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* Posts by boltar

976 posts • joined 15 Oct 2008

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MIT boffins moot tsunami-proof floating nuke power plants

boltar
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Re: @boltar

"The stupid "it won't work because a) terrorists b) mother nature" is really getting on my wick. With that kind of attitude, not using fire after the last ice age might have looked like the safe option."

Don't be an ass - there are certain places you don't build certain things. You wouldn't build a reactor on a geological fault or at the edge of a cliff so why build it in the middle of the sea where its exposed to harsh weather and waves and is a damn site harder to protect from attack? Oh , and if a reactor has a meltdown on land its bad news but at least there's some containment - if it did it in the ocean, well , shall we work out how large the extent of the pollution would be?

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boltar
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Re: @boltar

The reason for the sinkings are irrelevant - they sank. And no , there arn't any sunk nuclear aircraft carriers , mainly because they tend to stay out of harms way. A nuclear reactor sitting on a platform is a sitting duck for any halfwit terrorist with a grudge not to mention the elements.

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boltar
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"Well nuclear powered subs exist, as do nuclear powered air craft carriers......."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_sunken_nuclear_submarines

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Virgin Media so, so SORRY for turning spam fire-hose on its punters

boltar
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Do people still use ISP email accounts these days?

For me virgin just provide the router and the internet access. I'll have to check my email there sometime, probably got 5 years worth of spam in it.

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Batten down the hatches, Ubuntu 14.04 LTS due in TWO DAYS

boltar
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Re: @asdf The desktop deadend.

>If you keep your /home in a separate partition/filesystem installing from scratch is piece of cake.

Exactly this. Thats the whole reason for partitioning disks, something a lot of people don't seem to understand. Personally what I do is always have a spare partition to install a new release on so I can test it. If it works the old install partition becomes the new spare , if it doesn't the updated partition remains the spare. Good luck trying that with Windows.

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Fusion-io: Ah, Microsoft. I see there's in-memory in SQL Server 2014... **GERONIMO!**

boltar
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Perhaps I'm misunderstanding what they've done...

... but Oracle DBs have kept an in memory buffer of recent queries, plans and data rows for more versions than I can remember. How does this differ?

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Look out, bankers! It's Lily Cole and her (Brit taxpayer-funded) WISH-PRINTING ATM

boltar
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Re: Just for this...

Who's the idiot - the person who asked for 200K for some load of online rubbish , or the muppets who gave it to her? Perhaps Cole isn't quite the airhead she seems. More likely to have been laughing all the way to the bank - Coutts probably.

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Microsoft lobs pre-release Windows Phone 8.1 at devs who dare

boltar
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Re: Developer unlocked?

"Your windows 7 phone won't run windows 8 though, windows 8 needs a dual core processor."

There's a nice bit of built in obsolescence there from MS. I'm surprised they don't supply some KY Jelly with the phone so you can shove the it up your @rse yourself after a year to get that true MS customer experience.

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boltar
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"I upgraded this afternoon. Went smoothly and it looks very nice"

Given MS has apparently just dumped support 8.1 on PCs I'd suggest you enjoy it while you can. You might soon have a very expensive brick on your hands if you attempt an upgrade.

http://tech.slashdot.org/story/14/04/15/0053213/microsoft-confirms-it-is-dropping-windows-81-support

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OpenSSL Heartbleed: Bloody nose for open-source bleeding hearts

boltar
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"The trick is to pick your reviewers carefully - those that hit the "Ship it" button within 5 minutes are not reviewing code."

The problem is that a lot of the time the people who get chosen to review some code are presented with a lump of code that they have little idea of the function of. So the best they can do is check for obvious syntax and logical errors, pass it and then get on with their own work which they're probably under pressure to get done. For proper code review you need it set down as an actual task with a specific time slot allocated so people can get up to speed on what they're looking at - not something fitted inbetween other tasks if the person has a few minutes. Unfortunately thats just not the way its done in most companies.

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boltar
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Re: @Gene Cash

"That's why the software never failed in 30 years of use."

Never catastrophically failed sure, but *never* failed in any way that required a reset? You 100% sure about that? Even avionics software occasionally has the odd glitch. I'd be surprised if the software in the shuttle was any different. Certainly at least one well known rocket crash was down to faulty software: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cluster_(spacecraft)

and then there was the mars mission that used a mix of metric and imperial...

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Anatomy of OpenSSL's Heartbleed: Just four bytes trigger horror bug

boltar
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Re: boltar

"so any thoughts?"

Ah , the old devil and deep blue sea type question - if I answer I'll be accused of just quoting wikipedia, if I don't I'll be accused of bluffing. Either way I lose.

Fine, I'll bite - it was for data space client facing server. Multiple seperate blocks of memory allocated with various bits of important data scattered and interleaved among them with a core encrypted index. Not OS level ASLR but a similar concept.

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boltar
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Re: Simple script?

"I think you're being downvoted because you're coming across as a bit fighty."

Awww. Did I upset some delicate ickle wickle flowers on here?

Good :o)

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boltar
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Re: boltar

"No, that wasn't my intention."

Well thats not how it came across.

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boltar
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Re: Simple script? @boltar

"Are you a script kiddie? I didn't get ROP but I do know what ASLR is"

Good for you - I've actually implemented ASLR FWIW.

My point - which obviously you didn't get, quelle surprise - is that dropped acronyms into a post in an attempt to gain gravitas usually has the opposite effect.

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boltar
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Re: Simple script?

"Well, I'm not a dev, but I read and understood what's going on with the script, with no great difficulty. Probably wouldn't have done, if it'd have been in C or C++"

Like the other the dimwits on here you're confusing "understand" with "simple". I understand most of the 230K line c++ framework I'm debugging at the moment - I wouldn't call it simple. I understand everything this script does, but I wouldn't call it simple. printf("hello world\n"); is simple. This script isn't.

Interestingly I got 7 thumbs down for pointing out that the script is NOT written in C. Which I think shows the general IQ level of the posters on this group. Doubtless these knuckle dragging mouth breathers will mark this down too.

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boltar
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"@boltar this is C code."

The code in the text yes , the script - no.

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boltar
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Re: Simple script?

"And by simple, I meant there's no screwing around with race conditions, "

Err , you should never get race conditions on a half duplex protocol.

"dodging ASLR, building ROP chains and what not."

What not? Oh dear. No more acronyms to impress us with? Shame.

Most people definitions of "simple" mean something like a 10 line script sending one or 2 strings down the line. Not 300 lines of code doing challenge response.

"Take the rest of the year off."

Thanks for the advice. Here's some for you - buy yourself a dictionary.

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boltar
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Simple script?

Not that simple - unless you can remember 50 lines of cipher hex codes off the top of your head.

What language is it anyway? Looks like some fucked up version of python. Ruby maybe?

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How Brit computer maker beat IBM's S/360 - and Soviet spies

boltar
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Re: Sorry: Not impressed with aircraft industry rants

"We may not build airliners anymore, but we sell a hell of a lot of undercarriage!"

Oh whoopee, lets get out the champagne. Supplying parts is all well and good buts its not the same as building the final product. When you look at a car , do you think Ford/Audi/BMW/Whatever or Unipart?

"let's just concentrate on trying to play our part in this new world"

Yes, lets continue playing the part of the plucky underdog as usual. You ever thought of getting a job in the civil service?

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boltar
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Re: English Electric Lightning

"Sadly it had a very limited range/endurance."

It didn't need it - it was an interceptor. Take off , shoot down enemy , land.

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boltar
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The story of 20th century britain

So we invented the programmable electronic computer but the usual government and managerial incompetance stopped us becoming a world player until the 80s micro revolution (which itself only lasted briefly). Yeah well, thats the story of Britain.

Some other national tech missed opportunities:

Back in the 40s we handed Whittles jet engines designs to the yanks on a plate and they ended up trouncing and eventually destroying our commercial aircraft industry (though the Comet crashes didn't help but crashes haven't put Boeing or Airbus out of business). Oh , but we make the wings for a few airbus airliners. BFD.

In the 60s the government scrapped the Blue Streak rocket project and in effect our entire space program (sorry , satellites don't count, they can't launch themselves into orbit). Meanwhile the yanks went to the moon and even the french created Arianne.

We invent public private key cryptography but good old HM Govn keeps it classified for decades and meanwhile Rivest and co across the pond rediscover it in the 70s and claim it - perfectly legitimately - as their own invention. Uk govn eventually declassfies our version in 97. Long after the horse has bolted , settled down , had a few ponies of its own and gone to the glue factory in the sky.

Britain - lions led by donkeys. Every. Fucking. Time.

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Tesla in 'Ethernet port carries data' SCANDAL

boltar
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Re: Thank god I have an old car

"the same could be said of your phone, your computer and your printer"

A phone or printer without some sort of connection is just a plastic brick. A computer is still useful but not so much. A car OTOH will still get you from A to B quite safely.

"However it's about progress"

No it isn't, 90% of it is about marketing. A touchscreen in a car is not progress by any definition for example. And networking all the systems together to provide functionality thats not required isn't progress either.

"n a car, a CAN connected ABS system can report traction problems to a central system, it can report back for each individual wheel if necessary and this can be fed back"

In poor conditions like mud or snow switching the traction control off invariably gets you going faster especially if you have appropriate tyres. The only successful use of this technology outside of racing is in Land Rovers hill decent but thats an exception to the rule. Its certainly not required in a Ford Focus.

"If you've ever driven a vehicle with multiple driver profiles it's an enormous benefit having your own driving preferences compared to a partners and being able to switch between them quickly and safely."

Oh puh-lease! How long does it take to adjust the seat and mirror , 5 seconds tops? You're going to have to do better than that.

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boltar
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Re: Thank god I have an old car

"Or, if the driver hasn't put his seatbelt on, the parking brake does not release automatically (it can still be released by hand). Conversely, if you're stopped and unclip your seatbelt, the parking brake engages."

... etc

Every single thing you mentioned is a completely and utterly pointless gimmick IMO and frankly if you need any of that to drive you shouldn't be behind the wheel and I do know something about driving since I have an HGV license as well as a car one. If you were trying to prove they were useful I'm afraid all you did was do the complete opposite. As for a parking brake that releases as soon as you put on your seatbelt - yeah, great idea on a steep hill.

"You could achieve much of this by mechanical linkage, but Airbus already knew better in the 70s and replaced all that with light and inexpensive wire and servos, saving in both manufacturing and operating costs."

Right , because cars and airliners are really at the same level of sophistication arn't they? After all, if its simpler to run wires instead of hydraulic pipes the 30 metres from the cockpit to the wings and have an electric instead of hydraulic control unit then OBVIOUSLY that means its simpler to run wires to an electronic control unit instead of a cable and ... nothing else ... the 2 metres from the centre console to the drum brakes! Or maybe not. Perhaps you should check out how small light aircraft are controlled before making stupid analogies..

"some of us see it as the responsible thing to do to buy the safest machine that we can afford in order to match our safe (on public roads only!) driving habits"

I suspect your driving is pretty poor which is why you feel you need all these gimmicks.

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boltar
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Re: Thank god I have an old car

@ Nick Ryan

No offence mate, but you really need to go on an engineering course if you think ANY of the things you've listed require a networked system in the first place, never mind one running IP over ethernet.

Yes , CAN bus already exists and its already overkill. As for "air conditioning, windows and mirrors to control, seat positioning, lighting" needing networking - sorry, were you trying to be funny or have you really drunk so much of the kool aid that you just can't see a simple way of doing these utterly simple tasks?

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boltar
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Re: Thank god I have an old car

>1) a lot of people in their 20's buy new cars

Not many, at least not in europe. Most buy 2nd or 3rd hand or even older unless their parents have coughed up for one.

>2) you assume everyone in the world in their 30's is the same as you and the people that

>age you know. Forgetting of course, you are likely to know people similar to yourself,

>otherwise they wouldn't be very good friends.

Where did I mention anything about friends? I deal with plenty of clients and colleagues from all over europe. When I have chatted about these sorts of things down the pub or cafe the general consensus is they're just gimmicks.

>3) there are a lot of people who work in technology these days and like all this stuff,

>they don't stop working in the industry when they turn 30

I work in a tech industry. I've never met anyone yet who wanted a home cinema system in their car or for that matter a bloody touch screen that makes simple operations like changing the radio or switching on the air con almost impossible on the move. Plenty - including myself - once wanted a flash ICE system but most people grow out of that - and go faster strips and silly spoilers - by their 30s.

>4) they are selling these cars no problem, so clearly the features attract some people.

If they're in all the cars by default then people don't have much choice. And TBH I doubt many people buy a tesla because of the toys in the cabin.

>There are many other issues with what you said, which could all have been avoided if

>you had stated this was your opinion and what you want from a car, not everyone in

>their 30's and above.

Perhaps you just haven't met enough people and think the people YOU mix with are representative.

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boltar
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Thank god I have an old car

It has some electronics to run the engine and ABS and thats about it. It doesn't have some silly infotainment screen or iPad wannabe information display - it has an AM/FM radio and dials. End.

Am I the only person who's sick of seeing manufacturers shove ever more silly toys and complex systems into cars for no benefit other than a tick in the Flash Features part of the sales brochure? Perhaps someone should tell these companies that generally its NOT 15 year old boys who buy new cars - its mostly people in their 30s and older. And by the time most people have got to that age they've grown out of wanting the silly flashing lights and gimcrack features and don't need or want the hassle that all these systems come with whether its in operating them or paying to maintain them.

Electric cars are even simpler than internal combustion - some electronics to charge the battery and run the motor. Done. Dump all the other crap and save weight and space. I can't really see why it needs an internal network running over ethernet other than it being some geeks wet dream.

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Torvalds rails at Linux developer: 'I'm f*cking tired of your code'

boltar
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Re: coding @condiment

>I find Swedes and Germans speak English better than a lot of British folk.

Thats what I used to think until I started working in an international european company. The europeans all speak with good accents and grammar , but after a while you realise their vocabulary is a lot more limited than a native speaker, and if you start speaking idiomatically or - god forbid - use slang, they tend to get confused pretty quickly unless they've lived and worked in the UK for a long time.

This isn't a criticism, its same with anyone who learns a foreign language - unless you really immerse yourself in the language and culture for a LONG time you'll never speak the language as comprehensively as a native. I know - I used to think my French was ok until I spent a lot of time in France and realised how poor my actual ability in the language really was. And still is to be honest.

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I QUIT: Mozilla's anti-gay-marriage Brendan Eich leaps out of door

boltar
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Re: It's a shame

"Blacks didnt have any rights either in many countries, doesnt make that situation a valid or just one."

Here we go - the usual attempt to conflate racial issues with gay ones in some feeble attempt to gain gravitas for the latter. Not being able to marry is hardly oppression on the same scale as being forced to work as a slave and don't even attempt to make that connection. Marriage in almost ALL societies in the world , black, white, brown , whatever , is between a man and a woman, not between 2 people of the same sex and thats the way most of us want it to stay and if you don't like that that's just tough fecking luck.

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boltar
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Re: It's a shame

"That's interesting, so are you saying that if gays could already marry you wouldn't agree with banning it? Or are you just kind of nitpicking?"

I'm not nitpicking. You can't retrospectively assign rights to people so you can complain about others wanting to take them away.

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boltar
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Re: It's a shame

"He can promote and donate to a cause that conspires to take away the rights of others"

You can't take away rights someone doesn't have in the first place. I also don't believe in gay "marriage", perhaps I shouldn't be allowed to post here because I disagree with your political agenda which is essentially what the whole gay "marriage" really is?

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Puking! protester! forces! Yahoo! 'techie! scum!' to! ride! vile! bile! barf! bus! to! work!

boltar
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Re: "simply market forces in action"

>Maybe the protesters are picking on the big corps, because the big corps have the resources

>necessary to behave in a socially responsible fashion?

Sorry , what does "behave in a socially responsible fashion" mean in English? Isn't providing jobs in a recession enough or are you expecting companies to become sort of social security department too now? Are they supposed to house their staff or what exactly?

Tell me, were you a student? If you were did you give a damn or even think about you and your fellow students need for accommodation near your college putting up rents for locals? No, I bet you didn't.

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boltar
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Re: Follow the money....again

That's all well and good , but you're thinking it through. Protestors don't like to do that - its hard. Its much easier to piss about in silly costumes, make a lot of noise and inconvenience people while feeling all smug and self righteous and delude yourself that you've actually Done Something.

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boltar
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Re: "simply market forces in action"

Oddly enough , money does tend to trickle down from employers to the community since guess what - people often spend their money near where they live! And as far as I can see its not the companies raising rents and kicking people out but the landlords in the area. Why arn't these right-on trustafarians picketing their offices rather than the offices of companies providing much needed employement?

Seems like the usual shallow simplistic left wing protest politics in action to me - pick on big corps because its easier than actually thinking about the issues. All it'll achieve is people driving to work instead of taking the bus. As for being sick over the bus , thats got to be the most juvenile protest action I've seen in many years. If these idiots want to be taken even slightly seriously they'll need to grow up first.

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boltar
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Die Techie Scum

Am I the only person who for a split second thought it was some new German term?

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Yahoo! keen! to! slurp! news! video! distie! site!

boltar
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Just the corporate version...

.... of someone slowly going down in quicksand desperately trying to grab onto anything nearby that looks even vaguely like a rope or branch.

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Vodafone brings African tech to Europe

boltar
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Re: ......

"I sincerely hope that one day you get to join the ranks of the unemployed and see how much fun it is."

I've been unemployed jackass - twice due to redundancy. Guess what - I kept looking for work until I found it.

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boltar
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"You don't seem to like them"

I don't. I have no time for the sort of losers who won't get off their backsides and get a job. Almost a million Polish alone managed to come to the UK and get employment yet we still have the same number of bone idle witless scum on welfare whinging about they can't make ends meet. F*ck them.

"just think how much money the tax payer is saves, not paying the pensions of people who have smoked and drunk themselves into an early cremation."

True, and if people want to drink and/or smoke thats up to them. But I'm not interested in listening to their hard up stories because they blew all their money on non essentials.

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boltar
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" there is much bigger pile of "respectable" bloodsucking parasites who specialize in leeching from the destitute. Social responsibility? Providing social service to the community?"

F*ck the "community". No one in the UK needs to use a payday lender - the social pays for housing costs and other basic needs - unless they've decided they really need a 50 inch TV even though they can't afford it. Funny how the scum class always claim poverty yet they always have enough money for all the latest AV equipment, drink, ciggies, gambling and invariably 3 or more kids. As yourself why betting shops and booze outlets always congregate in downmarket areas. IMO separating these sorts of fools from their money is a public service - it can go to people who can spend it on something worthwhile.

Yeah , I'll get downvoted by all the witless bleeding hearts liberals on here who'll pay right-on lip service to social justice but switch on the central locking in their Range Rovers when they quickly drive through any area that doesn't have an organic health food shop.

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Dutch doctors replace woman's skull with 3D-printed plastic copy

boltar
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Re: Amazing operation

One hopes its special medical Acrylic otherwise I wouldn't want to be that patient once the plasticisers and other unpleasent chemicals that you get in normal plastics start to leach out into her brain.

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BT finally admits its Home Hub router scuppers some VPN connections

boltar
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Re: 4.7.5.1.83.8.94.1.37

>{major}.{minor}.{revision}

>

>and they decide there's a need for 6 further levels of categorisation. Nice

{major}.{minor}.{revision}.{last minute bug fix}.{bug fix to fix bugs introduced by last minute fix}.{oh shit this isn't supposed to happen fix}.{er yes it was actually - check ptr #265476 revert fix}.{feck-this-I'm-off-home quick fix for overnight prod build}

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Candy Crush King sees IPO go sour as stock price heads south

boltar
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Re: Over 350 years later ...

"Humans are absolutely daft, as a herd, and completely incapable of learning from their predecessor's mistakes."

There's a reason religions tend to call their followers their "flock". Because they are just like sheep. Luckily for our species a small percentage of every generation rebels against the status quo - above and beyond the usual teenage routine - and often helps us advance. Or they become criminals, but the behaviours are flip sides of the same coin unfortunately.

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boltar
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Its getting like the pop music industry

"The majority of game developers have gone bankrupt over the years"

One hit wonders come along, make everyone a load of money then fickle adolescent interest moves onto the next Big Thing and the "artist" or game developer is left wondering what happened. The only difference with a listed company is that pump and dump comes into play and I suspect thats whats happened here.

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Windows 8 BREAKS ITSELF after system restores

boltar
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Re: Is Windows 8 fundamentally broken?

"People just need to get their 'finger' out and adapt."

People don't want to adapt. A computer is a TOOL, just like a car or a hammer. When I get into a different car I don't expect to have to relearn how to drive because they've decided that having the driver facing backwards operating a joystick with his foot is more intuitive than the current arrangement! The GUI for desktop PCs is a solved problem - it didn't and doesn't need messing with. Until proper 3D displays are common then a mouse , keyboard and drop down menus work fine. Leave them alone MS!

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As WinXP death looms, Microsoft releases its operating system SOURCE CODE for free

boltar
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Re: Are you insane?

>I have no interest in writing software that can't take advantage of actual hardware features

>and power - and we're dropping XP support as well, it will allow us to write better software.

Err, what? Unless you're writing to the metal for some game engine or highly optimised DB , then API changes aside your code should be hardware agnostic. Its the OS that worries for example about which CPU core to use or how to best buffer the data to the disk and when , not you.

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boltar
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Re: Are you insane?

"Black hats would be combing it over for vulnerabilities applicable to Vista, 7, 8, and 8.1 too. The community might be able to fix vulnerabilities in XP, but they definitely couldn't with the newer operating systems."

I'm not sure why people seem to be under the impression that you need the source code to find vulnerabilities. There's this old fashioned tool called a disassembler and any black or white hat worth their salt can speak assembly language. All you need is the binary. Yes, its more work but it can be done.

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TV sales PLUMMET. But no one's prepared to say what we all know

boltar
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Re: @EddieD -- I don't want a tv - And I don't want one either!

"You may well ask why no TV. Simple really, with the crap infantile programs on offer, incessant ads and station promos etc., etc. why would one bother?"

Right. Because watching a bunch of immature eejits on youtube trying to neknominate is so much more intellectually stimulating than say watching a series about the Plantagents or a crime thriller.

I hate to break the news to you but 99% of the most infantile cr@p on this planet is found online , not on TV.

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boltar
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Re: "Lightbulbs, nylon tights, razor blades, can all be made to last years or decades"

"twat. that is all."

Did you think that riposte up all by yourself or did mummy help you?

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boltar
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Re: "Lightbulbs, nylon tights, razor blades, can all be made to last years or decades"

"I am afraid that anybody who actually knows any metallurgy knows"

Which apparently isn't you. My father had a very expensive razor that did last for years. And no, he didn't have a beard. Guess what - it is possible to sharpen cutting edges! Who knew?

"Anybody can make a light bulb last a very long time; under-run it. The problem is that incandescent bulbs are horribly inefficient to start with, and when significantly under-run, the cost of electricity to produce a given light output becomes many times the cost of the savings in light bulbs"

And of course what people like yourself forget is that "wasted" energy comes out as heat which warms up the house or office so the heating - in winter anyway - can be turned down.

"Extremely hard materials like WC do not lend themselves to making very sharp blades suitable for razors"

Riiiight, so I guess people in the past didn't actually use flint for cutting tools then?

Oh , while you're at it I suggest you look up Titanium Nitride.

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