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* Posts by DragonLord

214 posts • joined 5 Nov 2008

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Hey, non-US websites – FBI don't have to show you any stinkin' warrant

DragonLord

Re: So why bother to send a letter of request to a foreign country...

I figure that what they should do is get a warrant for hacking the server, and once they locate the server either the server is in the USA at which point the warrant still stands, the server is in a country they have a treaty with at which point they did their good faith bit by getting the warrant in the first place and now they can in good faith get assistance from the Icelandic government. Finally if it's in a country with no treaty they can ask a diplomat for advice and, because they've already got a warrant whatever course of action is advised will have started in good faith.

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CONSUMERISM IS PAST ITS SELL-BY DATE: Die now, pay later

DragonLord

Re: never forget though

Marketing, otherwise known as highlighting all the positives while minimising the negatives.

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Want to see the back of fossil fuels? Calm down, hippies. CAPITALISM has an answer

DragonLord
Headmaster

Re: Clean energy NOW

@DougS

If they weren't caring about that possibility and making sure that it couldn't happen then there's nothing to stop them using the same material they use in bombs in pure enough concentrations that if there was a failure in the system they could form a critical mass.

Hence I was saying that the reason nuclear is expensive is specifically to avoid those sorts of situations and to make it the safest form of electricity generation currently available.

In short, if you ignored all of the safeguards that we have in place for nuclear and used the wrong radio active material, you could indeed get an explosion. Which as I said not so directly in my previous post, would be stupid.

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DragonLord

Re: Clean energy NOW

Nuclear isn't expensive because of excessive bureaucracy - although that's part of the reason. It's expensive because of all the failsafes that need to be built into the station, and the fact that you need to employ highly qualified people for all of the important jobs in the station. The actual fuel is pretty cheap/GW compared to other fuels.

Why do we need all the failsafes? Because if something goes catastrophically wrong at a coal plant you get devastation within about a mile of the station at worst. If the same happens at a nuclear plant it could be because some fissile material has achieved critical mass and is the right type to actually cause an explosion, at which point you could be looking at devastation within 5-10 miles and problems outside that area.

The result of all this is that Nuclear power is the safest source of power/GW in the world.

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Spies, avert eyes! Tim Berners-Lee demands a UK digital bill of rights

DragonLord

Re: Well we'd need a more refined bill of rights

>> Of course if they started DRMing food/essentials you might have a leg to stand on.

>I think Monsanto would disagree with you on that.

I don't believe they are DRMing their products, and if they did I'm pretty sure that various governments would have strong words with them. But growing GM food is a different topic to purchasing the end product, and should probably take place in a different setting. Suffice to say that my issue with GM food is when they start making it so that you can't grow from G2 seed, rather than you're not allowed to grow from G2 seed.

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DragonLord

Re: Well we'd need a more refined bill of rights

The choice you have is whether to buy or not buy the movie legally. It's not as if these things are essential for your survival.

Of course if they started DRMing food/essentials you might have a leg to stand on. But as it stands they are only DRMing luxuries. And while they're only DRMing luxuries you have the option of not having said luxury.

Additionally I'm pretty sure that you could approach a studio and ask them for a DRM free copy of the film that you want. Though you can expect to be laughed at if you're not rich enough or from the right industry. But if you're rich enough I'm sure they'd sell you one for a few hundred thousand pounds.

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NSFW: Click here, watch iPhone 6 being TORTURED

DragonLord

Re: Ouch

Well it could mean that they fared worse, or it could mean he's only ever torture tested one thing...

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Poverty? Pah. That doesn't REALLY exist any more

DragonLord

Re: But is a fluid definition a bad thing?

Incorrect, he's actually written an article saying that absolute poverty IN THE UK is indeed gone. He said nothing about the rest of the world. So no where is he saying that it's now time to address relative poverty. I take that to mean that he's saying that when world wide absolute poverty is gone, we can look to address relative poverty.

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Spies would need SUPER POWERS to tap undersea cables

DragonLord

As a point, why wouldn't they just cut the cable and then during the few days that the company is scrambling to deal with the outage install their gear at the friendly end of the cable? It would give them plenty of time to do this sort of thing and make it much easier to change later.

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European Court of Justice allows digitisation of library books

DragonLord

Re: Creation and Duplication

Given that, as a private individual, you can buy a ream of really good quality paper for less than £10, and you can also get companies to deliver 100's lbs of goods in the same country for around a score. Do you really think that the dead tree edition of the books that you've got were the main sink for the money you spent on them?

No, the main money sinks were in the time that people took before the book on your shelf existed to create the master copy that your book is a copy of. If you tot up the cost of everyone's time and expenses from the time the author puts pen to paper, to the moment the printing plates have been produced and production is ready to begin you'll probably find that that's a pretty large chunk of cash. Add a small percentage on in case another book doesn't do so well and you're approaching the true cost for the publisher.

Someone else has done the work to analyse these figures here http://ireaderreview.com/2009/05/03/book-cost-analysis-cost-of-physical-book-publishing/

Looking at those figures, you're only going to save around 50% of the price of a dead tree edition book, most of which is the retailers costs rather than the publishers costs. Which when I look at amazon for books that have been out for a while seems to be where their prices end up.

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Read the proposed US ASTEROIDS Act to green-light mining IN SPAAAACE

DragonLord

Re: "Refine the fuel from ice".

You can brute force fuel by electrolysis using just solar electricity. If you take up a nuclear power source you can do it faster. If you have some carbon around you can then turn the hydrogen into a safer and more portable fuel using electricity and a catalyst.

It doesn't matter if it's slow as long as it's not too slow.

As a side thought though, once you've got your momentum going wouldn't you be using ion engines to move through the solar system anyway? At which point you need fairly small amounts of actual fuel, and would be using the hydrogen/oxygen for escaping gravity wells that are stronger than your ion engines only.

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DragonLord

Re: There are so many problems.

In theory the problem is one of getting to the asteroid belts to mine in the first place as having the fuel to return to earth shouldn't be a problem as soon as you find a few Ice bearing asteroids. Of course you need to work out how to refine the fuel from the water in the first place, but that's something that can be perfected fairly close to earth.

What's the betting that the first structure built outside earths gravitational field is a fuel depot/station with massive solar panels for the refining.

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'Our entire corporation cannot send or receive emails from Outlook'

DragonLord

Re: It will only get worse...

How do you know it hasn't

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Assange™ makes fresh bid for FREEDOM from Scotland Yard's 'physical encirclement'

DragonLord

Re: oh but that's just the start...

The problem with international treaties is that if you want their end to be upheld you have to uphold your end. As this is a European arrest warrant, the UK is obliged by treaty to arrest Assangne if he's on their land. There are penalties if they don't.

So it's not the crime that's at stake, it's the arrest warrant and treaty surrounding it.

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Slippery Google greases up, aims to squirm out of EU privacy grasp

DragonLord

Re: Missing the point

Because if you censor the source then it becomes impossible to trust that there is a fair, unbiased and not state controlled press. If the source is allowed to stay, but the means of finding said source becomes more and more burdensome as time goes on. Then it protects peoples privacy in a general sense as the article isn't showing up as fresh all the time while preserving it for the future when a relative or researcher may come across it while searching in the archives.

Also, the article itself isn't damaging sitting there in the archive. It's only damaging to the persons current reputation because it has been processed by a search engine and brought into the lime light during a search.

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DragonLord

because the published content falls under a different set of laws that applies to publishers rather than data processors.

In this instance google falls under the dataprocessing aspect of the dataprotection act. That means that they have a duty to ensure that the data that they hold and process is accurate and up to date. (This is existing law rather than the new right to be forgotten). News papers, blogs, et al, don't need to abide by this as they aren't processing data they are producing information. Thus the article that's sitting in their archive is the same one as it was when it was published.

The reason for the difference is (I think) to avoid post publication censorship by those in power.

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DragonLord

or less

http://www.yourrights.org.uk/yourrights/privacy/spent-convictions-and-the-rehabilitation-of-offenders/how-a-conviction-becomes-spent.html

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Microsoft eggheads publish JavaScript crypto code for devs

DragonLord

Re: charming.

And once it's finished it can be signed with the check sum in a public location so it's easy to verify.

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EU privacy A-Team tells Google: Get a grip and obey OUR laws

DragonLord

Re: Punishment

BillG - But what's their profit margin on that? I'm willing to bet that it's less than 10% which is what they could be fined.

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NASA beams vid from space via laser

DragonLord

So now all we need to do is set up a token ring network around the sun...

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Redmond is patching Windows 8 but NOT Windows 7, say security bods

DragonLord

As someone above mentioned, this could just be a case of different teams, unknown dependancies on the old functions that mean the new functions can't just be slotted in, or any number of other reasons than those that boil down to "can't be arsed"

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Glassholes beware: This guy's got your number

DragonLord

Re: Is that a portable access point in your pocket, are you ...

I think the problem with google glass vs using a camera/phone to take photos is that there's no easy way to tell if a glass wearer is taking photos or not, while a camera/phone user needs to go to some lengths to make it not easy to tell that they are doing so.

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DragonLord

Re: My network...

@AC - OK, so Imagine that I'm a small "mom & pop" cafe that provides internet access to increase the amount of time that people stay in the cafe, and thus buy more drinks...

Whoops there goes a commercial concern that may have the know how and kit to do one thing but not the other.

Why do you think that, in the UK at least, the major teleco's are providing the blocking software on their end rather than the consumer end?

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DragonLord

Re: My network...

Incorrect as the law recognises that you can only take "reasonable" steps to protect your network. It's the same as trying to protect your house. The law doesn't say that because you installed a lock it's your fault for not turning your house into an impenetrable bunker when it gets broken into.

Equally the law doesn't say that it's your fault if someone steals something of your if you told other people to leave.

The same's true in the IT arena. If you block port 25, that doesn't imply that you can block vpn connection 1..300,000 or that you can block traffic from www.kiddyfiddliersare.us without also blocking www.google.com - Infact I'd go so far as to say that there's a fairly high chance that you don't have access to the full black list of sites for kiddie porn. If you're saying, why don't you put a proxy in the way and use content filtering - Proxies don't deal with https very well (at all?).

If someone download kiddie porn over your network in the clear and the police trace it to your network. You'll be in for an arse of a time without your computers for the next 6 months while they go through them looking for any illegal content. But assuming that it wasn't you doing the downloading, then you'll get them back again eventually.

edit to add : Additionally having an auto deny process that monitors who's attached to the network and kicks of those that you've black listed every 30 seconds is very different to putting a proxy server on your connection and firewalling content/ports from those inside the network. They have a very different level of skill set needed to start with. Again it's similar to the difference between being able to fit a new lock to your house compared with being able to fit emergency shutters that are activated when an unauthorised person tries to enter the house.

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DragonLord

Re: My network...

@photobod - As the OP is blocking devices, wouldn't that mean that he is responsible for blocking other devices once he finds out they are performing illegal actions rather than blocking content that you and the poster above were implying.

I say this as by blocking a device you're not implying that you can stop devices from downloading illegal content as you've done nothing with the content.

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China puts Windows 8 on TV, screams: 'SECURITY, GET IT OUT OF HERE!'

DragonLord

So Basically, the chinese government has been keeping an eye on the snowden leaks, matching it with their own data and been drawing inferences that mean they think that their data is insecure. What's the chances that it's down to not being able to block traffic to a microsoft server otherwise windows 8 stops working (or won't activate) and needing to block traffic to the same server to prevent data leaking.

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EBAY... You keep using that word 'ENCRYPTION' – it does not mean what you think it means

DragonLord

Re: Sigh ...

These systems usually also have a second password that is hashed normally. It's basically so that if someone's looking over your shoulder they can't get 1 password, and if they hack the database they can't get the other one. It's still not as secure as having an out of band (second factor) 1 time password generated. Either through a dongle or via a text message.

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Boffins claim machines now beat humans at face-matching

DragonLord

Re: Abstract Mathematics

isn't that what a decompiler's for?

It doesn't produce pretty code, but it does do what you just asked for.

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How Microsoft can keep Win XP alive – and WHY: A real-world example

DragonLord

Re: Production Line

Stupid developer here, but as we're talking about systems to control HARDWARE, wouldn't it have been better for the companies that built the hardware to make it so that you could remove the control component and plug in a new one for say £100,000 and around 1 day's down time? You know the good old fashioned modular approach. That way it wouldn't have mattered what the software industry did (even if microsoft went out of business) they could still just slot in a new module with an upto date os and drivers and application support. Hell they could also allow for changing AutoCAD formats. These are all lessons that the software industry has had to learn in order to keep stuff together.

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Space-junk RAYGUN wins Australian government funding

DragonLord

Re: Why lasers?

Number of moving parts.

A space based laser would only need 1 for the solar cells, everything else would be done by moving the whole satellite. If they're using solar navigation (i.e. solar sails) then they may not even need fuel to change orbital location.

Weight

Mirrors aren't any where near as light as the laser would be.

Cost

Linked to the 2 above.

Hardiness

Given that it's going to be trying to shoot space debris, a laser that can be protected/armoured to some extent is going to be easier to protect and make rugged than a collection of mirrors that need to be able to move around to focus sunlight at a specific spot.

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Yes: You CAN use your phone as a satnav while driving – appeals court

DragonLord

Re: A test case perhaps?

Secondly it would immediately make a lot of on the road police communication illegal due to them needing to use a walkie talkie.

I seem to rememer there here was a case in the UK where the police were trying to convict a lorry driver for using a CB Radio while driving, and when the defence lawyer started the cross examination of the police officer that arrested the driver, he opened with a question like "And once you identified that the defendant was using a CB Radio how did you report this to home base?". At which point the judge interrupted and said that they were going to dismiss the case at that point as they didn't want to be setting the wrong precedent (I can't find the news article now)

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Energy firms' security so POOR, insurers REFUSE to take their cash

DragonLord

Re: Surprise!

Did you see the words "SCADA" or "Air Gapped" as I've looked through the article and can find no mention of "Microsoft". Or were you talking about "McIntosh" who is actually one of the People that was interviewed for the article.

I believe that if you read up on the history of this article with out any prejudgement on why they've got these problems, you'll find that the problem really has nothing to do with microsoft, rather it's to do with custom PCB's with very old firmware controls that were originally installed in an environment where you needed to be fairly close (geographically) to the system in order to make changes to it while now you need to be fairly close (network connectedly) in order to make changes. This means that the security vulnerabilities, that were probably actually ease of use/access features at the time, leave the system wide open to anyone that can breach the outer defences and get onto the internal network.

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Cable thieves hang up on BT, cause MAJOR outage

DragonLord

Re: Fibre or Copper?

The article said that the fibre was cut while thieves were looking for copper cable to nick.

Other commenters have mentioned that when they find there's no copper the thieves can go on a hacking spree.

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DragonLord

Re: Damn thieves

They tried that, the thieves left a message saying they needed to check anyway.

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Behold the world's first full-colour 3D printer

DragonLord

Re: Market Target?

I see this being useful in ad hoc production environments where you need to make a one off (or a few) of something and it matters more that you have it now than you have the potential for lots of them. (your Sales prototype is a good example) another example might be an artist that makes one off table ornaments (via someone that has enough money to afford the machine). Or custom mountings for circuitry (hobbyist). Finally as was mentioned somewhere else, with the metal versions, rapid prototyping and development for very small batch jobs where the cost to produce the final version using traditional methods is much higher (in time and/or money) than the cost of using a printer.

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Pay-as-you-GONE: Help! T Mobile's swiped my phone credit – customers

DragonLord

Around where I live it's pretty hard to find a telephone box unless you want one of those dial a cab ones.

As for the 2 hours, does she work in central london?

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Canada says Google broke law by snooping health info to serve ads

DragonLord

Re: I'm not sure about this

Apart from the fact that if your session is at all linkable to your Google account then the search will still be linked to that. (e.g. you're using chrome)

Google is very very bad at letting people do stuff without recording it against their profile.

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Apple coughs up 7 hours of profit to refund kids' $32.5m app spend spree

DragonLord

Re: Incompetent parents win again...

The hotel's unless the hotel made it clear in the T's&C's that you had to sign when you signed in that all room service requests would be charged to the supplied credit card.

Given that AFAIK this is quite common in hotels, I suspect they've been bitten by that in the past and learnt from it.

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Apple asks judge to axe ebook price-fixing watchdog

DragonLord

Re: Weasel

Note that one of the complaints is that he's wanting to interview top execs who Apple claim wouldn't have had anything to do with ebooks. This is despite the fact that quite often the people at the top will have an informal conversation and then it will turn into something formal with the right people.

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No anon pr0n for you: BT's network-level 'smut' filters will catch proxy servers too

DragonLord

Re: Seriously?

What company is that advert for so that I can avoid it in future?

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Go on, buy Bitcoin. But DON'T say we didn't WARN YOU

DragonLord

alternately you'll end up with a high value bitcoin and a low value alternative with a much larger capacity working together so that you end up with bitcoin being the equivalent of notes and the other currency being the equivalent of coins. Then have banks/exchanges being able to exchange against the 2. The only problem I currently have with the system is that there's no expiry mechanism in bitcoin so every bitcoin lost is gone forever. This IMO is the biggest thing that makes bitcoin unworkable into the future. Which is also one of the reasons for inflation in physical currency. If there was some way to version the coins so that they could be upgraded to a newer version every couple of years and eventually the old bit coins would no longer be accepted except in certain locations (same as old notes and coins) then this would work as a truly international currency.

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Analogue radio will CONTINUE in Blighty as Minister of Fun dodges D-Day death sentence

DragonLord

So basically, because the incumbent transmitter operator is price gouging people can't afford to put enough stations on digital to make consumers want a digital radio.

Simple fix, stop the price gouging.

After all, if it costs 16 times as much to run digital as FM then you'd be a fool to want to go digital.

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Twitterers rally round #CensoredUK - to demand MORE PORN

DragonLord

Re: TL;DR

So what you're saying is that the needs of the few outweigh the needs of the many.

In practice that leads to failed civilisations or totalitarian regimes as they need to put harsher and harsher constraints on the many to ensure that the few retain their privileges

In all practicality all this is going to do is make the kids work a little harder to get their porn fix and they'll do it the same way that the did at school... One kid will work it out and tell everyone else e.g. install this program (TOR) and away you go or change your DNS settings to this and it will work.

In general, kids are far more inventive than adults as they're not burdened with the knowledge of what they can't do.

So as the original poster said.

Won't someone think of the adults.

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NSA alleges 'BIOS plot to destroy PCs'

DragonLord

extra judicial killings

Technically they are known as assassinations rather than murder as they are typically perpetrated by someone other than the person that wanted them dead.

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Meet NASA's Valkyrie: A SILKY BUSTY ROBO-MINX that'll save your life

DragonLord

Re: Humanoid robots are fine for domestic use...

I think the point of a humanoid robot is that it needs to be of a similar size to a human so that it can be put into a situation where there are humans without needing to make massive changes that may not even be possible to accommodate it.

In an environment where you can cater for a robot what you suggested makes sense as, in theory, it should be cheaper to add an AI brain to a forklift than it is to provide this robot, or the industrial robots on a production line. If on the other hand what you really need is an extra person that can be pulled out of storage occasionally when you need x, y, or z done and then they can go back into storage, this would be ideal.

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How UK air traffic control system was caught asleep on the job

DragonLord

Re: Scary

I think that this is a different system to the one they can operate by cards. The one they can operate by cards being the tracking, prioritising, and routing of planes on the ground and in the air. The system that crashed being the one that enables them to tell the other traffic control areas that they've got a plane entering their airspace.

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SHOCK! US House swats trolls, passes patent 'extortion' bill

DragonLord

Re: Did the Patent "Industry"...

Na, the patent industry just pissed off enough of the little people that they started writing letters to their representative, and getting 10 or so letters a day on your desk all complaining about the same thing from different people kinda makes you sit up and take notice. If for no other reason than they have to reply to every letter, so it's a cost in time if not money.

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Darknet: It's not just for DRUGS. Ninja Banking Trojan uses it too

DragonLord

it could also be a planned way for the criminals to expand the use of i2p so that it ends up with a large enough network to matter.

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Carl Icahn: I don't want to fight with Tim... but I will

DragonLord

I'm guessing that the reason he's not investing in Microsoft is that he doesn't think they'll listen to him at all. Just wait for there to be a new CEO and I suspect he'll magically get some stocks and try to leverage those against the CEO.

Then again he may also be looking at the fact that Bill Gates, Steve Balmer, and more are large share holders in microsoft so they'll quickly point out any padded whining waffle he happens to spout to try and increase his share value short term.

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I am a recovering Superwoman wannabee

DragonLord

Re: Is this real?

One thing you'll find is that those attributes that seem to be holding you back from relationships now will hold you in good stead in a few years time once everyone's finished maturing and people actually want long term relationships rather than the hottest guy on the block.

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