* Posts by Tim Almond

195 posts • joined 27 Oct 2008

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Time for a brutal TELLY-OFF: Android TV versus Firefox OS

Tim Almond

Re: Cast your minds back

The smart bit is kept separate. I only bought my Smart TV because it was the cheapest 32" Samsung TV with 3 HDMIs. The smart TV is nice. But I'm under no illusion about eternal support. At some point, Samsung will switch that off, and it'll be a dumb screen. And I'll need a Fire stick or an Amazon-enabled blu-ray player for £50.

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Wristjobs, whopping big 4Kers and fondleslabs: Currys' Xmas tech

Tim Almond

Re: "...if the £1,000 price tag the Currys chap quoted is to be believed..."

"Currys call it 'enhancing the customer experience"

I cannot understand how the Dixons group stays in business. I've got decades of stories of bad experiences from friends and co-workers. I've helped a few dodge the bullet of their upselling after they didn't immediately buy and asked my advice (found them a PC from Dell that did what they needed at half the price). I know people who put their laptop in for repair and were still waiting for it a few months later. Yet somehow, the effect doesn't seem to spread and people still seem to shop there even though their friends had a bad time.

£50 for an HDMI? I remember Comet trying to sell a friend a gold-plated SCART lead for £30 in the early 2000s. Tip: Poundland.

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Samsung caught disabling Windows Update to run its own bloatware

Tim Almond

Re: There is a problem though!

"I had to install SAP"

Stopped reading there.

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Indiana Jones whips Bond in greatest movie character poll

Tim Almond

Empire Readers

Can't even pick the best Sherlock Holmes, who was Jeremy Brett.

I can forgive the absence of Niles Crane, but no Basil Fawlty, no Edmund Blackadder? No Eric Cartman? The Doctor? What are you all, 9?

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Larry Ellison: Oracle's going to WAR against Amazon cloud prices

Tim Almond

Um...

"AWS's Glacier storage starts at $0.0100 per GB. Then you add to this uploads and transfers to different AWS regions and out of AWS to the “internet”. Upload and retrieval requests start at $0.050 per 1,000 requests and transfers between regions at $0.020 per GB.

Oracle charges for storage plus data transfer: $0.026 a month per GB for the first TB and free for the first GB per month, going up to $0.120 per GB a month."

Can anyone explain to me how Oracle are 10 times cheaper?

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JavaScript creator Eich's latest project: KILL JAVASCRIPT

Tim Almond

Typescript

MS are pushing more for Typescript at the moment, which compiles down to JS.

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MILLIONS of broadband punters aren't getting it fast enough – Which?

Tim Almond

Does Anyone Use this capacity?

I'm running at about 7mbps at home and I've tried monitoring it and the only time I hit it is when downloading large games off Steam or things from MSDN subscription.

If you're watching a movie, it's 2mbps. If you've got 20mbps, it's still 2mbps. Websites are nicer, but it's not exactly a deal breaker to get a webpage in 3 seconds instead of 1.

The biggest benefit of fibre seems to be that upload speeds go up from about 400kbps to 1mbps.

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Foxconn's going to 'exploit' Indian labour? SCORE! Bye, poverty

Tim Almond

Re: It;s almost like they do it on purpose...

I think it was Tony Benn who opined, "if we could have full employment killing Germans (during the war), why can't we have full employment teaching/healing/mending roads etc., etc."

Why not indeed?

Which shows just what a monumental cretin Tony Benn was. We had to have everyone working hard because we were fighting a war and trying to keep people alive. And it was a miserable existence of rationing and curfews and limited opportunities.

So, here's a challenge. As Benn is no longer with us, perhaps you can answer it: show me a country that aimed for full employment that doesn't have people and businesses trying to get the hell out of it.

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Tim Almond

Re: Affects on jobs in USA

"The Rochester area had Xerox and Kodak doing quite well. The whole WNY economy was doing well.

Then came the various "Trade Agreements" that gutted these good paying middle class and entry level jobs and sent them out of the county. My job at GM went "south" as did many others and the plants have long since been mothballed or demolished. In their infinite wisdom, they tax empty facilities at the same rate as occupied facilities here. If there is no building on the property then the taxes are greatly reduced, therefore they demolish empty facilities rather than try to find new occupants. This effectively prevents new companies from filling in where the old ones were."

1. People don't need photocopiers, and if you're going to invent the modern computer (Xerox PARC) don't give it away. Jobs was on record as saying that Xerox could have been IBM.

2. Anyone want Kodak around? Technology killed them. I can take a thousand photographs at nearly zero cost. This is better.

3. Your job at GM went south because GM made lousy cars. Toyota and Honda came along and rightfully ate their lunch.

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Everything Apple touted at WWDC – step inside our no-hype-zone™

Tim Almond

Re: The Fall

"Released in the Fall"

To get hold of the software, you have to go on stage while Mark E Smith is tweaking the amplifiers and hope he doesn't take a swing at you.

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Apple to tailor Swift into fully open-source language – for Linux, too

Tim Almond

Cross-Platform

For simple, text and graphics apps, people are already tooled and schooled in Phonegap. Which will already deploy to a bunch of targets. If you're doing games, you're probably already using Unity. Does Swift work with PC, Xbox One, Wii U, PS4? So, who's going to go through wanting multiple codebases for all of those platforms?

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Why does Uber keep its drivers' pay so low? Ex-CFO: 'Cos we can'

Tim Almond

Reduced Prices

I'm sure no-one here has gone into a small shop and asked them if they can equal Amazon. I'm sure no-one here is only looking out for getting things at the lowest price.

I thought people at The Register were a bit more intelligent than Guardianista "big business" herpy-derp.

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4K refresh sees Blu-ray climb to 100GB, again

Tim Almond

Re: Total waste of time

"There are plenty of people who would love to stream Netflix at 4K"

You could stream movies in 4K on dial-up. You wouldn't be able to tell what was going on as the image quality would be so poor, but it would be a 4K image.

Companies like Amazon and Netflix already can't stream at blu-ray quality, which is a sharp, detailed, 2K image. "HD streaming" is little better than upscaled DVD quality. And that's because that's already a bandwidth hog. Some blu-ray players can tell you the bit rate of data transfer, and it's typically anywhere from 20mbps to 35mbps.

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Chill, luvvies. The ‘unsustainable’ BBC Telly Tax stays – for now

Tim Almond

You're honestly comparing a public healthcare system with Homes Under the Hammer? You really think we should view The Voice as a public good, without which we would feel like a poorer and less decent society? You really feel we need to imprison people for not opting for Masterchef and watching The IT Crowd instead?

You think it's excellent value for money? I think the works of Mark E Smith are excellent value for money. Why doesn't everyone subsidise my purchase of the new CD by The Fall?

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Tim Almond

Re: I just don't watch...

It's the lack of anything much that counts as "must-see"/"must-hear". I'm not sure they were much better when I was a kid, but at least there was the odd nugget in there. The last thing I enjoyed on the BBC was episodes, and that's a show that was created by a couple of Americans and co-produced with the BBC.

I've set more stuff on Five than I have on the BBC on my PVR this year.

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Tim Almond

Re: Subscription != high quality

"and how many programs do Sky actually make?"

Who cares? Starbucks aren't growing coffee beans in Colombia. Tesco isn't milking cows. My local shoe shop doesn't have a cobbler out the back.

All that matters is whether people like what they give people, and you know, there seems to be a lot more love for Game of Thrones and Boardwalk Empire than Tumble.

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Tim Almond

Re: Am I the only person...

Explain to me the morality of people facing threat of imprisonment because they don't want to pay for Strictly while watching the X-Factor.

Whether you think it's good value or not is irrelevant. Should we be threatening people with imprisonment for the equivalent of buying Pepsi without throwing some money at Coca-Cola?

There's a few things that the BBC does that genuinely count as "public goods", things that the market won't provide. Things we'd like people without money to have, like CBeebies to help educate their under-5s. In which case, should we expect the poor to pay for that? Or should richer people be paying for it.

And personally, I find little worth watching or listening to. Comedy has been reduced to cheap panel shows, midweek broadcasting has been stuffed with cookery shows and soap operas. Other than Episodes (an American co-production), Parks and Rec (American), QI and Only Connect, most of their output is very average. It all has high production values, but the content is generally pretty weak.

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Why MakerBot failed – but 3D printing is far from dead

Tim Almond

Bad Extrapolation

The problem with 3D printing is that a lot of people looked at the ubiquity of printing and assumed that 3d printing would be a thing. But normal printing is very flexible, from photographs to hotel reservations to invoices and reports.

I need some wood cut to particular dimensions. Am I going to spend thousands on machine to cut that? Well, if it's my job, but if it's a one-off, I'm going to upload the designs and pay someone to laser cut it and post it to me. That's why I'm quite sceptical about this being a big selling item.

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Apple to devs: Watch out, don't make the Watch into a, well, a watch

Tim Almond

iOS Apps

It's worse than that. It isn't even a "licensed Mac". Try uploading to the app store with an old mac, like one running Snow Leopard. Application Loader won't run on it, the latest XCode won't run on it. And you can't upgrade it past Snow Leopard because reasons. Then there's Apple's gatekeeping rules including "not useful" (sorry, not your decision).

I did a small app in Phonegap and we've dropped iOS. Android? Completely different experience. £30 to sign-up for life. Develop on anything. Make it look how you like. Don't include malware or porn but beyond that, it's your app.

We pretty much decided that it wasn't worth it and so are only doing Android.

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Apple Watch RIPPED APART, its GUTS EXPOSED to hungry Vultures

Tim Almond

Ursine activities in woods

"The difficulty removing the S1 casts serious doubt on the ability to upgrade the Apple Watch"

At this point, you might as well report on popes being Catholic.

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Selfie sticks BANNED by Apple: No hipster tools' tools allowed at WWDC

Tim Almond

Re: Why have age limits at all?

Conferences are weird to me. They're streamed on the web, but people go to them. I've done a couple because they were cheap and came with perks that paid for them, but $1600?

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Radio 4 and Dr K on programming languages: Full of Java Kool-Aid

Tim Almond

COBOL

"But the programme is very negative about that language, almost as if it’s a bit too easy after the mathematical basis of Fortran."

That's the whole point - you want languages and tools that make Getting Stuff Done as quick and reliable as possible. COBOL feels out of date today, but the reason it ran millions of lines of code in industry is that it was a really easy language for data processing.

As for the Raspberry Pi, I've yet to hear of anyone learning programming with one. More than anything they seem to get used as media servers. And if you want to teach your kids to program, you've already got a PC, download Notepad++ and teach them Javascript and then move them on to Python, PHP or C# later.

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Apple boots Windows 7 out of Boot Camp

Tim Almond

Re: An odd decision by Apple

Apple are just awful in terms of support.

I need to build a Phonegap app. So, I acquire an old Mac Mini off a mate. Install Snow Leopard, a 3 year old OS, and it can't install the latest XCode. And I also can't upgrade the machine to Mavericks, either.

By comparison: the latest Visual Studio will run on XP, a 14 year old OS. Yes, it'll probably run like a dog on an old XP machine, but you should have that option.

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‘Digital by default’ agricultural payments halted: Farmers start smirking

Tim Almond

Agile

My answer to "do you know agile?" is "what do you mean by agile?".

It's a meaningless buzzword, covering everything from well-managed, reasonably well-specified solutions with rapid prototyping and rapid releases and a strong emphasis on automated unit testing, to "throw it live and hope".

The thing this clearly failed on, one of the most valuable aspects of agile, is rapid prototyping. One of the drivers of agile over waterfall is rapid prototyping - the users get to see the system as early as possible and continue to be involved during the development stage. And that's the real end users, not some bureaucrat, but the poor sods that have to use your digital disaster.

But, hey, it's not their money. No-one will get fired for this.

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A gold MacBook with just ONE USB port? Apple, you're DRUNK

Tim Almond

Electric Perfume

I'm not much of a Jobs fan, but I think his talent was having a customer's perspective, and not letting things out of the door that weren't good for customers. Both of these products aren't.

Apple Keynotes have always been a lot of marketing hype, but at least the products generally delivered for their customers. When I'm abroad, I charge my laptop in a hotel room, and have my phone charging off the USB cable. The solution for Apple users to that now is to have 2 chargers - one for your iPhone and one for your Mac. Or a £65 box to carry as well as your Mac. Maybe Apple users will just accept that, but I think a lot of people might think that slightly bigger laptop, but with ports is better.

Whatever else I think of Jobs, he wasn't a me-too person. Smartwatches are, from what I can tell, gimmicks. And gimmicks don't do your company reputation good. It might be that what you sold someone was what they asked for, but if they don't derive value, they'll feel cheated.

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Bloody TECH GIANTS... all they do is WASTE investors' MONEY

Tim Almond

Re: Economics can't explain everything

"The critical fact is, there is no one on earth that can reliable predict which one out of the 5 will succeed and which 4 will fail. "

That's not the way it works. It's more about risk assessment - how much are we investing, what do we think we are likely to get from it, and best/worst case estimates. Quentin Tarantino makes a lot more films than Terry Gilliam because Quentin Tarantino generally has hits and Terry Gilliam doesn't. You might lose your shirt on the next QT film, and Gilliam might make another Time Bandits, but the information you have is that QT is probably a better place to put your money.

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Didn't the Left once want the WORKERS to get all the dosh?

Tim Almond

Re: Free markets or competitive markets?

"Football is NOT a 'market' in a traditional sense because fans are 'captive' to their team and would not be paying to buy, for example, a replica shirt of a rival team."

But you could not choose to go to football, not bother with it much, and not buy a replica team.

I'm not much of a fan, but I used to go and see Northampton Town play. then the terraces disappeared, prices went up, and I stopped enjoying it so much. I still keep an eye on what they're doing, but I'd rather spend my money going to the pictures or on a new PC game. An evening seeing Tosca is cheaper, and you get a bar at half-time.

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Hawking thesp Eddie Redmayne and Snowden doc Citzenfour win Oscars

Tim Almond

Not about Nerds

Not seen either, but from what I've heard, these films are not about nerds, they're just about a character pushed into a standard Hollywood (and more specifically Oscar-friendly) narrative.

The BBC made a decent film about Hawking called, Hawking, about 10 years ago, that is a mix of the man and his work, with some stuff in there about the creation of the universe, big bang and enough to make anyone who was curious to delve into the work of people like Penzias and Wilson.

The Oscars overlooked the really good nerd movie of the year, Interstellar, a movie people will be watching long after most of the Oscar bait that gets nominated.

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So long, Lenovo, and no thanks for all the super-creepy Superfish

Tim Almond

Buy "business" laptops

You don't get this shit with Apple because you pay a minimum of £749 for a laptop, and at that price, there's plenty of profit margin. If Apple tried to sell a £300 laptop, they'd be stuffing crapware on it too.

It's really a problem that infests so much of life, that people buy on price rather than value. You can get a £379 Thinkpad Edge from Lenovo and at worst you can describe the pre-installed stuff as "maybe useful", like an Office trial, or a copy of Picasa. And they're solid machines. But a lot of people will look at that next to a £239 Dell Inspiron and go for the Dell.

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Snapchat wants $19 BEEELLION for your selfies

Tim Almond

Re: So...

if the $500m investments keep coming....

That said, if I'd built a zero-revenue photo sharing app and someone offered me $3bn, I think I'd put the deal off by laughing at what idiots they were.

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Sitting on one's ARSE is the new CANCER, says Tim Cook - and an Apple watch will save you

Tim Almond

Re: $848M could have been spent more effectively

"Next time somebody has a billion to spend on "green" energy, could somebody at least work out where in the world it could be most effectively spent? Please. If the available money isn't spent efficiently, then we might run out of money having barely kept up with growth."

There's a group called the Copenhagen Consensus that does precisely that. And their outcome was that with $75bn to spend, things like adding micronutrients to poor people's diets (eg iron supplements), malaria treatment, immunisation, TB treatment all come far above climate change.

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Wizard of Oz OFFICIALLY 'most significant movie' EVER, says PNAS

Tim Almond

Re: meh

It's a film that's full of cryptic information about what's going on, and for that reason, I think it's a bit of a failure. I've seen one interpretation that makes a lot of sense and if the director had made things a bit clearer would have made it an excellent film.

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Tesco tosses loss-making Blinkbox into TalkTalk's basket

Tim Almond

Alternatives

Take a look at Google Play. I've bought movies on my phone and streamed them via Chromecast to a TV and they were fine (only a 20" TV, haven't tested it on a larger one). Also offline/online tablet watching.

Amazon don't just do packages. You can also rent films (not sure if you can without the package).

There's also Wuaki, but their terms aren't as good as Google. You only get the film for 2 days, where Google give you 30 days to watch, and then you have to watch within 2 days. And their "buy" are actually "rent for 3 years".

Sky store is fine, but the range is quite limited.

There's also Knowhow, who I haven't tried on principle as it's run by Dixons/Currys.

And if you like arthouse stuff, there's Curzon Home Cinema, although I'm personally impressed with the range on Blinkbox.

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Tim Almond

Re: Ultraviolet and Blinkbox

I've bought almost nothing from Blinkbox (or anyone else) for that reason. I bought The Raid because it was little more than a rental price (and it's highly rewatchable), but you're dependant on others with streaming. If Talk Talk bring the shutters down on the service because they can't make it work, what happens to your film library?

Plus, blu-rays are cheaper than buying HD streams, better quality and have a load of extras.

That said, I've enjoyed Blinkbox rentals. Tesco made a service that for me was better than Amazon Instant, and I hope that Talk Talk keep it as good, but they hardly have a good reputation for internet.

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Apple's DIRTY SECRET isn't that secret, or that dirty

Tim Almond

Load of Hype

I can't really get that worked up about the abuses they found. I'd rather do what they're doing than work in a coal mine. They had a worker who was told they had to work a couple of 7 day weeks, someone said he was tired after his 16 day shift and someone else fell asleep on a break in his shift. I've heard worse stories about the video game industry.

In my experience, young men (especially young men living away from home) will take every bit of paid work you throw at them. And really, if you hate it, leave. This is pretty far from the worst job in China and there's plenty of people breaking their backs in paddy fields that will take the job.

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Bring back big gov, right? If only the economics, STUPID, could tell us more

Tim Almond

Re: Lying, on a jet plane

But it's not about whether something has doubled in efficiency, it's about how useful that doubling is. What does that actually equate to in terms of the economic savings to passengers? How does that compare to say, the difference between the 1950s and the 1970s when in the 1950s, passengers were having to stop off in Newfoundland and Ireland for fuel and it took around 20 hours?

It's like say, DVD vs Blu-Ray. Everyone switched to DVD because it was so much nicer to watch, cut down storage, didn't break so easily. But most people I know haven't upgraded to Blu-Ray yet. It's nicer, but not so much that they care much about spending money for the extra resolution.

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REVEALED: Titsup flight plan mainframe borks UK air traffic control

Tim Almond

Re: MP

Of course, if people had then died, he'd have been complaining that NATS had been irresponsible.

In the grand scheme of government screwing up, this hardly even registers with me. I've had delays of a couple of hours waiting for a train and no-one at the station seemed particularly bothered.

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A nation of CODERS? Yes, says UK.gov, and have some cash to do it

Tim Almond

Re: Just maybe....

A huge amount of offshoring is because companies struggle to get people.

I'm not sure what this maths initiative is designed to achieve. More teachers doesn't mean more coders.

What we really need is a respected coder's certificate.Something that you can go to an employer and say "look, I can build code". A year's course in a local technical college - learn the fundamentals of computer science, how to code in a modern OO language like Python or Java, how a relational DB works, and then build a CRUD website that is both marked, and can be viewed by prospective employers. Something kids leaving school at either 16 or 18 can do.

And no, that doesn't cover all computing needs. I'd still need to take a Java guy and get him to convert to C#, to learn jQuery and AJAX. But at least I'd know he understood things like data structures and OO coding, which are a springboard to almost all other software development.

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We're not, er, 'cut-throat' capitalists – VC formerly known as ISIS

Tim Almond

Re: I still think of Archer.

The producers of Archer have had to ditch all the ISIS merchandise.

http://www.avclub.com/article/archer-drops-isis-name-suddenly-finds-itself-bunch-210378

No-one wanted to buy it, or they'd have been in the... DANGER ZONE!

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Microsoft exams? Tough, you say? Pffft. 5-YEAR-OLD KID passes MCP test

Tim Almond

Certs

There's nothing really wrong with them, but I'm rather dubious about certs without experience. I've met people with a few years of SQL and the certs and they're very good. And the certs may mean they cover stuff they don't normally and broaden their experience.

But a load of MCSEs just book learn.

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VINYL is BACK and you can thank Sonos for that

Tim Almond

Quality Sound?

"“In an increasingly-digitised world, it appears that music fans still crave a tangible product that gives them original artwork, high audio quality and purity of sound,” she says. At least two of those points are probably true."

Organisation that supports companies selling music bigs up format with a short shelf life shocker.

There's a museum up in the Cotswolds full of old mechanical music, like music boxes and pianolas and they can play really old cylinders and they still play pretty nicely from decades ago. The gramophone records from even a few weeks of play sound terrible.

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4G is quicker than 3G, says Ofcom. Can't we get you on Mastermind, Sybil?

Tim Almond

4G vs Wifi

It's seemed to me that anywhere you can get 4G, you can also get wifi for the price of an espresso. Not as fast as these speeds, but how often do you need 22mbps? How often you going to be in the middle of a city without an office and suddenly want to download Photoshop?

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Sky: We're no longer calling ourselves British. Yep. And Broadcasting can do one, too

Tim Almond

Re: History

So? 95% of what's on the BBC is crap. Homes under the Hammer, National Lottery: In it to Win It, Question Time, Children in Need. At least Sky customers aren't forced to pay for it if they want to watch the BBC.

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PROFESSORS! PROFESSORS! PROFESSORS!

Tim Almond

New Chairs

why, has he been throwing some around?

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What kind of generation doesn't stick it to the Man, but to Taylor Swift instead?

Tim Almond

If I can find pirated material, so can Google...

Well, no. They can't. You can find pirated material because your brain is tuned into how to identify pirated material in subtle ways that an algorithm can't.

Plus, how do you know something's pirated? I might write a song and just put it up on a file sharing site. How's Google to know that's not legitimate?

Ultimately, thwarting music piracy is nearly impossible. Even if you remove all piracy online, kids will just come to school and send each other songs via Bluetooth.

What these people can never seem to grasp is that sales are about money and people's moral beliefs. Do you have the money to buy an MP3? Do you think artists should be rewarded for their work? You are not going to convert people who don't tick those boxes into buying. They will not resign themselves to having to pay for it. They will find a way to get hold of it. If I saw a pirate result for an album before Amazon, I'd still buy it from Amazon.

The only thing you can do is to screw up the people who will pay. If an album's not available, some people will find it somewhere and rip it.

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BBC clamps down on ILLICIT iPlayer watchers

Tim Almond

Re: "...BBC charge £12/month, Netflix £6. Does BBC have twice the content...?"

"The BBC makes an enormous amount of content. All those documentaries, classical music - the Proms, Radio 6 Music, live sessions from current bands, Radio 4 - dramas, comedy, current affairs, intellectual debate and discussion, dramas on BBC1/2, popular shows such as Strictly, Bake Off (cue snide comments from intolerant snobs who object to the production of tv shows not to their tastes), the World Service. Etc etc"

But an enormous amount of that content is filler. Radio 4 comedy? You're joking. Absolutely terrible. Intellectual debate and discussion? Reality: debate shows with rabble-rousers like David Starkey. Live sessions from bands? That's free publicity for their music sales, something they can pay for themselves and stick on YouTube. Bake Off? Free TV given to the BBC on deals to sell the associated cookbooks. Strictly? Cheap TV that'll be forgotten in a matter of weeks. Drama? Well, The Fall's pretty good, and the first couple of series of Sherlock, but I'm struggling to think of much else.

I have no idea where £3bn of people's money goes. I'm not seeing it on the screen.

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Hey, YouTube lovers! How about you pay us, we start paying for STUFF? - Google

Tim Almond

"Once real money is changing hands, shouldn’t the video talent start to get feisty, and start demanding more? "

But they can't. The minute they start trying to charge, people will just find another video to watch. This isn't the 80s. There's no longer a tiny number of records out there by artists that get on the Radio 1 playlist. Anyone can make a video and stick it on YouTube.

Gangnam Style would never have been a global phenomenon without YouTube. If Psy had charged people, he'd have made some sales in South Korea, but be worse off than giving it away and collecting on the small percentage of the billions of views that bought the MP3. And the artists largely don't care if they give away a billion YouTube views. It's the million sales that come from it that matter.

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Game of Thrones man stars in sci-fi bit on comet-catcher Rosetta

Tim Almond

Re: What a waste of money

But why? Why do we have film credits? You don't have a credit on a Twix for the people who picked the cocoa.

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Entity Framework goes 'code first' as Microsoft pulls visual design tool

Tim Almond

Re: don't understand the logic

several times slower? Produce those MS figures.

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Tim Almond

EF Diff

Yes, they do, but that wasn't the problem. It was that everything was in one file. A couple of people changed or added some tables and that meant manual merging that was ugly and prone to errors. You try looking at a two huge EDMX file and working out what changed from the last version.

The last project I worked on was old EF and the simplest thing was to only have one person at a time updating and checking in the EDMX to avoid problems.

With Code First, developers can be making changes in and even if you get a conflict it's easier to resolve. The history is easier to see as you can see a list of all entities in a changeset and look at each individually. Plus the migrations stuff means that you have real DB source control. It enforces developers working out all the base data that has to be there, which means you're less likely to get a cockup because someone forgot they needed to setup all the country codes when you go live.

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