Feeds

* Posts by skelband

1820 posts • joined 18 Aug 2008

Uber, Lyft and cutting corners: The true face of the Sharing Economy

skelband
Silver badge

> What I am saying that in the long run, it is a business model that makes people lose out, if you factor in all the aspects. It's just a business model designed to lure people by the appeal of lower prices.

This, IMHO, is a distortion of the reality for most people. If you have a high disposable income and carry around an iPhone, it might seem that way.

But the reality for most people is that taxis are way too expensive to use at any time for any reason.

There is room in the market for a range of options. Cheap and cheerful to deluxe. You pay your money, you take your chance.

I'm not saying that Lyft or Uber are necessarily the right answer here but daily transport really is a commodity service. It has just never been able to reach a stable state in a lot of places because of extreme over-regulation. A middle ground is surely what is required.

Like the commenter above though, I think the real disruption will come with self-driving cars which are much closer than most people realise.

2
0

TROLL SLAYER Google grabs $1.3 MEEELLION in patent counter-suit

skelband
Silver badge

"Beneficial Innovations"

Marketing in action.

I suppose it's better than "Arseholes Inc".

18
0

Boffins attempt to prove the UNIVERSE IS JUST A HOLOGRAM

skelband
Silver badge

Re: Sock gnomes

> And, of course, there's the other phenomena of searching high and low for your car keys, then after a while discovering that they are in a place you have already searched.

This of course also applies to cutlery in the cutlery drawer, most commonly the tongs and the can opener.

0
0

GitHub.io killed the distro star: Why are people so bored with the top Linux makers?

skelband
Silver badge

Re: Does a lack of search=lack of interest?

> Don't forget BitTorrent, I haven't used a distro's mirror for ages so by your metric I would not be counted.

Same here. BitTorrent for all distro downloads for ages now.

0
0

The police are WRONG: Watching YouTube videos is NOT illegal

skelband
Silver badge

> I favour an alternative explanation: that the British police now truly believe they have the right to state that something's illegal even when that's not the case: "So what if it's not against the law, you shouldn't be doing it anyway."

I believe that this is likely the truth.

Too many top brass in the police service are effectively politicians. They should not be making public pronouncements of this type *at all*. It is their role to keep the law, not act as the moral guardians of the public good.

7
0

IT blokes: would you say that LEWD comment to a man? Then don't say it to a woman

skelband
Silver badge

Re: Surprised..

Could I second this?

Maybe it's an American thing but if we overheard anything like that coming from a guy with us, if they worked for me, they wouldn't for much longer.

No company needs that kinds of publicity or have that kind of impression created at a conference.

In my entire career working with many women, I have never seen this kind of thing and I hope never to have to witness it.

59
0

Microsoft: We plan to CLEAN UP this here Windows Store town

skelband
Silver badge

Re: Hello pot, this is kettle...

> It does have a standard framework for updates (never used WSUS?)

These are for Windows core principally.

As far as I'm aware, there is no standard facility for applications.

Is there a way for an application to have a dependency on a particular version of Pythin without having to enclose it specifically and install it by hand? What if two applications have the same Python requirements? Do you get two copies of Python or does it all fall flat on its face?

> did you ever write a Linux package?

Erm, yes.

> You can easily write packages with missing dependencies, and I've seen a few.

If by missing, I assume that you mean not installed. If that is the case most installer front-ends will resolve them automatically. If you mean unresolvable, then you can still install it by hand which is no worse than the situation without package management. TBH, I can't remember the last time I had a situation like this. The most common situation is where a distribution does not support a required dependency version. I agree that this is a serious issue.

> Good Windows installers will take care of dependencies as well, and usually a Windows application has far less dependencies than a Linux one.

Yes. It is a shame that this has to be so. A key point about this though is that applications cannot share dependencies. In addition, as I mentioned previously, one of the key aspects that often doesn't work at all is dependencies on .Net frameworks which, as core Microsoft technologies, should never require manual installation. Sure, some installations may necessitate it (such as machines behind a firewall or not connected to the Internet) but this is not the case for the vast majority of situations.

0
0
skelband
Silver badge

Re: Hello pot, this is kettle...

> Sorry, but I have several applications running on Linux which are not updated from their repositories. Oracle, for example, or Polarion. Or our Napatech NICs drivers and software. Many commercial applications under Linux *are not* managed or updated through the repositories.

True but that is not the fault of the distribution, it is the fault of those suppliers. Windows has an "installer" but it provides no standard framework for update or dependency resolution. How many times have people installed and application to be told that some version of the .Net framework must be installed first? Why can't it happen automatically which would serve for the vast majority of people?

So instead we get a plethora of installer packages each of which have to provide their own custom approach, more to the point, *they cannot interact with each other*.

0
0
skelband
Silver badge

Re: Hello pot, this is kettle...

>Um, WTF does Windows need an 'app store' anyway? Are people so brainwashed?

Principally to make gatekeeper cash for Microsoft I would guess.

"You want to sell Windows software? You come to me!", in your best Godfather voice.

What Windows was always missing was a standardised management system for applications that everyone could get behind. It's one of the best aspects of using Linux I find and to be honest, I've never fully understood why such a thing doesn't exist in the Windows realm.

14
1

Cracking copyright law: How a simian selfie stunt could make a monkey out of Wikipedia

skelband
Silver badge

> If the person is an employee on salary or wages and uses equipment and media belonging to the company then regardless of who 'pushes the button' the copyright belongs to the company.

The fact that it is the company's equipment is irrelevent. The assistants agree to assign copyright as part of their contract of employment. This is a common arrangment.

In this case, the monkey has made no such agreement. It cannot legally do so. If it was a legal entity, it could also be prosecuted for theft.

The situation is a legal anomaly, and grey edge case that will likely be settled in court by precedent.

0
0
skelband
Silver badge

Re: Copyright aping nature.

> It says a lot about copyright in general when a monkey has more rights than the owner of the equipment.

As far as I'm aware, Mr Slater is free to do with the pictures whatever he wishes.

Pretty much all the legal arguments are that the monkey has no rights whatsoever.

In what sense do you think that the monkey has more rights than Mr Slater?

1
0

Echopraxia scores 'diamond cutter' on the sci-fi hardness scale

skelband
Silver badge

You have piqued my interest. I shall purchase a copy.

0
0

US Copyright Office rules that monkeys CAN'T claim copyright over their selfies

skelband
Silver badge

Re: This is not a clever decision...

The gist of the debate over this seem to be twofold:

1) the extent to which Slater contributed to the creation of the image, and

2) whether he should have a moral right to the image because it was his equipment and he'd spent lots of money getting to the location.

As to 1) it seems that what has been claimed consists of some kind of selection process and presentation to the public. I don't know if this is sufficient according to the law. Could an archaeologist claim copyright his his/her artistic discoveries as long as they were created within the time frame proscribed by the law?

2) is a difficult one for the law to touch on. Slater is making much of this aspect. Appealing to emotion in this respect is great for the publicity but I don't think it will avail him in the end.

0
0
skelband
Silver badge

Personally, I think this guy Slater is doing a great disservice to other photographers by this situation.

By asserting that he has sufficient creative input to this picture to be able to claim copyright (which in many jurisdictions is a requirement) he is insulting the work and art of real photography. The facts of the story have been pretty much clarified now and it would seem that the monkey stole the camera and took the pictures with no contribution from Slater.

I don't judge him as a photographer in other instances of his work which may well be of high quality and merit the acclaim of his peers, but in this instance he's not done any favours for himself.

If his only claim to creative input was the selection of the image from many, then anyone picking a picture from an image library would be able to claim, morally, at least a partial copyright over that image.

1
0
skelband
Silver badge

>>"No, but it does seem to put the monkey's image in the public domain."

> I suggest you read what the USCO actually says, not what you wished it said.

Why not tell us what it is about what the USCO says that contradicts this statement?

From your own article:

"Now, according to the Copyright Office, the matter is formally settled. The Office clearly says that unless a human took the image, it cannot be registered and thus Slater cannot claim US copyright on it."

If Slater cannot claim copyright on the image and USCO says that an animal cannot claim copyright over it, exactly who do you think *can* claim copyright over it? That which is not under copyright is in the public domain, unless you know of some other legal state in which a creative work can exist that is neither one nor the other.

5
0

Slapdash SSL code puts tons of top Android Play Store apps in hack peril

skelband
Silver badge
Trollface

Well what did they expect using a library called "Slapdash SSL"?

Asking for trouble if you ask me.

2
0

Microsoft exits climate denier lobby group

skelband
Silver badge

Re: ...that word. I do not think it means what you think it means

> Still, it fits with the article author's own partisanship, using derogatory terms like "climate denier" with apparently no concern or shame whatsoever.

Yeah it's really weird.

I've never met anyone that denied the existence of a climate.

11
0

Simian selfie stupidity: Macaque snap sparks Wikipedia copyright row

skelband
Silver badge

Re: Good article.

> If I use the time delay feature that has been standard in cameras for decades, the camera takes the picture (usually with me in it), but I set it up. No-one in the last few decades has seriously attempted to claim that I don't have copyright in that picture.

I really think some of the commentators here should take a look at the facts of the article.

The picture was not "set up". The photographer contributed absolutely nothing to the taking of this picture:

=================

"British nature photographer David Slater was in Indonesia in 2011 attempting to get the perfect image of a crested black macaque when one of the animals came up to investigate his equipment, hijacked a camera and took hundreds of selfies.

Many of them were blurry and some were pointed at the jungle floor, but among them were a handful of fantastic images - including a selfie taken by a grinning female macaque which made headlines around the world and brought Mr Slater his 15 minutes of fame.

"They were quite mischievous jumping all over my equipment, and it looked like they were already posing for the camera when one hit the button," he said at the time. "The sound got his attention and he kept pressing it. At first it scared the rest of them away but they soon came back - it was amazing to watch.

He must have taken hundreds of pictures by the time I got my camera back, but not very many were in focus. He obviously hadn't worked that out yet."

=======================

What the photographer is arguing about is not his moral rights. He is not even asserting that he took the picture or contributed to it in a creative capacity.

He is arguing that it was his camera so it should be his copyright:

============

If the monkey took it, it owns copyright, not me, that’s their basic argument. What they don’t realise is that it needs a court to decide that,” he said.

============

His main argument seems to be that his trip was expensive, the equipment is expensive and it's his so he deserves to get copyright of the snaps.

As a legal argument, I think that's pretty thin.

2
0
skelband
Silver badge

Re: Good article.

> Well, that explains a lot. You don't understand how copyright works.

The distinction is subtle and I think there is a confusion of semantics here.

Copyright is granted by law. If it is not, in any specific case, then public domain is what is left, by default. I think that is what most people would assume that the comment means.

I don't think that anyone is arguing about the legal situation of the automatic granting of copyright to creators.

In this particular situation, there is the suggestion of a grey area where a creative work could be created without it being possible to bestow copyright on the creator because they don't have sufficient legal status. In that situation, public domain is therefore the only alternative, even though it is not mandated specifically by statute.

2
0
skelband
Silver badge

Re: Good article.

> If you own a monkey and the monkey takes a photo, do you own the photo in that case?

That's an interesting legal question.

Others have quoted the common situation of a photographer's assistant taking a picture but copyright being conferred on the photographer rather than an assistant. I suspect that this is resolved a "common practice" or by some legal contractual undertaking related to the terms of employment of the assistant. Certainly as a programmer, I cannot claim copyright over code I write while working for my employer: my employment contract says so.

Personally, I think the legal situation involved where you own an animal that takes a picture is a difficult one. There is no contractual arrangement and I think it is fair to say that there is little legal precedence to draw on here so it may be that it could be argued that no copyright ownership exists.

5
1
skelband
Silver badge

Re: Hold on! What about the legal rights of Simians??

> Those are prohibitions that apply to humans in contact with the animals, not rights that are conferred on the animals as individuals. What's next, healthcare and free bus passes for Grade II listed buildings? Or maybe housing benefit would be more appropriate...

Most rights conferred by law on humans are actually prohibitions set against others. Laws relating to theft, assault are not privileges afforded to people, but prohibitions set against others.

A "right to a private life" is actually a prohibition against others to interfere with your privacy.

Since the law has little enforcement provision other than to punish others in this area, I wouldn't be so contrite about what is and isn't a right.

1
0
skelband
Silver badge

Re: Doesn't intent have any sway?

> On the whole I agree with the idea of sharing information, but there is a big difference between sharing and taking.

What is under debate here is not anything to do with sharing or taking. That is a purely moral argument.

What is under debate is whether or not the photograph is copyrighted by the photographer or if it slips into the public domain because of some grey area in the law.

If the photograph is in the public domain, then moral judgement just doesn't come into it. Anyone can do whatever they want with it for whatever purpose since nobody has a copyright privilege over it. It's as simple as that.

The other arguments that I have seen prior regarding snaps taken by a passer-by do in fact suggest that there is some scope of ambiguity here. Since copyright assignment almost never enters into those kinds of practical situations then they're never tested in law. That doesn't mean that those situations don't fit into that same grey area though.

1
0
skelband
Silver badge

Re: Good article.

> On the other hand, if a monkey cannot hold copyright, then surely it should be taken down as nobody rightfully holds copyright? The rules are that something is not public domain unless the creator says otherwise.... Well? Who said otherwise, Jimmy?

No, it's actually the other way around.

Something that is not copyrighted is public domain by default.

Copyright is granted by law. Public domain is what applies for anything else.

You can certainly give something to the public domain that you hold a copyright on, however, which is what I think you mean.

When copyright expires (which may never happen in the US if Disney manage to get yet another extension for Steamboat Willy) public domain is what the work falls into. The copyright holder has no choice in the matter.

It is further confused by the fact that all creative works are granted automatic copyright in many countries now.

Personally, I think that the monkey has a good case for ownership of this picture. Inasmuch as the photographer must prove that the photo is his creation, he clearly can't. Therefore, he cannot claim copyright over it.

15
7

Ballmer leaves Microsoft board to spend more time with his b-balls

skelband
Silver badge

> You can't get much more service-y than subscription services to hosted & managed enterprise systems.

By subscription services, I assume you mean online software licensing. If you mean hosting services like Azure, then I would agree.

Adobe have made this mistake and they will pay for it long term. They dress their offering up as a service, but in point of fact it is software rental.

If it involves running a substantial amount of software on your machine, then you're licensing, not consuming a service.

0
0
skelband
Silver badge

> "Success requires moving to monetization through enterprise subscriptions, hardware gross margins, and advertising revenues," Ballmer helpfully suggested. "You must drive that." Translation: Selling software is 2000 and late.

It most certainly is not and idiotic statements like this are the reason that he's not at the helm now.

The future for Microsoft and their ilk is most certainly not in selling software, but in selling services.

2
0

The agony and ecstasy of SteamOS: WHERE ARE MY GAMES?

skelband
Silver badge

Re: It's unlikely to improve

> Porting a game from Windows to Linux is a large undertaking.

That's becoming less and less of the case.

Many games these days are using standard engines. If they support Linux as a target then a lot of the heavy lifting has been done.

Valve's efforts to get their titles to Linux will accelerate as Source become more mature and consistent on the Linux platform. I think this is likely to be true for a lot of games as general stability and engine support becomes more mature.

4
1
skelband
Silver badge

Re: Never gonna replace windows

> You are spot on however, that it's a chicken and egg scenario - if they don't make games for it, no-one will use it. If they don't use it, no-one will make games for it!

And also the next Unreal tech.

3
0

Chomp that sausage: Brits just LOVE scoffing a Full Monty

skelband
Silver badge

Re: A question for our British friends...

> The Americans seem to have some weird cinnamon fetish - it is next to impossible to get any sort of apple dish that hasn't been spoiled by the addition of that horrible spice.

Same in Canada.

I think it stems from the same issue as the reason why the food here has so much salt and sugar in it and the preference for very spicy sauces added to it. Historically, food has been utter shite and the only way to eat it without gagging is to heavily spice it. Now food is generally better with the advent of better refrigeration and faster transport, the habits continue. As meat used to be very heavily salted for preservation, salting continues to satisfy that habitual expectation.

Whereas in the likes of Italy where the climate promotes fresh, tasty food, the habits are very different.

0
0
skelband
Silver badge

Re: A question for our British friends...

> ...and a lot easier than the British way of doing a slightly whitened sunny-side-up fried egg by splashing the top with hot oil.

This is the only way to have enough runny yoke to stick your soldiers into.

It's the dog's :D

1
0
skelband
Silver badge

Re: So basiclly, @Dalek Dave

> I'm afraid you sir, are mistaken.... if you buy your sausages from a proper butcher they are indeed mostly made of meat... the same cannot be said of value supermarket sossies though.

Although I cannot speak for the US, but in Canada it is *possible* to buy decent bangers but you do have to go to a butcher or independent shop. All the sausages sold in supermarkets here (mainly spiced Italian style ones) are utter shite. Some I tried actually made me gag there was so much gristle in.

As for bacon, you *can* get proper back bacon (what they call "Canadian bacon" here) but the vast majority of bacon available is streaky, and very fatty streaky bacon at that. The only possible way to eat it is to grill it to within an inch of its life into what amounts to a long, thin pork scratching. They cleverly pack it offset so that all you can see is the small meaty bit that it does have, and the fat is hidden.

Black pudding is indeed the food of the Gods.

0
0

Hackers' Paradise: The rise of soft options and the demise of hard choices

skelband
Silver badge

Re: wrong on two counts

> It is an understandable and rational response to the myriad atrocities and injustices perpetrated in the name of God. On the other side, atheists have done no better.

Well, I'm an atheist and I don't remember ever committing any atrocities. As a non-theist, I cannot think of a single reason why I or anyone else would want to. It takes the suspension of rational common sense and personal responsibility to commit atrocities in the name of religion and we see the worst examples of people being total jerks to each other only in those places where religion or a quasi religious form (hero worship, dogmatic obedience: so yes, naziism and the Russian form of "communism" does count) are predominant.

2
0
skelband
Silver badge

Re: wrong on two counts

> And what, pray tell, does this have to do with the subject at hand?

I think he is saying that a still significant number of people are incapable of the clear and rational thought required for solving computing issues of this kind.

I do agree with one thing previously mentioned, that the fact that there is no clear distinction between what is operating system and what is application, and that which sits in some ambiguous area in the middle. Better, clearer segregation between the two is essential for good design.

There is a good argument in the microkernel world for the idea that a smaller kernel is better for security, but in some ways that has the additional problem of pushing the issue out into the wild west of user space.

6
1

US 911 service needs emergency upgrade and some basic security against scumbags

skelband
Silver badge

Pocket calls.

A big, slightly-related, problem is also that of pocket calls from smartphones.

Our kids have this problem with the Android devices.

Some dickwad thought that it was a good idea for the phone to auto-dial 999/911 when a pin-code or pattern access code was activated based on the minimum number of touches. I'm told by the police that this is becoming a majorly serious problem for them.

My daughter tells me that more modern phones don't do this, which is a relief to me, but my son and I have these older phones and it is a constant annoyance for my son and his friends even now, and even more for the poor sods at the emergency call centres who have to deal with it.

1
0

Yahoo! will! deploy! end-to-end! email! crypto! by! 2015!

skelband
Silver badge
Unhappy

Oi! Marissa! Sort out the bugs in your web mail!

0
0

REGULAR FISTING is GOOD for your HEALTH, says respected surveyor

skelband
Silver badge
Unhappy

Re: Hmmm...

> That's not what I understand as, "fisting." I read that headline and got all excited there for a moment.

Indeed.

I was anticipating a good read about the insertion of appendages into the vaginal opening of a woman for her sexual gratification. Imagine my embarrassment upon reading the article that it was no such thing.

Really ElReg, this sort of thing is just too much.

1
0

PEAK LANDFILL: Why tablet gloom is good news for Windows users

skelband
Silver badge

Growth

Can some economist type tell me why growth is the panacea for success?

I've never been able to quite grasp this concept. If you're selling a ton of stuff and making a decent profit, then what's there to complain about? As any fule kno, growth cannot be sustained indefinitely. It's impossible, yet market bods consistently tell us that if you do not have growth, you're in the shit. I don't get it.

Now, if your market is shrinking, that's surely cause for alarm.

8
0

Boffins spot weirder quantum capers as neutrons take the high road, spin takes the low

skelband
Silver badge

>Likewise, the particle/wave explanation fits because light acts as both.

My suspicion is that the "wave" and "particle" concepts are inaccurate and insufficient to describe what is actually going on. In essence they are analogies, and neither is a very good fit and certainly in my case cause confusion rather than clarification.

0
1
skelband
Silver badge

I'd like to put it out there that I'm not a quantum physicist, but...

It seems to me that when physicists come out with such convoluted and brain mangling explanations for stuff that they clearly have no intuitive explanation for, I have to wonder if they are really heading down the wrong path here.

Remember the contorted explanations that the "earth at the centre of the universe and everything spins around us" troop had to bend themselves around to explain what they observed? The theories got stranger and unconvincing as time went on, until someone came along with something so much simpler that the complexity just sloughed off. I guess this is at least what the string theorists are trying to discover here: something more fundamentally true that makes everything that bit simpler and consistent.

When doing physics at school, the wave/particle duality explanation never really convinced me as a viable hypothesis. Some vital piece is clearly missing from our understanding here.

2
3

Thirteen Astonishing True Facts You Never Knew About SCREWS

skelband
Silver badge

Re: Spanners Vs. Wrenches

Awww yeah.

As an ex-pat Brit living in Canada, it seems to me that everything mechanical here has to have a 2-stroke attached for extra noise. Other than the obvious that the country is big and there isn't often somewhere to plug anything electrical in, it seems to me that there is an addiction to noise here that is built into the psyche of the place, perhaps a US influence.

Oh and what is it about Harley Davidson bikes anyway? Why do some people feel that sitting on a mechanical fart machine is cool?

1
0
skelband
Silver badge

Re: Screws Vs. Bolts

> bolts with wrenches.

Or spanners.

After all, this is a UK site. :D

1
0
skelband
Silver badge
Headmaster

Point of Order

The second picture does in fact depict a screw, more correctly a "set screw".

Bolts have a threadless stem.

1
0

Verizon to limit unlimited 4G plans

skelband
Silver badge

Re: And yet...

> Why is it so hard for everyone else?

Because, particularly in the US, communications systems are so fragmented with bizarre peering agreements based on everything *but* the reality of how things really work make it terminally broken.

I see a great parallel with how health care is implemented. People whinge and whine about how expensive the NHS is, but you should see the waste and utter insanity of the equivalent in the US, all in the name of their version of the "free market". A typical tragedy of the commons scenario where no-one is even remotely concerned about the public good.

0
0

Secure microkernel that uses maths to be 'bug free' goes open source

skelband
Silver badge
Coffee/keyboard

Re: Is there a Microsoft parallel to Godwin's Law?

That's gotta be the post of the day.

0
0

Will the next US-EU trade pact prevent Brussels acting against US tech giants?

skelband
Silver badge

Re: I don't see what the size of the offended party has to do with it.

> Because large corporations wrote this thing. It's going to be setup to work for large corporations with teams of lawyers on staff. In the same way a corner shop can't assign their trademarks to a postbox in a tax haven the way Starbucks can.

I fear that you may well be right. I was speaking of the principle rather than the practice.

As a general rule though, I prefer small government over large where possible. That's because as a Brit, we've been f*cked over so may times by our lords and masters, that we instinctively suspect any restriction of our liberties. (It's also one of the reasons why I think in the US, they are less guarded about the abuses perpetrated against them and others by their own governments: they have less first-hand experience of it). Trouble is, more and more multi-national companies are running things through their proxies, the government, which is one of the reasons why we have such big government these days.

2
0
skelband
Silver badge

I have to admit to being in two minds on this.

On the one hand, I like to think that the arbitrary power of governments should be limited somewhat where law breaking is not actually involved. That governments can act for some indirectly related purpose, which negatively affects businesses lawfully carrying out their business is something that I would rather not see. If law breaking is being done, then all bets off, for example, the abuse of a monopoly position. However, also for example, if trade barriers are put up for entirely political reasons, that detrimentally affect importers, then they should have some recourse.

On the other hand, we have many legitimate reasons why governments have to act, such as times of war, or in "tragedy of the commons" type situations where the greater good is being served.

Add into that mix the various times we have uproar over increased bureaucratic meddling in the economic affairs of nation states by the EU, and the situation is far from clear cut.

Personally, I don't see what the size of the offended party has to do with it. All businesses big and small can be impacted by the whims of government to meddle in our affairs. It makes a great headline to whip up hatred of large muilti-nationals and I can certainly see these entities being in the best enomomic position to make use of these new clauses, but perhaps there should be some legal recourse (within a reasonable framework) for decmocratic governments to be held accountable for the aftermath of their failed or ill-conceived policies.

1
6

Cops nab suspect using CREEPY facial recog system

skelband
Silver badge

> They get a photo of someone committing a crime. They plug that into an enormous database of pictures. They come up with someone who by pure chance looks very similar to the criminal.

Hah, yes this was exactly my thought. The bigger the database of faces, the bigger the problem.

I guess the only way I think to mitigate it is to use the same technology to find a set of "innocents" with the same similarity to use in the line-up. That way, the identifier must be absolutely certain of the culprit to be able to make a selection. That and ensuring that it is only use to identify possible targets for further investigation where additional, more certain evidence is required.

As long as the possible failings of this technology are understood, I can see this being a good thing as long as it doesn't make for lazy police work.

0
0

LibreSSL RNG bug fix: What's all the forking fuss about, ask devs

skelband
Silver badge

> Also note - the libressl developers do NOT consider themselves ready for prime time in any OS. They would be the first to tell you that.

Agreed. I guess my main point, echoed by you, is that the devs have made no claim about the readiness of LibreSSL for general use and this is doubly true for Linux.

My understanding however, is that this PID test on fork is not required or used on OpenBSD anyway. I could be wrong on this point.

0
0
skelband
Silver badge
Facepalm

As has been commented elsewhere on this issue, the furore kicked up by this event is rather dumbfounding.

LibreSSL as I understand it, is OpenSSL currently stripped down to the bare essentials required for OpenBSD.

They are fairly happy with what they have now *for OpenBSD* and have opened it up for re-porting by others. The fact that a Linux-specific issue has been found is principally due to the fact that LibreSSL is not currently ported properly to Linux. That there will be issues in this process is pretty much guaranteed, even if there were some issues that were originally "fixed" in OpenSSL.

1
0

British cops cuff 660 suspected paedophiles

skelband
Silver badge

Re: for some definition of paedophile...

> And I think both homosexual people and BDSM crowd who have long had to struggle to convince outsiders that paedophilia isn't a part of their scene don't particularly want you trying to re-associate that.

Who is trying to associate gay and BDSM people with paedophilia and why would they do that?

The only connection that I made in this respect is the extent to which all these groups are castigated in society and the similar arguments used by their detractors to denigrate them. Personally, I think this is a problem for society rather than any of these particular groups.

Any other connection that you think I draw is entirely of your own imagining.

2
1
skelband
Silver badge

Re: for some definition of paedophile...

> You are aware that in the UK looking at cartoons of underage figures that are a)Cartoons and b)Not human is already a criminal offense.

> You weren't.

> Well ignorance of the law is no defense.

Err, yes I did and I don't think it is right.

Not sure what your point is or were you being sarcastic?

0
0