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* Posts by Anthony Hegedus

72 posts • joined 27 Oct 2008

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Best shot: Coffee - how do you brew?

Anthony Hegedus

Mine's a nespresso and a tassimo

Every morning I prepare a shot of Nespresso (not genuine Nespresso toner, I use Cafe Pod), and then prepare a big cup on my tassimo machine and make the rest of my breakfast. By the time I've fumbled through that, The nespresso has cooled down to just the right temperature. I drink it first to ensure the caffeine enters my bloodstream quickly (to lower the amount of blood in my caffeine stream?) then have breakfast and enjoy a nice long cup of coffee.

I bought the Tassimo machine because I was having far too many shots of nespresso and I needed a way of making a reasonably strong long cup of coffee.

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The Register to boldly go where no Vulture has gone before: The WEEKEND

Anthony Hegedus
Happy

An old friend

I've been reading The Register since I can't remember - 1998? - something like that. And it's my go-to source of information and news. During 9/11 when all the news websites couldn't cope, I ended up reading the latest on The Register. I go to the register before I go to the bbc news website every day. The reporting, if slightly eccentric at times, is brilliant - no bullshit, well written and just the right level of sarcasm. And now I get to read more of it. Well done!

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EE network whacked by 'PDP authentication failure' blunder

Anthony Hegedus

Re: works for me

And me... exactly what we see. The phones report a good signal but it's unusable for data. Our phones also sometimes do voice, and that's hit and miss. In my office, the signal goes from 0 bars and no signal to full strength and back all day. It means that I can be in the middle of a call and get cut off.

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Nanu nanu! Mork calling Orson on VoIP over 2G

Anthony Hegedus
Stop

Now if only there was some other way of implementing voice on mobile phones....

And it'll also fail because 2G isn't good enough for 11Kbps down AND up. 2G is good for nothing. It cannot deliver a consistent data rate, and with the number of push messages being sent to mobiles these days, it'll be a very broken-up experience. Now if only someone could crack the voice-over-2G problem, I'm sure people will pay more of a fairly solid reliable and good-ish quality call, that they don't need to install an app for. Perhaps this is a problem that doesn't need to be solved for some reason.

Maybe after they fail, this company will invent a type of copper tubing for water transmission. They could insert this into your home plumbing to run over your existing plumbing system. No need for a new water supply. Or they could invent a sort of rubber sock for car tyres. Or a luminous lampshade.

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Thirteen Astonishing True Facts You Never Knew About SCREWS

Anthony Hegedus

screwdrivers

I do computer repairs and servicing, and my business partner and I visit customers' premises a lot. Screwdrivers are consumables to us, like toner, ink, pens, whatever. No matter how many we buy, I never have one in my van when I need one, or the workshop. They just seem to go missing. So every time we order a Draytek router for a customer, we order a half dozen of their promotional screwdrivers. They come with two flat blade sizes and two pozis and they're only a quid each.

Perhaps they're related to biroid life forms....

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Microsoft's anti-malware crusade knackers '4 MILLION' No-IP users

Anthony Hegedus

Re: Great Opportunity

What utter crap! you mean to say there are two people using their search engine? What search engine anyway???

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Stone the crows, Bouncer! BT defends TV recorder upgrade DELETION snafu

Anthony Hegedus

Re: @Anthony Hegedus

You're right. I misremembered

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Anthony Hegedus

I seem to remember that happening with my BT Vision box a year or so ago. The reason the recordings got deleted was that they changed from a linux-based system to a WinCE based system. The new interface was ghastly, and unreliable. I shouted at BT until they gave me a Humax Youview box. The UI is slow and clunky and the BT part of it is ghastly and unreliable. Seriously, this box is far too slow at EVERYTHING!

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Plusnet shunts blame for dodgy DNS traffic onto customers' routers

Anthony Hegedus
WTF?

don't get this - what's it got to do with plusnet?

So, some users of an ISP use badly designed insecure router eh? And that's the ISP's fault how exactly? The article seems to suggest that PlusNet were returning dodgy addresses, because of customers' routers. I don't get this at all. The routers surely didn't actually affect plusnet?

And yes, the routers most ISPs supply are complete bollocks. A friend of mine had his DNS repeatedly modified despite him disabling remote admin and changing his admin password. And that was a Thomson router supplied by TalkTalk!

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Think British weather is bad? It's nothing to this WOBBLY ALIEN planet

Anthony Hegedus
Alien

"Luckily for any would-be space explorers, they won't be required to experience the erratic climes of Kepler 413b as it's too warm for life as we know it. It's also too close to its suns for liquid water to exist and it's a super Neptune - a giant gas planet - so there's no surface for anyone to stand on." - However, the local council has still managed to paint double yellow lines to prevent shoppers from parking, and there's still a starbucks on every corner

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Apple: That 'white screen of death' nightmare? We'll fix it... AT SOME POINT

Anthony Hegedus

Re: Just goes to show.....

well that's because apple is good and microsoft is bad. Simples.

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Sinclair’s 1984 big shot at business: The QL is 30 years old

Anthony Hegedus

I had a QL and I seem to remember getting one of the JS ROM versions, which was the least buggy of the lot. Oddly, I never really had trouble with the microdrives, but I managed to purchase (out of my own money - I was just 16) a floppy drive. This was fantastic. For just £40 more I purchased 10 floppy disks and had a storage capacity of 10MB! This was amazing, it was like, the capacity of a WINCHESTER but for a fraction of the price, and only the slight inconvenience of having to change disks. Still, I managed to keep the thing going till I started university and I used it to do coursework in the first year or two. I had a Centronics GLP ("Great little printer") that could actually print on A4 sheets!

At one point I had purchased a multitasking programming language called QBasic or something - can't remember - but it did allow for inter-process communication. I also had a mouse, which was useless, as it only worked with one specific and rather bad "paint" program.

I also did various bits of coursework in Pascal using a compiler I'd bought and it overall a bloody useful tool. In those days we put up with buggy software, unfinished hardware and lies from manufacturers. It was just part of what you'd expect from home computers at the time. Especially sinclair. Compared to today, when software "just works", it was a different world...

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Microsoft tries to trademark 'Mod' in the US

Anthony Hegedus

Windows Mod sounds awful to me, like "modification". Or reminds me of Mods and Rockers of course (not that I have a clue what they are - not quite old enough!). Seriously they ought to come up with a better name. Metro was a good name, pity it can't be used. As a footnote I'd just like to say how much I hate MS office when you install it coming up with a video clip which speaks to you "welcome to your modern office"! Cringeworthy!

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Australia puts 300 sharks on Twitter

Anthony Hegedus

The shark's main diet is humans, everybody knows that

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El Reg's contraptions confessional no.5: The Sinclair Sovereign

Anthony Hegedus

Re: Ahh, the days of real calcluators

I bought a 41CX in 99, "new in box", and it's bloody marvellous. I had a plain old 41C back in 1980, which sadly died, so buying a "new" one all those years later really brought back memories. It's amazing how you can get attached to a calculator...

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Fiendish CryptoLocker ransomware survives hacktivists' takedown

Anthony Hegedus

For all out customers with the appropriate linux servers, we've just blocked zip files in incoming emails. The minor inconvenience is outweighed by the safety aspect. For customers with windows servers and an antivirus on the server, we can usually block these attachments too. Most of our customers are perfectly happy with this arrangement.

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Microsoft touts SCROOGLE merch: Hopes YOU'LL PAY to dump on rival

Anthony Hegedus

The mug looks like an advert

... for google.

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Look at how many ways we ruin your life, Redmond boasts

Anthony Hegedus

Re: There are so many things you can do in a bathroom

Water Closet is just a euphemism for the original word, "shit house" or "crapper".

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Internet Explorer 11 for Win7 bods: Soz, no HTML5 fun for you

Anthony Hegedus
Megaphone

Same old nonsense

It's just the same typical nonsense from Microsoft. They're pushing this tiled (TIKFAM) interface on us whether we like it or not. I think someone at Microsoft had been watching too much Star Trek TNG - everything there is touch based.

One of our customers upgraded from windows 8 to 8.1 and found that IE11 didn't work with her ancestry.co.uk website properly. In previous versions of IE, when a site didn't work, you could click the "compatibility view" button and often that would cause the website to be rendered correctly. In IE11, you have to go to a menu and add the site to the compatibility list, something way beyond what most users are capable of, let alone dream of doing.

But then MS have always done this. They make the most arcane, complex and buggy software on the planet and nothing about windows 8.1 is going to change my mind about that

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GoDaddy kicks off gTLD land rush with first domain sales

Anthony Hegedus
Megaphone

Who cares? I meet hundreds of different people in my (IT) line of work and everybody without exception just searches for stuff. Half the time in google chrome, even if you type a domain name it goes and does a search anyway. Just as DNS makes the need for people to hunt for IP addresses superfluous, decent search engines make the need for domain names superfluous. Even Bing.

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Want to keep the users happy? Don't call them users for a start

Anthony Hegedus

Re: BOFH reprisal

We refer to certain classes of problem as PICNIC

Problem

In

Chair

Not

In

Computer

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Anthony Hegedus

Re: Not 'users'

Today I had to correct three people during a conversation with them (together) lasting about five minutes because they kept referring to their computers as either a modem, a hard drive, a power pack and rather oddly, a "TCP Stack" . And the number of people I meet who tell me that their computer "crashed - what could that be?"

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Anthony Hegedus

Re: Do not trust but don't dismiss either

I never trust what my customers tell me.

Rule 1: Don't listen to the customer's description of the problem

Rule 2: Absolutely never listen to the customer's proposed "solution". Remember, if their "solution" had a cat's chance in hell of working, they'd have tried it and it would have worked, and they wouldn't have called me.

To rephrase the above, find out what the customers really need to do rather than what they want to do. They'll often be more pleased with the result. Case in point - a customer once asked me to bring a CD Writer for their computer.

1. They already had a CD writer

2. I asked her why they needed one. Shetold me that they wanted to save their pictures onto them.

3. I asked why she wanted to save their pictures onto CDs when she already did backups onto a portable drive. She told me so that she could transfer the pictures to their husband's computer.

4. I asked why she wanted to transfer the pictures onto her husband's computer. She told me that she sometimes wanted to sit at her husband's computer if he wasn't using it because it had a bigger screen to edit her photos with

5. So I suggested "how about a system where you can sync the photos on the two computers together so that if she edits a photo on one computer, the edits will show on the other, and all she needs to do is run a program to synchronise the two.

6. She said "AH!! That *just* what I wanted! I knew that's what it was but didn't know how to explain it....

So I asked "Why?" THREE times to determine what she really needed rather than what she said she wanted....

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Anthony Hegedus

Re: ALWAYS from HR and Finance.

I've met someone like that. He told me he kept his important stuff in the deleted folder. I asked him if he kept important letters and documents in the bin under his desk. His reply was that he didn't know he could create folders and thought he had to keep them in the deleted items folder.

I meet several people who won't delete their deleted items folder "just in case"...

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Post-PC era? Post-MAC era! OS X Mavericks 'upgrade' ruins iWorks

Anthony Hegedus

part of the long-term strategy I'd imagine

This will serve to lessen the appeal of Macs to die-hard Mac fans. Making the software free and including it with new Macs would appeal to a PC user who might be thinking of buying a Mac this time round, who generally would only use the word processor to write a letter to the bank or make a shopping list.

But I fear Apple's long-term strategy doesn't really include Macs at all. By dumbing them down and upping the ante on their now faster and faster ipads, there'll be little need for Macs at all.

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Expert chat: The end of Windows XP and IE6

Anthony Hegedus

Re: IE 6

This is a recurring problem I see.

"what internet program do you use to access the internet?"

"er... is it google?"

"who is your internet provider?"

"er... is it google?"

"who do you actually pay monthly for internet access?"

"er... is it vodafone?"

"do you use google chrome or internet explorer?"

"what's internet explorer?"

"it's the one with the 'e'"

"oh in that case I use BT"

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Anthony Hegedus

Re: Time to investigate the alternatives

Make no mistake, I'm no Microsoft fan, but I'm realistic. Precious few of our small business customers could run on a linux desktop. Most of them use Sage or some such. And driver support isn't better on linux when you're comparing it to Windows 8.

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South Carolina couple cop cuffing for shed shag

Anthony Hegedus
IT Angle

Re: Not exactly flashing

... and presumably up until the point where the shed was opened, his genitals were not on view because they were inside his co-conspirator

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Google goes dark for 2 minutes, kills 40% of world's net traffic

Anthony Hegedus

Perhaps someone switch off the internet and switched it on again

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Win XP alive and kicking despite 2014 kill switch (Don't ask about Win 8)

Anthony Hegedus

Rushed Vista out without much though or user testing, you say? Sounds like Windows 8. People aren't using Windows 8 out of choice from what I see in my market of support (small business/home users) - they're buying it because they need a new computer. First thing I do with Windows 8 is install classic shell or Start8, so that it just "works like you're used to". Windows 8 might be fast and possibly reliable, but the whole UI is a train-wreck. It is universally (from what I can see) despited, or and best just tolerated.

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Anthony Hegedus

Re: 37%

I'm still seeing some people not even having SP2 installed... "what's that?" "oh, just an update from 9 years ago that you didn't do, probably because it wasn't automatic"

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Microsoft waves goodbye to Small Business Server

Anthony Hegedus
WTF?

... Such as SME server. For us, it's a no-brainer. Small company wants a server for mail and file. Windows server means you need to buy MS Office/Outlook and CALs and spend £3-4K on the whole thing. SME server means you probably need to spend £1K. And you can use open source email and office apps. Yes they might not be as refined looking as the Microsoft equivalents but when it costs £180 a pop for MS Office Home and Business 2013, I think most small businesses would put up with the differences.

MS want you to spend money on annual SaaS plans don't they? For most small businesses, MS Word is a tool. They tool works as well the day it's bought as a year later. So why would you want it updated? It's only a word processor for christs sake!!! Companies don't mind paying for antivirus regularly, or backup, because those are things that provide a SERVICE. An ever-changing word processor is NOT a service.

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BT earmarks super-speedy 300Mbit/s broadband for 50 exchanges

Anthony Hegedus
Facepalm

Re: 300mbit! Holy crap!

Yes, who could possibly need 1Mbps when 512Kbps is more than enough? Who could possibly need 256MB RAM in a computer? I've even heard "who needs a colour screen in a business environment" all the way back to the IBM exec who said (in the 1940s I think) that he could see a world market for perhaps six computers.

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The only Waze is Google: Ad giant tipped to gobble map app 'for $1.3bn'

Anthony Hegedus

Re: Indeed

Why? Waze makes you log in at the moment anyway

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'Fastest storage in the WORLD' plugged into mighty boffinry Cray

Anthony Hegedus
Coat

... Start button

Does it run windows 8?

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BSkyB punters drown in MASSIVE MYSTERY Yahoo! mail! migration!

Anthony Hegedus

I knew this would happen

I've been warning people for months about this. And telling them NEVER to use their ISP's email - if they want a freebie, use gmail!

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BIGGEST DDoS ATTACK IN HISTORY hammers Spamhaus

Anthony Hegedus

Re: Spamhous must really be hurting those parasites

Sounds good, do you use it to send outgoing mails too? I run an SME server linux distro at home and have absolutely no problems with spam - yes, we get a few, but no more than with other providers. Having said that, I won't even bother to let it send mail out directly, as I'm using a BT dynamic address. And yes, I use a dynamic DNS service.

Don't you mean "it consumes less than 10w"? Sorry...

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NORKS switch off 3G data for tourists

Anthony Hegedus
Big Brother

data rates

€150 for 2GB sounds quite reasonable compared to what roaming charges can be. For example, travel to another secretive third-world state, such as the USA, on O2 it costs £6 a MB (£6000 per GB!). On the subject of roaming, call me thick, but how can something that costs £10 here (an extra GB of data) cost 600 times as much abroad. I know they have to make some money, but that is just ridiculous! Oh wait, they do a deal where you pay £120 a month for 200Mb of data. That's only £600 a GB. Bargain!

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Next from Microsoft: 'Blue', the Windows 8 they hope you don't hate

Anthony Hegedus
FAIL

Wow! amazing!

So some of Windows ME's unloved features that nobody cares about because they've never found them anyway have been "improved". Like that's exciting: "Oh look I can move a tile around and make it a different size, and I can two apps side by side just like Windows 3.1!". Sorry Microsoft, but this is a crock of shit. Same shit, same colour.

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Oi, Microsoft, where's my effin' toolbar gone?

Anthony Hegedus
Flame

Re: @Lusty

yes, but you're wrong. Enter may insert a paragraph mark into a document, but to the average user it inserts a new line, and badly. By default MS Word 2007 and above has a default line spacing between paragraphs, so pressing Enter after a para automatically puts in a a nice gap. Not so useful when typing a list and you don't want bullet points or numbering or bloody great gaps between each line.

So you can use shift-enter. Except you can't if you've got full justification on, because if you've got just a few words on the last line, using shift-enter sets these few words out fully justified with the last word all the way on the right, and huge horizontal gaps between the words!

So you end up having to rejig the style, or choose a different style (easy enough if you know what the hell a style actually is!!!).

No, this is not usability. It's crap. Yes, it works for people who want to design nice looking consistent office manuals and the like, but then for the rest of us, it feels like bullying tactics. Seriously, I've talked to enough ordinary people trying to use this crap and these are the sort of things they say.

For me personally, I know how it's meant to work, and it doesn't bother me that much. I find frustrations will all word processors, as I switch between "typing a shopping list" and "typing a 10-page proposal".

And to avoid accusations of MS-Bashing, I have similar problems in Apple's Pages effort: It's super-easy to type simple documents and edit bits of more complex ones, but you try and do some complex numbering or align pictures and it's not so much that it's difficult, it's more a matter of "where the hell do I go now - why isn't there a button for this???". In LibreOffice, you try doing a mail-merge, something microsoft has got fairly much spot-on.

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Anthony Hegedus
Devil

Re: There is a simple explanation

Your point is to my mind true to some extent only. Yes, the dreaded ribbon helps people use styles. And styles help keep document consistency and other things. BUT when you want to write a letter to the tax office, when you want to write a poster saying "hot tap faulty" or a simple quote.... you don't want typesetting rules and styles to cloud your mind. You want to find where they've put the fucking "save as" command, or how to insert a table, or you want to know why the stupid thing insists on putting a blank line after every carriage return (SO many people ask me to stop it doing that!).

The point is that WP is a commodity app for most tasks and most people - nobody gives a shit about styles, alignment or anything complex like that. For MOST tasks MOST of the time all you need is Print, Save As, bold underline and Italic and the ability to change fonts. And also (and this is the problem) the ability to open documents written by people who do give a shit about styles etc without it completely cocking up the layout.

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Anthony Hegedus
Coat

Re: There is a simple explanation

My point EXACTLY. MAC OS may not be perfect, but their usability team have probably been testing it on slightly less weird people.

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Anthony Hegedus
Big Brother

Re: There is a simple explanation

It seems that microsoft employs demented cabbages to design their UIs. I challenge anyone to log into their new "outlook.com" style hotmail and write an email without a message coming up about "are you sure you want to send this without a subject?". Actually, we can all do it, but sit someone down who hasn't just just read this and challenge them to do it. The way it's designed is such one's eyes do to travel over naturally to the subject "area", and you end up forgetting to do it. Not massive problem for most people, you'll eventually work it out. But usability testing - don't they spend millions, if not billions on this at Microsoft?

So the end result is that we will do what microsoft want because we're forced to use their rubbish, until one day we open our bloody eyes, and there's a worthy competitor around. No, much as I like and use linux, it's not a serious contender yet. But google could do it... It really is like the story of The Emperor's New Clothes and has been for years and years. Microsoft-bashing is boring because it's so easy, and that's the point, surely: it shouldn't be.

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Anthony Hegedus
Facepalm

Re: What is this article supposed to be?

Which is why you shouldn't buy it in the first place really.

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Young model ruthlessly fingers upskirt iPad petshop pervert

Anthony Hegedus
Coat

Re: Her Mutt

I think "mutt" in this case is a term used in satire by journalists to indicate "we all know full well than a King Charles Vauxhall Cavalier Spaniel is probably some kind of 'pure bred' as opposed to 'affordable' dog, but back in the real world, it's just a bloody dog"

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Who's riddling Windows PCs with gaping holes? It's your crApps

Anthony Hegedus
Mushroom

.net?

.net - isn't that a suite of addon shit that take longer to install than a full OS, has more potential for updates failing than an HP Printer Driver and most people haven't got a clue why it's on their system in about 5 entries in programs&features? And isn't it just basically an API for windows APIs, in other words should have been part of the OS in the first place? Or am I wrong about that too.

And Java? unless there's a specific application, you just don't need it. So some goofy websites don't work. Better than the whole OS is broken due to a drive-by virus download!

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HGST: Nano-tech will double hard disk capacity in 10 years

Anthony Hegedus

Re: are just scratching the surface

Interesting idea - why not have three read heads? By clever arrangement of data, you could achieve 3x the throughput maximum, and more importantly, 3x lower seek times. Defragging's going to be fun!

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Any storm in a port

Anthony Hegedus

Re: Optional

Yes, SCART was the work of the Devil himself. A French Devil. They're designed to fall out of the socket when any amount of force is exerted from the massive sideways-fitting lead. And then when you do try and fiddle with them, they usually fall to bits. They are also used to con gullible a-little-knowledge-etc type people into purchasing gold-plated versions. Who remembers seeing gold SCART leads for £79 at currys?

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The universe speaks: 'It's time to get off your rock!'

Anthony Hegedus
Alert

Doomed...

They swore blind the planet was about to be eaten by an enormous mutant star-goat, or some such thing

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