* Posts by Jellied Eel

223 posts • joined 18 Aug 2008

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GCHQ's Twitter move: Wants to be 'accessible', people to 'understand'

Jellied Eel

Re: Interesting Concept...

It's nice that they're being a little more open. It's also nice they got welcomed by NSA & CIA.. but FSB?

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F-35's dodgy software in the spotlight again

Jellied Eel

Re: Anyone seen the rabbit hole?

One does not need to code 'Angry Birds' into ALIS when one can simulate angry Raptors from inside the app. Complete with leaderboards and mission evaluation. On the bright side, suppliers may improve delivery, if angry maintenance workers can plan airstrikes on their HQs. But even with DoD style guides, this must be a rather complex system to test and secure.. And if it's not secure, what could possibly go wrong?

Otherwise, the TCO for the F-35 is looking much worse than it already did.

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Britain is sending a huge nuclear waste shipment to America. Why?

Jellied Eel

Re: Bury it and mark it

Of all the anti-burial arguments, the 10ka signage one has to be the worst. So we could (and possibly have) create a Signage committte, with international experts from Greenpeace, FoE etc. They could meet in exotic locations quarterly, and be funded by taxpayers and the nuclear industry.

Alternatively, repainting signs could just be part of the site maintenance plan. It's a non-problem. Unless the UK gets depopulated entirely, and everyone forgets where the site was, it can be maintained. Or future archaelogists could discover an ancient tomb, and try to discover who may have been buried with such a rich haul of fuel to power their afterlife. Or future us could just change the signage from Waste Dump to Fuel Dump.

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German ex-pat jailed for smearing own pat all over Cork apartment

Jellied Eel

Re: The, ahem, marvellous variety of the human race

"A good loss adjuster will have those floorboards put on Ebay in minutes"

Luxury stained wood flooring. Well seasoned, and perfect for high-end renovations. Also available, several square meters of extra-cured leather.

If that doesn't shift it, then perhaps list it for the specialty market.

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GCHQ's CESG team's crypto proposal isn't dumb, it's malicious... and I didn't notice

Jellied Eel

Re: a user’s identity is their public key

"Want to be able to access a load of services that trust each other - they'll either have one big KMS, or some kind of trust relationship between them."

That's the general idea, and identity management services are a huge business opportunity. And something CESG is very familiar with, eg previous efforts with services like 'Cloudcover'. Sadly CESG's been better at tech than marketing and that was perhaps premature. But still useful to have and it all boils down to that fundament of security. Trust. I'd rather trust someone like CESG than some of the commercial identity providers.

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Jellied Eel

a user’s identity is their public key

And their public key is issued and can be revoked by.. whom? And used to securely identify themselves with all public sector services. And can be extended to a 'trusted identity' service for other commercial users. CESG is of course expected to generate business and revenues to support it's activities. And I'd rather trust CESG to do this than, say, Facebook. Sign into my NHS account with my Facebook ID? What could possibly go wrong?

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Licence to snoop: Ipso facto, crypto embargo? Draft Investigatory Powers bill lands

Jellied Eel

CCDP? Certfied Cisco Design Professional?

It's strange people are up in arms about our security services wanting to do this, yet many are happy for Win10 or Google to hoover up far more personal information.

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SeaMeWe-3 submarine cable spur borked until November 10th

Jellied Eel

Cable theft has happened in the past. There was one fairly recently near Singapore. Given the power going through most submarine cables, it's likely to be semi-Darwinian. If not, I think the lot that did this were sentenced to death anyway.

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Volvo eyes kangaroo detection tech

Jellied Eel

That's official advice. I went to a zoo near Melbourne and the police had a stand doing the safety thing. Including a rather flat estate car that a big red had used as a crash mat. The occupants did not survive and should have fitted roo bars. Then there was some other critter that was like a hell's hedgehog. Big, solid, curled up in the road when it saw headlights and would flip cars if they hit it. And traction control vs a corner covered in cane toads. And I guess hitting a saltie croc at speed would be bad for one's no claims bonus. The land of natural hazards..

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Post-pub nosh neckfiller special: The WHO bacon sarnie of death

Jellied Eel

Re: Well...

Have we done chilli and bacon yet? If not, best to go out with a bang. Or a whimper..

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Bacon can kill: Official

Jellied Eel

Re: Which process?

A process of elimination, obviously. That which might kill you makes more taxes.

Curing is a double whammy which is why bacon is on the list with plutonium. Nitrates are commonly used in making explosives, and whilst there are restrictions on buying nitrates in bulk, there are no such restrictions on bacon. Therefore it is in the interests of public safety to restrict purchases to no more than 6 rashers a month to avoid terrorists creating a very dirty bomb. Imagine the chaos if something with a high bacon load was detonated in an area like Islington.

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UK drivers left idling as Tesla rolls out Autopilot in US

Jellied Eel

Re: "We’re not totally clear how the car intends to deal with being rear-ended"

It'll eject the warp core. Then they'll be sorry. Anyway, once someone's close enough to read the maker's name, they'll hopefully back off unless they've got a dry-powder extinguisher. Especially in the wet. It's much like Steam early access in that respect I guess. So I think I'll skip V7 and wait for Tesla to produce a V8.

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Cisco shocker: Some network switches may ELECTROCUTE you

Jellied Eel

Darwinian product development

It's one way to get rid of the cowboy installers I suppose. Perhaps Cisco is also trying to reduce future service costs by ensuring problem sites end up DOA.

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Stealth service – Metal Gear Solid V: The Phantom Pain

Jellied Eel

Climbing up the walls

Minor bugbear. Snake, being the uberest soldier in the known universe (sorry Master Chief) can't do chin-ups. Well, he can on some walls/bars. Otherwise this suffers the usual problem in 'open world' games of our hero being unable to walk up some inclines or climb onto a ledge below head height. Snake's been around a while so maybe it's the arthritis. The hyper-Helium is impressive in the way a small balloon can lift a large tank though..

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Apple's AirDrop abused by 'cyber-flashing' London train perv

Jellied Eel

Re: Ho hum,

How else are companies supposed to push adverts to unsuspecting iPhone owners? With default settings, you see the ad. Default of contacts only and they won't.

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Perhaps middle-aged blokes SHOULDN'T try 34-hour-long road trips

Jellied Eel

I have a modest proposal

"If we were starting with a blank slate would we have the slow lane merging back into the traffic flow, or the fast lane?"

Simple. Remember Google is pioneering both driverless cars and SDN. So merging would be based on G-WRED. Low priority vehicles (ones that don't pay Google) would simply be randomly discarded. Google is currently working on the equivalent of the bit bucket, and ways to prevent motorists getting jittery. This may simply involve paying Google to become high priority, and thus reduce probability of the long drop.

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A pause in global warming? What pause?There was no pause

Jellied Eel

Re: This again?

"So basically, the Register's position on this topic is that the data PROVES there is no warming; unless it doesn't, in which case the data PROVES the scientists are fudging the numbers? (To what end is never quite explained)."

Proof in science is a tricky thing. In climate science, it can be a bit easier because their standard of proof is perhaps more lax than in traditional disciplines. So there's a theory that there is a relationship between CO2 and temperature. What that relationship is is uncertain. So we have climate models producing a range of predictions showing that as CO2 increases, so should temperatures. Thus we got the calls for action to prevent xC warming by <whenever> and the UN wanting $100bn a year to fight the War on Warmth.

So along came The Pause. Observations showed warming wasn't increasing despite record amounts of CO2. Whilst this was a short Pause, it could be shrugged off. It's a non-linear system and short pauses are expected. So climate scientists said it didn't falsify the models unless The Pause exceeded X years, with X increasing in proportion with the length of The Pause. Various attempts were made to explain The Pause with it being due to aerosols, volcanic activity or the missing heat somehow diving deep into the oceans in some undectable fashion.

But the longer The Pause continued, the harder it is to explain the divergence between simulated and observed reality. Especially with COP coming up and possibly a last chance to get developed countries to sign up to giving the UN $100bn a year. So with much fanfare, we get this new paper launched with a blaze of publicity that pretends The Pause just doesn't exist.

Skeptics naturally are.. skeptical.

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WikiLeaks, er, leaks the Bundestag Inquiry into NSA naughtiness

Jellied Eel

Re: figures...

My attempt got as far as..

"Once the vulnerability in Google translate was detected, the ability to remotely execute code from steganographic text hidden in the source documents.."

.. but then my browser crashed and reloaded. But flicking through it I saw a few mentions of DE-CIX, but no diagrams. So possibly a simple interception.

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Apple Watch HATES tattoos: Inky pink sinks rinky-dink sensor

Jellied Eel

Re: What?

It's possibly a licence feature. On the event of death, revoke licence so iWatch can't be resold.

Or it's a zombie app ready for the impending apocalypse. No pulse, but still moving.. Send GPS location to DHS/CDC for immediate intervention.

But I'm curious what you can't do with it if it's removed from your wrist. So if you take it off at night but just want to check the time, having to log in requires a higher level of consciousness than may be convenient.

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Your new car will dob you in to the cops if you crash, decrees EU

Jellied Eel

Re: Anyone else wonder...

"why the *EU* is trying to mandate this?"

Simple. Rent-seeking. You make eCall boxes. You've got them installed in a couple of cars. You lobby the EU to make installation mandatory in all new cars and you have a much larger business. Once you have them established, you can then boost revenues via scope creep. There are soo many potential revenue streams from in-car telematics from road charging to insurance or auto-generating speeding tickets. All via a simple OTA update or update when the vehicle's in for servicing.

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Quid-A-Day Nosh Posse taunted with sausage sarnie snap

Jellied Eel

Re: But have you tried dehydrated milk?

Nature will eventually stop you hunting & trapping out of season. That's one of the simple population challenges for sustainable living. If predators are hunting faster than they can breed, eventually the prey runs out. If you live in a city, you're not screwed. Balcony or roof + trap = plentiful supply of pigeons. Then there's rat onna stick..

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Labour policy review tells EU where to stuff its geo-blocking ban

Jellied Eel

DIRECTIVE 89/552/EEC - "TELEVISION WITHOUT FRONTIERS"

"What's called (propaganda-friendly term) "geoblocking" really means "freedom of licensing". The EU wants to stop this."

Or they're a bit confused.

http://europa.eu/legislation_summaries/audiovisual_and_media/l24101_en.htm

"The Directive aims to ensure the free movement of broadcasting services within the internal market and at the same time to preserve certain public interest objectives, such as cultural diversity, the right of reply, consumer protection and the protection of minors. It is also intended to promote the distribution and production of European audiovisual programmes, for example by ensuring that they are given a majority position in television channels' programme schedules."

Except when this contravenes rights owners rights to maximise rights owner's rights to ignore the internal market and try to maximise revenues per territory. It's one of those strange situations where too many rights might make a wrong. Or smaller EU members may need some protection from the EU's broadcasting giants to try and protect their own customer base. The get-out I guess for content/rights owners is the existing Directive states 'broadcasting services' rather than content.

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Easy ... easy ... Aw CRAP! SpaceX rocket ALMOST lands on ocean hoverbase

Jellied Eel

Re: A very well done

I think this is all kinds of awesome tinged with some doubts.

So the basic launch is kind of old-hat, we've been there, done that. So now rather than landing large, expensive and potentially reusable bits of the launch rocket in the Pacific +/- a few square kilometers.. It's landing in a much more controlled fashion in a way one could almost walk away from. Or <stuff> fab'd in space could end up useable vs dropping it in a reasonably sized ocean and having enough recovery vessels handy before it sinks.

But I'm bothered about the vendor lock-in. If we're to colonise space, we shouldn't be reliant on coffee machines which need Earth-created capsules. This is inefficient and we need to spend more money working out how to grow coffee beans in space if we're ever going to get off this rock. Then again, if people will spend a lot of money on beans that have been shat by civets, think how much they may spend on orbital/lunar/martian beans.

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Bloke hits armadillo AND mother-in-law with single 9mm round

Jellied Eel

Check for owner's tag before shooting!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UvpLAMfYgJ8

This is a public safety announcement.

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+5 ROOTKIT OF VENGEANCE defeats forces of gaming good

Jellied Eel

Re: If professional gamers are really worried about cheating

Some do, ie tournament players play at the event. But to get to the tournament, or become a pro-player you need to get ranking. Which may get boosted by cheating. But then they should be found out if they play in a tournament without their cheat crutches. Or the cheats might have some financial reward, so gold farming, dupes etc. Or they could just be anti-fun, so aimbots or wallhacks in shooters.

So there's a bit of an arms race. Developers create anti-cheat systems like punkbuster or VAC which can already be rootkit-like. Cheaters come up with lower level designs to bypass those, increasing security risks. Not like cheaters who'll happily download random hacks off the Internet are probably too concerned about their security. But to counter this new threat, anti-cheat systems are going to have to become even greater potential security risks.

And to what end? I recently installed some game and discovered it also installed punkbuster for me, and set it to run at startup. All because the game had some online/multiplayer functionality I never intended to use. Or 7 Days to Die just updated. When I click play on that, it gives me an option for a VAC & non-VAC version. So remember which one to click if you want to use the built in cheats in your own sandbox..

So we end up with a situation where we may have to accept installing one rootkit to 'protect' ourselves against another. And we'll have to accept that the good rootkit won't be doing anything privacy or marketing related, and won't be a security risk.

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Drill, baby, drill: HIDDEN glaciers ON MARS hold 150bn cubic metres of precious frozen WATER

Jellied Eel

Re: triple point...

It's one of those fun thought experiments, at least for most of us. For the scientists, it's more work. So terraforming. First create your atmosphere. Grab some nice ice asteroids and drop'em on Mars. That would be quite some environmental impact statement to write, especially if the field geologists haven't finished. It would be an opportunity for pressure groups like Fiends of the Earth to diversify though.

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Jellied Eel

"Why? What sorts of minerals or contamination is in it?"

Until we can analyse it, or figure out Martian kidneys.. who knows? I'm guessing one issue may be isotopic, so more deuterium and oxygen isotopes. Then again, deuterium consumption increases the circadian cycle. If that's by 40mins, that would be convenient, or just spooky.

"I was hoping they would send back a chemical analysis of it so that it could be simulated here on earth and we could have a taste of Martian mineral water."

Pfft.. Rail gun + iceball + orbital bottling plant for the most expensive and exclusive bottled water or ice cubes. One snag with the Martian colony idea is a certain food giant has already bagged the brand.

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BBC waves £230m of feepayers' dosh at tech backbone deal

Jellied Eel

Re: eh?

Not really. It's a wide range and it gives prospective bidders an idea if it's worth bidding. If a quick eyeball of the service requirements comes up with a cost of £250m then it's a quick 'No Bid'. Or usually fending off over-eager sales people who just see the £230m and think of their potential commission..

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Power, internet access knackered in London after exploding kit burps fire into capital's streets

Jellied Eel

Problem is back in the day, there was pretty much just the BT ducts and other utilities. Now the area is a major cable jungle with multiple ducts with mutiple paths for gas/fire to travel. There are power tunnels, sewer tunnels, ducts connecting buildings. There are cable chambers connected to other provider's duct networks. Those *should* have gas stops, but if they don't then gas or fire can travel around easily.

So there'll be a lot of field engineers looking for fibre routes around the location to bypass damaged sections and restore services, then a lot of work to replace any damaged sections once the area's declared safe.

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Jellied Eel

That's one of the things that put me off working in telcomms for a power company. And seeing a report from a field engineer cancelling a request for a TDR team to shoot a fibre fault. He didn't need it, he could see the cable ends in the crater. Oil-filled HV cable had a bad day and made quite a bang.

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Snakes on a backplane: Server-room cabling horrors

Jellied Eel

Re: As long as there is one cable in the universe...

Shame on the network team for not locking switches away in a cabinet with 'BEWARE OF THE SHARK' signs on it. Helps avoid those fault escalations caused by 'helpful' users trying to fix their problems by swapping some cables around. Especially now Ethernet's escaped from the WAN and spanning tree problems can go global in a hurry if you're not careful.

Oh, and the before and after pics in the original article. I'm guessing that site wasn't planning on needing fibre. Fibre from the top, copper from the bottom..

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Jellied Eel

Re: Underfloor can be much worse!!!

Sounds like Telehouse.. The floors wouldn't lay flat, so the walls started closing in..

And for IBM cabling.. Channel Cables. Cable diameter must've been getting on for 2" thick and brick sized connectors on the end. The cable pulling ferrets went on strike when they saw those.

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The internet IS a series of tubes. Kinda: A Reg 101 guide to cabling

Jellied Eel

Re: Errrr

"The difference between SMF and MMF is that with SMF, the light follows a single path through the fibre, while MMF uses multiple paths."

This bit is wrong/misleading. The diference is modes supported, not paths. OMx then defines the modal bandwidth of the multimode fibre which affects the distance, and also future proofing an installation. So OM1 & OM2 don't support 40Gbps or 100Gbps.

"Both SMF and MMF come in two wavelengths, 850nm and 1300nm, with the latter supporting longer distances."

SMF supports many more wavelengths, hence why it's used for DWDM. 850nm isn't generally used AFAIK, but that's more to do with SM v MM. Pretty much all common SFP's @850nm are intended for MM fibre. If you connect those to SM fibre there's a mismatch between expected core size and although it may work, it's generally a bad idea.

"The most widely used connector is the SFP+"

An SFP is a transciever, not a connector. Connectors would be FC, LC, SC, E2000. Important because they're the bits on the end of the fibres and connectors on SFPs or other kit. LC and E2000 probably most useful on an ODF/patch panel given connector size & density, and for E2000, built in dust caps. Patch cables can have different connectors each end.

"If you need to get 10GbE in longer distances, but not quite in the miles range, using MMF cables such as OM3 or OM4 with SFP+ connectors would be a good option."

I'd suggest that's a bad option. Key thing is to come up with a plan and stick to it. So OM4 offers the best speed/distance combo for local connections. If that's within a smallish datacentre, stick with that so you can do 100G if/when you need it over a typical room-sized distance. Get color coded patch cables made up, stick samples on a board somewhere prominent and set your BOFH on anyone who doesn't follow it. This will make future maintenance easier.

For longer distances, ie inter-room, inter-floor or inter-building, use SM fibre. Or make sure you run plenty of spare fibres. OM4 will support 1x100Gbps. If you need more, or want to segment then the ability to add a WDM or DWDM mux gives you more flexibility in the future, and most of that kit is designed to work over SMF.

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‘Digital by default’ agricultural payments halted: Farmers start smirking

Jellied Eel

Re: WHY Shoreditch?

I'd prefer Southampton and Croydon for a bit of joined up government. One of the challenges seems to have been mapping elements. So GIS. So Ordnance Survey and Land Registry. So hopefully one knows where it is, the other who owns it. Then RPA can add attributes to polygons showing what it's used for and how much to pay out. If £177m has been spent, I suspect a certain amount of wheel reinvention occurred. Then again, given how much OS charge for map data, it could be wooden dollars circulating between government pots.

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Blighty's 12-sided quid to feature schoolboy's posterior

Jellied Eel

Re: security chip???

Unfortunate choice of name. The videos on the site seem like a sales pitch to other countries/issuers rather than explaining our new pound, but then the Royal Mint makes a lot of money for other countries. It's one of those fun Treasury/Central bank things. To me it's a humble quid in my pocket, to them it's the cost of that coin and TCO of money. Plus the arms race between Mints and counterfeiters and the cost of replacing coinage or notes if they're too easy to fake.

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UK spaceport, phase two: Now where do we PUT the bleeding thing?

Jellied Eel
Mushroom

Re: I'm sure we're missing something here

Not missing anything. Check out cargo cults. Build space port, space planes will come! Let Norman Foster design it and they won't be able to afford the landing fees though. Let Heathrow Epxress run the connection service and nobody but Branson will be able to afford to get to the space port.

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So who just bought the rights to .blog for $20m? A chap living in Panama

Jellied Eel

Re: Is the TLD important?

"So is it worthy to pay that much for dot blog?"

No, not really. So you have an existing blog. Call it myblog.com. Most people would probably think of it as myblog and not care about the TLD. They have it bookmarked or just type myblog into their search engine of choice. So along comes .blog. They need to convince you that registering myblog.blog is valuable and necessary. You may be unconvinced because you're happy with your existing traffic and anyone else registering myblog.blog who isn't you may be infringing or passing off. Easier if you're running cocacola.blog

If you're thinking of some exciting new blog, then it's still about whether the name exists or infringes. Having a new TLD may not save you from lawyers. Or may not save the .blog operator if the registrant attempts to register a domain that infringes. Why pay large sums of money to protect your IP when you can throw a sueball at anyone who aids passing off? Coca cola may respectfully decline the offer of $100k a year for a protective registration and point out that if they let anyone else use it, it'll be the registrar's nuts in a vice.

Having .blog for a blog could be more fun though, but the registrar probably wants to use that themselves.

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Now Samsung's spying smart TVs insert ADS in YOUR OWN movies

Jellied Eel

Re: meanwhile in other news...

Oversaturation is not just you. YT seems to serve up a limited number of ads in entirely unrelated videos. So after seeing a Twix in a shop, I'm reminded of the f'ng annoying 2-brothers, one factory ad that interrupted my viewing pleasure. It's a demonstration of ad nauseum and probably not the positive feedback they were hoping for.

Other ads are just dumb. So the tech & cookies should let an ad server know what platform I'm browsing from. So why throw me an ad for a console game, not a PC game I could potentially click & buy there and then? Other circles of hell should be reserved for ad flingers who think it's ok to unmute an ad.

All Samsung is doing is taking that kind of idiocy to it's logical conclusion. The display's purpose is to sell you stuff.

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'If someone in Australia says lick my toad, it's not a euphemism'

Jellied Eel

Re: surströmming

"But Swedish surströmming fits the description nicely. Fermented herring from hell."

I quite like that, and potential nosh challenge? Not sure if my idea of surströmming/tunnbröd wraps would sell well outside Sweden though. My Swedish colleagues defeated me with lutfisk. Cod soaked in drain cleaner is just wrong. For a fish supper from hell, could try this with hákarl as a third course? Best eaten outdoors, tables set downwind and large buckets available.

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Jellied Eel

Re: Marmite?

Marmite was discovered after Justus von Liebig dropped a cheese sandwich in a beer vat he was cleaning, and luckily for generations of Brits decided 'that tastes quite nice'. If he'd binned the sandwich, the beer industry would have to dispose of the yeast sludge in an environmentally sound way. This would obviously increase the price of beer, and affect the brewing industry's sustainability and recycling targets.

Marmite is therefore a public good.

However, some disagree with the flavour, notably Vegemite fans and the Danish. Having experienced what the Danes can do to innocent herrings, I'm suprised they objected to recycled beer products. Marmite is still under attack by it's detractors though. The latest tactic by the 'Hate It' brigade is to try and 'ban this filth' via the EU Salt Reduction Framework. If you love it, protect your Marmite!

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Tom Wheeler flings off dressing gown, dons gloves for net neutrality RUMBLE

Jellied Eel

Re: Just curious...

Devil will be in the detail around comments like "It's feared these expensive web toll roads". Would transit from a CDN provider be counted as an expensive toll road, and if so, would that mean CDN heavy networks like say, Level3 would have to offer free (or at cost) peering?

As usual with anything regulatory, once details are published it'll be important to watch who's objecting to what. And equally importantly, who's not objecting to things that seem objectionable. Those would be the areas where they've spotted some advantage.

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Breaking news: BBC FINALLY spots millions of mugshots on cop database

Jellied Eel

Re: Double whammy black eye for the police

"The problem with facial recognition systems is it depends on how old the 'reference' photo is."

This is why you're also not allowed to smile/look happy in passport photos. To give the immigration machines a fighting chance, your photo needs to look like you, tired, pissed off after a long flight and long queue. And then being directed to the 'express' queue where you can gurn for the amusement of the people queuing around you. It would probably be easier, faster and more accurate if they just flashed your photo up on a screen and let your fellow travellers vote on if you were you, or not.

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Hardboiled, fast-paced, mind-bending fun – Dark Intelligence IS sci-fi

Jellied Eel
Mushroom

But..

Does it contain my favorite fisher-drone, Sniper? Time to find out..

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Dark Fibre: Reg man plunges into London's sewers to see how pipe is laid

Jellied Eel

Re: Other pre-existing infrastructure that could be used ...

Bin Done. A few places have installed cable in canal bottoms but it usually needs to be buried to protect against anchors. Which can sometimes cause issues, like an install in Paris that ploughed a bit too deep into the canal bed and it started leaking. But usual challenge is getting wayleaves, negotiating costs for wayleaves and then access to sites to do emergency repairs. So although this kind of thing can reduce install costs, sometimes it can make it tricky to get access to repair or maintain. Hence route diversity is important for anything safety or mission critical.

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Jellied Eel

Re: IP67

Just stay away from the toilet when the OP guys tell you they're going to rod & rope the duct. You'll be fine. And pay close attention to gas seals between their chambers and yours!

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Free Windows 10 could mean the END for Microsoft and the PC biz

Jellied Eel

Re: Doesn't matter if the "update process is expertly controlled"

I think it does as it assumes the average user/upgrade victim isn't an expert.

I kinda like Win7. Ok, I tolerate it on this box which I play games on. It works for me. It may not work for MS, who may prefer me to 'upgrade' to Win8. Or Win10. (What happened to 9)?

Call me old fashioned but I like stuff to work when I click on it. I don't like the idea of having to reinstall loads of stuff just to get a candycrush interface and touch features on a box who's touch inputs are a good'ol mouse and keyboard. I don't care if the 'upgrade' gives me access to MS's AppStore because I'm puzzled why I couldn't just download an app for that. Every other store seems to let me.

So if I could just click on an Windows 10 upgrade button and it upgraded, and all my stuff still worked, and it worked faster.. I might be tempted. Even if that meant spinning up a Win7 VM in the background, I don't really care. I just want my PC to work much the same as it did before the 'upgrade', and I'm fairly certain most users feel the same way.

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MYSTERY RADIO SIGNAL picked up from BEYOND our GALAXY

Jellied Eel

Decoded

.- .-.. .-.. -.-- --- ..- .-. -... .- ... . .- .-. . -... . .-.. --- -. --. - --- ..- ...

We have confirmed it was not, repeat NOT 'We are the world'. Minsters are reminded of the advice by Pellegrino & Zebrowski prior to attempting any reply:

1. THEIR SURVIVAL WILL BE MORE IMPORTANT THAN OUR SURVIVAL.

If an alien species has to choose between them and us, they won't choose us. It is difficult to imagine a contrary case; species don't survive by being self-sacrificing.

2. WIMPS DON'T BECOME TOP DOGS.

No species makes it to the top by being passive. The species in charge of any given planet will be highly intelligent, alert, aggressive, and ruthless when necessary.

3. THEY WILL ASSUME THAT THE FIRST TWO LAWS APPLY TO US.

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EU-turn: Greenpeace pressure WON'T mean axing of Chief Scientist

Jellied Eel

Re: too much influence in one person?

"So says Doug Parr, Chief Scientist ... of Greenpeace."

Soon to be Doug Parr, Chief Scientist, EU? Getting inside the system worked well for Bryony Worthington and other ex-NGO types.

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Reg Oz chaps plot deep desert comms upgrade

Jellied Eel

Build or buy/rent..

Sounds like you may want something like this-

User – WiFi router – Riverbed - Satellite modem – Satellite – ground station – Riverbed - Internet

Riverbed appliances I think can act as authentication servers, so if WiFi can authenticate against the local Riverbed/proxy it'll reduce the initial setup delay. And give the Riverbeds a cleaner path to do their optimisation/caching magic. Riverbeds aren't cheap, but it's the usual support cost tradeoff between building your own cache/proxy vs getting one ready made with a GUI and support. It's a standard config I've used in a few jobs via satellite connections.

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FBI fingering Norks for Sony hack: The TRUTH – by the NSA's spyboss

Jellied Eel

The NSA bot is telling elements of truth.

This bit is true

"[Cybercrime] is that times a million. Dillinger or Bonnie and Clyde could not do a thousand robberies in all 50 states in the same day in their pajamas, from Belarus. That’s the challenge we face today,” Comey told attendees."

And law enforcement needs some way to detect and prevent these crimes. Problem is-

"Several times, either because they forgot or they had a technical problem, they connected directly—and we could see them," he said. "They shut it off very quickly before they realized their mistake, but not before we saw it and knew where it was coming from."

So is the NSA saying they were aware of ongoing attacks against Sony, but did nothing? They didn't notify the FBI so they could have a quite word with Sony and explain they had a problem? Seems a rather awkward position the Admiral has put his agency in. Either this is a post-facto detection after some archive trawling, which would indicate Sony wasn't a high value target worth protecting, or it had more timely evidence but chose to do nothing with it.

"Sony is important to me because the entire world is watching" but seemingly it wasn't important enough when they were watching the attacks taking place in September.

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