* Posts by Justin Pasher

67 posts • joined 13 Aug 2008

Page:

Orion: To Mars, the Moon and beyond... but first, a TEST FLIGHT through Van Allen belt

Justin Pasher
FAIL

@Dalek Dave

"If they are trying to figure out how to get astronauts through the VARB then it is because they have never done it before."

And I guess you're also one of the people that complains about the lack of stars in the pictures? And the "inconsistent" shadows? And the "too perfectly framed" pictures on the moon? And the "too perfect video" of Apollo 17's lunar lift off? And the "earth transparency overlays" used in the video shot through the Apollo 11 window?

A little research goes a long way. Much more so than the trite theories being recycled.

14
1

Webcam hacker pervs in MASS HOME INVASION

Justin Pasher

Re: Hmm.

In additional to the "convenient" dynamic DNS supported by Foscam devices, some devices will attempt to use UPnP to dynamically forward ports to the camera/NVR device. If your router supports this by default (for example, the ActionTec provided for Verizon FiOS), the device can (unbeknownst to the end user) make itself accessible to the outside world.

I've had this experience with a Q-SEE NVR (although I had read the included "quick setup" guide that mentioned how to access it remotely, so I knew it was doing that). Although changing the default password will "lock it down", it is still a bad idea for the default setting to be "punch holes in my firewall". Come to think of it, I don't even know if the NVR HAD the ability to disable UPnP

3
0

Mozilla, EFF, Cisco back free-as-in-FREE-BEER SSL cert authority

Justin Pasher

Re: So how will this work?

That's not how a typical SSL MITM attack works.

Normally, a nefarious system will try to intercept the end user's traffic secretly. It would do this by jumping in between the two end points of the connection. To make it seamless, the bad guy would need to decrypt an already encrypted session, which is theoretically difficult (although the practicality of it changes over time). If the bad guy doesn't have the server's private key, it has to rely on exploits or weaknesses in the encryption.

Now pretend the private keys of the CA were compromised. This allows someone to sign their own certificates that browsers will automatically trust. It doesn't involve breaking or compromising the encryption of the two end points. In essence, the MITM attack becomes more of a reverse proxy.

Ultimately, that's no different than any other CA getting their private keys compromised. It still has nothing to do with the private keys of the original server providing the SSL connection.

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Justin Pasher

Re: So how will this work?

What does this have to do with keys? They wouldn't have the private keys to decrypt the data. Only you would have those (installed on the server). All they are doing is signing a certificate to let others know it can be trusted (assuming the CA is included in the browser). They only get a CSR signed by your private key, not your actual private key. It's the whole point of asymmetrical encryption (e.g. public-key cryptography).

8
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Brighten your November morning: 900 in-browser arcade classics added to the Internet Archive

Justin Pasher

Controls

FYI, for those that are familiar with MAME, you can configure controls the same way.

Press 'P' to pause the emulation, then press the Tab key to bring up the config menu.

0
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Hungary PM ditches internet tax plans after mass protests

Justin Pasher

Errr.... Huh?

"We really should see somehow where the huge profits generated online go, and whether there is a way to keep some of it in Hungary"

How would putting a tax on data usage "keep it in Hungary"? That would imply that the tax money the people are forced to pay would normally be going to pay for something elsewhere. It's not a sudden shift in the money's destination. If anything, you take money away from what a person can spend on other things, which a majority of the time is already spent in the country (rent, utilities, gas, car payments, insurance, etc).

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Feds seek potential 'second Snowden' gov doc leaker – report

Justin Pasher

eak-spa ig-pa atin-la?

"Justice Department officials are 'reluctant to bring criminal charges involving unauthorized disclosures to the news media' – because of criticisms of the tactics used in recent leak investigations"

Translation:

We don't like it when the media hears about the bad things that we do and then say we are doing bad things and make us look bad.

9
0

Pay a tax on every gigabyte you download? Haha, that's too funny. But not to Hungarians

Justin Pasher

Correction

"It's feared the web toll will be passed onto subscribers by the ISPs"

s/feared/guaranteed/

FTFY

10
0

DEATH by PowerPoint: Microsoft warns of 0-day attack hidden in slides

Justin Pasher

UAC to the rescue...?

"... won't cough admin privileges to the hacker – at least not by itself. Attacks are likely to generate pop-up warnings and under default settings a User Access Control popup would get displayed."

Ohhh, you mean that "this program is requesting admin rights" pop up where everyone just clicks Yes when they see it?

2
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Apple promises to lift Curse of the Drained iPhone 5 Battery

Justin Pasher
Trollface

Dazed and confused

"The point is ... no one from apple cares. They keep being silent. They used to care about their customers but now..."

How long have you known Apple? Sounds about par for the course... Everyone knows that there are never any problems with their hardware, only the end user.

10
2

Netflix swallows yet another bitter pill, inks peering deal with TWC

Justin Pasher

I'm so confused

Netflix complains that the speed issues are due to the end user's ISP. The ISP says it's because Netflix is sending traffic over other upstream providers that don't have the capacity to carry the traffic. Yet now, Netflix creates another peering agreement with another ISP. They even have a peering agreement arranged (but maybe not implemented) with Verizon, but they had their recent spat over who's at fault for the slow down.

What in the world am I missing? Netflix complains that the problem is with someone else, then they establish peering agreements with those parties. Are they just trying to make the ISP look like the bad guy? Is Netflix just bi-polar?

1
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HTTP-Yes! Google boosts SSL-encrypted sites in search results

Justin Pasher
Black Helicopters

Ulterior motive...?

Hmmm... Methinks this would be a good way to suck up more IPv4 addresses and push more toward IPv6 (not really, but hey, it's Google). It's too bad we can't just all assume that SNI will work everywhere, although with the "death" of Windows XP, there should be less resistance, in theory.

Irony alert: When the Heartbleed bug was discovered, you would have actually been a little safer to NOT be using SSL, as you wouldn't have had the potential for private keys to be stolen and allowed a third party to impersonate your site over a secure connection (although nowadays, I'm sure a large percentage of netizens don't pay as much attention as they should to whether a connection is secure or not).

1
8

Facebook goes down, people dial 911

Justin Pasher

Re: Wait... what?

Just like people call because McDonald's gets their order wrong or they are out of a particular food item.

This is the unfortunate world we now live in...

19
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ICANN can't hand over Iran's internet, bomb victims told

Justin Pasher

Minor correction

There are a lot more than just 13 root name servers

http://blog.icann.org/2007/11/there-are-not-13-root-servers/

0
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Want to legally unlock your phone from its network? The US Senate says that's A-OK

Justin Pasher

Re: [Obama] promptly passed the buck and said it was up to Congress to get it done.

"Yes, he loves them so much that he's actually only 21st out of 44 for number of executive orders issued (182 as of June 20.) See also: http://www.presidency.ucsb.edu/data/orders.php"

Uggh... This argument again? The NUMBER of executive orders DOES NOT MATTER. It's the CONTENT of those executive orders that matters. If one president issued 500 executive orders that did small, non-law creating things, that would be so much better than a president that issued just one executive order that established a new law that made everyone take 15 minutes our of every day to personally bow down to him or risk imprisonment. He's already riding the line when it comes to what power he is actually granted by the constitution.

Now, back on topic...

3
2

Aereo has to pay TV show creators? Yes. This isn't rocket science

Justin Pasher

Flip the coin

"Aereo even found three Supreme Court Justices who agreed with it. Six Justices, however, didn't, sticking broadly to the common sense and widely accepted principles of property and compensation."

Putting the "spirit of the law" aside for a moment, let's look at this scenario.

(I am assuming the one-to-one antennae aspect of Aereo is true, as they say)

An end user goes out and buys an antennae to receive over the air broadcasts. He hooks up said antennae to a capture card on the computer and uses some form of PVR software. The net result? The end user is getting the same content as the Aereo service (at least at the location of antennae installation) for a one time hardware payment. No money has gone to the broadcasters, following the "common sense and widely accepted principles of property and compensation". Yet this scenario is perfectly legal.

Let's take the DVR aspect out of it for the Aereo service. Now, a user only has access to a live stream of whatever is being broadcast at the time. Take that technology and put it in a USB dongle, and now it's portable. Assuming the verdict would be the same if Aereo did not provide DVR service (I wonder if it would have been), the former method is illegal but the latter is legal.

Since (I assume) the Aereo service could be accessed from any Internet just by logging in to a user's account, it's not quite as straight forward, but the principle is still relevant.

12
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Stopping IT price gouging would risk SOCIALIST DYSTOPIA!

Justin Pasher

Yea, that's how it works...

"... new legislation that limits firms’ ability to control prices could also cause foreign suppliers to abandon or decide not to enter the Australian market, resulting in less competition and less choice for consumers in Australia."

Assuming that the final prices being charged are stilling providing a profit, I'm pretty sure if a company is given the choice of "no profit" (exit the market) versus "some profit" (stay in at a lower margin), they would choose the latter.

3
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IPv4 addresses now EXHAUSTED in Latin America and the Caribbean

Justin Pasher

ARIN not doing any favors

If ARIN actually wanted to help with the adoption of IPv6, they would make it more cost effective (i.e. free) to at least get your feet wet with it. As far as I know, there's no way to get a free "test" block of IPv6 addresses from ARIN for experimenting with a publicly accessible IPv6 setup. At the very least, they should have made IPv6 addresses available for people with existing direct IPv4 allocations. If I had access to an IPv6 block and I didn't have to try to justify an associated cost with management for something that is just being tested, I'd definitely show more interest in playing around with it.

Think about it. A large portion of the "value" associated with an IPv4 address is because of supply and demand. For IPv6, the "demand" is essentially not there, not because so few people are deploying it, but because there are so many addresses available that every micro-organism could be assigned one and we'd still have plenty to spare. This eats into ARIN's bottom line, so they have to start out by establishing a dollar value for IPv6 that's not anywhere close to its real value (e.g. millionths of a cent per IP)

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Ballmer SLAM-DUNKS $2 BEEELLLION bid for LA Clippers

Justin Pasher

Wait... You think that the owner of a team can't be a control freak that wants to do things his way for the better of the team? Just look at how well it's work for the Dallas Cowboys.

Oh wait....

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Comcast exec says wired broadband customers should pay-as-they-go

Justin Pasher

So... cheaper for some?

'According to Cohen, the move is all about fairness. 'People who use more should pay more and people who use less should pay less,' he said.'

So given your example, people that use less than the 300GB get a discount right? Oh, that's right. The base price would include up to 300GB for everyone at the same price, regardless of what percentage of people are using a lot less than that. Almost sounds like a redistribution of the wealth.

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Study: Users don't much care about Heartbleed hacking dangers

Justin Pasher
Stop

Misinformation aplenty

Reading some of these posts, it seems there might be a lot of misinformation regarding the technical implications of Heartbleed. Without writing a huge article, here's a brief overview of critical points.

The flaw affects BOTH servers AND clients. The heartbeat command that is generated that causes the flaw is like a ping. The server can "ping" the client and the client can "ping" the server. Granted, a server would have to be specifically set up to send malicious heartbeat packets sniffing for data, although it's still possible. Embedded devices, like routers, WiFi access points, etc. are potentially affected because they can be running a "server" too (although this should make people take a good look as to whether you really need that WiFi access point interface to be accessible to the whole internet over port 443).

A MITM attack is NOT needed for a random third party to (potentially) obtain username/passwords that are sitting around in memory on a server. All that has to be done is for someone to attack a vulnerable server with forged heartbeat packets, then sift through the returned data. Would it be difficult to find usernames and passwords? Potentially, as the leaked data is whatever random data was stored in memory at the location that was copied. It could return useful information after only one request, or it could return useful information only after 10 millions requests. Now when it comes to sifting through that data, that's a whole other issue.

A MITM attack IS required for someone to pretend they are another site, IF they happen to get a copy of the server's private key. Because of that IF, this is why people are recommending revoking SSL certificates. Just like the usernames and passwords, they might get the private key easily, or they might have a really hard time getting it. One they get the key, they still have to get the end user to visit their site (to avoid certificate warnings, they would need something like DNS cache poisoning to redirect someone to a different IP while keeping the domain the same).

As an end user, you visit a lot more than just your "ISP's server". Any web site you visit over SSL poses a potential risk.

All in all, I still agree that the media over-sensationalized this quite a bit. Odds are most people will not be affected by it. Sure there will be some (especially considering known attacks started up shortly after the vulnerability was revealed), but most will not, simple because they first have to attack a server that vulnerable, then they have to hope the server leaks the credentials, then they have to actually be credentials for you.

Kudos to the majority of the staff out there that got things patches up quickly (I'm probably a little spoiled, as I keep the 50 or so servers I manage up-to-date on a regular basis, so a simple apt-get upgrade is easy. The SSL certificate revocations was a little bit more work).

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Comcast to dump 3.9 MEEELLION subscribers to quell Time Warner merger antitrust fears

Justin Pasher

How does this work?

Aren't cable provider's service areas typically regionally exclusive (i.e. "this area is serviced by Comcast while this other area is serviced by Charter")? The end user generally doesn't have a choice, except possibly across different technologies (e.g. cable, FiOS, DSL, etc). Maybe the cities they mention are different...? If not, how exactly are they planning on doing this? Selling the local infrastructure with it?

And what if the client likes Comcast more than Charter? (well, I guess the answer is "tough luck")

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Netcraft adds Heartbleed sniffing to site-scanning browser tool

Justin Pasher
Stop

Risky information

"If the Netcraft extension determines that a site was vulnerable before news of Heartbleed broke, it checks the date on the site's SSL certificate to make sure it has been recently replaced. If it hasn't, the extension displays an alert."

Ugh... That's all fine and dandy if every CA changed the issue date on certificate reissues. I've read from multiple sources that this is not always the case. I know that GoDaddy will update the issue date, but I think Comodo is an example of one that does not update it. Without installing the extension and knowing how the "alert" is presented to the user, they could be venturing into dangerous territory by saying a site is still affected when it's truly not.

Also considering the possibility where someone was running a non-vulnerable version (0.9.8 or 1.0.0) and they upgraded their servers to now be running 1.0.0g+. Most likely they wouldn't get their cert reissued because they were never vulnerable.

0
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Commonwealth Bank in comedy Heartbleed blog FAIL

Justin Pasher

Re: Apache & OpenSSL

They *could* have been using GnuTLS instead, but considering the extra work involved in doing that as opposed to installing the distro packages, that would be extremely unlikely.

The state of open source SSL libraries is a pretty sad affair right now. OpenSSL is the "defacto" standard mainly because it's been around for so long, but the code is so big and cumbersome, there's not a single person that knows everything about it (or probably even a large percentage). GnuTLS isn't really much better. I've read on some sites where developers dislike the GnuTLS code just as much (if not more) than OpenSSL.

Debian uses GnuTLS for some services (OpenLDAP is the first to come to mind), but they did that because of the licensing issues with OpenSSL (GnuTLS is LGPL).

1
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Apple says iOS, OS X is immune to Heartbleed SSL bug

Justin Pasher

Re: The reported version of openssl is 0.9.8 so that'll do me.

OpenSSL 0.9.8 is not "dead". Yes, it's the older branch, but it still receives major security fixes. Many systems still utilize it because it's been around for so much longer than the 1.0.x series, so it (should be) more stable.

The biggest disadvantage of the 0.9.8 branch is that is doesn't support the newer ciphers suites.

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Call of Duty 'fragged using OpenSSL's Heartbleed exploit'

Justin Pasher

Re: My thoughts exactly

I understand that the potential risk is there (and theoretically everyone COULD have already had their information exploited) and there's know what to know for sure, but the problem is the media is essentially going straight to the "doomsday" scenario when the odds are it's not nearly that extreme. However, now that world+dog knows about the exploit, I'm sure a lot more attempts are being made to capitalize on it (as evidenced by other sites mentioned by another ElReg article).

I'm not saying it would be a bad idea to change critical passwords for the sites you access, but once the majority of the big providers have patched their servers, a lot of this will blow over and the majority of people will be unaffected, IMO.

0
0
Justin Pasher
Stop

My thoughts exactly

"The flaw is potentially among the most damaging ever to surface on the web but there's been little evidence that it has been widely exploited so far - leading some security experts to say it's been overblown"

The media has severely sensationalized this. The actual compromised data can range from "move along, nothing to see here" to "hide your kids, hide your wife, hide your husband"*. For the majority of the people seeing the reports (read: non-technical people), they are receiving the message that "The world is collapsing and nothing is safe. You have been compromised, change all of your passwords, PINs, combination locks, dead bolts, alarm clocks, dog's name, etc"

Yes, the *potential* for your secure data to be compromised is there, but most likely, the majority of people are just fine. It's hard to imagine that if this particular exploit was in wide use in the "hackers" underground that it wouldn't have surfaced much sooner. Think about it: the main thing the crooks want are usernames, passwords, credit cards, etc. If they've compromised those, I think you would have noticed before now.

It doesn't mean the IT departments around the globe shouldn't have due diligence patching what they can (at a minimum the OpenSSL libraries and rekeying SSL certificates where feasible), but it's not exactly "the sky is falling" scenario that is being presented.

* http://youtu.be/EzNhaLUT520?t=59s

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Running OpenSSL? Patch now to fix CRITICAL bug

Justin Pasher

Not exactly...

"This compromises the secret keys used to identify the service providers and to encrypt the traffic, the names and passwords of the users and the actual content"

This is a little misleading. There's no GUARANTEE that private keys were compromised, although it's possible (and should be assumed as a precaution). It just all depends on what happened to be in the memory location that was leaked. However, statistically the number of instances where this is true is going to be much smaller than the ones where it is not.

1
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Google grabs Gmail-using HTTPS refuseniks and coats them with SSL

Justin Pasher

It's Secure*

"Every single email message you send or receive ... is encrypted while moving internally"

Yup. Gotta be clear about that little point. INTERNALLY. Once it leaves their server, all bets are off.

1
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Justin Pasher

Re: Pissing Tiscali...

Eh?

imap.googlemail.com and imap.gmail.com both support IMAPS (port 993).

1
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Microsoft closing in on Apache's web server crown

Justin Pasher

Re: Apples & Pears

My thoughts exactly. I think it's pretty rare and unique circumstances that make someone run nginx as their primary web server software (at least at the present time). It would typically be a front end/proxy for another server instance. Imagine if Varnish identified itself as the "web server" instead of passing through what was behind it.

All in all, I don't think it really matters what web server someone is running, as long as it gets the job done and you can configure things correctly and securely. Even if IIS jumped over apache, does that mean Apache will die off? Of course not. Now if PCI compliance checking companies started saying stuff like "well, you need to be running the top web server in order to make things secure", then we'd start having problems.

0
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MtGox has VANISHED. So where have all the Bitcoins gone?

Justin Pasher

Re: Were people really stupid enough to use MtGox as a bitcoin wallet

And this is where I get confused. Was MtGox not (supposed to be) used just as sort of an escrow service that facilitated the transfer of bitcoins from one address to another? I'm only moderately versed in how bitcoin operates, but you only need the private key to send money from one address to another, so why would you ever give the "keys to the kingdom" away to someone else? I would think the process was "pay X bitcoins to a MtGox address, they take a cut, then send the payment along to the person that bought it".

Did it operate differently where MtGox was the judge, jury, and executioner for your wallet?

2
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Super Bowl's SUPER BALLSUP: CBS broadcasts Wi-Fi password

Justin Pasher

Rubbish?

"Just to add insult to injury, the password was rubbish, featuring the word "welcome" with a few numbers."

The password displayed was w3Lc0m3!HERE

12 characters long, mix of uppercase, lowercase, numbers, and symbols. Decent entropy (number seems to vary depending on what site you ask).

You may not think it's as secure as LnzujrfAI5489u!#$a832PT, but rubbish? I wouldn't go that far.

7
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KCOM-owned Eclipse FAILS to cover up the password 'password'

Justin Pasher

Re: Login without knowing password is entirely possible

It's easy to retrieve the auto-complete password just with a javascript snippet after it's been autofilled by the browser.

1
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Rap for KitKat in crap app wrap trap flap: Android 4.4 is 'meant to work like that'

Justin Pasher

Terminology confusion

El Reg seems to be confused with the term "deprecated". If NARROW_COLUMNS and SINGLE_COLUMN was deprecated, it would still work properly, just no guarantee it would work in the future. According to the Android development page, the feature was completely removed, not deprecated.

Without researching, I'm not sure if they previously deprecated these features, but if they didn't, it's a little brash for Google to remove an important feature out of the blue without any warning.

1
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Lifesize, driveable AIR-POWERED LEGO CAR hits the road

Justin Pasher
Black Helicopters

Well that didn't take long

Hmmm... It sure didn't seem to take long for the [censored] to catch wind of this dangerous new technology and deploy a drone to investigate and/or possibly destroy it.

1
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Winamp is still a thing? NOPE: It'll be silenced forever in December

Justin Pasher

Re: useful features

Check out foobar2000. I switched away from WinAmp a few years ago and I use foobar2000 for my light playback needs. It supports a lot of the features that people probably use in WinAmp and is much less bloated. It supports most (all?) of the common formats and few additional ones via the plug-in system (.MOD anyone?). I also use it for WAV > MP3 conversion (interface to lame.exe command line)

10
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Yahoo! starts $1.99 'watch list' to recycle old usernames

Justin Pasher
FAIL

Security: That's someone else's job

So let me get this straight. Their method of "security" to avoid people getting emails intended for the previous recipient is to make everyone ELSE implement code that lets said third party check to see if an email address has been "valid" since a certain time frame? So basically if said third party does not implement this new Require-Recipient-Valid-Since header in their "ping back" email, it's no different than someone taking control over an email box through some other nefarious means.

What could possibly go wrong?

0
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Spotify strikes back at Radiohead - but artists are still angry

Justin Pasher

Adapting to the times

Of course artists should be paid for all their hard work they put into music, but just like music as moved from a physical format to a digital format, the primary source of income for an artist as moved from selling the music to PLAYING the music (e.g. concerts). That's where all the money is going to come from nowadays.

There are probably countless numbers of artists out there that think "I'm just gonna write the songs then let the money pour in from the sales while I kick back." It's just not the way the big boys do it.

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5

Poor iPhone sales mean Verizon could owe Apple $14bn

Justin Pasher

Business as usual (for Apple)

Like them or not, you have to admit that Apple has a pretty slick deal for their phone order contracts (assuming they follow through in some way):

The phone is successful, Apple gets paid

The phone is unsuccessful, Apple gets paid

0
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Suck it Vine: Instagram adds 15-second video clips with fancy filters

Justin Pasher

Must Have Filter

Please tell me one of the filters they have is this:

WARNING: You are shooting your video in portrait format. This is not the standard video format used by every playback device on earth. It will not only look bad, but it will also waste over half the pixel space when viewed in a standard viewing box / monitor / TV / etc. Please rotate your camera 90 degrees. Otherwise ...

Continue?

Yes - Pfft. What do you know about how to hold a phone?!

No - Thanks for helping me become smarter and save the world from yet another poorly shot video clip!

1
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I told you I'd be back: Arnie set for another career revival

Justin Pasher

Standing out

"I'm very happy that the studios want me to be in Terminator 5 and ... I'm also going to do [Conan the Barbarian sequel] King Conan ... and also to do another Twins movie."

Hmmm.... One of these things is not like th other ....

1
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Interwebs taunt Sir Jony over Apple eye candy makeover

Justin Pasher
Stop

Keep them away!

I an a former programmer turned IT manager, and I can definitely say one thing:

Keep us away from the design aspect!

It's one thing to IMPLEMENT the design. It's another thing altogether to MAKE the design. It's like the difference between a paint by numbers picture and a blank canvas.

I'm sure hardware designers fall in the same basic category.

0
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US spyboss: Yes, we ARE snooping on you, but think of the TERRORISTS

Justin Pasher

Re: Who'd have guessed it, NSA exceeding their remit

In a lot of cases, they wouldn't even need to go that far. Just look how easy it is nowadays to take a phone number (at least non-mobile) and perform a reverse lookup. Granted, some people will have made the effort to "unpublish" their number or make it private, but most will not.

You want "anonymous" data? Convert each phone number to a one-way hash key. That allows you to "link" the data between two callers but makes it very hard to KNOW who those two callers are.

Then again, what good would the data be to them in that case .... I guess that's why they need a little more than "anonymous" data...

4
0

Oracle to lop off Java's least secure bits to save servers

Justin Pasher

Re: @jerry 4 (toolbars)

I was hoping that the "removal of certain libraries" was a reference to that...

0
0

'Extremely sophisticated' Apple settles watery iDevice lawsuit

Justin Pasher
Stop

Re: It Just Works

@Velv: Check the article. The settlement only applies to the iPod TOUCH and some iPhones, not all iPods.

Referencing the "never wrong" Wikipedia [1], about 100 million iPod Touches have been sold (including later gen models not covered). It says approximately 250 iPhone units have been sold (also including later gen models not covered. Granted, with those numbers, the percentage is still pretty small, but 350 million is a lot smaller than 800 million.

[1] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IPod_Touch

0
0

First Cook, now Intel bigwig pokes Google in the eye over Glass

Justin Pasher

History will repeat itself

Although I don't (yet) see exactly how well Glass will pan out, here's my prediction

1. Google releases Glass

2. Apple says "that's stupid"

3. A few years pass

4. Apple releases a product that's basically the same with a prettier interface and say they have invented a revolutionary new product

5. Fanbois swoon and flock in droves to buy it.

For some reason, this all sounds so familiar... just ... can't ... put my finger ... on it...

8
0

Reports: New Xbox could DOOM second-hand games market

Justin Pasher
Stop

Steam vs Xbox game = invalid comparison

Assuming that it is impossible to pirate an Xbox One game (yes, I'm sure it will eventually happen), I don't see why people are missing the most obvious reason why you can't compare something like Steam to an Xbox game:

Once you sell the Xbox game, you don't have it anymore! Period.

With something like Steam, you already have a copy of all the files needed to run the game, so it is MUCH easier to maintain a copy of the game. That's why "reselling" a used game on Steam wouldn't work. You don't have that problem with an Xbox game because you don't have a copy of the game anymore.

Obviously once the hackers figure out a way to rip and play "backed up", the argument becomes moot, but until then, there's absolutely no comparison. There's also really no logical reason in my mind why they shouldn't allow second hand games just like the past (excluding corporate greed, politics, etc).

1
1

FLABBER-JASTED: It's 'jif', NOT '.gif', says man who should know

Justin Pasher

Pronouncing acronyms

I'm more confused by the people that feel that an acronym has to be pronounced using the same hard/soft letters as the words it stands for. Using that logic, take these examples:

ASCII - Do you pronounce it uh-ski, since "A" stands for American?

ICANN - Do you call them ih-can, since "I" stands for International?

... just to name a few

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