* Posts by Jellied Eel

187 posts • joined 18 Aug 2008

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So who just bought the rights to .blog for $30m? A chap living in Panama

Jellied Eel

Re: Is the TLD important?

"So is it worthy to pay that much for dot blog?"

No, not really. So you have an existing blog. Call it myblog.com. Most people would probably think of it as myblog and not care about the TLD. They have it bookmarked or just type myblog into their search engine of choice. So along comes .blog. They need to convince you that registering myblog.blog is valuable and necessary. You may be unconvinced because you're happy with your existing traffic and anyone else registering myblog.blog who isn't you may be infringing or passing off. Easier if you're running cocacola.blog

If you're thinking of some exciting new blog, then it's still about whether the name exists or infringes. Having a new TLD may not save you from lawyers. Or may not save the .blog operator if the registrant attempts to register a domain that infringes. Why pay large sums of money to protect your IP when you can throw a sueball at anyone who aids passing off? Coca cola may respectfully decline the offer of $100k a year for a protective registration and point out that if they let anyone else use it, it'll be the registrar's nuts in a vice.

Having .blog for a blog could be more fun though, but the registrar probably wants to use that themselves.

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Now Samsung's spying smart TVs insert ADS in YOUR OWN movies

Jellied Eel

Re: meanwhile in other news...

Oversaturation is not just you. YT seems to serve up a limited number of ads in entirely unrelated videos. So after seeing a Twix in a shop, I'm reminded of the f'ng annoying 2-brothers, one factory ad that interrupted my viewing pleasure. It's a demonstration of ad nauseum and probably not the positive feedback they were hoping for.

Other ads are just dumb. So the tech & cookies should let an ad server know what platform I'm browsing from. So why throw me an ad for a console game, not a PC game I could potentially click & buy there and then? Other circles of hell should be reserved for ad flingers who think it's ok to unmute an ad.

All Samsung is doing is taking that kind of idiocy to it's logical conclusion. The display's purpose is to sell you stuff.

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'If someone in Australia says lick my toad, it's not a euphemism'

Jellied Eel

Re: surströmming

"But Swedish surströmming fits the description nicely. Fermented herring from hell."

I quite like that, and potential nosh challenge? Not sure if my idea of surströmming/tunnbröd wraps would sell well outside Sweden though. My Swedish colleagues defeated me with lutfisk. Cod soaked in drain cleaner is just wrong. For a fish supper from hell, could try this with hákarl as a third course? Best eaten outdoors, tables set downwind and large buckets available.

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Jellied Eel

Re: Marmite?

Marmite was discovered after Justus von Liebig dropped a cheese sandwich in a beer vat he was cleaning, and luckily for generations of Brits decided 'that tastes quite nice'. If he'd binned the sandwich, the beer industry would have to dispose of the yeast sludge in an environmentally sound way. This would obviously increase the price of beer, and affect the brewing industry's sustainability and recycling targets.

Marmite is therefore a public good.

However, some disagree with the flavour, notably Vegemite fans and the Danish. Having experienced what the Danes can do to innocent herrings, I'm suprised they objected to recycled beer products. Marmite is still under attack by it's detractors though. The latest tactic by the 'Hate It' brigade is to try and 'ban this filth' via the EU Salt Reduction Framework. If you love it, protect your Marmite!

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Tom Wheeler flings off dressing gown, dons gloves for net neutrality RUMBLE

Jellied Eel

Re: Just curious...

Devil will be in the detail around comments like "It's feared these expensive web toll roads". Would transit from a CDN provider be counted as an expensive toll road, and if so, would that mean CDN heavy networks like say, Level3 would have to offer free (or at cost) peering?

As usual with anything regulatory, once details are published it'll be important to watch who's objecting to what. And equally importantly, who's not objecting to things that seem objectionable. Those would be the areas where they've spotted some advantage.

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Breaking news: BBC FINALLY spots millions of mugshots on cop database

Jellied Eel

Re: Double whammy black eye for the police

"The problem with facial recognition systems is it depends on how old the 'reference' photo is."

This is why you're also not allowed to smile/look happy in passport photos. To give the immigration machines a fighting chance, your photo needs to look like you, tired, pissed off after a long flight and long queue. And then being directed to the 'express' queue where you can gurn for the amusement of the people queuing around you. It would probably be easier, faster and more accurate if they just flashed your photo up on a screen and let your fellow travellers vote on if you were you, or not.

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Hardboiled, fast-paced, mind-bending fun – Dark Intelligence IS sci-fi

Jellied Eel
Mushroom

But..

Does it contain my favorite fisher-drone, Sniper? Time to find out..

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Dark Fibre: Reg man plunges into London's sewers to see how pipe is laid

Jellied Eel

Re: Other pre-existing infrastructure that could be used ...

Bin Done. A few places have installed cable in canal bottoms but it usually needs to be buried to protect against anchors. Which can sometimes cause issues, like an install in Paris that ploughed a bit too deep into the canal bed and it started leaking. But usual challenge is getting wayleaves, negotiating costs for wayleaves and then access to sites to do emergency repairs. So although this kind of thing can reduce install costs, sometimes it can make it tricky to get access to repair or maintain. Hence route diversity is important for anything safety or mission critical.

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Jellied Eel

Re: IP67

Just stay away from the toilet when the OP guys tell you they're going to rod & rope the duct. You'll be fine. And pay close attention to gas seals between their chambers and yours!

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Free Windows 10 could mean the END for Microsoft and the PC biz

Jellied Eel

Re: Doesn't matter if the "update process is expertly controlled"

I think it does as it assumes the average user/upgrade victim isn't an expert.

I kinda like Win7. Ok, I tolerate it on this box which I play games on. It works for me. It may not work for MS, who may prefer me to 'upgrade' to Win8. Or Win10. (What happened to 9)?

Call me old fashioned but I like stuff to work when I click on it. I don't like the idea of having to reinstall loads of stuff just to get a candycrush interface and touch features on a box who's touch inputs are a good'ol mouse and keyboard. I don't care if the 'upgrade' gives me access to MS's AppStore because I'm puzzled why I couldn't just download an app for that. Every other store seems to let me.

So if I could just click on an Windows 10 upgrade button and it upgraded, and all my stuff still worked, and it worked faster.. I might be tempted. Even if that meant spinning up a Win7 VM in the background, I don't really care. I just want my PC to work much the same as it did before the 'upgrade', and I'm fairly certain most users feel the same way.

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MYSTERY RADIO SIGNAL picked up from BEYOND our GALAXY

Jellied Eel

Decoded

.- .-.. .-.. -.-- --- ..- .-. -... .- ... . .- .-. . -... . .-.. --- -. --. - --- ..- ...

We have confirmed it was not, repeat NOT 'We are the world'. Minsters are reminded of the advice by Pellegrino & Zebrowski prior to attempting any reply:

1. THEIR SURVIVAL WILL BE MORE IMPORTANT THAN OUR SURVIVAL.

If an alien species has to choose between them and us, they won't choose us. It is difficult to imagine a contrary case; species don't survive by being self-sacrificing.

2. WIMPS DON'T BECOME TOP DOGS.

No species makes it to the top by being passive. The species in charge of any given planet will be highly intelligent, alert, aggressive, and ruthless when necessary.

3. THEY WILL ASSUME THAT THE FIRST TWO LAWS APPLY TO US.

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EU-turn: Greenpeace pressure WON'T mean axing of Chief Scientist

Jellied Eel

Re: too much influence in one person?

"So says Doug Parr, Chief Scientist ... of Greenpeace."

Soon to be Doug Parr, Chief Scientist, EU? Getting inside the system worked well for Bryony Worthington and other ex-NGO types.

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Reg Oz chaps plot deep desert comms upgrade

Jellied Eel

Build or buy/rent..

Sounds like you may want something like this-

User – WiFi router – Riverbed - Satellite modem – Satellite – ground station – Riverbed - Internet

Riverbed appliances I think can act as authentication servers, so if WiFi can authenticate against the local Riverbed/proxy it'll reduce the initial setup delay. And give the Riverbeds a cleaner path to do their optimisation/caching magic. Riverbeds aren't cheap, but it's the usual support cost tradeoff between building your own cache/proxy vs getting one ready made with a GUI and support. It's a standard config I've used in a few jobs via satellite connections.

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FBI fingering Norks for Sony hack: The TRUTH – by the NSA's spyboss

Jellied Eel

The NSA bot is telling elements of truth.

This bit is true

"[Cybercrime] is that times a million. Dillinger or Bonnie and Clyde could not do a thousand robberies in all 50 states in the same day in their pajamas, from Belarus. That’s the challenge we face today,” Comey told attendees."

And law enforcement needs some way to detect and prevent these crimes. Problem is-

"Several times, either because they forgot or they had a technical problem, they connected directly—and we could see them," he said. "They shut it off very quickly before they realized their mistake, but not before we saw it and knew where it was coming from."

So is the NSA saying they were aware of ongoing attacks against Sony, but did nothing? They didn't notify the FBI so they could have a quite word with Sony and explain they had a problem? Seems a rather awkward position the Admiral has put his agency in. Either this is a post-facto detection after some archive trawling, which would indicate Sony wasn't a high value target worth protecting, or it had more timely evidence but chose to do nothing with it.

"Sony is important to me because the entire world is watching" but seemingly it wasn't important enough when they were watching the attacks taking place in September.

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Net Neut: Verizon flips the bird to FCC on peering deal crackdown

Jellied Eel

"Um, why would Netflix agree to ongoing, recurring payments for a peering agreement when they could have simply have incurred a one-time cost by adding some hardware on their side? I believe it is because the missing resources were not on Netflix's side of the connection."

It's traditionally the way the Internet has worked, for better or worse. Peering was between "peers", ie other ISPs with some expectation of mutual benefit and equality. Naturally this begat peering wars, Tier-1 bragging and the Net Neutrality debate. If you're not a peer, you pay something towards the cost of delivering your bits. Netflix doesn't want to pay if it can help it because obviously that becomes an operating cost that eats into it's margins and profits. Situation gets a bit more complex when ISPs like Level 3 and Cogent are involved. But basically it's an issue with the way the money flows, and pretty much a plain cost to your ISP.

User > Netflix

Netflix -> Cogent/L3 <-ISP <-User

So double dipping is really from Netflix's transit providers, as unless the agree to free peering with the ISPs connected to them, the ISPs would also have to buy more transit from Cogent/L3.

"And again, um, isn't that how the Internet works? Users pay for a connection, then go out to external sites and exchange packets. Yes, when the packets consist of a video stream from Netflix the arrangement is pretty one-sided, but then this is >>EXACTLY<< what ISP's expect. My connection is rated for 50 Mb downstream, but only 5Mb up..."

Yes, to an extent. Unless you're a business user or running servers at home, usage patterns have pretty much always been asymmetric since the good'ol days of 1200/75 modems. Difference is the amount of traffic generated by traditional usage, ie email, web, VoIP, gaming and streaming large amounts of HD video content to millions of users. That's not something the Internet was ever really designed to do and just highlighted settlement problems. Which isn't something new and the voice world solved it over 100yrs ago. If originating/terminating traffic balances, costs net out, otherwise one side pays the other to reflect the costs of delivering the other parties traffic.

"Why does a packet from Netflix "cost more" to deliver to me than a packet due to downloading an ISO image from Debian?"

Assuming you're downloading from the same place, it wouldn't. Difference is you're probably not downloading those images every night. Just like I'm not downloading 11GB from Steam every day. Plus if there's congestion, your download can be slowed down and it'll just take a little while longer to complete. If it's video, the ISP probably has no control over the session and if there's congestion, playback stops and user blames their ISP. Or Netflix blames your ISP. Or your ISP blames their transit provider for not increasing capacity. Widespread video streaming massively increases capacity needed during peak busy hours, and if content providers won't contribute towards those costs, the only option is again to charge the user.

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Brit GUN NUT builds WORKING SNIPER RIFLE at home out of scrap metal!

Jellied Eel

I blame the empire!

Because it was large, made things up as it went along and invented the Imperial measurement system to annoy the French. A possible explanation for how various 'calibres' evolved went like this..

Back in the day guns were sized based on projectile weight, so 12-pounder, 17-pounder etc. So weight of shot defined barrel diameter. Then along came muskets and a need to standardise ammunition. So they derived from the gauge system used in shotguns still, ie a 12 gauge has a bore size of 1/12lb of lead formed into a sphere. Some old rifle/pistol calibres then got based on that, or dividing up an ounce of lead.

That kind of fits with tradition, but not sure how plausible it would be. It's a way to standardise calibres or ammunition manufacturing, but by that point in history it have been just as easy to work from measurement or gauges. I still envy our colonial cousin's ability to experiment with wildcat rounds though. Subject to state laws, BATF regs etc etc..

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Thought your household broadband was pants? Small biz has it worse

Jellied Eel

Re: A rock and a ransom strip.

Sometimes lack of decent connectivity can be blamed on business park developers. Namely they don't consider communications services when developing sites. Or they view those as services that should be bought through the Estate/FM company at a hefty premium. Otherwise as many estates are private property, trying to provide services means trying to negotiate wayleaves, often at a high cost. Or show us their shiney new comms/fibre distribution room and look put out when asked why they installed multimode to feed a 20 acre site.

If there were competitive and practical access to ducts, splice chambers etc etc, businesses on industrial or retail parks may get more choice but generally there's no incentive for providers to do that.

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Google+ to offer 'infinite' gender identity options

Jellied Eel

Re: Big Deal

But what if the completion checking sees "other" or "freeform" as incomplete forms and refuse to process my application? And come to think of it, why do these forms often ask me to submit? We're not all submissives you know!

And would it allow me to specify my identiy as

Ambivalent'); DROP TABLE PATIENTS; --

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Gigabit-over-copper VDSL successor G.fast signed off at last

Jellied Eel

As others have pointed out, a large part of the market are things like shopping centres, hotels, apartment blocks etc etc. There, it's about potential to re-use existing cabling, cabling distance, subscriber density, contention and all that good stuff. Plus avoiding OAM costs.

So wiring up Ethernet would mean installing additional ducts, cabling, wiring closets. Costs may vary depending on property type and building regs. So depending on building size, closet may need an Ethernet switch trunked back to one or preferably more main switches. Then each subscriber would need their own VLAN and some way to be able to point that VLAN at their chosen provider.. Unless you're not intending to give them any choice. And then it becomes a question of who'll manage and support that lot, especially if they're trying to manage multiple properties.

Then the ability to slap on a G.fast modem and having it work much the same way as a regular xDSL subscriber starts to look attractive. It's also a way to improve on existing pseudo-FTTH deliveries where the 'F' is really copper and the ASA lets ISPs get away with it. Where properties are dense enough, G.fast can aggregate subscriber connections back to a street cab & fibre conversion can happen there.

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What a pity: Rollout of hated UK smart meters delayed again

Jellied Eel

Too cheap to meter

Anyone remember that one? In telecomms, metering, billing and mucking out the suspense account is a painful and expensive exercise so reduced some costs by not bothering. So customers can just pay x a month and provider figures out if the mix of light vs heavy users means x is about right. No reason why energy companies couldn't do the same and offer S/M/L/Cannabis Farm bundles based on XXkWh/month. No need then to pish £12bn+ up the wall on 'smart meters'. After all, our brilliant energy policy from DECC means our energy is cheap & plentiful..

Oh, wait. It's not. Which is why Baroness Vermin talks about 'demand management' and reduction being the solution to our energy market. So the only smart thing about the meters is an ability to disconnect them when demand exceeds supply and customers have been foolish enough not to pay a premium for an uninterruptable supply contract.

If however the lil displays did something more useful than emulating a 1950's meter, and showed a rates feed from competing suppliers.. That may actually be a consumer benefit and could save consumers some money, but that's not the objective here.

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GOOAALLL! Back of the net! 'Millions of dollars' score .football gTLD

Jellied Eel

Re: .football

No, cue letter to NFL asking them for large amounts of money to buy the premium domain, nfl.football

Then followup letter from NFL's lawyers pointing out that if anyone but NFL tries using that domain, donuts would get deep-fried in court. And they'll offer $10/yr for nfl.football and sell miami and dolphins.nfl.football to the club owners for $$$$.

I'm unconvinced many of the new tld owners will ever make their money back given the typical user will just type 'miami dolphins' into their search box and not care about the tld. Or if brand owners will really bother registering their brands given they're protected anyway. Some will no doubt convince themselves, and the Internet has long shown there's money to be made by never underestimating the gullibility of it's users.

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Androids in celluloid – which machine deserves the ULTIMATE MOVIE ROBOT title?

Jellied Eel

No flesh shall be spared

M.A.R.K. 13 from Hardware. An oldy but a goodie. Bad robot, Angry Bob and Lemmy as your cab driver. What more could you want?

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BOFH: An UNHOLY MATCH forged amid the sweet smell of bullsh*t

Jellied Eel

Re: What's a female BOFH?

Bob, until they've survived their probationary period. Or in exceptional circumstances where your own survival is less certain, call them whatever they'd like.

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Antares apocalypse: Orbital points finger at turbopump FAIL

Jellied Eel

Re: Some perspective on this

"When you put these facts together with Orbital's lack of experience in rockets, you have to wonder why NASA awarded them a contract in the first place."

Anyone looked at Orbital's board/investor list? Otherwise elements of this quote spring to mind-

Rockhound: You know we're sitting on four million pounds of fuel, one nuclear weapon and a thing that has 270,000 moving parts built by the lowest bidder. Makes you feel good, doesn't it?

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Pitchforks at dawn! UK gov's Verify ID service FAILS to verify ID

Jellied Eel

Re: Experian

You were lucky. They asked me to confirm the value of a loan I hadn't taken out. Some ranting and assistance from the DPR later, it turns out they'd confused me with someone else with the same name. And would I like to pay for one of their services so I could correct their records for them.

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'Urika': Cray unveils new 1,500-core big data crunching monster

Jellied Eel

Re: They call this progress?

It's one of those things where I'd love to hear the rationale for the design. Someone made a conscious effort to turn a supercomputer into furniture, as seen here-

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cray-1#mediaviewer/File:Cray-1-UIUC_CAC.jpg

which spawned lables saying 'Please do not sit on the supercomputer'. Back then, we had upholstery, now we have differentiation by way of designer rack doors. Plus there are still latency advantages from the old-school toroidal designs vs generic 19" rack layouts.

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Jellied Eel

They call this progress?

Cray-1 at least came with seating.

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Dyslexic, dyspraxic? No probs, says GCHQ

Jellied Eel

Re: well I blame the management.

Classic example from the wiki definition of dyspraxia-

"Many dyspraxics benefit from working in a structured environment, as repeating the same routine minimises difficulty with time-management and allows them to commit procedures to long-term memory."

Alternatively, a management that understands the issues could create an environment structured to maximise performance of the individual, and minimises the stress. Which is what GCHQ appear to be doing by recognising they can get exceptionally skilled individuals. They're not alone in doing this, but it does take a bit more effort from management to understand and support them.

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Spies would need SUPER POWERS to tap undersea cables

Jellied Eel

Re: some South American country

"Then they ran the new cable sideways (east) to Whats-it-stan."

That sounds like a standard branching unit for a new customer. Ideally you want to get those on board when the system's being designed because post-installation it means getting cable ships, cutting the cable and more cost/risk.

There's some videos on YT and Hibernia Atlantic's website showing how the subsea cable stuff works. Some of it seems crude, ie cutting anchors but done by specialists on some very special ships.

There was a point where industry was complaining about the O&M (maintenance costs) on subsea capacity and trying to squeeze costs. So was challenging sometimes to explain those charges paid to keep the cable ships crewed and ready to deal with faults. Some were in danger of going bust, but the increase in offshore wind farms helped generate new business. But also means they may be busy on other jobs. If you're buying wet capacity, always use protection as finding and fixing faults is really possible inside a day.

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Jellied Eel

Relevant bit is called a branching unit, eg Huawei BU1650 which is basically a switch/splitter that works usually with an amp/repeater to split signals off to drop at a landing station. They can be attached to the cable offshore, otherwise the cables are built through the landing stations in sections with the PFE and SLTs (Submarine Laser Terminals) powering and lighting each section. Adding one could get tricky given the power and optical signals are closely watched and cuts detectable very quickly. Then fire a TDR test from landing stations both ends of the cable to measure how far along the cable the cut is and send the co-ordinates to a cable ship to start looking for the cut.

They use either an ROV to visually follow and inspect the cable so may send a picture back of something unexpected. Alternatively the cable ship hooks up the section where the damage is, or cuts either side and splices a new cable section in. If there's an unexpected cable hanging off it, that would easily be noticed. Old copper cables could allegedly be clamped and monitored with the clamps detaching if they were disturbed.

For fibre, the idea of a parasitic clamp that could monitor a fibre without cutting it is less plausible. You could possibly do it via microbends but they'd require exposing the fibre which is in the middle of the cable surrounded by the cladding, armor wire and chunky copper power core. Which on a long distance cable like a transatlantic or transpacific one would probably be running 30-50kV DC. Exposing that to sea water could allow rapid detachment via the resulting short and steam explosion.

If you're not running the tap cable back to your own landing station, you'd then have to manage the data. That's not hundreds of megabits, it's usually n x 10/40/100Gbps. So an off-shore data logger would need to be a combination of DWDM mux, DPI system and storage, which would need it's own power and communications. Perhaps this is where the Google barges ended up? ULF isn't exactly practical if you're trying to send data transmitted originally at Ghz via ULF at a a few hundred hertz, or a few bits per second. That could involve rather a lot of buffering.

But if all those challenges are overcome, then it would be possible. A while ago I did look into the practicality of creating an off-shore PoP with a mux and router. Operating Juniper or Cisco at those depths would be tricky, not to mention voiding their warranties. They don't include deep-sea divers in their SmartNet contracts either.

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TROUT and EELS in SINISTER PACT to RULE the oceans

Jellied Eel
Terminator

Re: Hope

Indeed. Nothing to see here, move along. Isn't that a new iShiney over there? If you're quick you can buy one. Meatbag,

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LOHAN gets laughing gear round promotional mug

Jellied Eel

Re: Mug??

Mine's the diet version. But looks like the glass issue is resolved. So that would be errm.. nearly 200ml of Whiskey :)

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Jellied Eel
Pint

Re: Mug??

Still fine for café irlandés and if using the official 2 parts whiskey to 4 parts coffee, ideal for getting a drunken buzz on..

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LOHAN packs bags for SPACEPORT AMERICA!

Jellied Eel

Re: Explosives factory

Stretch goal!

Best way to beat bureaucracy is enjoin it in shenanigans. Probably find you could get EU development grants to cover sheds and a few berms.

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Assange™: Hey world, I'M STILL HERE, ignore that Snowden guy

Jellied Eel

Re: Please

"I have no opinion on this person as regards his character, motives,"

Motives? He's got another book coming out soon so needs to get back in the news.

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Brit kids match 45-year-old fogies' tech skill level by the age of 6

Jellied Eel
Flame

6 year olds have the same tech skills as a 45 year old because modern UI's seem to have been designed for them. Bold colors easily stabbed with little fingers for instant gratification. Want to know more? Well, did you buy the support contract, or call our premium rate number for help.

Case in point. In World of Tanks, there'd been some network tweaks and a claim that altering TCP parameters improved UDP peformance and fixed 'lag'. Which sounded weird. And some claimed it had improved things. Which sounded weirder. But this is on Windows so I figured I'd have a quick poke to figure out why. My first mistake was that if I could find a network settings widget it'd show me all of them, maybe in the control panel, hopefully under 'network'.. But this is Windows. One is not meant to look under the hood.

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Danes cram 43 Tbps down ONE fibre using ONE laser

Jellied Eel

Re: Impressive

Abstract here, paper is paywalled-

"We demonstrate 43-Tbit/s transmission over 67.4-km seven-core fiber using a single source. Each of the 6 outer cores carries 6 Nyquist-WDM channels using 320-Gbaud Nyquist-OTDM-PDM-QPSK 330-GHz spaced, and the center core carries 10-GHz clock pulses."

It's not a fibre type that's in the ground, ITU-standardised or widely available. Good news is it's a reasonable distance, but may be bad news if your network has spans >60kms. Real-world applications would come down to cost. As the author says, currently you can lay 144f or 288f and that's pretty cheap. By using 7 fibres, you could do the same thing, and if that works out cheaper or gives you greater capacity, you'd likely go that route. Where it may get more interesting is with submarine cables. Those typically have much lower fibre counts due to mechanical challenges with attaching the 'torpedoes' containing amp/regen electronics to the cable.

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Bring back error correction, say Danish 'net boffins

Jellied Eel

Beware of heresies

What's needed is a network that's designed to deal with a mix of voice, video, other real-time apps and some flavors of data. It should be able to offer 'permanent' paths for defined endpoints like Ethernet pseudo-wires or VPNs, and temporary paths for things like bulk data transfers. It should offer some form of congestion control and management and be dynamically reconfigurable. To some, this will sound like SDN. To others, perhaps older and more cynical, ATM. The Internet. Re-inventing the wheel since at least 1876..

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You! Pirate! Stop pirating, or we shall admonish you politely. Repeatedly, if necessary

Jellied Eel

Useful end of the slippery slope

"..its warning emails will now include a link to purchase a copy of the illegally downloaded content."

This could be handy. So if I download a bit of Game of Thrones, will the link let me buy a legal DVD/Blu-ray now-ish? Like not having to wait until Feb 2015?

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YES: Scotland declares independence ... from the dot co dot uk empire

Jellied Eel

Re: Another money earning scam

Confused. Press release claiming a glorious day for the techno-scot. But nic.scot appears to be sitting in.. Bulgaria?

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Jellied Eel

Re: alt.swedish.chef.bork.bork.bork

.alba was blocked by Albania for passing off and to avoid confusion.

.sco forked to .ibm and .nov and may still be in dispute resolution.

.wee and .eck are available from alternative registrars. Premiums apply to golden registrations.

.midge is reserved for the Scottish Air Force.

According to ISO 3166-2:GB it should be .sct anyway.

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We got behind the wheel of a Tesla S electric car. We didn't hate it

Jellied Eel

Re: domestic power....

"It would seem that once there is a critical mass of chargers (for transit) and sinks (for domestics), the grid will have a reserve capacity not unlike a big dam.."

I think these are two of the biggest challenges (aside from cost). Teslas's rolling out it's Superchargers which cut filling times to more realistic levels, but not petrol/diesel convenience. Plus the challenges of managing high current charging and battery life. Potential problem there is they'll only be for Tesla's vehicles at present. Fair play to Musk for getting on and doing it but incompatible charging infrastructure will increase cost and reduce take up.

For domestic, the pitch seems to be buy a Tesla and a SolarCity solar charger/storage system using Tesla batteries. That's fine if the panels charge the store batteries ready to charge your car when you get home in the evening. If not, then demand isn't going to match solar profiles, so there'll probably be an increased night-time demand.

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YouTube in shock indie music nuke: We all feel a little less worthy today

Jellied Eel

Net neutrality

Google has long been a champion of net neutrality and the concept that all content is created equal. There should be no preferential treatment because that may lead to a 2-tiered 'net where rich companies can squeeze out the smaller operators. Google has spent years (and millions) lobbying for these rights, and creating a 2-tiered royalty system for YT is just demonstrating how sincerely it holds these views.

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D-Wave disputes benchmark study showing sluggish quantum computer

Jellied Eel

Re: Seems they are playing the old school definition of a "computer"

What do you get if you multiply six by nine?

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YouTube will nuke indie music videos in DAYS, says Google exec

Jellied Eel

Don't forget..

"Oh good, so it's gonna be just <pop tartlet du jour> and <ageing rock "icon"> from now on."

And endless Mars and Twix ads.. It's the Interwebz. Your stuff is free so we'll make money from it!

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British boffin tells Obama's science advisor: You're wrong on climate change

Jellied Eel

Re: Mathematician vs. a "Real" Scientist...

I'm confused. Which one is meant to be the "actual climate scientist"? One is Holdren, who's thesis was titled-

COLLISIONLESS STABILITY OF AN INHOMOGENEOUS, CONFINED, PLANAR PLASMA

who drifted from physics to poltics with the odd collision along the way. Notably the infamous Simon-Erlich wager which Holdren advised Erlich about. And lost. Holdren also co-authored a book with Erlich which contained some radical ideas about overpopulation. The other is Dr Screen, who..

"...leads a three-year project entitled “Arctic Climate Change and its Mid-latitude Impacts”, in collaboration with the UK Meteorological Office Hadley Centre and the US National Center for Atmospheric Research."

One's a specialist, the other's a politician and bureaucrat. But given climate science is largely about the numerical analysis of weather and climate data, who would you think more likely to produce credible results, the mathmatician or the politician?

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London commuter hell will soon include 'one card to rule them all'

Jellied Eel

"If everyone used ITSO on the underground, gate-lines would suddenly have enormous queues behind them and stations would close due to overcrowding."

Alternatively we could do as the Czech's do and have a carrot and stick system. Buy a card, activate it, walk freely onto the underground. Stick comes in if you get caught fare dodging, which means they have more *people* on the network keeping an eye on things and fewer machines.

Of course this means there are fewer people getting paid to run those machines, skim transaction charges or just analyze gigabytes of passenger information to work out where bottlenecks may exist. Or just people who are x hrs away from home, where the next Amazon ticket office conversion should be. Or correlating data from wifi & phone info to make targetted mailing lists. Your phone + person who is not your wife's phone take a cab to the west end, then to a hotel so wife gets added to mailing lists for lawyers and PIs. The possibilities are endless, especially when 'cost overruns' (this is goverment IT) mean 'exciting data sharing opportunities' are explored.

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Yet another reason to skip commercials: Microsoft ad TURNS ON your Xbox One

Jellied Eel

Re: Somewhat deceitful if not downright false advertising

"Advert is all about voice commands and ends with "XBoxOne- Now £349" ...which would be the kinectless version ...and you need Kinect for voice commands."

I blame marketing. If you want to gauge audience participation, what better way than to make sure your analytics collector is enabled and capable of sending audio/video at the start of an ad. Or finding out which channels Xbone owners prefer. As MS put it when they flogged Atlas to Facepalm-

"Perhaps more important than anything, five-plus years ago we did not have the stable of mature owned & operated media/screen assets with global reach that we now have, including: Xbox/Kinect, Skype, Bing, Windows Phone, a new and improved MSN that delivers premium ad experiences, and last but certainly not least, Windows 8 applications.

Our vision has evolved. We want to stay laser focused on building devices and services that we believe will represent the advertising platforms of the future."

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Psst. We've got 400Gb/s Ethernet working - but don't tell anyone

Jellied Eel

Re: Reg's standard for this?

"I think you'll find 40Gbps is incredibly popular among those who need it. The reason you may not have seen much of it is that very few people do need it."

I work on the supply side and haven't seen a request for 40G in a long time. That's on the WAN rather than LAN though. Reason I'm sceptical is historical. 40G was ok for older systems that worked on Nx10G wavelengths, newer systems use Nx25G which is one of the reasons why 100G is standardising around 100GBase-xR4. On the line-side flexible grids (ITU-T G.694) using PM-QPSK are running 500Gbps and 9Tbps+ on a single pair. So generally 40G isn't a convenient or efficient fit with modern muxes. 400G may work as in interim 4x100 solution but again less efficient it you end up wasting 100G on a line card. 1Tbps is possible now with 2xOSCs between compatible telcos, which generally means another DTN-X user. More info here-

https://www.infinera.com/technology/files/infinera-IEEE-Meeting-Superchannels.pdf

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