* Posts by Muscleguy

332 posts • joined 15 Aug 2008

Page:

Brit boffins debunk 'magnetic field and cancer' link

Muscleguy

Re: Eliminating 'their best guess for a candidate' doesn't prove no cause/effect

A pressure group started by loonies who think they are electrically sensitive which has produced a cherry-picked list does not a balanced research assessment make. Tell me, what is your background in the assessment of research publications?

3
0
Muscleguy

Re: Changes in circadian rhythms

We are not fruit flies and our last common ancestor with them was probably a very simple flatworm in the pre-Cambrian seas. Plenty of animals have been proven to be able to sense the earth's magnetic field. Birds have deposits of magnetite in their ears to help with that.

But if you think that EMFs disturb circadian rhythms in humans in the wild then you are at liberty to seek research funding, though you should be aware that most grant applications are unsuccessful and the ability of the applicant to do the research is part of the assessment. Knock yourself out.

2
1
Muscleguy

Re: You can't use science to disprove theories not based on science

A Biologist writes: All attempts to test people who claim to be unusually sensitive to EM fields have all failed. With indicator lights disabled test subjects are unable to discern whether any given item of electrical equipment is on or not.

So you can posit the idea of people who are more sensitive all you like but 1. We cannot find them and 2. You need to elucidate a molecular or physiological basis for this. Some combination of variant protein alleles that not only provide a credible mechanism but can be shown to be present in people who are sensitive and not others.

Even then the correct solution will be to test people and advise them to avoid visiting Aluminium smelters and making heavy use of decades old mobile phones. They should also have the inverse square law of the propagation of such fields from their sources through the air explained to them.

I have been in my time to two talks by the redoubtable Douglas Henshaw who dedicated his research career to finding the mechanism. He was full of ideas but all his results were resolutely negative. You want to keep the developing human away from strong fields but the skin and uterine muscle in human females will attenuate most signals. I'm a developmental biologist and when my wife was pregnant with our eldest she was left at home when my father in law took me around the aluminium smelter where he worked. But she had been around it in the past when not pregnant and there is NO epidemiology of strange biological effects in the workers at such plants. Her father is still alive too.

5
0

Webcam hacker pervs in MASS HOME INVASION

Muscleguy

Re: Err?

A traceroute on this IP address says it is located close to Virgin media's HQ instead of somewhere in Eastern Scotland where I really am. So, it depends on who your ISP is it would seem. I fully expect the spooks can find out but they would either have to make Virgin tell or like in the US GCHQ might well have a backdoor to more easily facilitate such things.

14
0

Hide your Macs, iPhones and iPads: WireLurker nasty 'heralds new era'

Muscleguy

Re: OK so let me get this straight..

"I recently ditched my (free) Sophos AV for excessive CPU guzzling doing live scans. "

Ditto. The iMac was going unresponsive for minutes at a time. Then I noticed in Activity Monitor the routine that was using 100% of CPU and removed it.

0
0

Rise of the Machines: FIRST HUMAN VICTIM – 2015

Muscleguy

Re: Why?

wrt pacemakers there is kit in development at the very least whereby you run an app on your smartphone which can connect to your cardiologist and give her a realtime readout on your ticker and enable her to tweak the settings on your pacemaker from her office or maybe wherever (because that would be convenient).

Now I can see several benefits both the patient and the clinician which is why this is being developed. But I can also see how it could potentially be subverted. I have a PhD in physiology and I reckon knowing the parameters of the pacemaker I could set it remotely to either do or not do something and maybe in a contra-indicated way. But then you would need to know that the target is going to be doing something stressful or strenuous and not within easy reach of those motorcycling paramedics they have as first responders now. Kill you straight out? probably not, though that might depend what sort of pacemaker you have. The sitting there waiting to shock your heart into normality when it gets beat funky? hard. The sort that is actually driving the heart beat by unfunky beat? now that might be possible. But such a person is already pretty sick, so why bother?

0
0

Comet Siding Spring revealed as flying molehill

Muscleguy

Fine I'll race you. I'll run 816m and you run 1,000 and we'll see who wins shall we?

3
0
Muscleguy

In the same way that shooting down your neighbour's quadcopter toy with a rifle is a bad bet compared to a shotgun, even one loaded with buckshot. Only one of the low velocity pellets needs to hit a rotor or a wire or a piece of electronics.

It's also how the missile that took down the Malaysian Airlines jet over Ukraine works. Instead of directly hitting the aircraft it has a proximity fuse and explodes nearby peppering it with shrapnel. A more advances form of old style flak that used best guess altitude fuses.

2
0
Muscleguy

Re: 450m molehill?

The point is that even compared with actual earthly mountain, that is at best a hill. It is not even a Munro. Everest for e.g. is roughly 7km above sea level and very, very much denser than a dirty snowball. In Mars terms Everest is a tiddler. Olympus Mons is so tall it nudges the edge of space. If it were on Earth you would not just need some oxygen bottles, but a pressure suit to climb it.

So, molehill is thus entirely appropriate especially in the context of the aphorism it very obviously references. Do you need it spelling out?

1
0

What’s the KEYBOARD SHORTCUT for Delete?! Look in a contextual menu, fool!

Muscleguy

Re: Text editting

At school in New Zealand in 1979 first year of secondary we did all the 'options' in half year bunches. So I learned bookkeeping and touch typing on an old manual typewriter. The typing class was thus 50/50 boys and girls. But then NZ is a different country when it comes to gender opportunities. I got up to 30 words a minute on the manual.

Then fast forward to '87 and the period between been in the first class to write our honours thesis entirely on computer and starting my PhD I brushed up my skills with Mavis Beacon Teaches Typing on a 400k Mac floppy that was pre hfs, so all files had to be in the same directory as the program. I practised my skills by entering the references from my thesis from a card file to a Reflex database.

0
0
Muscleguy

Re: Devolution?

It's the education system, of more specifically the examination companies. Time was they employed ex teachers or those who wanted some extra cash. People who knew the curriculum backwards and thus could be allowed to exercise DISCRETION. But then the penny pinchers came in and made them into lean money making machines. They started paying peanuts and so the ex teachers gave it up and they had to employ monkeys to mark exam scripts. No discretion was possible.

The schools cottoned onto this and they now make kids rote learn the correct responses, in the 'right' form of words. Creativity and initiative are thus penalised at exam time.

A few years ago when the youngest was still at school she came to me with a biology worksheet that kept being marked wrong and she couldn't understand why. Me being a biologist she asked me if her answers were right, they were. So she took this to her teacher who told her that they may have been right but they were not in the correct form of words and the above was why it was important to learn them.

Another problem is ambulance chasing lawyers (NOT elfin safety). Business is scared of being sued by no-win-no-fee lawyers so all procedures must be seen to have been adhered to to the letter as anything not 'standard' is what the lawyers feed on (you didn't follow procedures did you?).

Between these two forces all initiative is squashed out of people. 'I can't do that, it's more than job's worth'. Sound familiar?

23
0

Cut-off North Sea island: Oh crap, ferry's been and gone. Need milk. SUMMON THE DRONE

Muscleguy

Hmmm, dodging duelling cycle couriers (easy to see/hear etc) vs having a delivery drone and cargo drop on your head without warning because too fat kids got too 'gamified' and forgot it was actual meatspace they were flying in? Which would you choose?

Also we are used to checking both ways when crossing the road, hard to do when you are constantly scanning the skies for falling drones.

0
0
Muscleguy

Except the drone can fly safely at a much lower altitude than a crewed copter. Meaning a lower cloud ceiling than the copter is allowed to fly in. If you installed a radio beacon on the island with a receiver on the drone etc. It could then fly through pea soup fogs.

0
0
Muscleguy
Boffin

Density

Hmm, a swimming drone battling waves and currents in a fluid as dense as dihyrogen monoxide (made denser by various salts, glycolypids etc) vs a flying drone battling currents in a largely nitrogen gaseous environment (okay occasionally made denser with the above mentioned fluid in gaseous or fine droplet form)? Which is the easier engineering and energetics challenge?

0
0

Are you a fat boy? Get to university NOW, you PENNILESS SLACKER

Muscleguy

Re: Flaw in the argument

If you go online and are not fussed about last year's colours you can get decent running shoes for around or not much more than that £40 for one month's gym membership. My last pair of shoes (Asics gel pulse goretex) cost me £50. They were the last pair that shop had so were heavily discounted and they were in my size! You would normally pay a premium for the goretex versions but in this case they were the cheapest pair I could find. Roughly page 3 of the search, so not much effort expended.

As for running clothes, buy in the sales and only in the sales, online. Which means buying summer stuff in winter and vice versa. Much, much cheaper than the gym. Self motivation not supplied though.

0
0

Snowden, Dotcom, throw bombs into NZ election campaign

Muscleguy

The point is not so much if Internet-Mana get into the parliament* but what effect the revelations and accusations will have on the National Party's vote. Dotcom is not trying to become NZ prime minister, he is trying to bring down Key's govt in revenge and there's more than one way to do that.

*Mana are likely to get one Maori seat. Under MMP type elections getting an electoral seat despite not getting above the 5% party vote boosts your effective % and you get a couple of list MPs elected. So that they are polling at only 3.5% is only half the story of their electoral chances.

6
1

Boffins build CYBORG-MOTHRA but not for evil: For search & rescue

Muscleguy

Sigh, as if no scientist ever saw a big pot of research money and how their research could get them some of that to do that experiment they have always wanted to do.

The science of immunology has come on in leaps and bounds in recent decades compared to when I was an undergrad. Why? well off the back of all the funding for AIDS research of course. A vast amount of absolutely basic science was done funded by AIDS money. Sure it needed to be done to understand the actions of the virus. But not all of it was strictly necessary, in hindsight.

Similarly a lot of good basic cellular biology is done in cancer research institutes and groups. Developmental biology (my area) too. Lots of oncogenes play vital roles during embryonic development and to understand their normal function . . .

Not all research funded by organisation X is absolutely focussed and enslaved to the absolute, iron clad, narrow aims of organisation X.

After all have humans not been gaming systems for millennia?

3
0
Muscleguy

A biologist writes: Yeah right, so they are going to have a huge colony of Manduca sexta with a highly automated electrode implantation facility attached just waiting for a suitable disaster? Not the aftermath of a hurricane where the winds still tend to be on the high side, or during tornado season would be my bet.

A 'distributed aerial network' sounds a neat thing to have, right? But the devil is in the detail.

Oh, I really, really hope there won't be any of those windy helicopters or fan bladed micro-drones flying through the air while the mini mothra are deployed. It could be carnage out there: drones falling from the sky with hardware bugs.

2
0

Murder accused DIDN'T ask Siri 'how to hide my roommate'

Muscleguy

Re: @muscleguy

Hmm, must have been some sort of Freudian typo. M is on the same hand but a different finger to I. Might have been some sort of autocorrect I suppose. Deionised is not exactly as common as a word as demonised. My spellchecker suggested demonised instead just then so that is explanation I'm going to go for. Dystonia or other nastier mental degenerations I could name and in some cases describe the genetic or physiological basis for notwithstanding.

0
0
Muscleguy
Boffin

Re: Ask Brick Top

Except it is VERY hard in the modern world to cut up a body without leaving tell-tale residues around the site of the dismembering.

I have done quite some pcr in my time and it is VERY sensitive. There was so much bluescript cloning vector in use in one lab I was in you could PCR it up by simply adding demonised water as a substrate. We had to limit the number of amplification cycles when testing which mice were transgenic and have more than sort of negative control or else all the lanes had bands in them and you were reduced to judging intensity . . .

If you are going to kill someone do it non messily where they live and transport the body to a convenient sinkhole in a vehicle you both have used before. You might, get away with it. Unless someone you didn't see, or a camera saw you, or in your panicked state of mind you too your switched on smartphone with you.

There are so many things to think about when you have killed someone and just one of them is needed to slip your mind and you are banged to right. So best not to go to the killing stage in the first place.

3
1

Has Europe cut the UK adrift on data protection?

Muscleguy

Re: Little Englander syndrome

I very much doubt you will either the first or last Scots émigré to return here after a Yes vote. As a Scot who left aged 6 for New Zealand and came back as an educated adult just in time to vote for the first Scottish parliament in 300 years I would welcome you hame.

The place will boom after March 2016. With a land registry at long bloody last the landowners will finally be able to be taxed and land reform will not be stifled by not knowing who owns what. If you recall The McLeod of McLeod tried to sell the Cuillin Mountains on Skye (his castle roof leaked you see) but it turned out after court cases and much trawling of mouldering documents that he didn't own it. Not even the aristocracy can look up a registry to see what they do and do not own.

That's just one benefit. I was chewing the fat with a neighbour on the issue (yes really) the other day. You would not believe how switched on to political issues the Scottish electorate is these days. Outsiders who have only recently engaged with the referendum are so far behind the knowledge curve it is no longer worth the time or effort to bring them up to speed with only 5 weeks to go.

I will vote Yes with you, and a lot of others, in mind. You won't recognise the place, in a good way. The Scottish people have learned how to hope.

2
0

Maybe it's because I'm a Londoner: Capital is top target for computer thieves, say police

Muscleguy

If this survey is truly 'UK' and not just 'England and Wales' then it would be interesting to see the month by month stats for Edinburgh and if there is an uptick in August when large sections of the London Arts community and glitterati head for the various Festivals (there is more than one in Edinburgh at the mo).

In terms of 'target rich environments' Edinburgh in August must be like the West End of London at any other time.

I expect detecting a corresponding downturn in London would be futile as August is prime tourist season there too.

2
0
Muscleguy

Re: Lets get this straight

Your reading comprehension is in dire need of an upgrade. How you can conclude that from the article when it contains absolutely clear statements like this:

"“Crimes such as burglary, theft from the person and robbery resulted in far more electronic equipment being taken than crimes directed against business such as shoplifting and non-domestic burglaries,” he concluded."

is completely beyond me. Is English your first language? If it is can I suggest you sue your English teachers at school because they have clearly failed. Add your parents to the list as well.

2
1

Scotland's BIG question: Will independence cost me my broadband?

Muscleguy

Christian my arse

You are conflating what people put on census forms with worship and belief. Note that in parts of Scotland religion is tied with identity and football, sadly. But you are more likely to see people of that stripe in fitba grounds than the kirk of a Sunday.

You may live in a rural area where the kirk is still involved in community cohesion but here in the cities congregations are combining and buildings being deconsecrated. Here in the East of Dundee there are a lot of deconsecrated churches AND up here in the postwar housing estates not a single place of worship has been constructed. A local kirk recently evicted the girl guides and brownies from their hall so they could lease it out to a commercial business. Too small a congregation, not enough income.

5
0

Mozilla fixes CRITICAL security holes in Firefox, urges v31 upgrade

Muscleguy
Unhappy

What new look?

I upgraded from 30.0 to 31.0 and my look didn't change. Mind you I don't use skins, they make my head ache looking at them.

I do have two gripes. After restarting from the upgrade every single window had at least one new tab spawned showing Abine.com and urging me to install their anti tracking software. I would close one only to have it respawn. Reloading a tab caused a new Abine.com window to spawn. It behaved like a virus. Yes I send feedback shouting my complaints. No response, no apology, no explanation.

The second one is now every new window doesn't have the bottom add-on bar. To get it I have to manually go up to the View menu, no shortcut. There is no preference for this.

0
0

Chrome browser has been DRAINING PC batteries for YEARS

Muscleguy
Devil

Re: I, personally, am not surprised

Me too, I usually crash out of it as this means I have more chance of being able to choose which windows and tabs to reopen before doing so.

HOWEVER, today I upgraded from 30.0 to 31.0 and on reopening every single window had an additional tab from a company called abine.com offering do not track me add-ons. Closing them in about a third of the windows caused new ones to spawn. Now when tabs are reloaded some of them cause more respawnings. I have alerted Mozilla and requested they remove this crap they have installed.

Oh and now, just like this window, the bottom add-on bar is not there.

At this rate I will be forced back to Safari, oh the horror!

1
0

Major problems beset UK ISP filth filters: But it's OK, nobody uses them

Muscleguy
FAIL

Opt Out more likely

So last week there I was a surfing away (A Scottish Indy website as it happens) and suddenly the site symbols on the browser tabs start turning into red V's. Smelling a Virgin rat (my ISP) I logged into my space on the website and there was their nanny software enabled by default, without me asking them to. I was unable to stop the damn thing. At least the person on the phones I eventually (after much menu choosing) was able to turn the thing off. I had to restart my computer to make it stick mind.

Not impressed.

It isn't as though the house is strewn with children on the net. Ours are well grown and flown. Just two middle aged adults, both well web savvy and one of us has a CompSci degree (much underused).

BTW we need a Branson based icon.

9
0

Watch: DARPA shows off first successful test of STEERABLE bullet

Muscleguy

Re: My hopes are dashed

Mostly they are 'my country right or wrong' types. I'm a biologist and I have perused job ads at Porton Down and the like and wondered. I have also worked with people who are ex that world and they my country etc patriots.

I'm a pacifist and anyway my skill set is not really a good fit for that stuff anyway.

4
1

DON’T add me to your social network, I have NO IDEA who you are

Muscleguy

Re: Swirling JDs??

I use the unpeated Caol as a winter aperitif whisky. It needs a decent dollop of water to open it up, but once you have my tasting notes would be 'honeyed melon'. A very, very, nice dram.

0
0

Police at the door? Hit the PANIC button to erase your RAM

Muscleguy

Re: Does this mean future raid teams will be skilled in knife throwing????

Touch screens can be head butted though. So no hands, no problem. Also I am ambidextrous so I would require two very good knife throws.

2
0

Tech that we want (but they never seem to give us)

Muscleguy

Re: We Were Promised Jetpacks

It is here and has been for a while now http://www.martinjetpack.com/

Technically it's a double cowled fan personal helicopter running off a hi-spec 2-stroke engine (for robust reliability) but it comes with a parachute installed and can run for much longer than an actual jetpack and you will not need asbestos trousers.

Start saving now.

Made in New Zealand.

3
0

Beautiful balloon burst caught on camera

Muscleguy

Re: Surprised at all the little pieces

It is COLD at 30k feet. If you froze a household balloon then popped it, it would shatter too.

0
0

Hey, does your Smart TV have a mic? Enjoy your surveillance, bro

Muscleguy

Since my WiFi does not broadcast said TV will have trouble connecting via WiFi. None of the neighbours have default passworded routers (I've checked), so the poor TV will have trouble getting online.

IOW you have to setup a Wifi connection, if you don't do so or bork it in software by sending it looking for a non existing proxy then you have the same effect as not connecting the ethernet cable. What do you think the effective range of WiFi is? YMMV in really dense housing instead of semi-detached suburbia like here but the point still stands. WiFi is not long wave radio.

3
0

Middle England's allotments become metric battlefield

Muscleguy
Boffin

Re: So what is the correct unit in the Register's System

The Jimmy Wales is not an unvarying unit* since he might adopt, or give up, the 5:2 diet or suffer an injury that prevents him exercising.

*Yes, I know Wales is not invariant either but the percent change is minimal compared to the potential % change in the J Wales.

Yours a Physiologist

1
0

Hey, Glasshole: That cool app? It has turned you into a SPY DRONE

Muscleguy
Terminator

How to hijack your actual Android too

I can just see it, Google Mark 1 Androids 'your friendly home help' sent to the shop will be hijacked by QR codes stuck on lampposts and the like, just lurking to be logged by the cameras used for vision. This will not be a documented feature of course but a 'clever' way to deliver upgrades and online servicing of the units.

Icon chosen as the closest one to that red light that goes on in I Robot.

1
0

It's 2014 and you can pwn a PC by opening a .RTF in Word, Outlook

Muscleguy

Phew!

Office 2004 for Mac no longer runs under 10.7 after the upgrade from 10.6. Libre Office is now useable even if it does still take far too long to load, so no point in paying for the upgrade.

I have warned the rest of the family wife uses PC's and kids might well run various versions at home and at work.

Oh and I'm reminded why I never liked Outlook so never more than glanced at it, let alone set it up. Thunderbird does just fine and dandy.

7
0

MH370 airliner MYSTERY: The El Reg Pub/Dinner-party Guide

Muscleguy
Boffin

Hypoxia All The Way

I'm with the corrosion and gradual air leak hypothesis. I'm a physiologist by training and in 2nd year undergrad physiology respiratory lab on the hypoxia station run by a medically qualified member of the academic staff your status is monitored by getting you to do sums, long division, complex multiplication that sort of thing. The staff member watches you because it's not that you suddenly get them all wrong at a certain threshold but that you get more wrong or you just slow down.

Hypoxia explains the lack of motive, it explains their turn for home. Confusion might explain turning the coms off, intending to turn them back on again but not getting around to that. Everyone is unconscious, they then lapse into coma and know nothing further until the plane crashes and they die, all unknowing. Oh and nobody is wearing a lifejacket either. Nobody is awake and concerned enough to call home.

It is my understanding that hypoxia detectors on planes work on threshold changes and slow changes might not trigger the oxygen masks, at least until it's too late.

The silver lining is nobody suffered. They all went to sleep and didn't wake up.

0
1

WTF is … the multiverse?

Muscleguy
Boffin

Re: Multiverse? So 1990's, THIS universe is someone's simulation

The problem with the simulation idea is that even from inside the simulation you can observe information entering and leaving the simulation mediated by whatever device the simulation is being run on. Now you might posit black holes as being the out buses, but where is the incoming data stream? and wouldn't you expect either the cosmologists or the boffins at the LHC noting such an information flow? IANAP, just a Biologist but when you add up all the debris of an LHC collision the energies have to add up.

BTW this also deals with religious claims that god 'sustains the universe' such claims have real world consequences we should be able to see in the data. Absent those consequences we don't need the absence of dead pixels in the sky to indicate we are not living in a simulation or being dreamt by some deity a la Bishop Berkeley.

1
0

Elon Musk slams New Jersey governor over Tesla direct sales ban

Muscleguy

Re: Allow me to comment on another country's practices

Mrs Muscleguy used to refer to herself as a wff: well formed function. Back when she was doing CompSci and using a mainframe running VAX. I was expected to confirm that assessment you see.

So if I were to refer to her online as such no trouble would ensue as it would just be a trip down computer memory lane.

1
0

Bugger the jetpack, where's my 21st-century Psion?

Muscleguy

If the desire for sexual congress with a jetpack ever overwhelms you then help is at hand:

http://www.martinjetpack.com/

Not technically a jetpack, it's a double cowled fan personal helicopter running off a 2-stroke petrol engine, for reliability. It has a number of advantages over an actual jetpack, asbestos trousers not required, integral parachute, much longer flight times and much more actual control. Not sure how amenable it is to coitus but you could buy one and see.

0
0

Passenger jet grounded by two-hour insect attack

Muscleguy

Re: Balancing Imbalance

Had you gone to NZ or Oz in that state someone would have sold you the Auckland or Sydney harbour bridges in double quick time. It's sad that the Information Age has killed the skilled art of kidding the gullible. Used to be great fun in NZ youth hostels with assorted World Travellers.

If this Kiwi girl was a lawyer, I think I might know her, but not in the Biblical sense, way out of her league.

0
0

Candy Crush King went 'too far' when it candy crushed my app – dev

Muscleguy

Re: As for another King product -

I think a Mr W. Shakespeare sometime resident of Stratford on Avon has prior art on the 3 witches concept and Mr Pratchett's acolytes should know this.

As for King 'something wicked this way comes' would seem to be appropriate.

3
0

Amateurs find the 'HOLY GRAIL' supernova – right on our doorstep

Muscleguy

Re: This event that's happening now happened a long time ago

But surely nearby non nova stars and other high energy sources bounced photons, neutrinos, cosmic rays, x-rays and other stuff off the superposition thus observing it by interaction even with no conscious observers around.

There is a reason why in order to demonstrate superpositions we need still relatively small objects kept in hard vacuums at close to absolute zero, shielded from vibrations and in Faraday cages. As soon as the universe is allowed to interact with superpositions they tend to go 'poof'. No observers need apply.

4
0

Walking while texting can – OUCH! – end badly, say boffins

Muscleguy

Re: Maintaining a straight path

The point is that if you are also paying attention to your phone then your chances of collision go up. When half the pedestrian population is paying attention to their phone of course your chance of collision will go up even if you are paying attention because there are too many others to monitor and predict the paths of.

0
0
Muscleguy

"Those measurements lead to a very detailed discussion of kinematics and other exercise-related stuff that make the innards of a CPU seem comfortingly simple. "

This biologist thanks you for that one. Wetware is much more complex than hardware though it is much more predictable than it likes to think it is. While trying to log in to my bank yesterday was anything but predictable.

1
0

Sweet work, fellas: Boffins build high-density battery powered by sugar

Muscleguy

Re: Fueled by sugar, but fuel is not flammable...

Since the maltodextrin will be in solution then you will first need to dry it before you wish to ignite it.

As a biologist the man problem I can see will be keeping the unit sterile. The environment is full of bacteria, fungi and assorted protists who will happily chow down on maltodextrin. Since the cells would have to be refillable since they are not electrically rechargeable (yet) then that provides an ideal route for infection.

Being unable to use your battery because something ate the charge is going to be a problem. I also wonder what the range of operating temperatures that enzyme has.

3
0

Mystery 'doughnut' materializes in front of Mars rover: 'OH MY GOD! It wasn't there before!'

Muscleguy

Re: Gravity?

Slid maybe, as it is nowhere near round enough to roll. Except there's a step up onto the rock pavement it is lodged on, difficult for a sliding object which would be more likely to come to a rest in the dusty stuff in between. There is also no trail from a sliding/rolling object visible which is why the ejecta or flipper from a wheel interaction is favoured.

IOW the scientists ran your hypothesis through the bullshit meter and discounted it early in the process for the sort of reasons above. I am not a planetary scientist but that is how most scientists think or should think. They explicitly point out they discounted the idea of rock throwing Martians. That one would not have taken long.

1
1

Tube be or not tube be: Apple’s CYLINDRICAL Mac Pro is out tomorrow

Muscleguy

Re: I thought I'd seen it all...

That is a bit of historical revisionism. The transparent, colourful RevA iMac preceded the first iPods by some months. Those did quite a bit to redeem Apple's bottom line and was the first outing for Apple from a certain Jonathon Ives.

Sure the iPods and latterly iPhones and iPads respectively have not hurt the bottom line either, but it was funky desktops for home users that were Jobs' first big success. After he killed the clone market of course that caused the initial haemorrhage.

1
0

Fury as OS X Mavericks users FORCED to sync contact books with iCloud

Muscleguy

Re: Legal?

That is an excellent point. I can see lots of corporates deciding that letting their workers have an iPhone is a bad idea. Maybe when that starts to hit Apple's bottom line they might reconsider.

I'm now feeling happier that my machine is, just, too old to run Mavericks. Didn't stop the Apple Software Updater installing the software to mediate the upgrade process to Mavericks though.

1
1

Thought you didn't need to show ID in the UK? Wrong

Muscleguy

Re: Humph!

Our B&Q still has ONE checkout desk and I use that regardless of the queue as a form of protest at lost jobs. Checkout jobs may not be wonderful but they are still jobs. Our Sainsburys has yet to install even one self checkout but I expect it is only a matter of time. I will boycott it when it comes in. The Co-Op show no sign of introducing them and I have never been asked for ID there. It might help that I'm a member and carry my Co-Op card at all times so they know who I am.

2
0

Page:

Forums