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* Posts by BristolBachelor

2020 posts • joined 30 Jan 2009

ESA's spaceplane cleared for lift-off in February 2015

BristolBachelor
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Re: With it's enhanced direction control...

It's sadly lacking in space (and life support) to be a lifeboat. As it is, the Soyuz can depart at a moment's notice; no need to wait while the ISS disintegrates around you (worst case). That is unlike the Space shuttle, which needed to wait until an oportune moment to detach.

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Countdown contestant pays homage to IT Crowd's Moss

BristolBachelor
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Re: "Not available in your country. Sorry."

"As in Amazon.co.uk? (can be used to order stuff to a French address)"

Yes, and I can tell you that Amazon.co.uk can sell you the DVDs. (even to a French afdress, although they'll now stiff you for postage) I can also tell you that the DVD loading sequencies, menus and extras are all worth watching.

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Lights OUT for Philae BUT slumbering probot could phone home again as comet nears Sun

BristolBachelor
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There has been discussion of designing one in the future for outer solar sysyem probes, and things like a possible boat craft to sail the seas of Titan (as well as work to produce the required nuclear isotopes). For now, there is some R&D to optimise solar array power generation on the surace of Mars, which would also help for future probes similar to Philae.

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BristolBachelor
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Possible recovery

I know of 2 missions where the agency lost a satellite during eclipse but then recovered it. (the battery ran below the end of discharge threshold, and so everything switched off). When you get power back, you first have to run heaters to defrost some subsystems, including the battery, and then you can start charging it again. As the comet gets nearer the sun, the power available in the solar array will increase substantially (I'm currently doing work for a mission at Jupiter, and there is 1/4 of the power that I'd typically have for the same craft at Earth)

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Philae healthier... beams CHEESE: Proud ESA shows off FIRST COMET SURFACE PIC

BristolBachelor
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Trollface

Re: Bah!

<Reply sarc = comment sarc>

Yes, and the inquiry will find that the imaging system was designed using SI units, only metres, so no foot in the mouth, and hence a succesful(ish) landing and and that is why there is a working imaging system.

</sarc>

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Vodafone: For Pete's sake! Apple’s 'soft' SIM's JUST AN EE SIM

BristolBachelor
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Re: Sounds like Vodafone is unhappy

I have a phone that could not be more consumer friendly - I can put ANY SIM from ANY network in it and it will work. No need for anything else. No need for the manufacturer to do anything, and certainly no need for them to compile the list of who I can use.

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Ericsson boss sticks a pin in Google’s loony Loon bubble

BristolBachelor
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Re: They're not fighting the wind @ratfox

Yup, that's right. They are sort of trying to do an Iridium on the cheap (launching satellites is still bloody expensive). However they are running into the same problems; each country wants to regulate the airwaves within their borders. They'll have to negotiate with every country they overfly for bandwidth (or re-sell their broadcast capability to current license holders in each country).

I don't know how succesfully the loons could change their altitude to take advantage of winds in different directions to stay in a rough location.

I wonder if Hans Vestberg is just suffering from sour grapes from not being able to sell his companies kit to go on the loons?

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BristolBachelor
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Re: He's right.

Yeah Google should hire an RF engineer. They'd be able to tell them that you can't fire radio signals from up in the air to down on the ground.

Meanwhile I'll wait until Hans Vestberg tells me that Orange will start covering where I live. It's at almost 1000m above sea level, and Orange seems to have gravity problems; their coverage doesn't reach this high.

Disclaimer - I currently live here because I'm working on a crazy project to build a ship that will travel to an altitude of 3x diamter of the planet to transmit radio signals down to here.

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The late 2014 Apple Mac Mini: The best (and worst) of both worlds

BristolBachelor
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Re: SIMMs

Yeah, and before they were selling the new Mac Mini, there weren't any PCB manufacturers making the PCBs for it either. Funnily enough, there are now. If Apple says they want to buy memory in a certain format, it will be available.

I obviously don't know the reason, but soldering the RAM directly on the board will save the cost of the extra PCB, and the sockets. Selling it for the same price means extra profit. Forcing people to trade up to a more expensive one rather than buying a cheap one and seperate RAM elsewhere makes even more profit. Not having people change the RAM avoids lots of service and technical questions about what you can do or because it doesn't work right afterwards. A bit of negative press; people will still buy them; there is almost no negative for Apple.

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BristolBachelor
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It's not quite that simple. Memory monitor always stayed green on our Mac, but the difference between 8GB and 16GB was unbelivable, even with only Lightroom and Photoshop open. With only 8GB, having mail and Safari open at the same time led to Photoshop basically hanging while importing from Lightroom, and Memory monitor still didn't say that there was a problem. I've seen older Mac Pros happily chewing through more than 48GB of RAM using Adobe CS.

Not having upgradable RAM is a bit of a show stopper. When our Mac was bought, 16GB wasn't an option from Apple, and was barely available elsewhere. A year later and suddenly the upgrade option was available from many places. Buying a whole new machine just to change the RAM is plain wrong.

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Japan tells operators: Put a SIM lock in a new mobe? You'd better UNLOCK it for FREE

BristolBachelor
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Re: Yah! @No 6

In addition to what is said above; if I enter into a contract with, say Vodafone, how does locking a phone to Vodafone stop me from selling the phone to someone else who wants to use it on Vodafone?

And if they insist on locking the phone to protect the contract, they won't chase after someone who stops paying?

The contract protects the contract full stop. Locking the phone is just to spite you if you want to go elsewhere.

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Who wants to be A MILLIONAIRE? Not so fast, Visa tells wannabe pay-by-bonk thieves

BristolBachelor
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Smaller payments better

There was a case in the US of a gang stealing 20¢ or similar at a time. It was ages before anyone bothered complaining and they investigated. By then, they had netted millions.

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Pixel mania: Apple 27-inch iMac with 5K Retina display

BristolBachelor
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Re: Value for money?

I'm still playing nicely with the Dell U2410. This uses the same IPS LCD panel as the iMAC from a while ago. However the difference is that the Dell has a CFL backlight that gives nice even coverage and AdobeRGB colour gamut. The i-version only manages sRGB, has a very shinny front and uneven lighting. Also the i-brightness is so high that you lose almost 2-bits per pixel attempting to adjust the brightness level when you calibrate it (and the calibration still varies across the screen). All of this is necessary with things that actually go to print.

I'm watching the Dell 5k monitors with interest to see how they play out. I'm unlikely to buy the i-version because of the limitations that normally come with it. Oh and I'm not anti i-things at all. These Dells are driven from Macs.

As an aside, I'm lost for words that Windows cannot scale the UI properly on screens, given that Window3.0 had a screen resolution DPI setting that was expressly designed to do things likt this.

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Cisco and friends chase WiFi's searing speeds with new cable standard

BristolBachelor
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Re: It would make more sense to have a "passive" Interface

So what you are saying is that instead of having the modulator/demodulator next to the RF stages and antennas, you put it at the other end of a Cat5 cable?

And this allows you to more easily upgrade your infrastructure? <Sarc>Why, because you don't have to climb a ladder to where the RF/antennas are to change the modulator/demodulator - you just change them in the rack where they are fitted instead? </Sarc> If you seriously change the modulation scheme, you still have to change the modulator/demodulator unless you built enough flexibility into the original design, and in this case it doesn't matter where it physically is.

Also beam forming invloves adding a phase delay into the RF signal. I'm not sure that you could do it at any stage other than RF. Beam forming is also to direct the signal from a particular set of antennas that are close together. If you have a whole site that was say 300m accross and tried beam forming, the beams would only really be formed at a significant distance from all the antennas (likely beyond the range for WiFi), and would not really work inside the perimeter of the antennas. Meanwhile, beamforming accross the 6 antennas of a single AP works very nicely because you are outside the perimeter of the antennas, and at 2-3m away you are at a significant distance compared to the 10-15cm between the antennas.

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Knocking Knox: Samsung DENIES vuln claims, says mysterious blogger is a JOKER

BristolBachelor
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Re: "using a password and PIN that was subsequently written into a "pin.xml" file in cleartext"

But presumably "automount" means that the user doesn't want to/need to enter it (similar to the auto login account name and password being stored in clear text in the windows registry)

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Trips to Mars may be OFF: The SUN has changed in a way we've NEVER SEEN

BristolBachelor
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Re: Magnetoplasma propulsion

Because we don't have any way to power it. They've been talking about 250kW, which is a little over twice the power available on the ISS. If you were happy to have no power, and no thrust while you were in eclipse, you could just about use all the solar arrays of the ISS to do it, until you started moving towards Mars, when thevpower would drop off because of that pesky 4th power rule.

You'd probably have to look at an active nuclear reactor, but with the cooling issues above. Whereas nuclear thermal doesn't need much extra cooling - the cooling comes for free by heating the gas that you then expell for thrust, thus carrying the heat away.

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Xiaomi boss snaps back at Jony Ive's iPhone rival 'theft' swipe

BristolBachelor
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Re: Correction...

It's not juat mobile manufacturers. I hear that Swiss railways even stole a clock-face design from Apple. :/

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Inflatables in SPAAACE! ISS 'nauts to enjoy bouncy castle spaceship

BristolBachelor
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Re: Bit of an empty article?

"I thought this was a new site, not twitter? Did I take a wrong turn?"

No. The news is that they are now announcing that they intend to launch a module to the ISS in 2015.

The technology is certainly not new; there are at least 2 in orbit and have been for years, and there is plenty written about how they work, etc. in other places, with handy links provided.

I see that there is also an article about Belkin routers melting. Should that article include pages describing exactly what a router is, and how IP packets are transferred from one interface to the other?

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Marriott fined $600k for deliberate JAMMING of guests' Wi-Fi hotspots

BristolBachelor
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Re: curious how it works

It probably sniffs WiFi packets, and for any not on their netwotk, sends a deauth.

The solution is this: the radio hardware is pretty obvious. Simply imagine that you suffer from "electro-smog" phobia, rip the stuff from the ceiling/walls and claim it was self-defence, as it assaulted you.

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Turn OFF your phone or WE'LL ALL DI... live? Europe OKs mobes, tabs non-stop on flights

BristolBachelor
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Re: Great.

It's more likely a consequence of what ham radio/CBer discovered about the new fangled electric petrol pumps. While the mechanical ones just worked (TM), the electric ones forgot how to count if uou held down the press-to-talk key. Yay! free fuel! Eventually, the garages noticed abd put up signs, similarly the pump makers were forced to do a better job.

The claim of hazardous environment doesn't cut it when they then don't force you to ground your car during filling, the the things like light fittings on the forecourt are not safe for use in hazardous environments either.

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BristolBachelor
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Re: Don't get too upset

So these potential projectiles are only a problem if they are electronic and switched on? The same device turned-off is suddenly a not-projectile, and the wooden mini chess set with magetic pieces just doesn't count?

Which law of physics is that? Must be one of the classes I skipped /

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Man buys iPHONE 6 and DROPS IT to SMASH on PURPOSE

BristolBachelor
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Re: Transparent aluminum (sic)

How about transparent aluminum oxide? Call it saphire if you want. Bit expensive for a whale tank though.

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Apple's Cook: We have never allowed g-men access to Apple servers

BristolBachelor
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They don't need to. The government come knocking at the door, and Apple just hands over everything. However, they haven't put a back-door in anything, nor given access to their servers; hence no lie. Call me a cynic.

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Spies would need SUPER POWERS to tap undersea cables

BristolBachelor
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Why cut it live?

The thing is that these cables take a long time to lay, and you get loads of notice as companies group up, sell prospective bandwidth, issue requests for quotations to cable manufacturers, book cable laying ships, etc.

So, you put in a splice after the cable has started being laid, but before it is operational. You have loads of time to do it, and it could be done before people notice. Yes, it's probable that the cable is not 100% dead for 100% of the time that it is being laid, in order to ensure that they don't lay dead bits, but it's probably not live 100% of the time either.

The other thing is that it would be relatively easy to pay the layers to look the other way, while you play with it, and/or implant someone in the crew.

However, it's far easier to just hook in where the cable lands.

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THREE QUARTERS of Android mobes open to web page spy bug

BristolBachelor
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Re: I can't actually remember the last time I purposely used the Android Browser

With the stock Android browser, you can get into an extra settings page and set any user-agent that you want, including NCA Mosaic. Sorry, from here can't remember how, but istr you enter a specific non-URL string and then select something weird in settings or somesuch.

I actually run Firefox because I also run it on one of my boxes too, so have access to open tabs, and bookmarks. However it doesn't do a good job with the "request desktop site" imho.

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Apple's big bang: iPhone 6, ANOTHER iPhone 6 Plus and WATCH OUT

BristolBachelor
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Re: Apple Pay? Not if they use the current iTunes approach..

I'm in this boat(but have 2x iTunes accounts). I also have the same fchsking problem with Google and their app store too - even for FREE apps. It makes me want to do illegal things to some commercial manager at Google.

Microsoft is even worse though. For Win7 /Office 2010, we have 8 different versions that are all enterprise - but for different countries. We coukdn't even just use the English plus language packs, because changing the language screws some things up, and even then parts of Excel don't work

However there is only ONE version of OSX - just install and set language (haven't bought anything from the app store - everything direct from Adobe, etc.)

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Power station fault cuts electricity, water and internet in Cairo

BristolBachelor
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UK too this winter

Sounds like a prediction of this winter in the UK - except that the temperatures will be 4°C instead of 40°C. Anyone else remember going to the local elecy shop to get a timetable for when there'd be power in your zone of town, and lighting by candles?

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NASA clears zero-G 3D printer for mission to SPAAAAACE

BristolBachelor
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No, they'd just have to change the storyline a little. The printer would only work from the power supply socket in the command module. The power supply in the command module would then fail, and they'd need to print a new part to fix it... Something would have to be built using just a bog roll, a staple stolen from a printout, the foil packet of a space curry meal..... in order to power the printer from the socket in the Service Module, but the computer to control it would still be in the CM - so they would have to try to hand cross-compile the code for the incompatible computer in the SM.....

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Pimp my lounge and pierce my ceiling: Home theatre goes OTT

BristolBachelor
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Re: time to seperate switching amplification and processing

I do that with my Panasonic Plasma (Optical output for selected input channel). Also has the advantage, that it is not smart and does exactly nothing except display pictures and has a digital tuner. It also outputs the audio on one of the HDMI inputs, but my amp does not have HDMI, so I don't use it.

An advantage of it is that it also delays the optical output by the same amount as the time taken by the video processing to maintain lip-sync.

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NASA to reformat Opportunity rover's memory from 125 million miles away

BristolBachelor
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"...write off the rovers after 90 days..."

It doesn't work like that. You don't assume that your car will stop working after 2 years, but when you buy it, they only say that it will work for 2 years (after that you are on your own and have to pay if something happens).

What happens, is that the specs call for a reliability figure and a time (e.g. my last project had a reliability figure of 99.999999% for 15 years of life). Everything is then designed for that lifetime/reliability. So in the case of the rover, there would've been "somepercentage%" probability that it would last 90 days. If it died before that, someone would've been sent to the American equivalent of a Siberian weather station (Guantanamo?). The expectation would be that the mission would last longer than 90 days, but you need to draw a minimum line in the sand to start with.

Everything would've been set up and funded to operate the rover for at least 90 days, and after that, additional funding and manning would be provided if it still worked, and the resources were not needed elsewhere (e.g. time on NASA's deep space network.

The wiper blade idea has been mentioned in other posts, but the dust is not like Earth dust. It is extremely gritty and will scratch anything it's dragged over. Also, if it is charged, that won't necessarily help anyway, because it could just jump back over the cells when the wiper blade has passed over.

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Facebook to let stalkers unearth buried posts with mobe search

BristolBachelor
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Re: Has it?

I'm not on it, but Mrs. Bachelor is, and she did some research that showed some new posts are automatically buried and not shown to everyone who subscribes. So to be able to find old posts when even new ones might not show up? - you may need to use the AccessAll API included for the NSA.

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DNS cockup locks Virgin Media customers out of ntlworld.com email

BristolBachelor
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Re: @Angela Taylor

Rarely?

So if an email server tries to send an email, and there's no MX record the email still gets sent? News to me. And the list-server doesn't drop the email address from the list because the email address doesn't exist?

There is a possibility that a human will see a message that an email wasn't drlivered, and they might try a 2nd time (and it will probably fail again, and they'll probably give up). However any invoicing/ordering etc. system will just fail to deliver the email.

Afaiac the email will normally be lost.

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Harvard boffins 'reverse-engineer' Chinese censorship

BristolBachelor
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Is it that different in England, where you now have to apply for permission to protest about something? (And the request can be denied, or the protest takes place, and the police beat anyone there, even if they are just passing by).

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Galileo can't do the fandango: Two Euro GPS nav sats sent into WRONG ORBIT

BristolBachelor
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Re: Why not ask SpaceX?

Well I believe that the normal approach will be to launch the sats in groups of 4 on Ariane 5 (which has an excellent record for very precise orbits). However, they wanted to launch fewer for the first launch to test out the design of the satellite to allow the following satellites to be modified if required. Hopefully, the booked Ariane launches will go without a hitch. Note that SpaceX has also failed to deliver 2 payloads to their correct orbits.

Also the European union /ESA probably would prefer to use Ariane because it helps to assure European access to space (Ariane was originally developed because the US said that Europeans could launch sats on their rockets, but would not be allowed to keep any money made by the satellites - imagine how the telecoms market would look in that case). This may be seen as similar to SpaceX receiving a large amount of cash so that the US can launch cargo/people to the ISS without using Russian launchers, or satellite manufacturers in the US being banned from using launches provided by the Chinese.

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True fact: 1 in 4 Brits are now TERRORISTS

BristolBachelor
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Re: Possessing "Information useful to a terrorist"

So is a bus timetable "Information useful to a terrorist". Basically it seems that the law was written by a bunch of nitwits, or was deliberately vague to allow it's easy use to arrest, hold and convict people. (notice that's "or", not "XOR")

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BristolBachelor
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Re: Geneva convention

I suspect that the original poster was refering to the requirement (request?) to not simply bomb the fuck out of whole areas containing "civilians". The murdering/maiming aught to be constrained to the "enemy combatants".

Personally I don't see anything civilised about a list of rules for who it is ok murder. From this I don't understands about "innocents" being murdered (probably because I don't understand the concept of being "guilty of being on a list of those ok to be killed). While I'm at it, why do the press then go on to say "...including women and children" - wtf? is it suddenly ok to murder men? It's only a problem if you murder women or children?

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Galileo, Galileo! Galileo, Galileo! Galileo fit to go. Magnifico

BristolBachelor
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Re: The good news, of course, being...

GPS (and Gallileo) receivers are purely passive devices. They receive signals from a number of satellites and use those to calculate their position. They transmit nothing. The only way for someone to track you is to have something else that then transmits the coordinates that the GPS receiver calculated (or if you forgot your aluminium foil hat; by reading your mind).

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UK fuzz want PINCODES on ALL mobile phones

BristolBachelor
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That may help in one regard, but how long between you leaving your phone on a table in a Starbucks, walking around a bit, realising that you've lost it and then being able to access said Google service to lock your phone to prevent someone reading it's contents?

I always have mine locked, and that's mainly to prevent opportunistic reading of its content.

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Snowden is FREE to ESCAPE FROM RUSSIA, say officials

BristolBachelor
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In US Gov and US TLA agencies' eyes, US law is international law "What is law?"

Fixed it for you.

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SCORE: Rosetta probe hits orbit of duck-shaped comet

BristolBachelor
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Re: Very impressive re. semantics

Unfortunately I bought all the sequels a couple of years ago before I found out they weren't actually written by Arthur C. Clarke. When I read that he gave storylines for the books, I read them anyway to see where the story went, but the writting style was depressingly different.

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NASA tests crazytech flying saucer thruster, could reach Mars in days

BristolBachelor
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Re: Captain Future's enemy had one of those.

The last time I thought about it, it seemed evident to me that the force towards the "front" would exactly equal the force towards the "back".
I guess that you come from flatland and can only thonk 1-dimensionly. If you think 3-dimensionly and use vectors, you realise that the conoical sides are supposed to generate a net difference in one direction compared to the other. I'm not saying it works, but hey, that would be a great thing, no?

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BristolBachelor
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Re: REPORTEDLY...

Bit of a pants vacuum chamber then. Ours have bulk-head patch panels that allow passthrough of cables, fibres or waveguides. Thec whole idea is to have a vacuum inside it but be able to connect your kit up to stuff outside to test it.

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BristolBachelor
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Re: @Paul Crawford

Nah, 2.5kW is in the class of reasonable (big) size imaging or science satellite. Big communication class is more like 15kW - 22kW. Of that maybe 1kW is used by the platform and the rest is for the payload.

As for solar panels, I'm not sure I believe 40%. For space you need GaAs, not silicon because of the radiation, especially as you move out of LEO orbit and out of the atmosphere. I think maybe 32-35% might be achievable at the cell level, but your panel isn't 100% cells - you have wiring, mechanism, other circuits, etc. Outside the atmosphere you get an average insolation of ~1370W/m², but as has been said, that drops to ~40% by Mars. Given that I don't have Mathcad on my mobile, I'll leave the calcs to someone else.

The Russians had quite a few satellites with thermal nuclear power plants that would go nicely with this tech for getting to/from the outer planets.

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Kiwi Rocket Lab to build SUPER-CHEAP sat launchers (anyone know 30 rocket scientists?)

BristolBachelor
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Please don't get me wrong. I wholeheartedly agree that this is needed, and I like the look of what they are proposing. I just think it a bit disingenuous to compare the launch costs of this and a geo telecoms sat. (Just like if I say that my bicycle is cheap because it costs less than a Rolls Royce)

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BristolBachelor
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Re: How many orbiting satellites can be put up there?

It depends. If you want to put something on the equitorial geo-stationary belt, then yes, there is slot allocation. However this rocket wouldn't even manage to get itself anywhere near on a trajectory in that directdion, let alone a payload.

In Low-Earth Orbit, there is a generally agreed rule that if you put something up there, you have to make sure it comes back safetly and doesn't just litter. The new Metop sats had a problem with this, and the redesign to carry enough fuel to de-orbit safetly was significant. However Metops are also significantly bigger than this rocket can fly.

That leaves the little micro / nano satellites etc. I think that the rules generally depend on the launching country, and are generally more relaxed. You generally have to ensure that it will de-orbit within a certain time-frame, which normally just means putting it into the correct orbit. However, for example the law in the UK says something like if you want to launch something into space, then you have to get it up there and back by chauffeured Rolls Royce and jump though a few hoops on the way, while wrapped in red-tape.

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BristolBachelor
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It's a bit of a bad comparison to say that it normally costs over $100m to launch a 5T satellite to geo-stationary orbit, and then say that this rocket will launch 0.1T to LEO for $5m.

It's a bit like asking why does a flight from the UK to New Zealand cost so much, when a Tuc Tuc ride in Tailand only costs £0.10.

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Israel's Iron Dome missile tech stolen by Chinese hackers

BristolBachelor
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Re: @ AC

It's very well saying that the intercept rate is meant to be over 95% - I have specifications for projects that say all sorts of things. You just issue a request for deviation, or a specification waver, and the nasty "meant to be" just goes away.

There was an interesting article published a while ago, and then a similar one more recently by the "Bulletin of Atomic Scientists". It covers how the Iron Dome interceptor works, and suggests a possible kill rate. It's interesting reading, but suggests that 95% may be the miss rate.

http://thebulletin.org/evidence-shows-iron-dome-not-working7318

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Child diagnosed as allergic to iPad

BristolBachelor
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I remember having all sorts of problems with a domestic appliance I was responsible for, because the the li-ion cells used inside the battery pack are nickel plated! There is no excuse these days for not knowing that nickel can cause sesitivity.

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That 'wiped' Android phone you bought is stuffed with NAKED SELFIES – possibly

BristolBachelor
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Re: BristolBachelor

"More on that story please!"
Well let's see. From where I was working at the time, it was sometime in the 90's. Some details are deliberately left out, like the country, airport, aircraft etc. As I understand it, I could use the investigation in general terms as an example when talking about investigations, failures or systems engineering, but certain details that aren't relevant to that use might make people blush. So here is an example of a system level failure and a small part about the investigation that is worth baring in mind when designing equipment that might be expected to undergo post mortem if something goes wrong.

Pilot flying a small regional jet came in to land and set the engines to idle (oops 1). During final approach, he decided he didn't like something, and decided to do a go-around, so he throttled the engines to 100%. The engines now being below nominal operating temp because of the time spent at idle, throttled up a bit, but not to 100% (if you go from 0% to 100% in a sudden jump, the turbine blades heat-up, expand quicker than the outer of the engine and things get really noisy really quickly).

Realising that he wasn't getting 100% thrust, the pilot decided that he was going to have to land anyway, so changed his mind in a hurry, and got the plane onto the runway. Sometime around now, with the engines up to nominal temp and with the throttle still at 100% (Oops 2), ramped up the trust to the max. Plane shot down the runway like a bat out of hell, overshot and went into a forest.

They scrambled a helicopter to locate the plane as it was a bit hard to follow the random path through the trees. The investigation could not interview the flight crew and reconstructed evens from the flight recorders, radar records, positions of controls, etc. We were asked to retrieve whatever we could from the built-in records in our unit. The unit does a built-in-test (BIT) every time at start-up, a fuller BIT when commanded, and some periodic on-going checking during normal use. Also any anomalies are recorded - all done to identify possible faults for maintenance.

The box was a bit of a mess as I said earlier. The E² (effectively flash that is erased byte at a time instead of page at a time) dies were taken to the manufacturer who had a nice test set-up that could probe directly on the bond-pads. Can't remember which manufacturer it was, but it's likely that they don't exist by that name anymore and have been bought and assimilated so many times it would be difficult to find out. Anyway, the data was read-out of the die, and for speed was copied into a new chip and plugged into an engineering unit to read-out the logs. Separately, a manual search was done through the raw data to confirm that nothing was missed by the log read-out.

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Today's Facebook fury: Coppertone-like baby pic ban baffles US mom

BristolBachelor
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I think your case is a little exyreme, but obviously, anyone who has posted a photo on Facebook of a woman in which more than her eyes are visible should be banned, because in one corner of 1 state in the world, it's ilegal. Utter fcsking nonsence!

Mrs bachelor is a newborn photographer, and she has to deal with this sort of shit every week! She even has edited photos of babies like Barbie, that have no arse cracks or nipples!

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