* Posts by Justin Pasher

96 posts • joined 13 Aug 2008

Page:

T-Mobile US CEO calls his subscribers thieves, gripes about 'unlimited' limited tethering

Justin Pasher

Re: The War on Customers (was: Unlimited doesn't mean unlimited then...)

Can I get an explanation for why these two things are actually separate to the point where one demands metering and the other not? Except for, you know, "marketing segmentation we want to impose" kind of reasons?

Seems pretty obvious to me. It's a lot easier to suck up a huge amount of bandwidth by tethering a laptop to a cell phone's data connection than being restricted to the capabilities of the phone/installed apps. Then there's also the fact that you could use tethering to set up a mobile hot spot for others that do not have unlimited data, thus "reselling" your unlimited data plan to others for free. Now you have people that are not paying T-Mobile a dime but potentially using a lot of their bandwidth.

If the problem was REALLY wide spread (which it's not), you have the situation where T-Mobile thinks "we have X million customers, so we need Y infrastructure", when in reality they would have X million customers + however many mobile hot spot users are tethering for free.

11
6
Justin Pasher

Re: Unlimited doesn't mean unlimited then...

Although I largely don't agree with the nonchalant way carriers throw around the word "unlimited" nowadays, T-Mobile clearly defines it.

If you look at their FAQ:

Doesn’t Unlimited mean Unlimited? How can T-Mobile advertise Unlimited 4G LTE when T-Mobile doesn't offer it on all T-Mobile devices?

Yes, at T-Mobile, unlimited mean unlimited. Every T-Mobile Simple Choice™ Plan includes Smartphone Mobile HotSpot at no extra charge, and when customers reach their paid high-speed data allotment, speeds are reduced so they never worry about overages. Our standard Unlimited 4G LTE smartphone plan includes unlimited high-speed data on your smartphone and also comes with 7 GB high-speed Smartphone Mobile HotSpot data, followed by unlimited reduced-speed Smartphone Mobile HotSpot data.

Regular, non-tethered 4G LTE is unlimited. The ability to use your phone as a hotspot is an add-on they give you for free. They're also talking about people who are deliberately circumventing the check put in place to avoid people abusing the free tethering.

For comparison, I am on a grandfathered AT&T unlimited data plan, but I don't have any (legal) tethering allotment, because that's a paid add-on.

19
5

Honor 7 – heir apparent to the mid-range Android crown

Justin Pasher

That says it all

I guess this really shows the direction of the world today when a phone has an explicit scene mode called "food".

1
0

$100m fine? How about, er, $16k? AT&T teabags FCC with its giant balls

Justin Pasher

No text message here

"AT&T also claims that it did let its customers know about the constraints it was imposing by posting a disclosure online and texting customers – once – about the fact they would have slower speeds past a certain monthly data usage."

I've had an unlimited data plan through AT&T since the last year they were offering it (2010 I think). I never received a text message from them about throttling speeds after a certain usage. Granted my usage is well below anything that would set off alarms (generally less than 1 GB because I'm on WiFi so much), but unless they (erroneously) only notified actually abusers, I never received their alleged "head up" message.

4
2

James Woods demands $10m from Twitter troll for 'coke addict' claim

Justin Pasher

You do realize that something called libel still exists, even in the days of the internet, and it's illegal, right? Whether this will constitute that is up to the courts.

48
1

'Untraceable' VoIP caller ID-spoofing website accepts Bitcoin

Justin Pasher

Re: No legal use...

"You could route VOIP through your VPN/Firewall so that your calls from home are coming from work."

And if your work uses a traditional PBX without VoIP support? Maybe the UK is different, but VoIP is far from universal in the US for businesses.

1
0

OpenSSH server open to almost unlimited password-guessing bug

Justin Pasher

Re: PermitRootLogin no

Although I wouldn't necessarily say that "not a lot of people permit root login any more" (at least intentionally), in Debian Jessie they finally made the default config option "PermitRootLogin without-password" to help with people that just run out-of-the-box setups.

3
0

Arctic ice EMBIGGENS, returns to 1980s levels of cap cover

Justin Pasher

Re: Arctic sea ice extent for June 2015 was the third lowest in the satellite record.

You realize that the two reports are measuring two different things, right?

Sea ice extent vs Sea ice thickness

Which one is more important? I would imagine volume is a bigger deal than surface area, considering you can have a little visible surface area with a lot volume (and vice versa), but I'm not a climatologist (for lack of a better term).

12
0

Microsoft to Windows 10 consumers: You'll get updates LIKE IT or NOT

Justin Pasher

@Pheasant Plucker: Silverlight

"They certainly do with Silverlight. Still do with Silverlight."

Technically it is not being overridden. It is released under a new KB number, so it's treated like a different update.

0
0

Apple pulls Civil War games in Confederate flag takedown

Justin Pasher

Fast track to offense

And just like that, the flag which has been around for over a century has suddenly become "offensive imagery" overnight and requires immediate eradication. This is the state our world now lives in.

25
4

So what are you doing about your legacy MS 16-bit applications?

Justin Pasher

Why mess with Ghost when CloneZilla does it for free (and with a Live CD/USB)?

1
0

Verizon promised to wire up NYC with fiber... and failed miserably – audit

Justin Pasher

Promising the world

"In particular, Verizon said that while it can lay fiber under the streets, actually getting it into buildings is another matter."

Hmmm... Maybe they shouldn't have come up with that agreement if it's something they couldn't do, eh? The article doesn't make it clear if this was some sort of signed contract or just mutual agreement.

6
1

Amazon cloud to BEND TIME, exist in own time zone for 24 hours

Justin Pasher

Re: Sounds complicated

Obligatory xkcd

https://what-if.xkcd.com/26/

4
0

MAID to order: Inside Facebook's cold-storage data ziggurats

Justin Pasher

Not just Facebook

Backblaze also created a home grown solution to large quantities of data storage, also using Reed-Solomon versus traditional hardware RAID. It has some pretty impressive scalability (in theory). Some of the concepts seem similar to Facebook's solution, although they didn't put much focus on reducing power consumption and the like.

It's a very interesting read

https://www.backblaze.com/blog/vault-cloud-storage-architecture/

1
0

Lack of secure protocol puts US whistleblowers at risk, says ACLU

Justin Pasher

Re: startls

The situation we are in now is a little like trying to put the toothpaste back in the tube.

You can run an implicit SSL SMTP server on port 465 (port 993 is IMAPS, btw) and other could connect, but a much larger percentage of the SMTP servers out there don't do this versus those that do. The only way you would know is if you attempt a connection first (which will most likely fail), and then you have to fall back to regular port 25 anyway, thus increasing the overhead for sending emails.

Fundamentally, an implicit SSL connection and a clear text connection where you issue STARTTLS are the same, but the advantage of STARTTLS is that you only have to connect to one port (which should always be open for any public SMTP server), and you can then secure up the session. Granted, you might have the fallback to an unecrypted session depending on the client/server config. It is possible to set up some SMTPd servers to require TLS when connecting to remote servers, even by using STARTTLS, but you still end up in the same situation (many servers do not support it).

Now, if the government enable STARTTLS functionality for inbound and outbound, it still relies on the other client and server to support it. They can't force that to be the case, and if it's not supported on the other end, it defeats the implementation anyway. Thus, implementing the change might give some a false sense of security just to tick another box on the security checklist. I'm not saying they shouldn't implement this at all, however.

0
0

Yelp can protect critics in rough reviews row: Virginia yanks rug from under furious carpet biz

Justin Pasher

Sticky issue indeed

"There was a concern that the appeals court's judgment could set a precedent, encouraging organizations or anyone with a chip on their shoulder to trample on free speech by demanding the identities of anonymous reviewers posting online. The threat of legal action against those who write negative reviews will have a chilling effect on free expression."

The flip side is also true. Let's assume for the moment that the anonymous person posting the review WAS fake or not a customer. Depending on what they said, it could be considered libel, which has legal recourse. Should a person be protected under "free speech" for libel just because they made themselves anonymous? Think about how fast false information can travel these days. It used to be much harder back in the days before widespread internet to anonymously spread misinformation. Nowadays, it's incredibly easy.

As far as the solution (at least in this case)? Maybe set up some third party to authenticate whether the person was actually a client without the carpet company being told who it is. That might be hard to do while maintaining privacy for the actual customer list.

0
0

LA schools want multi-million Apple refund after kids hack iPads

Justin Pasher

@Ken Hagan

"These would be kids who are too young to enter into a legal contract. Sorry, the responsibility for the laptops remains with the last legally responsible entity who had them"

So given that rationale and returning to my previous scenario of a neighbor borrowing something, you'd be perfectly content if the neighbor never returned said item or conveniently lost it since you never had a legal contract between the two of you explaining the terms of the loan?

I'm not arguing from a LEGAL standpoint. I'm arguing from a responsibility stand point. There are plenty of situations where someone cannot be LEGALLY held responsible for something, but that doesn't make it right or something that should be swept under the rug.

6
2
Justin Pasher

"But how would you feel if your boss made you take home an expensive piece of equipment everyday and told you that you were responsible for any loss or damage - you would tell him to stick it."

It's called being responsible. If you have the attitude of "I'm not going to take care of something because it doesn't actually belong to me", then maybe people should stop giving you stuff on their dime. Would you rather the boss say "Go buy your own laptop so you are solely responsible for it"? What if you loaned something to a neighbor, and it was lost or stolen. Would you not think the neighbor is accountable for it?

And in this case, according to the article, the kids were not forced to take them home, they were ALLOWED to take them home (at least until they were "hacked").

11
14

E-commerce enterprises gently told to update those protocols ... or else

Justin Pasher

Re: Older browsers

By disabling SSLv3, you really don't cut off that many people (communication via older scripts could be a different story). PFS is recommended, but that's not what this is talking about.

Works fine:

------------------------------

Android 2.3.7 - Uses TLS 1.0

IE7 on Vista - Uses TLS 1.0

IE8 on WinXP - Uses TLS 1.0

Safari 5 on OS X 10.6.8 0 - Uses TLS 1.0

Safari 6 on iOS 6 - Uses TLS 1.2

Does not work:

------------------------------

IE6 on WinXP - Uses SSLv3

I'm sorry, but if you are really that concerned about cutting off IE6 users on Windows XP, then you need to contact those people and tell them to get their act together. Either upgrade off an unsupported OS or switch to an alternate browser that was written in the past decade.

0
0

Comcast: Google, we'll see your 1Gbps fiber and DOUBLE IT

Justin Pasher

Marketing fluff?

(note: I don't use Comcast, so I don't know their physical infrastructure)

Why the bump to 2Gbps, aside from a one-upsmanship towards Google? To fully benefit, I assume this means you'll have to use the ISP supplied router, since running such a device in bridge mode will basically lock you down to 1Gbps (how many people have 10Gbps interfaces at home?). Additionally, so many people do things over wireless nowadays (laptops, cell phones, tablets), you'll still have a bigger bottleneck there.

Do they just want to say "Hey, our number is twice as big, so we are twice as fast!" (although past comments from Comcast users seem to indicate the ISP throttling will bring it down much lower)?

3
0

We've read all 400 pages of the FCC's baffling net neutrality rules – here's what YOU need to know

Justin Pasher

No priority for you!

The big question that I still have that I haven't really seen answered anywhere (primarily since the rules just came out) is whether this affects QoS-type transmissions.

The biggest thing I see toted is "you can't sell 'fast lanes' to a company to give their traffic higher priority" (which seems good on the surface), but I've also seen people say "you can't discriminate traffic". For services that require low latency (say VoIP or anything real-time between two or more people), how do the new rules apply? You could easily say that giving VoIP traffic a higher priority is discriminating against Joe Schmoe's torrent download, but if everything is a free-for-all FIFO/round robin approach, things will collapse.

I obviously haven't read through it (that's a long set of rules), but I'm hoping someone as a take on this based upon the new rules.

1
0

Phabba-dabba-do: Samsung hypes up Galaxy S6 and S6 Edge

Justin Pasher

Re: Built in battery, no SD slot, no waterproofing?

"I'm curious, what do people need SD cards for?"

Personally, I don't use it for the extra capacity that much. I use it because it is REMOVABLE storage. It's an easy way to get large amounts of data on or off the phone. I can also perform periodic backups with Titanium Backup, which means if the phone conks out, I can still have a copy of my data that doesn't require some on-line cloud-esque sync solution. Granted, ad SD card can die too, but a phone dying takes a lot more down with it.

5
0

Start stockpiling tinned beans and ammo: This malware will end civilisation

Justin Pasher

"There's nothing "only" about a flaw that exposes usernames and password in plaintext."

Although the POTENTIAL was there to expose usernames and passwords, it was still wildly a crap shoot as to what information you could actually obtain from the random memory locations. The fact that you couldn't easily detect an attack is what made it so hard to accurately determine the level of the data leak.

2
1

FCC sexes up, er, sextuples 'broadband' speed to 25Mbps in US

Justin Pasher

Re: .. but it makes a difference

So what's to stopping them from just using the "high speed internet access" instead? Unless that term is explicitly defined somewhere, I don't see it having the effect that they hope it will have.

4
0

Judge to Dish Network: your Hopper's hip, it ain't no Aereo

Justin Pasher

And now we know

"The difference between Hopper and Aereo, the Judge found, was that Hopper does not store content at a third-party location"

Hmmm... I wondered the exact same thing after the Aereo decision

0
0

Elon Musk: Wanna see a multimillion-dollar rocket EXPLODE? WATCH THIS

Justin Pasher

Acronym fun

RUD - Rapid Unscheduled Disassembly

I love it! I'm going to start using that instead of things "break", "crash", or "destroy"

23
0

Get coding or you'll bounce email from new dot-thing domains

Justin Pasher

Re: Gmail?

There are a surprising number of "odd" characters that are considered valid in an email address per RFC specs (the plus sign being a definitive yes).

http://www.remote.org/jochen/mail/info/chars.html

And RFC 821 has been obsoleted by RFC 2821, which has been obsoleted by RFC 5321.

3
0

What an ACE-HOLE! This super-software will whip you at poker, hands down

Justin Pasher

Re: Numbers printed without challenge

Exactly. The math is off somewhere (or the description of the numbers)

4,000 CPUs each doing 6 billions hands a second = 24,000 billion hands a second

They say more a billion billion hands (1,000,000,000 billion)

1,000,000,000 / 24,000 = 41,666 seconds (less than half a day)

They ran the simulation for 2 months = about 5,184,000 seconds

At that rate, it would calculate about 124 billion billion hands.

As suggested, clock cycles makes much more sense.

0
0

4K off, Google Fiber: Comcast, Broadcom tout 2Gbps cable

Justin Pasher

A Good Thing(tm)

"The standard itself was developed at record speed as cable companies started to worry about the arrival of competitors, such as Google Fiber."

And this is exactly why competition in the technology space is so important. If this wasn't there, how long do you think it would be before they decided to even look into this kind of upgrade?

1
0

Orion: To Mars, the Moon and beyond... but first, a TEST FLIGHT through Van Allen belt

Justin Pasher
FAIL

@Dalek Dave

"If they are trying to figure out how to get astronauts through the VARB then it is because they have never done it before."

And I guess you're also one of the people that complains about the lack of stars in the pictures? And the "inconsistent" shadows? And the "too perfectly framed" pictures on the moon? And the "too perfect video" of Apollo 17's lunar lift off? And the "earth transparency overlays" used in the video shot through the Apollo 11 window?

A little research goes a long way. Much more so than the trite theories being recycled.

14
1

Webcam hacker pervs in MASS HOME INVASION

Justin Pasher

Re: Hmm.

In additional to the "convenient" dynamic DNS supported by Foscam devices, some devices will attempt to use UPnP to dynamically forward ports to the camera/NVR device. If your router supports this by default (for example, the ActionTec provided for Verizon FiOS), the device can (unbeknownst to the end user) make itself accessible to the outside world.

I've had this experience with a Q-SEE NVR (although I had read the included "quick setup" guide that mentioned how to access it remotely, so I knew it was doing that). Although changing the default password will "lock it down", it is still a bad idea for the default setting to be "punch holes in my firewall". Come to think of it, I don't even know if the NVR HAD the ability to disable UPnP

3
0

Mozilla, EFF, Cisco back free-as-in-FREE-BEER SSL cert authority

Justin Pasher

Re: So how will this work?

That's not how a typical SSL MITM attack works.

Normally, a nefarious system will try to intercept the end user's traffic secretly. It would do this by jumping in between the two end points of the connection. To make it seamless, the bad guy would need to decrypt an already encrypted session, which is theoretically difficult (although the practicality of it changes over time). If the bad guy doesn't have the server's private key, it has to rely on exploits or weaknesses in the encryption.

Now pretend the private keys of the CA were compromised. This allows someone to sign their own certificates that browsers will automatically trust. It doesn't involve breaking or compromising the encryption of the two end points. In essence, the MITM attack becomes more of a reverse proxy.

Ultimately, that's no different than any other CA getting their private keys compromised. It still has nothing to do with the private keys of the original server providing the SSL connection.

0
0
Justin Pasher

Re: So how will this work?

What does this have to do with keys? They wouldn't have the private keys to decrypt the data. Only you would have those (installed on the server). All they are doing is signing a certificate to let others know it can be trusted (assuming the CA is included in the browser). They only get a CSR signed by your private key, not your actual private key. It's the whole point of asymmetrical encryption (e.g. public-key cryptography).

8
0

Brighten your November morning: 900 in-browser arcade classics added to the Internet Archive

Justin Pasher

Controls

FYI, for those that are familiar with MAME, you can configure controls the same way.

Press 'P' to pause the emulation, then press the Tab key to bring up the config menu.

0
0

Hungary PM ditches internet tax plans after mass protests

Justin Pasher

Errr.... Huh?

"We really should see somehow where the huge profits generated online go, and whether there is a way to keep some of it in Hungary"

How would putting a tax on data usage "keep it in Hungary"? That would imply that the tax money the people are forced to pay would normally be going to pay for something elsewhere. It's not a sudden shift in the money's destination. If anything, you take money away from what a person can spend on other things, which a majority of the time is already spent in the country (rent, utilities, gas, car payments, insurance, etc).

0
0

Feds seek potential 'second Snowden' gov doc leaker – report

Justin Pasher

eak-spa ig-pa atin-la?

"Justice Department officials are 'reluctant to bring criminal charges involving unauthorized disclosures to the news media' – because of criticisms of the tactics used in recent leak investigations"

Translation:

We don't like it when the media hears about the bad things that we do and then say we are doing bad things and make us look bad.

9
0

Pay a tax on every gigabyte you download? Haha, that's too funny. But not to Hungarians

Justin Pasher

Correction

"It's feared the web toll will be passed onto subscribers by the ISPs"

s/feared/guaranteed/

FTFY

10
0

DEATH by PowerPoint: Microsoft warns of 0-day attack hidden in slides

Justin Pasher

UAC to the rescue...?

"... won't cough admin privileges to the hacker – at least not by itself. Attacks are likely to generate pop-up warnings and under default settings a User Access Control popup would get displayed."

Ohhh, you mean that "this program is requesting admin rights" pop up where everyone just clicks Yes when they see it?

2
0

Apple promises to lift Curse of the Drained iPhone 5 Battery

Justin Pasher
Trollface

Dazed and confused

"The point is ... no one from apple cares. They keep being silent. They used to care about their customers but now..."

How long have you known Apple? Sounds about par for the course... Everyone knows that there are never any problems with their hardware, only the end user.

10
2

Netflix swallows yet another bitter pill, inks peering deal with TWC

Justin Pasher

I'm so confused

Netflix complains that the speed issues are due to the end user's ISP. The ISP says it's because Netflix is sending traffic over other upstream providers that don't have the capacity to carry the traffic. Yet now, Netflix creates another peering agreement with another ISP. They even have a peering agreement arranged (but maybe not implemented) with Verizon, but they had their recent spat over who's at fault for the slow down.

What in the world am I missing? Netflix complains that the problem is with someone else, then they establish peering agreements with those parties. Are they just trying to make the ISP look like the bad guy? Is Netflix just bi-polar?

1
0

HTTP-Yes! Google boosts SSL-encrypted sites in search results

Justin Pasher
Black Helicopters

Ulterior motive...?

Hmmm... Methinks this would be a good way to suck up more IPv4 addresses and push more toward IPv6 (not really, but hey, it's Google). It's too bad we can't just all assume that SNI will work everywhere, although with the "death" of Windows XP, there should be less resistance, in theory.

Irony alert: When the Heartbleed bug was discovered, you would have actually been a little safer to NOT be using SSL, as you wouldn't have had the potential for private keys to be stolen and allowed a third party to impersonate your site over a secure connection (although nowadays, I'm sure a large percentage of netizens don't pay as much attention as they should to whether a connection is secure or not).

1
8

Facebook goes down, people dial 911

Justin Pasher

Re: Wait... what?

Just like people call because McDonald's gets their order wrong or they are out of a particular food item.

This is the unfortunate world we now live in...

19
0

ICANN can't hand over Iran's internet, bomb victims told

Justin Pasher

Minor correction

There are a lot more than just 13 root name servers

http://blog.icann.org/2007/11/there-are-not-13-root-servers/

0
0

Want to legally unlock your phone from its network? The US Senate says that's A-OK

Justin Pasher

Re: [Obama] promptly passed the buck and said it was up to Congress to get it done.

"Yes, he loves them so much that he's actually only 21st out of 44 for number of executive orders issued (182 as of June 20.) See also: http://www.presidency.ucsb.edu/data/orders.php"

Uggh... This argument again? The NUMBER of executive orders DOES NOT MATTER. It's the CONTENT of those executive orders that matters. If one president issued 500 executive orders that did small, non-law creating things, that would be so much better than a president that issued just one executive order that established a new law that made everyone take 15 minutes our of every day to personally bow down to him or risk imprisonment. He's already riding the line when it comes to what power he is actually granted by the constitution.

Now, back on topic...

3
2

Aereo has to pay TV show creators? Yes. This isn't rocket science

Justin Pasher

Flip the coin

"Aereo even found three Supreme Court Justices who agreed with it. Six Justices, however, didn't, sticking broadly to the common sense and widely accepted principles of property and compensation."

Putting the "spirit of the law" aside for a moment, let's look at this scenario.

(I am assuming the one-to-one antennae aspect of Aereo is true, as they say)

An end user goes out and buys an antennae to receive over the air broadcasts. He hooks up said antennae to a capture card on the computer and uses some form of PVR software. The net result? The end user is getting the same content as the Aereo service (at least at the location of antennae installation) for a one time hardware payment. No money has gone to the broadcasters, following the "common sense and widely accepted principles of property and compensation". Yet this scenario is perfectly legal.

Let's take the DVR aspect out of it for the Aereo service. Now, a user only has access to a live stream of whatever is being broadcast at the time. Take that technology and put it in a USB dongle, and now it's portable. Assuming the verdict would be the same if Aereo did not provide DVR service (I wonder if it would have been), the former method is illegal but the latter is legal.

Since (I assume) the Aereo service could be accessed from any Internet just by logging in to a user's account, it's not quite as straight forward, but the principle is still relevant.

12
4

Stopping IT price gouging would risk SOCIALIST DYSTOPIA!

Justin Pasher

Yea, that's how it works...

"... new legislation that limits firms’ ability to control prices could also cause foreign suppliers to abandon or decide not to enter the Australian market, resulting in less competition and less choice for consumers in Australia."

Assuming that the final prices being charged are stilling providing a profit, I'm pretty sure if a company is given the choice of "no profit" (exit the market) versus "some profit" (stay in at a lower margin), they would choose the latter.

3
0

IPv4 addresses now EXHAUSTED in Latin America and the Caribbean

Justin Pasher

ARIN not doing any favors

If ARIN actually wanted to help with the adoption of IPv6, they would make it more cost effective (i.e. free) to at least get your feet wet with it. As far as I know, there's no way to get a free "test" block of IPv6 addresses from ARIN for experimenting with a publicly accessible IPv6 setup. At the very least, they should have made IPv6 addresses available for people with existing direct IPv4 allocations. If I had access to an IPv6 block and I didn't have to try to justify an associated cost with management for something that is just being tested, I'd definitely show more interest in playing around with it.

Think about it. A large portion of the "value" associated with an IPv4 address is because of supply and demand. For IPv6, the "demand" is essentially not there, not because so few people are deploying it, but because there are so many addresses available that every micro-organism could be assigned one and we'd still have plenty to spare. This eats into ARIN's bottom line, so they have to start out by establishing a dollar value for IPv6 that's not anywhere close to its real value (e.g. millionths of a cent per IP)

1
0

Ballmer SLAM-DUNKS $2 BEEELLLION bid for LA Clippers

Justin Pasher

Wait... You think that the owner of a team can't be a control freak that wants to do things his way for the better of the team? Just look at how well it's work for the Dallas Cowboys.

Oh wait....

0
0

Comcast exec says wired broadband customers should pay-as-they-go

Justin Pasher

So... cheaper for some?

'According to Cohen, the move is all about fairness. 'People who use more should pay more and people who use less should pay less,' he said.'

So given your example, people that use less than the 300GB get a discount right? Oh, that's right. The base price would include up to 300GB for everyone at the same price, regardless of what percentage of people are using a lot less than that. Almost sounds like a redistribution of the wealth.

5
0

Study: Users don't much care about Heartbleed hacking dangers

Justin Pasher
Stop

Misinformation aplenty

Reading some of these posts, it seems there might be a lot of misinformation regarding the technical implications of Heartbleed. Without writing a huge article, here's a brief overview of critical points.

The flaw affects BOTH servers AND clients. The heartbeat command that is generated that causes the flaw is like a ping. The server can "ping" the client and the client can "ping" the server. Granted, a server would have to be specifically set up to send malicious heartbeat packets sniffing for data, although it's still possible. Embedded devices, like routers, WiFi access points, etc. are potentially affected because they can be running a "server" too (although this should make people take a good look as to whether you really need that WiFi access point interface to be accessible to the whole internet over port 443).

A MITM attack is NOT needed for a random third party to (potentially) obtain username/passwords that are sitting around in memory on a server. All that has to be done is for someone to attack a vulnerable server with forged heartbeat packets, then sift through the returned data. Would it be difficult to find usernames and passwords? Potentially, as the leaked data is whatever random data was stored in memory at the location that was copied. It could return useful information after only one request, or it could return useful information only after 10 millions requests. Now when it comes to sifting through that data, that's a whole other issue.

A MITM attack IS required for someone to pretend they are another site, IF they happen to get a copy of the server's private key. Because of that IF, this is why people are recommending revoking SSL certificates. Just like the usernames and passwords, they might get the private key easily, or they might have a really hard time getting it. One they get the key, they still have to get the end user to visit their site (to avoid certificate warnings, they would need something like DNS cache poisoning to redirect someone to a different IP while keeping the domain the same).

As an end user, you visit a lot more than just your "ISP's server". Any web site you visit over SSL poses a potential risk.

All in all, I still agree that the media over-sensationalized this quite a bit. Odds are most people will not be affected by it. Sure there will be some (especially considering known attacks started up shortly after the vulnerability was revealed), but most will not, simple because they first have to attack a server that vulnerable, then they have to hope the server leaks the credentials, then they have to actually be credentials for you.

Kudos to the majority of the staff out there that got things patches up quickly (I'm probably a little spoiled, as I keep the 50 or so servers I manage up-to-date on a regular basis, so a simple apt-get upgrade is easy. The SSL certificate revocations was a little bit more work).

2
0

Page:

Forums