans) back in 1971, which they then used to construct the Kfir - I really have little sympathy for them getting spied on in return.

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Stick a 4K in them: Super high-res TVs are DONE

Mayhem

Re: aware of the benefits of 4K

Speaking as someone who actually has an 80" TV (non-4k) in the lounge, anyone sitting closer than about 5ft from the screen will have much more serious problems than differentiating pixels. Preferred viewing distance is 10-14 ft. You can however comfortably separate pixels @1920/1080 from about 2-3ft away with good eyesight.

First things first, you *need* HD or blu-ray content to make the most of it - low res imagery looks horrible as the pixels are blown up to massive proportions. Particularly noticeable when streaming poor youtube content. The difference between SD and HD content from Sky is orders of magnitude, but there just aren't that many good HD channels.

Secondly, gaming when closer than about 6-8ft away (which fills your vision) is pretty much a recipe for motion sickness. The brain has issues coping with that much stuff changing that quickly in your peripheral vision. Just moving a mouse around up close is a headache. I end up doing something else while the controller batteries recharge.

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Reg Latin scholars scrap over LOHAN's stirring motto

Mayhem
Pint

Re: Caliganote

Just wanted to say that dodgy puns like this (and the attention to detail in the delightful article that spawned it) is one of the main reasons I love el Reg so much.

Two. Two main reasons. And whoever writes the subheads on the front page has those occasional flashes of brilliance that makes whatever rubbish is in the story well worth reading.

So the three main reasons I love the Reg...

Barkeep! A round to the Reg team on my way out!

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Who has your credit card data? 1 million HOLIDAY-MAKERS' RECORDS exposed

Mayhem

Interesting

Ahh, so that's what happened.

I actually used Essential Travel for the past five years, found them a good and reliable inexpensive travel insurance provider for a worldwide multitrip policy.

And they no longer exist, as of some time in the past year - I was unable to renew my policy in January as the new company simply didn't support anything other than package holiday cover.

I wonder if the previous lot got flattened in an acquisition, and the underlying setup was so bad it was safer to start afresh. Certainly the old website was terrible, both to use, and from a coding viewpoint. And as demonstrated here.

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Microsoft's Windows Phone 8.1 world conquest plan: folders!

Mayhem

Re: @Robert Grant

It means he's heard of Jokes, and knows that good Jokes bring the mythical Upvote, but hasn't really understood how they work, so is building his own imitation Joke based on what he's seen used before in the hope of getting some sympathetic Upvotes.

aka ... the Cargo Cult, where primitive tribes built fake wooden airstrips after WWII to try and attract back the military aircraft bearing Cargo.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cargo_cult

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The cute things they say

Mayhem

Re: Barf

Easiest way to clean a keyboard is to put it in a mesh bag and put it in the dishwasher (ideally without all the dirty plates)

The mesh bag is just to collect any keys that fall off in the process, to save hunting around to see where they went.

Put it in a hot water cupboard for a day or three to dry properly, good as new.

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