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* Posts by Daniel Palmer

195 posts • joined 19 Apr 2007

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Heartbleed vuln under ACTIVE ATTACK as hackers map soft spots

Daniel Palmer

Re: foss

The mistake people seem to be making here is that this issue is somehow down to TLS implementations. It's unfortunate that this issue is in OpenSSL because of the number of apps that depend on it and obviously applications that link to a TLS library will probably have private keys etc in memory.. but lets say that the biggest target of attacks using this issue is Apache. Apache itself could also have similar issues and the end result would be exactly the same.

Ok so Microsoft don't use OpenSSL for their products and MS' TLS implementation apparently doesn't have a bug like this. Is everyone absolutely sure that IIS doesn't have issues that would allow an attacker to read memory they shouldn't and thus have the potential to find private keys etc? There's nowhere in the complete Windows stack that might allow an attacker to become a superuser and read whatever memory they like?

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Daniel Palmer

Re: foss

Closed source has exactly the same issues you just can't:

- Know exactly where those issues are unless you have a code access agreement or are very good at working with binaries.

- Can't see what a vendor did to fix a problem and thus be sure they A: actually fixed it, B: didn't create more problems in the process.

- Can't fix really old legacy versions that the vendor no longer supports but you depend on.

etc etc.

Humans make mistakes. It's unfortunate but we can't avoid ever making mistakes. The most important thing is to be able to recover from the mistakes. All of the vendors that shipped broken versions of OpenSSL should have put out an update by now. If the setup you are running doesn't have an update you can compile a newer version of OpenSSL or if a newer version won't work on your setup you can backport the fix (I don't think there are any systems out there running the broken versions that couldn't compile the latest though) to a version that works on your system.

All of this "hah! I told you open source is crap" bleh bleh is nonsense either way. Closed source products have been using favourably licensed open source components forever. If closed source vendors really cared there wouldn't be tons of different TLS implementations that are ALL broken in different ways.

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Japanese schoolkids arrested in £2.4 MEEELLION phone fraud bust

Daniel Palmer

>Especially in Japan where the elderly are essentially experiencing

>the teenage phase of their lives for the 2nd time.

Keep the funnies coming lads.

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Daniel Palmer

Re: Interesting...

>english as a foreign language and he said how different the culture

>is there, how teachers had to be a piller of the community etc.

Eikaiwa workers and ALTs pillars of the community. Probably the funniest thing I've seen all day.

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Daniel Palmer

Re: RE: "I know this might be a little inappropriate....."

>"I'm not racist, but..."

You can't use that line any more. You have to say "I'm not racist, I have tons of <insert race or religious group that is often confused to be a race here> friends, but there are some <previous race> that.."

I'm pretty sure the previous poster was actually playing on the "they all look the same" thing to get a reaction out of people that are easily offended for others.

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Torvalds rails at Linux developer: 'I'm f*cking tired of your code'

Daniel Palmer

Re: coding

>Swearing is inappropriate in a public venue,

Dismissing someone who is leading the biggest and most important software project in existence based on "he used naughty words mummy". Grow the fuck up.

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Daniel Palmer

Re: All I can say is

I thought that had already been decided.. Jessie + 1 will ship with systemd as the default. Unless that decision was reversed?

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Daniel Palmer

Re: Linus for motivational speaker?

>It doesn't mean "This is my baby, you must feed it, and if you don't have breasts

>you must grow them".

That would be the case if Kay weren't being paid for his work and was doing it out of the goodness of his heart *AND* the systemd project hadn't merged in udev etc that are fundamental parts of the Linux userland. If they didn't want to make sure their stuff works and support it i.e. run their project as a toy project they shouldn't have done things like that. "It's opensource and free, do what you like with it, if you don't like it don't use it" is the line that Lennart uses to get rid of people that bring up realities he doesn't like. It would make a lot more sense if they hadn't created a situation where it's almost impossible not to use their stuff. Then you have the problem that they refuse to merge patches to fix problems. They won't let people help them.

I predict we'll eventually have exactly the same situation we had with glibc.

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Daniel Palmer

All I can say is

Ha fucking ha. Kay and Lennart get your shit together. You guys browbeat everyone that makes any negative comment about systemd (to the point of hijacking a speakers talk at a conference) but time and time again you prove that you shouldn't be trusted with vital system components.

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India's outsourcers look east with eyes on Asian tigers

Daniel Palmer

I can only speak for Japan but there is already a growing presence of Indian workers here. I live in the middle of nowhere where it's usual to see Filipinos and Brazilians that work in factories around here but recently a lot of Indians have been popping up too. When I was looking for IT work around here I was concerned that my lack of a JLPT cert would be my undoing but I was told "you should try xyz, they have a guy that can't even speak English let alone Japanese". In my opinion bad indian English plus poor bad Japanese English would be a recipe for disaster but I guess the savings they think they are making on paper offset the communications difficulties.

From what I've seen Japanese companies tend to be good at hardware and not so good at software. I have been told that managers don't understand anything about software other than line counts and developers have decent enough job security to not have to not have to try too hard... I'm sure the managers will love the massive codebases (99% duplicate code) at a fraction of the cost for a lifetime employee.

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Mt Gox fielded MASSIVE DDOS attack before collapse

Daniel Palmer

>It later emerged that attackers had found a way to exploit

>the Mt Gox code to steal 850,000 Bitcoins worth hundreds of millions of dollars.

Zero evidence of this and Mt Gox themselves said the coins were stolen via "transaction malleability" over years.

The fact that coins that Mt Gox moved and hasn't touched since 2011 were moving all over the place over the weekend suggests that there is a little bit more to this story than Mt Gox have been making out.

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Brit Bitcoin dev: I lost 'over £200k' when MtGox popped its socks

Daniel Palmer

good luck on that one..

The Japanese police (Not any worse than the UK police though..) barely do anything when crazy drunk old farts are trying to kick your windows and doors in (true story) so I doubt they'll put much effort into chasing a crime that can't be traced back to anyone unless MK stole the coins or lost them/the passwords... I think the best he can hope for is that they get pissed off with trying to actually work out what happened and will revert to their normal tactic of questioning and bullying until they get a confession from MK that he stole real world money.

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GNU security library GnuTLS fails on cert checks: Patch now

Daniel Palmer

Re: The only reason this is news worthy...

The number of eyes looking at Linux is going to be a few orders of magnitude greater than those looking at GnuTLS.. and there are even fewer people that are qualified to properly audit crypto suites.

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Daniel Palmer

>The notion that open source software is more likely to be secure because anyone can look at the >source code looks just a little less sound today,

I know everything on the register is a bit tongue in cheek ... but this is just FUD.

The reason this was fixed is because someone could look at the source, see that it was broken and fix it. These exact same bugs undoubtedly exist in closed source software but you have no chance of fixing the issue as a third party.

The fact that someone didn't find it sooner just suggests that more code audits need to happen more often. If GnuTLS is important to you, your business etc maybe instead of whining about someone finding bugs and fixing them you should be putting your money where your mouth is and pay someone to audit the codebase for you.

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MtGox to customers: Your call is important to us … NOT!

Daniel Palmer

It's good for their Japanese customers that they actually have Japanese people on the phones and not a bunch of Mark's expat mates I guess.. judging from his "I'm sorry all your coin is gone" speech I'm not sure he/they could have dealt with some very pissed off Japanese people ranting down the phone.

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Chipzilla just won't quit: Intel touts 64-bit Atoms for Android phones, tabs

Daniel Palmer

Re: and we're the only company currently shipping 64-bit processors ...

"and capable of supporting 64-bit Android when it is available."

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Daniel Palmer

Re: and we're the only company currently shipping 64-bit processors ...

>I don't think it's being too pedantic

You're making it seem like they made a wild claim that was untrue. They didn't .. they can run multiple operating systems today and they should be able to make their support for the current x86 Android work for amd64/x86-64 Android when it comes around. The point being made is that they have a product that is somewhat future-proof not that that they are the only 64bit game in town.

>You can make anything factually correct if you just change all the words around.

You don't need to change the words around to make it factually correct.

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Daniel Palmer

Re: The real question is...

>There are companies that aren't intel fabbing

*are* not aren't of course.. missed the eidt window.

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Daniel Palmer

Re: and we're the only company currently shipping 64-bit processors ...

"Either way, AMD certainly makes the (64 bit) processors for some tablets that I'm sure can run both Windows 8 and Linux."

Neither of those is Android. Do AMD ship an Android support package for their chips? Linux support is a bit different to Android support as Android has it's own driver system for graphics, hw accelerated video.... It's possible that AMD do have something but Atom is the only officially supported x86 platform for Android as far as I can tell. So what the Intel person said is factually correct and you're just picking hairs/quote mining.

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Daniel Palmer

Re: The real question is...

>Uh, because Intel's architecture is proprietary and they will not sell you the design

>so you can go off and fab your own chips with your own modifications

There are companies that aren't intel fabbing X86 based SoC's.. And yes, ARM is a fabless semiconductor company that licenses their design but there is nothing special about the ARM design that would mean that Intel can't build similar mobile SoCs based around the Atom core. You could argue that the ARM designs are significantly less complex than modern x86 chips and thus are easier to integrate into low power SoC designs but I would argue that's becoming less and less the case as ARM is trying to get to a point that isn't "laughably behind" x86 on performance.

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Daniel Palmer

Re: The real question is...

>You can take a Arm processor core(s) add customised

>silicon round the outside and send it to a Fab.

If you can do that for ARM why would you not be able to do it for any other architecture?

I know it's hip to love ARM and hate x86 but there isn't anything that's amazingly special about ARM that isn't available in or possible to do with at least a few of the hundreds of architectures that are out in the wild.

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Daniel Palmer

Re: and we're the only company currently shipping 64-bit processors ...

"and capable of supporting 64-bit Android when it is available."

Are AMD shipping an AMD64 core that works with Android? I know that really Android should be portable to AMD's chips but do they have a 64 bit mobile chip with Linux support and Android driver support? If not then what Intel have said there is factually correct.

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MtGox boss vows to keep going despite $429 MILLION Bitcoin 'theft'

Daniel Palmer

I'm not really down with the bitcoin stuff but the Mt. Gox guy's face was on TV over here in the land of the stolen bitcoin so I did a bit of googling to inform myself...

To be honest I'm surprised so many people stashed their virtual cash with this guy and his crew. He (Mark Karpeles) seems to be one of those guys that has done bits and pieces at a bunch of shady companies but hasn't really ever had a proper position anywhere. His "company" Tibanne Ltd is apparently him + a website.. and it seems that almost everyone else involved with Mt. Gox were also expats that had "decided they needed a change in life and moved to Japan".You can't just up and move to Japan like moving around Europe as an EU citizen so I don't really buy that. The skillset of the whole company seems to have been "I knows how to makes sites and turn on servers I does" and they all seem to have KKs registered with inspired company titles like the Japanese for cat.. I have no idea why these people would all need their own registered companies for one man freelancer style operations.. and why would they need them if Mt. Gox was their full time job?..

Maybe I'm missing something.. did people hold vast sums of money there because the people running it are pretty fishy and don't have a clue because the shady nature of the funds going in and out would be less of a problem?

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Google warns Glass wearers: Quit being 'CREEPY GLASSHOLES'

Daniel Palmer

Re: Here in Japan, shutter sounds are mandatory

>So they'll use video instead...

The auto focus LED is usually forced on while taking video.. at least it is on mine and my wife's phones.

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Daniel Palmer

Re: Here in Japan, shutter sounds are mandatory

If they managed to actually force all apps to create a shutter sound and thus made taking pics of the panties in front on the escalator very risky and not worth doing 90% of the content for the police follow around shows here would be gone..

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Tata says USA rejecting HALF of Indians' work visa requests

Daniel Palmer

In my experience the code of an entry level US or UK native is usually on par with that of someone that these companies would claim is "a senior developer". Indian's are apparently born with Java certifications but I've yet to see a piece of Java written by an Indian that:

Uses packages properly.. yes a mix of hundreds of classes that implement totally different parts of the system is just great.

Understands how visibility works and uses it properly.. let's make everything public instead of actually thinking.

Doesn't use singletons all over the place to pass around state instead of structuring the application properly.

Doesn't contain code ripped straight off of stackoverflow (even funnier when they rip off the non-working code the person asking the question posted..).

etc etc etc

If you did a few hour sessions in Java at college or uni you can produce better code than that.

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Daniel Palmer

So the US can expect to see a massive rise in code quality and a dramatic decrease it stuff that has to be totally rewritten from scratch by someone that costs ten times as much but actually knows what they're doing. I wish that all developed nations would actually enforce the "skilled" requirement of these guys visa applications.. by excluding 99% of developers from India, Vietnam etc local people could actually get entry level jobs and big state funded IT projects etc might actually work for once.

And if you're thinking I'm just being nasty about the foreigners that "took our jobs!" you'll understand once you see 4000+ line classes that are 90%+ identical to 100s of other classes in the same codebase and have to fix it or are bleeding money paying expensive consultants to fix it.

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The internet is 'a gift from God' says Pope Francis

Daniel Palmer

Was this..

before or after god invented paedophile priests and methods to hide their activity from the flock? Was the internet needed before their introduction? god really is a tricky guy.. inventing all this technology that uses horrible sciency stuff that directly contradicts the bible. It's like he doesn't exist at all.

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Not even 1.4m users can save 4Chan founder Chris Poole's startup

Daniel Palmer

Re: I think I see the problem...

I think the plan with startups isn't to make something that actually has value but something that investors can be made to think has potential..

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Google grabs slice of interwebs for EVERYONE (who speaks Japanese)

Daniel Palmer

Re: みんな

>Should be 皆様, surely?

様 is only used in a few situations where that level of politeness is needed.. like on letters from your bank.

If you want a domain that promotes inclusiveness and togetherness why would you use a suffix that suggests a relationship like that?

To be honest I think it's stupid anyway. It's playing to the stereotypical image of all Japanese people being pacifist Bonsai fanciers that are all polite and nice to each other... To the outsider observer that has only ever seen the lovey dovey types that inhabit NHK it might well seem like that but the reality is fairly different.

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Daniel Palmer

I don't see this taking off to be honest.. An English TLD like "together" would probably be more popular with the Japanese as it has that 格好いい factor.

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Daniel Palmer

it's romaji (ローマ字) not romanji.. There are only a few places where romaji might appear in an otherwise kana + kanji sentence.. things like foreign brand names. There again if you don't even know what it's called I suspect you also don't know how/when it's used.

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NTT DoCoMo says two mobe OSes are enough, so sayonara to Tizen

Daniel Palmer

The only space for another mobile os here is..

The legacy keitai users.

I don't know about DoCoMo as I'm on AU but AU at least has dropped all of older keitai type handsets except super simple granny phones and phone/beacon products that you strap to the kiddy winks before they go off to school. While a lot of the 40 and 50 year olds have moved on to smart phones I think there are a lot of die hards that don't want a smartphone. Mainly because you're looking at going from 1500 yen a month for a no thrills plan (after paying off the handset) to a 8000+ yen a month unlimited data smartphone plan and you apparently can't move to a smart phone without a data plan any more (with AU at least).

If Tizen could be packaged into some lower end phones that left out most of the apps and data hungry stuff it could have a place as keitai++. There again if it doesn't have Puzzle Dragons it's basically dead on arrival in the Japanese market.

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Intel bungs PC on an SD: Tiny computer for Internet of Things and wearables

Daniel Palmer

>The full details are obscured by an NDA but the publicly available interface is plain vanilla

> SPI which allows for pretty much anything.

Except maybe driving I2C etc.. which the imp does. Because something is SD card shaped doesn't mean it's an SD card. This is what the difference between mechanical (shape, size) and electrical (signal levels, signal types) is.. If it is an SD card it will require a host and that makes very little sense for the interwebs of things.

And the SD card protocol is no SPI. One mode is SPI but that isn't the SD standard.

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Daniel Palmer

>Having an SD interface only makes sense (but given how flimsy & unreliable they are, not much sense)

The SD form factor of the dev imp is a bit of a pain in the ass.. if the mating isn't good you can go from working to trying to debug what the hell is wrong for a few hours until you probe pins. But it means you can get connectors to put on your prototypes almost anywhere. For both the Intel product and the imp I think it's a bit of "Hey, look! it fits in an SD card" and a bit of shipping something that connectors are readily available instead of some fancy connector that you can only get if you order 1000+. If intel are serious about this they will have a solder down module version coming out at the same time.

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Daniel Palmer

>We assume it does: there would be little point in adopting the SD card

>size and shape if developers couldn’t fit a low-cost SD card slot onto

>their project boards to take the Intel card.

This makes no sense. Mechanical interface and electrical interface are two different things..

They can use the SD card shape and connector without it being a true SD card. The imp mentioned below this paragraph is exactly that.. If you plug it into an SD card reader it would probably kill it.

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Don't panic! Japan to send nuke fuel rod into MELTDOWN in Fukushima probe

Daniel Palmer

Well..

At least this didn't come directly from RocketNews this time.

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HTC: Shipping Android updates is harder than you think – here's why

Daniel Palmer

Re: this is how closed hardware works

>... as a game developer

It's interesting that 9 out of 10 times that people claim they are a "game developer" the games they apparently develop seem to be poor rip offs of Speccy era games.. it makes me think that there is a word like "amatuer" missing somewhere in the sentence.

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Ubuntu desktop is so 2013... All hail 2014 Ubuntu mobile

Daniel Palmer

Re: "Does this mean Linux gets a real chance on mobile?"

>The Android kernel is still significantly different from the

>Linux kernel in terms of architecture changes.

It's not. The fact that a vanilla Linux userland will run on top of an "Android" kernel proves that... oh and the Android patches are being/have been merged into the mainline kernel.

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Torvalds: Linux devs may 'cry into our lonely beers' at Christmas

Daniel Palmer

Re: So

>So you have used Linux on the desktop for the past decade. Good for you.

>You can now count yourself in the statistically proven, entire ONE POINT SIX percent of the

> worldwide desktop users who do so as well.

I'm not sure why desktop users is some killer metric that Linux must achieve to gain status above toy OS in your mind... every Windows user in the world interacts with multiple Linux machines on a daily basis. Even the most loyal Windows fanboy probably has at least one device that is running Linux in their house (or parent's house).

Smart phones and tablets are quickly replacing the desktop and it's not Windows that is powering those devices.. Linux is probably the biggest and most important software project opensource or otherwise in the world.

If anything Windows has lost everything but the desktop. Linux runs everywhere that isn't a very low level embedded platform (AVR, Cortex M? etc). If you want a metric to back up the greatness of your OS I'm not sure that "well, lots of chain smoking grannies use it to play bingo online!" stands up against "It runs super computers, it runs major banks, it runs most of the internet, it runs most mobile devices... it scales from 1 core to many hundred cores, it scales from megabytes of memory to hundreds of gigabytes of memory etc etc".

>You've proven your "point" of Linux on the desktop by quoting your own personal experience as proof

Where did I say that was "proof" of Linux on the desktop. I don't give two flying fucks about the unwashed masses using Linux or not. Many people use Linux for serious work at the desktop level on a daily basis and it works. No one is trying to prove anything to anyone. I don't actually care if you want to use Windows.. knock yourself out.. but going around claiming that nothing works in Linux, it's not ready blah blah is just complete and utter bullshit.

>And then you even quote the status of five different kernel levels as "maintained",

>with each one having their own idiosyncrasies, as the final bonus "proof".

You were suggesting that the fast pace of kernel development makes adoption of Linux hard. Which it doesn't. There are long-term maintained kernels and there are backport projects for some key drivers. You actually have to try really hard to find a released version of a distro that is running even a few point versions behind the latest release.

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Daniel Palmer

Re: So

>But Linux is "not finished" in many areas, one major point of which is covered in

> this very news story. Linux's frequent kernel updates are doing it NO favors in

>terms of market penetration

What's the point of replying to all of your other gibberish if you apparently don't have any idea what you're talking about.. Linux has a series of maintained stable kernels -> https://www.kernel.org/category/releases.html

By the way, I've used Linux "on the desktop" just fine for the best part of a decade now. If you stopped mashing your hands onto your keyboard to try to convince everyone that Linux isn't ready yet (for what exactly I'm not sure) and actually tried to use a modern distro you might even like it.

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Daniel Palmer

Re: So

>it begs the question how long is Linux going to take?

Might help if you mentioned something that you are waiting on.. I guess you're talking about the age of "Linux on the desktop" that some simple minded folk were always going on about back in the Mandrake CDs in the post days. Try out KDE on any modern Linux distro. It works.. it might not be perfect but there again Windows or OSX aren't either. You might even like having your computer treat you like you might actually know what you're doing.

>I remember hearing about this in highschool and how it was meant to eventually be better than Windows.

Who ever said that point of Linux was to be "better than Windows". Lets forget that it already is better than Windows in many many areas.. comparing Linux to Windows is basically impossible. Windows is actually a family of kernels that have varying levels of compatibility and a similar looking UI. Windows doesn't even attempt to target all of the areas that the single Linux kernel does.

>Of course back then I was young and naive so I bought into all the hype.

What hype from where?

>Fast forward five years and its STILL not finished.

What still isn't finished? I can think of things that aren't finished.. Device Tree still has a way to go, there is a NAND interface driver for some Marvell SoCs that still isn't in mainline.. but they don't affect generic PC users. "its STILL not finished" might make some sense if the hardware world stopped progressing after the release of the Pentium but it hasn't so it will never "be finished" as long as there is new hardware, new things to do... The important thing is that key areas of the kernel A: work, B: are relatively bug-free, C: have stable interfaces so your applications don't stop working between upgrades. Can you tell us a key area of the kernel that doesn't meet A,B and C?

>Instead we get a hurried note before christmas containing a joke (?)

> about drinking beer and an off the cuff remark that Linux doesn't yet contain anything exciting.

Yes, we should demand that Linus doesn't send any more emails until Linux is 100% "finished" whatever the hell that would mean.

>This is beginning to look like Duke Nukem Forever all over again.

Do you have a serious mental dysfunction?

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Worried OpenSSL uses NSA-tainted crypto? This BUG has got your back

Daniel Palmer
FAIL

Re: Used by the NSA? Perhaps not?

>So can we conclude that either the NSA have more than one 'backdoor' into SSL

SSL != OpenSSL. OpenSSL is not the only SSL/TLS library that exists.

>and so they didn't need Dual EC DRBG working in OpenSSL,

Or they weren't targeting OpenSSL.

>or the rumours about them exploiting Dual EC weren't true to begin with?

Or they weren't targeting OpenSSL.

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Fukushima fearmongers: It's YOUR FAULT Japan DUMPED CO2 targets

Daniel Palmer

Pretty sick with all the western reporting of this...

One thing that really got me was the BBC interviewed some greeny and the quote was something like "I've been to Japan since the earthquake, it's pretty dark over there". I read that while sitting in my little apartment in rural Japan where it was nice and bright and my wife was watching loud "variety" shows on TV. I'm not sure exploiting a tragedy with outright lies to support their cause makes me want to even consider their opinions.

Apparently one in two people* get cancer at some point here ... if anything people shouldn't be worrying about an increased chance of getting cancer as it's pretty high already. They should instead be making sure they are on an extra health insurance plan that will cover them if they do need treatment as people that are only on the state system are pretty fooked if/when they get cancer.

*Yomiuri Shimbun's wording not mine.

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Linus Torvalds seeks REDEMPTION for every coded SIN

Daniel Palmer

Re: Distros too

> where long-standing bugs and incomplete (to the point of non-existence) documentation are plentiful.

This is how it works:

1. Identify the problem and fix the problem*

2. Send it to the upstream or the package maintainer of your distribution of choice to include and possible upstream

3. ?????

4. Profit.

*If you can't fix it at least report it.

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Daniel Palmer

> but to say that in my job, as an alleged professional, I spend a lot of time fixing bugs in product,

I wonder if that says something about the overall quality of the code you write..

>You don't get to work on the good stuff all the time.

There are multiple "stable" linux branches that only get fixes.

--> https://www.kernel.org/category/releases.html

Even if Linus says that the merge for 4.0 is only for fixes that doesn't stop devs working in their own local branches* on their own brand new stuff and pushing it for 4.1 so I don't actually see how this will stop people "working on the good stuff" and don't think that's actually the intention either.

>And while they are at it, can someone fit GIT so it's usable by humans without 2 years of training.

Lots of people use git without issue or "2 years of training". If you can't operate the CLI try one of the many frontends.. if you can't manage that then you're a lost cause.

* That's if they can operate git of course.

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Google RIPS aside curtain, exposes Nexus 5 phone, KitKat Android 4.4 coupling

Daniel Palmer

Re: no sd card=fail

Almost all the recent SOCs being used support OTG. To make it work on devices that don't work is usually just a case of adding the USB host permission but you need root for that.. I would expect OTG to work out of the box on the nexus 5 and it does on other Nexus devices.

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Daniel Palmer

Re: Have they actually FIXED the wireless?

That sounds like a kernel issue if anything.. Did you report the issue to the issue tracker that says it is only for framework issues and not device issues by any chance?

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Open-source hardware hacking effort 'smacked down' by USB overlords

Daniel Palmer

Re: There should not really be any problem here

You hit the nail on the head here really.. I don't think there is a problem with custom ids for the same piece of usb hardware (with the clients own hardware behind it) but giving out sub-licensed IDs for anything and everything is basically selling something like a "sub VID". The USB-IF might have been a bit heavy handed but it's easy to see the problem with the guy's idea.

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Japanese pussies slurp 'meow meow' sex wine

Daniel Palmer

Yay!

It's another one of those "ain't Japan crazy!" articles.. even better it's directly lifted from that high quality source Kotaku.

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