* Posts by Muscleguy

373 posts • joined 15 Aug 2008

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Magnet-wobble wireless charging system dishes out a respectable 10 kW

Muscleguy

Already Here

The buses on the routes around here in Dundee are electric hybrids with flywheels to recover braking energy which with the hills here can be significant. We live at the top of a 60m hill and the double deckers sitting at the lights at the bottom of the hill can turn the corner onto the main road and get up the shallow incline to the bus stop entirely on the flywheel. You can hear it. The bus company, a division of First Bus, says they are performing very well and saving significantly on fuel costs. They are also much lower in emissions. There's a narrow winding canyon like road in the town a lot of buses use (right by the central bus station) that can have very high PM10 etc levels with idling bus diesels, especially in the winter. So these buses decrease that output significantly.

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Alien dwarf 'star' flashes her dazzling brown rear at stunned space boffins

Muscleguy

Re: Hang on,

Ditto. Even though at a mere 20 light years it is in our galactic back yard but even so. The technological achievement of this is mind blowing. I was born in 1965 and remember the moon shots (we got to stay up late specially to watch, which helped it being memorable). To go from that to this in my lifetime is amazing.

If you can accelerated a probe up to a decent fraction of light speed you could even envisage swinging by this in someone's lifetime (to keep the project from being forgotten).

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Bloke cuffed for blowing low-flying camera drone to bits with shotgun

Muscleguy

Re: He should go free...

Not to mention that staring into the sky without a blink reflex puts your eyes in danger of excretory masses falling from cloacas of the feathered dinosauria that frequent the skies.

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Hole in (Number) Two: MYSTERY golf-course pooper strikes again

Muscleguy

Me Too

I'm a runner and I can assure you that the necessity to 'clear the decks' prior to setting out is even more urgent. My usual routes are also seriously deficient in convenient copses, the use of. Too much agrarian agriculture adjacent to the cycle paths. My personal temple is well trained by practice to evacuate twice a day to accommodate early evening runs in the week and first thing in the morning runs at the weekend. A decent diet is however required to achieve this, but then a decent diet is also required to support moderately intensive athletic exertions.

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Slippery, slimy find: LEGGY, WRIGGLY fossil shows SNAKES weren't legless. Or ARMLESS

Muscleguy
Boffin

One Squeeze Now

Boas today still have vestigial hindlimbs, or the males do, with little bones, though no hands, buried in their body wall. They do still use them for grappling with lady snakes during scaly nooky. So this is hardly unexpected. But by the sounds of it a very nice fossil example. Another gap created!

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Robot surgeons kill 144 patients, hurt 1,391, malfunction 8,061 times

Muscleguy
Boffin

Re: Wot?

In Science, rather than medicine I have used and seen/smelt the use of a good old soldering iron to cauterise and remove when doing animal surgery. Usually the non survival type, but male mice getting the snip usually have their vas deferens snipped out and the ends cauterised. That was certainly how I was shown to do it.

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Smartphones are ludicrously under-used, so steal their brains

Muscleguy

Re: "Why would I want my phone connected to the washing machine or cooker?"

"Speak for yourself - some of us are more than capable…"

Seconded, and that sports top these days needs to be washed without fabric softener long before it needs a delicate cycle. The technical sweat wicking ability of it is all in the weave and fabric softeners rearrange the weave and destroy the wicking. If you have been washing your sports tops or any modern sport/exercise gear in with everything else you have probably munged it all.

I co-opted the 'whites' partition in the washing basket for running gear and my technical under shirts and polos so they get washed together using the non softener detergent. A machine that might flag up a t-shirt in the general wash might be useful mind. Such things do happen on occasion, sadly.

One day, hopefully soon, they will sort out hard wearing, smart, technical trousers then I can pretty much stop wearing cotton.

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Ant-Man: Big ideas, small payoff

Muscleguy

It was a lamb vindaloo monster, which is why it had a sheep's jaw. You are confusing it from the time they did the same thing to a chicken dish and ended up with a dinosaur.

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Your gadget batteries endanger planes, says Boeing

Muscleguy

Re: Fuck this...

Try travelling to Australia by cruise ship from Blighty, very hard. You might be able to do it with a content crossing of North America in the middle of it, then island hopping across the Pacific in stages. Maybe you have months of unused holiday accumulation your employer has allowed to allow such a venture but most people do not. Cruise ships do not, by and large, travel routes set up for long distance travel of that sort. The age of travel by liner is over, long over.

I understand some commercial vessels, container ships etc, have cabins available for long distance travellers. But the environs, fare and entertainment are not up to cruise ship standards. The writer AL Kennedy hates flying and uses such means, but she is essentially self employed and can essay the experiences into paid newspaper articles, short stories and the like.

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Behold: Pluto's huge ICE MOUNTAINS ... and signs of cryovolcanoes?

Muscleguy

Re: mostly...

Except Pluto, god of the underworld has him in his clutches. Only Orpheus has returned from Hades. If you recall your Greek myths Charon is the ferryman over the Styx. So to escape Cthulu will have to persuade Charon to ferry him, and Charon is on the other side of the Styx and does not ferry anyone, other than Orpheus, back the other way. I rather think instead that Charon is rowing around Pluto laughing at Cthulu's impotence.

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What do you MEAN, 'Click on the thing which looks like a Mondrian?'

Muscleguy

Re: Click on the Save icon...

At some point the yoof are going to wonder why on road signs cameras are shown as ancient bellows jobs, phones as old corded circular dial machines, trains are always steam engines and presumably old people will look antediluvian when instead of sticks they are equipped with mindcontrolled robotic exoskeletons.

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Muscleguy

Re: Explain anything

That is secondary to the modern thing where everyone is doing the jobs of three and has no time to read things properly so they skim looking for keywords and respond robotically. That this means you and I have to make them more frazzled by sending more emails, including ones that insist that all the necessary information has been sent (included below).

A related problem is that customer interface operatives are often not technically competent or educated. So when you or I seeking to be precise and helpful use technical terms it just confuses them. I remember ringing the help desk of the university IT dept 'the DNS is not resolving' I told the guy on the other end. 'What?' was the response. They obviously hadn't got up to that bit in that student's course and he wasn't curious enough about it to have learnt it otherwise. And I was merely a technically conversant scientist trying to use the net to do my job and being frustrated.

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Muscleguy

Re: £££s

My opinion of The Knowledge was not encouraged on arrival in London by aeroplane early on a wet Spring Sunday in '93. Six of us were crammed into a black cab from Heathrow bound for a B&B in a side street in North Finchley. It seems the Knowledge only extends to main roads beyond the North Circular and this individual had to resort to his A to Z to find the place.

Later on I would see them on their mopeds with clipboard on the handlebars training for it. But only along the main road to Burnt Oak. I never saw one go down any of the actual residential streets where people might want to go. If you are a visitor who doesn't know the area, you are not going to be much help, are you? Which is why you engage a supposed professional guide . . .

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ALIEN SLIME SHOCKER: Approaching comet probably NOT inhabited, say boffins

Muscleguy
Boffin

Wickramasinge has form as long as any kook. Way back in the '80s he and Fred Hoyle noted a weak correlation between flu outbreaks and earth passing through some dust cloud causing micrometeorites. Except of course it only accounted for the Northern Hemisphere, can you say Hemispherecentrism professor? And if that wasn't enough shortly afterwards virologists demonstrated that most seasonal flu is the result of mixing of bird and mammalian flus in pigs. There used to be millions and millions of pigs living in people's backyards with chickens all over Asia. Bird flu has done a lot to change that, people in Asia are neither stupid or have death wishes.

But undeterred, even by Fred Hoyle's death the professor has continued to see life everywhere he looks and to ignore the sequence evidence here on earth, EVERYTHING is RELATED to EVERYTHING ELSE. It's relatives all the way down, including the turtles. Even the archaea are related to the bacteria though the split is very ancient.

And of course the chance that a virus so well evolved to bind to human nasopharynx cells, avoid intracellular antiviral measures etc. etc. is just silly. We are surrounded by viruses all the time, plant viruses, bacteriophages (our guts are full of them), worm viruses, insect viruses, fish viruses, amphibian viruses, reptile viruses, feathered dinosaur viruses and mammalian viruses and only a very small fraction have a scooby chance of even infecting us, let alone causing disease. All are exquisitely evolved and adapted. And we are RELATED to all of them.

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Boffins demo 'memcomputer', plot von Neumann's retirement

Muscleguy

Re: @dESTROY aLL mONSTERS

Its not scalable or you do not understand or know how to make it scalable? They used to say that about valve architectures, then silicon came along. I don't think we are talking about fundamentals of the universe here but limitations in materials, fabrication and programming added to architectures.

Computers and computing is not some fundamental property of the universe unless you get really arcane in information theory that both leaves practicality behind and suffers from poverty of assumptions.

We also have and do have dedicated units in our computers. What is a graphics card but an optimised sub motherboard dedicated to one task? I remember the Mac SE 30 that had a maths co-processor added to the chip. I was doing 3D reconstruction (stacked dinnerplates, not solids) of mouse legs and the difference from a computer without vs with was in the former: input x.y,z go away and do something else, maybe get yet another coffee while you wait; the latter watch it in real time and cancel if you get the x,y.z wrong and go again.

So I don't see this as a motherboard architecture, I see this as a dedicated add-on unit for speeding up particular tasks or doing them more efficiently and thus freeing the CPU for other tasks. Imagine how much slower your device would be if the CPU was handling all the graphics.

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WHY did NASA probe go suddenly SILENT - JUST as it was about to send pics of remote ice-world?

Muscleguy

Re: Still bloody amazing

Agreed, but ESA with a probe ON a frigging comet and still doing science after a tumble and a spell in the deep freeze still have bragging rights in SPAAAACE.

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Engineers 3D-print ROBOT SEAHORSE, then SMASH it with rubber mallets

Muscleguy
Boffin

I for one wish to welcome our square prism toothed sucker equipped armored robot overlords.

What? That tail is just asking to become a robot tentacle and as we all know tentacles need suckers and once you have them then why not equip them with teeth/spikes/thorns like Vampiroteuthis infernalis.

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Let me PLUG that up there, love. It’s perfectly standaAAARGH!

Muscleguy
Pirate

Re: Spurs - In Wales

Bought this 3 Bed Betts Semi here in Scotland, there was a convenient socket in the corner of the lounge where we wished to site the telly, except it didn't work. Cue long cabled junction boxes. While waiting for the cable installation guy with everything pulled out of the way I pulled the relevant fuse for the downstairs sockets and had a look, cue a flash bang and the lights fused WTF?

A later crawl around under the floor and what they had done was run a spur to that socket from a standard light fitting, Doh! So, I tried unsuccessfully to insert the now disconnected cable end into a convenient double socket but it would not go. Bugger. However, there was a four way junction box screwed to a rafter with only two filled positions, on the downstairs ring. The cable reached nicely.

Then all I had to do was chase out the space for a double socket and we are long cable run of power cables at least free.

Best bit? Grey cable, so pre part P regs, into old style box. So it looks original. Sorted.

Oh and just pre part P I replaced the grey flex cable feed to the garage with an armoured cable. The grey flex had of course perished in the UV rays and should not have been surface mounted above the garden gate in the first place.

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Reg hack survives world's longest commercial flight

Muscleguy

Re: Save time by flying

10minutes!? three minutes each side for me. Place cut side down, 3min high, turn cut side up and repeat: one cooked spud. I'm surprised the thing doesn't fall apart on the journey from microwave to oven.

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Muscleguy

Re: @Jeffy "sixteen hours aloft"

I'm 2.5" shorter than you but I have long legs and wide shoulders too, so I hear you. My problem last long haul (Auckland-Dubai-Glasgow) was that my well exercised gluteals have little to no fat on them and I was feeling the hard underpinnings of my economy seat and experiencing bruised buttocks. So, I took the little pillow they give you for your head and sat on it. In future I shall be doing that at the start of every long haul flight.

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Samsung, Oppo collared in smartphone bloatware probe

Muscleguy

Re: I want bloat. I demand bloat!

You overestimate the bravery, desire and technical ability of the average phone user to rootkit their phone, especially while it is still under warranty. I've yet to see a genuine normal user useful reason to rootkit my phone along with no guarantee that it will not just result in new forms of bloatware and that all my current apps (the ones I want) will continue to work etc.

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Hide the HUD, say boffins, they're bad for driver safety

Muscleguy

Re: "a pilot is also taught when it's safe to ignore the view outside"

I do wonder about Night IR HUDS, mainly because what happens to the camera when a car with headlights on full comes the other way? How quickly can modern cameras adapt to that? because being presented with a whiteout on the HUD is not going to enhance safety.

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Brit plods' post-TETRA radio omnishambles comes home to roost

Muscleguy

A civilian signals operative follows the plod around with a spool of wire and a telegraph station. The lead acid battery can be in a backpack, providing he doesn't fall over. Problem solved.

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Glass door to the ancient past FOUND ON MARS

Muscleguy

Re: Fingers crossed

Even entombed in glass DNA still continues to degrade and break down. Jurassic park is and pretty much always will be scifi, with emphasis on the fi. In the lab dna is kept at -20C, though if it is genomic in scale and you do not want it fragmented you might keep it at 4C. Though not for tens of millions of years. I know we are pushing ancient DNA ages backwards but the quality you get back is not good, it is better than nowt but compared to fresh sample sequencing and DNA assembly it is very, vary hard to do. Not all fresh genomes are easy either, our youngest has been trying assemble a mollusc genome and it is proving anything but easy.

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Bill Nye's bonkers LightSail spaceship unfurls solar sails at last

Muscleguy

Re: Changing direction...

I take it you do not sail anywhere near the gulf of Corryvrackan then? ;-)

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Muscleguy

Re: Next up: Crazy Eddie

Waste has the advantage of being denser, though unless you plan to boost a LOT of water out of the gravity well you will need to scavenge 99% of the water for reuse. Gonna need a very, very good RO unit and changing the membranes will not be pleasant.

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Strap-on fiddle factor: We poke ten Apple Watch apps

Muscleguy

Re: IFTTT - worst app ever

Agreed. I installed it on my Android phone thinking it looked promising then looked at endless recipes all for apps I never use, have no intention of using, do not want to use, would rather chop my hands off than use etc. Definitely one for the hipster generation, I think I'm just too old. But then I remember when Facebook started and it was this thing just for us academic/scientist types . . .

I'm simply not into sharing everything with everybody instantly type stuff.

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Scot Nationalists' march on Westminster may be GOOD for UK IT

Muscleguy

1. Salmond inherited Trump's golf course from Jack McConnell. Having found no watertight reason to refuse it, he then plopped an offshore wind turbine testing centre right next to it and fully visible from it. Trump in high dudgeon went to Holyrood, and was refused entry as he has no standing here in Scotland. 'Twas a windy day in Auld Reekie and his tonsure was cruelly dealt with to the amusement of all.

2. Salmond met Murdoch twice on official business. Murdoch was thinking of building a tech centre here. Salmond has never met him socially, become godparent to his kids or gone horse riding with his executives and has publicly stated that he has no desire to.

But let's not let facts get in the way of smearing and propaganda.

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Muscleguy

Re: Question

It doesn't even imply that. It simply notes that those on the Right who object tend to do so from a Libertarian perspective. Other objectible viewpoints are available.

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Muscleguy

Re: Nukes

The problem is not depth for the submarines, they are actually fairly shallow draft vessels when surfaced. The problem is access to sufficiently deep waters into which they can disappear shortly after leaving their berths. Such exist just off the West Coast of Scotland.

The need for this rules out the entire North Sea coast, far too shallow. It rules out any Irish sea coasts such as Cumbria or Cymru (even if PC did not represent a further threat). It also rules out much of the Channel. The Cornish peninsula offers the only alternative but there pretty much every usable harbour has a fishing village on it. So to base the subs there at least one and probably several (the subs need the maintenance base and the rearming base to be separate for safety reasons, Faslane and Coulport respectively atm).

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Smile! Brit transport plods turn bodycams on travelling public

Muscleguy

'British' Transport Plod?

The Scottish arm of BTP are about to be merged into Polis Scotland, the single, national police force we have (no more local polis for local people, discus). So exactly how 'British' will they be after that happens and will the 'Scottish' ones get these cameras? An enquiring Scottish (feel the fear, we are coming) mind wishes to know.

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Segway bought by former patent spat adversary Ninebot

Muscleguy

Only if you live on top of a hill and commute down it. I spent five teenage years cycling 5 miles to school and five back. I started by cycling up a steep 200metre hill. The down the other side. The road to school, after a long flat straight rose gradually to a much lower height.

Oh and for the first three years I got up at 05:30 and cycled up that hill to do a paper run. The downhill braking was episodic as I stopped to deliver papers.

All this cycling was good low impact muscle and CV conditioning for a distance running career. I would cycle home and then run up to 14 miles over those volcanic ridges. Power assist would have robbed me of all that conditioning.

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Telly behemoths: Does size matter?

Muscleguy

Re: You want a bigger picture?

Resolution can get a mite high though. I remember back in the early noughties I bought a hires (don't remember how much) large screen for the lab graphics workstation. The rationale being you could have your montage open in photoshop and beside it, instead of underneath it you could have the source pictures. We had to install that app with the pair of eyes as when you had the PS crosshairs cursor it was VERY easy to lose it on the screen.

That was about the only hiccup though. Paired with the dye-sub printer it was the real deal.

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Prawn cocktail offers hot new way to make solar cells

Muscleguy

I used to know some people, who worked in Hawai'i, who worked on the jaw closing muscle of the lobster. Just the jaw closing muscle. The rest of the lobsters was not utilised and so could be utilised for other purposes since the lobsters did not survive the process.

During my PhD we had a Chinese guy half in the lab who was doing a project on deer velvet (the skin from immature antlers, thought to be an aphrodisiac in China). On hearing that the postdoc had been married for some years without offspring he came in with a bag of sliced young antler with instructions to stir fry it as a 'tonic'. Since I was married with kids I didn't get any ;-(

Sometimes working on mouse muscles has it's drawbacks. I would be okay eating rat, there's enough eating on a rat. But mice are not worth bothering with. Less meat on the hind limbs than a frog leg.

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Muscleguy

Read the article. They carbonise the chitin/chitosan which burns off organic components that could rot. It's simply a cheap and abundant feedstock, not the finished article.

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Muscleguy

Re: 'Once we've improved their efficiency...'

I expect you could force evolve/mutate pigs into flying beasties but they would no longer be pigs. Think something more like a megabat. All of whom will of course be called Eric.

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Muscleguy

Re: Seconds?

Chitin and chitosan like many such exoskeletal elements (and like our own surface skin) are layered on the nanoscale. So I imagine that when you carbonise them that layering is retained and that this is beneficial for a quantum dot. I don't pretend to the physics to know if this is true but as a biologist I do have a passing knowledge of the structures of such things.

I also imagine that being able to pull a ready made scaffold like that out of a natural discard material to be much, much cheaper than trying to manufacture such a thing.

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Will fondleslab's fickle finger of fate help Windows 10?

Muscleguy

Re: @AC / technical expertise?

The answer to the router question of course is just to wander the streets. From here I can see two SKY default names and one Virgin default. What's the betting their running the default password too?

I'm not doing that to my neighbours but out and about with my phone I'm not so sniffy and there are plenty of people with unsecured wifis. Which means they have enough technical literacy to turn passwords off.

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Australia: even more empty than you imagine

Muscleguy

Re: Bumper Sticker?

The Norwegians have done this. They could have just let everyone congregate around Oslo but they have deliberately subsided and invested to keep people in places like Bergen or Tromso above the Arctic Circle. Of course it helps if you have an oil fund because your government was pragmatic and sensible instead of dogmatic and politically obsessed and having grown up in NZ the antics of politicians in OZ are not unknown to me.

You get the same thing in New Zealand, a large proportion (around ⅓) live within a 3hr drive of Auckland, a bit like the UK except Auckland is not the capital (thank fuck).

At least NZ has water, most of the time, and geological processes that push the land up out of the sea (mostly, except around poor Christchurch where it dropped AND liquified) but the point still stands. The point about water in Australia is a good one. Thirst will kill you much quicker than hunger and drive you mad in the process. Strangely the UK has a similar problem in the SE, in Kent in particular. Would you want to drink desalinated Thames estuary water?

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El Reg tests portable breathalyzers: Getting drunk so you don't have to

Muscleguy

Additional

Oh and back home in New Zealand they have just done what Scotland has done and lowered the limit. There the police have the power to randomly stop and test you. They set up what are optional road blocks where they wave you over to stop. They found lots of people over the limit the morning after.

Unlike here in Scotland where our parliament has the power to change the limit but not the sanction, in NZ an interim sanction period is in effect for those caught over the new limit but under the old one. You get a fine and points but your license is not suspended. Once the new limits are bedded in this will change.

But be aware if you come up here to Scotland and go on a wee bender. Driving the next morning might not be wise.

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Muscleguy
Boffin

Experiment stopped too soon.

The real application of these devices is the morning after. Am I safe to drive after last night's session? When you are drinking it is fairly trivial to work out/remember if you have drunk enough to be illegal to drive. If you don't know that then it past time you worked it out. Most people here in Scotland where the limits have just dropped have done that.

So do it again but give the previously inebriated hacks the devices to take home to see if they are legal to drive to the office (regardless of whether they do so or take some other transport option).

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Brit boffins debunk 'magnetic field and cancer' link

Muscleguy

Re: Eliminating 'their best guess for a candidate' doesn't prove no cause/effect

A pressure group started by loonies who think they are electrically sensitive which has produced a cherry-picked list does not a balanced research assessment make. Tell me, what is your background in the assessment of research publications?

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Muscleguy

Re: Changes in circadian rhythms

We are not fruit flies and our last common ancestor with them was probably a very simple flatworm in the pre-Cambrian seas. Plenty of animals have been proven to be able to sense the earth's magnetic field. Birds have deposits of magnetite in their ears to help with that.

But if you think that EMFs disturb circadian rhythms in humans in the wild then you are at liberty to seek research funding, though you should be aware that most grant applications are unsuccessful and the ability of the applicant to do the research is part of the assessment. Knock yourself out.

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Muscleguy

Re: You can't use science to disprove theories not based on science

A Biologist writes: All attempts to test people who claim to be unusually sensitive to EM fields have all failed. With indicator lights disabled test subjects are unable to discern whether any given item of electrical equipment is on or not.

So you can posit the idea of people who are more sensitive all you like but 1. We cannot find them and 2. You need to elucidate a molecular or physiological basis for this. Some combination of variant protein alleles that not only provide a credible mechanism but can be shown to be present in people who are sensitive and not others.

Even then the correct solution will be to test people and advise them to avoid visiting Aluminium smelters and making heavy use of decades old mobile phones. They should also have the inverse square law of the propagation of such fields from their sources through the air explained to them.

I have been in my time to two talks by the redoubtable Douglas Henshaw who dedicated his research career to finding the mechanism. He was full of ideas but all his results were resolutely negative. You want to keep the developing human away from strong fields but the skin and uterine muscle in human females will attenuate most signals. I'm a developmental biologist and when my wife was pregnant with our eldest she was left at home when my father in law took me around the aluminium smelter where he worked. But she had been around it in the past when not pregnant and there is NO epidemiology of strange biological effects in the workers at such plants. Her father is still alive too.

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Webcam hacker pervs in MASS HOME INVASION

Muscleguy

Re: Err?

A traceroute on this IP address says it is located close to Virgin media's HQ instead of somewhere in Eastern Scotland where I really am. So, it depends on who your ISP is it would seem. I fully expect the spooks can find out but they would either have to make Virgin tell or like in the US GCHQ might well have a backdoor to more easily facilitate such things.

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Hide your Macs, iPhones and iPads: WireLurker nasty 'heralds new era'

Muscleguy

Re: OK so let me get this straight..

"I recently ditched my (free) Sophos AV for excessive CPU guzzling doing live scans. "

Ditto. The iMac was going unresponsive for minutes at a time. Then I noticed in Activity Monitor the routine that was using 100% of CPU and removed it.

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Rise of the Machines: FIRST HUMAN VICTIM – 2015

Muscleguy

Re: Why?

wrt pacemakers there is kit in development at the very least whereby you run an app on your smartphone which can connect to your cardiologist and give her a realtime readout on your ticker and enable her to tweak the settings on your pacemaker from her office or maybe wherever (because that would be convenient).

Now I can see several benefits both the patient and the clinician which is why this is being developed. But I can also see how it could potentially be subverted. I have a PhD in physiology and I reckon knowing the parameters of the pacemaker I could set it remotely to either do or not do something and maybe in a contra-indicated way. But then you would need to know that the target is going to be doing something stressful or strenuous and not within easy reach of those motorcycling paramedics they have as first responders now. Kill you straight out? probably not, though that might depend what sort of pacemaker you have. The sitting there waiting to shock your heart into normality when it gets beat funky? hard. The sort that is actually driving the heart beat by unfunky beat? now that might be possible. But such a person is already pretty sick, so why bother?

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Comet Siding Spring revealed as flying molehill

Muscleguy

Fine I'll race you. I'll run 816m and you run 1,000 and we'll see who wins shall we?

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Muscleguy

In the same way that shooting down your neighbour's quadcopter toy with a rifle is a bad bet compared to a shotgun, even one loaded with buckshot. Only one of the low velocity pellets needs to hit a rotor or a wire or a piece of electronics.

It's also how the missile that took down the Malaysian Airlines jet over Ukraine works. Instead of directly hitting the aircraft it has a proximity fuse and explodes nearby peppering it with shrapnel. A more advances form of old style flak that used best guess altitude fuses.

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Muscleguy

Re: 450m molehill?

The point is that even compared with actual earthly mountain, that is at best a hill. It is not even a Munro. Everest for e.g. is roughly 7km above sea level and very, very much denser than a dirty snowball. In Mars terms Everest is a tiddler. Olympus Mons is so tall it nudges the edge of space. If it were on Earth you would not just need some oxygen bottles, but a pressure suit to climb it.

So, molehill is thus entirely appropriate especially in the context of the aphorism it very obviously references. Do you need it spelling out?

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