* Posts by Irony Deficient

746 posts • joined 5 Aug 2008

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Drum roll, please .... Results are in for the collective noun for security vulns

Irony Deficient
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Re: we’re offering all seven of those that did well in the poll …

ElRegUser007, perhaps a veneration of collective nouns ?

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reviewed/signed add-on enforcement in Firefox 42

Irony Deficient
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reviewed/signed add-on enforcement in Firefox 42

According to this Mozilla Add-ons Blog entry,

Starting in Firefox 42, add-on developers will be required to submit extensions for review and signing by Mozilla prior to deployment, and unsigned add-ons cannot be installed or used with Firefox.
This Mozilla Wiki page has further relevant details — e.g. the current plan (presumably not yet set in stone) is that the ESR branch starting in Firefox 45 ESR will act like Firefox 41 (only) in that the enforcement mechanism can be overridden by a preference in about:config.

If you use Firefox and depend upon unsigned add-ons (e.g. those not available through addons.mozilla.org), start thinking about what your mitigation strategy will be.

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Visitors no longer welcomed to Scotland's 'Penis Island'

Irony Deficient
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Re: With all due respect to Gaelic speakers…

100113.1537, the difference between bhoid and Bhòid is to guide pronunciation — the ò indicates a longer vowel sound than o has, and they’re not allophones in Gaelic. As you’d stated, the purpose of written language is to be understood by those who read it; if you believe that the length mark is the cause of the change of meaning, then you haven’t understood what its purpose is. It is no more the cause of the change of meaning than the trema is the cause between “coop” and “coöp” in English; in both cases, the diacritic is used to indicate a different word altogether, not to cause it.

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Irony Deficient
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Re: apparently…

Aha — the grammatical reason for the lenition in Eilean Bhoid (and in Eilean Bhòid, for that matter) is that in place names, even masculine nouns like eilean will cause lenition of genitives like boid (and Bòid).

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Irony Deficient
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Re: apparently…

Anonymous Coward, boid is the genitive form of bod, and bhoid is the lenited genitive form of bod. Given the wording of the sign, Boid would have been the expected spelling in “Penis Island” (literally “Island of Penis”), since there was no grammatical reason for the lenition to take place there.

Fun fact: the linguistic term “lenition” means “softening”.

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Manhattan-sized iceberg splits from glacier – and spotted FROM SPACE

Irony Deficient
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when measuring things in terms of Manhattans

Robert, when measuring things in terms of Manhattans, one should use a standard cocktail glass.

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Yet another Android app security bug: This time 'everything is affected'

Irony Deficient
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flaw vs. floor

bluefin333, it doesn’t work as well for speakers of rhotic dialects.

“A scourge of flaws” was my first thought, but since “scourge” is already used with mosquitoes, I’d go with “a knout of flaws” instead.

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Youth Hostelling with Chris Eubank becomes TV reality

Irony Deficient
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Re: I wonder if your American readers understand what’s going on here?

Anonymous Coward, no, we haven’t a clue why you’re dropping apostrophes.

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Amazon UK conditions 'exhausting', claims union

Irony Deficient
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Re: So where do the Amazon-phobes shop online?

Necronomnomnomicon, “Amazon-phobe” is an inaccurate term; no fear is involved. “Amazon-periphrone” would be much closer to the mark, if this alternative Greek suffix may be adopted into English also. Since I’ve never bought anything from Amazon.com, Inc., there isn’t anything that I’d go there for. Most of my (occasional) online purchases are of books that are long out of print, and I go to bookshop sites to find them. Since they’re typically located in different states from where I live, I’m the one who pays (use) tax on them; the bookshops will pay income tax (or their owners will pay income tax if they’re run as proprietorships or partnerships) when they’re operated profitably. I don’t know what abuse (if any) their staffs are subject to. If I don’t consider the prices to be fair, then I don’t buy. I’ve found USPS media mail to be both cheap and reliable; it is slow, though, but I’m content with that tradeoff.

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Assange™ is 'upset' that he WON'T be prosecuted for rape, giggles lawyer

Irony Deficient
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Re: WTF?

h4rm0ny, Article II. of the US−Sweden extradition treaty lists all of the offenses for which extradition can be granted. Which of these offenses would the US charge Assange with to allow his extradition from Sweden? (If an offense isn’t on that list, then he can’t be extradited to the US from Sweden because of it.)

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Irony Deficient
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an extradition warrant to Ecuador

Velv, the US−Ecuador extradition treaty was written in 1872, and last updated in 1939; it’s the oldest extradition treaty still in effect in the US. Among its list of extraditable offenses is abortion, which is no longer an extraditable offense since it no longer has dual criminality. Which criminal offense might Assange be charged with for the US to be able to extradite him from Ecuador?

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Apple, Google should give FBI every last drop of user information, says ex-HP CEO and wannabe US prez Carly Fiorina

Irony Deficient
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insert Benjamin Franklin quote on freedom

ratfox, if you insist:

In that Case the Sharpness of the Urine gives me great Pain when I make Water, which I have frequent Urgencies to do, and with little Effect. The Blackberry Jelly taken at Night about the Bigness of a Pigeon’s Egg, which I sometimes eat with a Bit of Bread, and sometimes dissolve in a Tumbler of Water and drink it, mixing sometimes two or three Tea Spoonfuls of Brandy, has constantly given me Ease and Freedom by the Morning, with long Intervals between the Calls during the following Day.
letter to Walter Dulany, 1787-11-29

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W3C's bright idea turned your battery into a SNITCH for websites

Irony Deficient
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Re: Seriously?

Crisp, no — Microsoft brought you the marquee element, and Netscape Communications brought you the blink element.

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Chechen women swindle ISIS via social media: 'We need roubles to join you xx'

Irony Deficient
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Re: Piracy / Privateering could be a historical precedent for this

theModge, privateers required a letter of marque — a government license — to plunder Spanish galleons. Without one, they’d have been guilty of piracy under English law, despite not touching British ships.

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'White hats don't want to work for us' moans understaffed FBI

Irony Deficient
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Re: Invasive hiring process?

Boris the Cockroach, perhaps someone who would prefer to admit his two-week dalliance with the Pennsyltucky Vegetable Liberation Front during his gap year over leaving himself open to a felony charge of perjury?

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Windows 10: Buy cheap, buy twice, right? Buy FREE ... buy FOREVER

Irony Deficient
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disclosure

Alistair,

[Disclosure: I bought myself a pair of Beats in-ear phones recently in a sale and they’re OK. I am currently trying to destroy them with anti-culture by playing only early-1970s Tangerine Dream and Mike Oldfield on them. I like to think Dr Dre would be appalled.]
If you bought it from an authorized retailer, Dr Dre won’t be appalled at all.

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Google to French data cops: Dot-com RTBF? Baiser ma DERRIERE

Irony Deficient
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Re: Better translation

John, another improvement would be to use the imperative (baise or baisez, depending upon the circumstance) rather than the infinitive (or noun). However, as Handy Plough pointed out below, a literal translation doesn’t accurately convey the intended message.

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Bloke cuffed for blowing low-flying camera drone to bits with shotgun

Irony Deficient
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US airspace rights

Boothy, yes, it’s US-wide due to the Supreme Court’s decision in United States v. Causby (1946). This part of that decision could be relevant in this instance:

While the owner does not in any physical manner occupy that stratum of airspace [below 500 feet (152.4 m)] or make use of it in the conventional sense, he does use it in somewhat the same sense that space left between buildings for the purpose of light and air is used. The superadjacent airspace at this low altitude [83 feet (25.3 m) in this case] is so close to the land that continuous invasions of it affect the use of the surface of the land itself. We think that the landowner, as an incident to his ownership, has a claim to it and that invasions of it are in the same category as invasions of the surface.
State governments can (and do) regulate airspace below 500 feet.

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Hurrah! Uber does work (in the broadest sense of the word) after all

Irony Deficient
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Re: Potential topic for Worstall …

auburnman, in the case of New York, you could research the “Haas Act” (really a city ordinance) from 1937. This 1996 article from the New York Times provides a brief overview of the situation that led to its adoption. The number of medallions were frozen at that time; the post-WWII economic boom led to the increase of value of the medallions, and additional medallions were first issued only in 1996, but not in numbers that significantly affected the (artificial) value of the originals.

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So what the BLINKING BONKERS has gone wrong in the eurozone?

Irony Deficient
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coming off the gold standard in the Great Depression

Tim, the US didn’t abandon the gold standard until Nixon “shut the gold window”. In 1933 Roosevelt limited the amount of gold that could be held by individuals and corporations in the US, requiring all excess to be delivered to the Federal Reserve and exchanged for other forms of US money at $20.67 per troy ounce of gold; in early 1934 Congress devalued the dollar from $20.67 to $35.00 per ounce, but the fixed exchange rate remained until 1971.

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Blessed are the cheesemakers, for they have defined the smidge

Irony Deficient
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Re: Totally wrong!

Pen-y-gors, the closest approximation to your theory would likely be smidín, a diminutive form of “breath” or “puff”. The OED notes that ‘“smidgen” (under that spelling for the headword) is

orig. and chiefly U.S. Also smidgeon, smidgin, smitchin, etc. [Origin unknown, perh. f. smitch sb.² + -en, -in, repr. dial. pronunc. of -ing¹: cf. prec.]
I think that your theory could apply to “smithereen” as coming from smidirín (“a small fragment”), though. Perhaps there was an intermediate English form “smidgereen” at some point?

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Get root on an OS X 10.10 Mac: The exploit is so trivial it fits in a tweet

Irony Deficient
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Re: Congratulations on repeating exploits before they can be fixed

Len, time will tell; Apple didn’t fix CVE-2015-1130, the “RootPipe” vulnerability, in OS X 10.9.5 and 10.8.5, despite their ostensible policy of still providing security fixes for these versions of OS X.

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Lottery IT security boss guilty of hacking lotto computer to win $14.3m

Irony Deficient
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side effects?

I take it that people who weren’t involved with these shenanigans and who won non-jackpot prizes in that particular drawing aren’t having their winnings clawed back?

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Thunder-faced Mozilla lifts Flash Firefox block after 0-days plugged

Irony Deficient
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Re: but only for Windows (and OS X, and Linux for Chrome), not Linux (for Firefox)

Anonymous Coward, Flash Player 11.2.202.491 for Firefox on Linux has been released.

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Toyota recalls 625,000 hybrids: Software bug kills engines dead with THERMAL OVERLOAD

Irony Deficient
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Re: Quality

Terry 6, it depends upon what you’d meant by “consumerist campaign” — Nader was active a decade before the Pinto with his book Unsafe at Any Speed; one of its chapters was focused on the Chevrolet Corvair’s suspension.

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Free internet for kids! Obama's offering free internet to kids! (Yes, there's a catch)

Irony Deficient
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Re: Old cause and effect confusion again…

… city financial areas!

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Behold: Pluto's huge ICE MOUNTAINS ... and signs of cryovolcanoes?

Irony Deficient
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Re: Yuggoth

Roj, I dare not type more than what was revealed in Sonnet X:

I knew those fires were brewing monstrous things,

And that those birds of space had been Outside

I guessed to what dark planet’s crypts they plied,

And what they brought from Thog beneath their wings.

The others laughed — till struck too mute to speak

By what they glimpsed in one bird’s evil beak.

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Reddit CEO U-turn: Site no longer a bastion of free speech – and stop posting so much hate

Irony Deficient
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Re: an I with a centre-stroke in Unicode

LaeMing, in sans-serif Arial, no. (The unstroked I in Arial is sans-serif.) In a serifed typeface like Linux Libertine G, yes.

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Irony Deficient
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an I with a centre-stroke in Unicode

LaeMing, like this?

Ɨ

(See U+0197.)

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Hacking Team: Oh great, good job, guys ... now the TERRORISTS have our zero-day exploits

Irony Deficient
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Re: As ye sow …

Jon, ye was the second-person nominative plural pronoun; it is correct as is. Thee was the second-person singular object form; using thee there would be ungrammatical. If it were intended to be said to a single entity, it would have been “As thou sowest, so shalt thou reap”.

Where “ye” was really “þe” was for the definite article the, e.g. “Ye Olde Hacke Shoppe” was really “Þe Olde Hacke Shoppe”.

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Boffin: Will I soon be able to CLONE a WOOLLY MAMMOTH? YES. Should I? Hell NO

Irony Deficient
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Getting eaten by people is by far the best evolutionary strategy for a species

bjr, it didn’t work so well for the passenger pigeon.

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Wake up, sheeple! If you ask Siri about 9/11 it will rat you out to the police!

Irony Deficient
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Re: pounds

Lostyearsago, the monetary pound originally referred to a unit of account rather than a unit of exchange: a Tower pound mass (slightly less than 350 g) of 0.925 fine silver. Coins of that time were mostly silver pennies, 240 to the unit of account, each ideally weighing in at 32 Tower grains (1.45 g or so) of 0.925 Ag. Edward I. in 1300 was the first ruler to break this monetary/mass relationship, coining 243 pennies from this mass rather than 240; successive devaluations reached their nadir in 1551 under Edward VI., who coined 540 pennies from a Troy pound (a bit over 373 g) of 0.250 Ag. The following year, revaluation reforms began; these stabilized under Elizabeth I., who in 1560 had established the 60 shilling (720 pence) footing of a Troy pound of 0.925 Ag; in 1601, this was devalued to 62 shillings (744 pence) per pound mass. This level lasted until after the Napoleonic wars, when the footing became 66 shillings (792 pence), the UK went on the gold standard, and silver coinage lost unlimited legal tender status. The 20th century saw the reduction, and then elimination, of silver from coinage, followed by the elimination of the £ s. d. subdivision in 1971.

I believe that wool was traditionally weighed in stone.

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Irony Deficient
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US rotary dials

fishman, on my Western Electric 500 telephone (the model whose herds once thundered in their millions across North American desks), the shortest distance is given by 1, then 2, …, then 9, with 0 being the longest. When the NANP was introduced, the area codes with the largest populations had the shortest distances on the dial: 212 for New York, 213 for Los Angeles, 312 for Chicago, and so on.

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Microsoft finally finishes its PowerPC emulator

Irony Deficient
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Re: Rosetta

Annihilator, Photoshop (from the PowerPC version of Creative Suite 2) runs on SWMBO’s Leopard partition using Rosetta.

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Chancellor Merkel 'was patient zero' in German govt network hack

Irony Deficient
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quantum chemistry

Anonymous Coward,

her doctorate is in physical chemistry, but her dissertation involved quantum chemistry:

Am 8. Januar 1986 reichte sie ihre Dissertation Untersuchung des Mechanismus von Zerfallsreaktionen mit einfachem Bindungsbruch und Berechnung ihrer Geschwindigkeitskonstanten auf der Grundlage quantenchemischer und statistischer Methoden ein.

(On 8th January 1986 she submitted her dissertation Investigation of the mechanism of decay reactions with single bond breaking and calculation of their velocity constants on the basis of quantum chemical and statistical methods.)

Yes, quantum chemistry existed in 1986; see the earlier work by Linus Pauling et al. to allay your doubts.

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Keurig to drop coffee DRM after boss admits 'we were wrong'

Irony Deficient
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Re: I suppose.

Anonymous Coward, the transformer would be for a Teasmade, so it would likely be making its fashion statement (hopefully “form follows function”) in a bedroom.

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Irony Deficient
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Re: I suppose.

Dana W, have you looked into step-up transformers to run 230 V @ 50 Hz appliances on a 120 V @ 60 Hz grid?

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NSA spying is illegal? Then let's make it law, say Republicans

Irony Deficient
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Re: All that is left is to pay attention

Keven E., Senator Sanders is an independent, although he caucuses with the Democrats (and despite his pursuit of becoming a Democratic presidential candidate).

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HORDES OF CLING-ONS menace UK.gov IT estate as special WinXP support ends

Irony Deficient
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Re: err, what?

Trigonoceps occipitalis, the original tron („Alttron“ auf Deutsch) didn’t have one, but the new and improved tron („Neutron“) fixed that.

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Traumatised Reg SPB team barely survives movie unwatchablathon

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four words

The 1980 film Windows.

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Canada passes controversial spook-powers law

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royal ascent

Kat, are you sure about your word choice there?

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Snowden scandal latest: NSA, GCHQ lingo-spies replaced by unstoppable RHINEHART robots

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Re: Welsh?

A Mhaidhc, d‛fhoghlaimeoidís fiú na bPoncán Gaeilge a labhairt.

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Hey! Want a FREE TOASTER that makes BITCOIN? What? You DO?

Irony Deficient
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Bitcoin toaster

If I had to have one, I’d rather get the offline version sold by these folks instead.

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Top Spanish minister shows citizens are thick as tortillas de ballenas

Irony Deficient
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Re: The Spanish Inquisition

Dr Paul Taylor, I didn’t claim that defending Copernican heliocentrism made Mutis a mathematician; would you please explain how you came to that conclusion? Eighteenth century Spain, like ancient Rome, was more interested in applied mathematics, such as those found in Tosca’s Compendio Mathematico; see here for one list of 18th century Spanish mathematicians. Since you don’t consider botany to have been a science before Wallace and Darwin (which happens to exclude any botanical work done by Spaniards while the Spanish Inquistion was active), how would you describe the botanical work of, say, Linnaeus?

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Irony Deficient
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Re: The Spanish Inquisition

Dr Paul Taylor, that would depend upon your definition of “of note”. José Celestino Mutis was both botanist and mathematician, a priest who defended Copernican heliocentrism and Newtonian mechanics before the Inquisition. He was known well enough during his lifetime to have been elected a foreign member of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences.

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So how should we tax these BASTARD COMPANIES, then?

Irony Deficient
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Re: Fair Tax?

phil dude, Congress can eliminate the federal income tax without a repeal of the 16th amendment; a repeal would be needed to prevent a future Congress from being able to reïnstate one.

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FBI alert: Get these motherf'king hackers off this motherf'king plane

Irony Deficient
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conveying meaning in English

bazza, lawyer-speak also exists in the US. My understanding* of one example here is that “includes” in our legalese means “includes only” in colloquial English, so a sentence like “For the purposes of this act, vehicles includes bicycles.” would mean that only bicycles would be considered vehicles in that legislation; all other types of vehicles would be excluded from its measures.

* — That of a layman with no legal education, so caveat lector.

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Digital killed the radio star: Norway names FM switchoff date

Irony Deficient
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Re: DAB, what is that?

MacroRodent, are there any powerful enough AM transmitters near Tallinn from which transmissions could be received at your home?

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America was founded on a dislike of taxes, so how did it get the IRS?

Irony Deficient
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Re: a country that was founded on a dislike of taxes

No, I will not fix your computer, Article VIII. of the Articles of Confederation contained its taxing mechanism. What the Articles lacked was an enforcement mechanism to ensure that each state legislature provided its proportional share to the common treasury; but given that Article II. noted that “Each state retains its sovereignty, freedom, and independence”, and Article III. described its union of member states as “a firm league of friendship” rather than as a single nation, one shouldn’t be surprised by its absence. To address your final remark, and to reïterate my initial point, the 1789 USA reboot was “Founded on taxes with representation”.

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Irony Deficient
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Re: a country that was founded on a dislike of taxes

bazza, this has been the case since the beginning of the 19th century, and DC residents are perfectly justified in their dislike of taxes without representation. There are at least two solutions that wouldn’t require constitutional amendments: change the tax code to exempt DC residents from federal income tax, or repeal part of the District of Columbia Organic Act of 1801 to restore their ability to vote in federal elections as if they were Maryland residents (as this 2004 bill proposed).

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