* Posts by Robert Baker

136 posts • joined 24 Jul 2008

Page:

NHS IT bod sends test email to 850k users – and then responses are sent 'reply all'

Robert Baker
IT Angle

Re: A valuable insight into human nature

"5. Please don't reply all. (Understand what's going on.)"

That last one should be "kids themselves that they understand what's going on, but they actually don't, especially not the deep irony of replying to all to say 'don't reply to all'."

0
0
Robert Baker
Flame

Re: A special place in Hell...

"The common example of this is the email that asks all an "if " question, as in "If any of you can help with x please email me.." and there well be then a flood of "reply all" emails from people who don't need to answer at all, because they can't help, saying that they can't help"

Amazon Marketplace has a feature whereby anyone can ask a question about a product, and Amazon then email those who have purchased the product, asking if they can answer the question; but the dumb and poorly-thought-out aspect of this is, that there is also an "I don't know" button. I have always felt the latter to be pointless, since any moderately intelligent person can infer that I don't know the answer from the fact that I don't give one.

To my mind, the only earthly use of this feature is that if someone asks a question about a Pink Floyd product, the "I don't know" option could be replaced with "I don't know, I was really drunk at the time".

2
0
Robert Baker
Joke

Re: It did not need "reply all"

"Sadly, Croydon is already on the map at the moment."

...until a certain US President-Elect, who shall remain nameless, gets access to the nuke button? ;-)

1
0
Robert Baker
Alien

Re: So, the UK population has doubled?

"You under counted the Travellers, Sirians and Afhanis by about 6.5 million..."

Sirians? So we're now getting immigrants from a planet of Alpha Canis Majoris as well? :-)

3
0
Robert Baker
Joke

Re: Only 70 or 80 people

"You actually use Spiceworks?? You deserve all you get."

I'll tell you what he wants, what he really really wants... shooting. ;-)

1
0

Boy, 12, gets €100k bill from Google after confusing Adwords with Adsense

Robert Baker
FAIL

@Semtex451, Re: Twelve =/= teen

"@GKraut - Re: "realizes..." - Please upgrade to the UK Dictionary."

Which UK dictionary? The OED, which is widely regarded to be the British English dictionary, favours the "-ize" endings.

0
0

Google may just have silently snuffed the tablet computer

Robert Baker
Flame

Re: SD card storage and Android

"You're storing important stuff on (single) SD-card storage? Remind me how reliable that is, especially long-term, again??"

As opposed to the renowned superb reliability of relying on the device's internal storage, or on cloud storage (read: somebody else's computer)?

As I already said, my first tablet was a Nexus 7 (no SD card slot and I didn't even have the option of cloud storage back then), and I lost several months' data when it failed without warning. Never again.

As for cloud storage, I had already learned the hard way that one cannot trust a third party to store data; what if they go bust, or decide without warning that they no longer want to keep your stuff? (Both of which have happened to me.) Many a web site has been lost forever because the owner made the mistake of editing it online, instead of editing it on their computer and uploading the changes, which is what I did when I had a site.

1
0
Robert Baker
Facepalm

Re: @Arctic fox, @RIBrsiq "I remember a time when tablets were supposed to kill the PC"

Oops, in the above I of course meant to say "...for when it inevitably fails, any data saved..."

0
0
Robert Baker
Unhappy

@Arctic fox, Re: @RIBrsiq "I remember a time when tablets were supposed to kill the PC"

"I note that a certain section of our little congregation here at El Reg post regularly claiming that Win 10 is destroying the pc-market. I wonder what their explanation is for condition of the tablet and smartmobe markets?"

Probably the fact that Google, in their infinite wisdom, have decreed that being able to save to a device's external SD card (and thereby do useful work on it) is somehow a "security risk". The fact that the Android OS even has such a setting is to my mind idiotic; but to have it enabled by default, and locked so that the end user cannot correct it (short of rooting the device), makes less sense than deliberately trying for a Darwin Award. You couldn't make it up.

I know from experience (my first tablet was a Nexus 7) that it is not safe to buy a tablet which lacks an SD card slot, for any data saved to internal memory since you last backed-up the device is lost forever; and the other choices are to contend with the real security risk of cloud storage (not to mention the waste of internet connectivity; we don't all have so-called "unlimited" data) or to ignore Google's paranoia and decide to use my device in my way, not theirs. Even if there is some kind of risk in saving to an SD card, to my mind it's much less than the risks of the other two approaches, as outlined above.

12
0

Apple seeks patent for paper bag - you read that right, a paper bag

Robert Baker

Re: Folds or Gussets?

Folds and gussets never show their fruitless worth.

0
0
Robert Baker

Re: Now if only...

Is superglue made from pegasi?

0
0

Delete Google Maps? Go ahead, says Google, we'll still track you

Robert Baker
Black Helicopters

Re: Creepy

"When the whole postcode delineates one city street and the satnav takes me to the precise house. And when this precision extends to knowing which side of the road we can rule out simple coincidence."

Unless the street is shorter than average, it's likely to have more than one postcode covering it. My street has one postcode for the northern part, another for the middle (covering just two houses!), and a third for the southern part. If it had house entrances on the odd side as well as the even side, it would probably have another two or three posttcodes to cover those.

0
0

BT boils over, blows off Steam, accuses Valve of patent infringement

Robert Baker
IT Angle

I have these wonderful ideas

I have just thought of "Method of sending text messages over the Internet", "Method for allowing debate to take place online" and "Proposal to construct an online book of faces".

I wonder if BT would be willing to buy them off me and patent them, so as to make millions?

0
0

'Daddy, what's a Blu-ray disc?'

Robert Baker
Facepalm

"There are 2 competing '4K' sizes - one which is 4K pixels wide (4096x2160) and one which is double 1080p in either dimension (3840x2160), but not quite 4K pixels wide."

The trouble with the term "HD" is that it is becoming meaningless through abuse, like the way "hi-fi" all too often means only "this device makes some kind of sound"[*]. In video projectors particularly, I've seen ones advertised as "HD" (which if true would mean 1920x1080) which in fact aren't even XGA (1024x768).

[*] I have actually seen the term "hi-fi" applied to an electronic organ, which is a sound generator and hence has no "fidelity" to be higher or lower.

0
0

BBC detector vans are back to spy on your home Wi-Fi – if you can believe it

Robert Baker
IT Angle

Re: What a pile of c**p!

"It not a huge job to associate an IP address with a property address ..."

MaxMind, who provide the IP/geographic address database, has always stated that this doesn't work, that their database is not fine-grained enough to locate IP addresses down to below city-block level (that is. at best to within about 500 yards) — in most cases, to city level and in some cases county or country level.

I have done location traces on my own IP addresses from time to time; when I was on Three, I was shown to be in Maidenhead Berks (about 30 miles out), although I don't know what the uncertainty radius was, and more recently I'm reckoned to be in the centre of London (probably Trafalgar Square or Piccadilly Circus), with an uncertainty radius of the entire Greater London County out to the M25.

The erroneous belief that "it is easy to associate an IP address with a household" has led to the creation of websites claiming that all the cybercriminals in the USA operate from one small farm north of Wichita, Kansas — because that farm's co-ordinates were the ones returned for IP addresses whose only known location is "somewhere in the USA", and those searching for it ignored (or weren't delivered) the 1500-mile uncertainty radius. Even the FBI made that mistake. Hopefully, now that the secret supervillain den has moved to the middle of a lake west of Wichita, the innocent inhabitants of the farm will be left in peace.

0
0
Robert Baker

Re: Once upon a time detector vans existed

"...no counsel I encountered on either side [of any case] displayed a knowledge of statistics.no counsel I encountered on either side displayed a knowledge of statistics."

Statistics is one of those subjects which even experts sometimes get wrong. I recently saw an article about how 3% of men and 11% of women suffered some kind of child abuse; it was headlined "14% of adults suffered child abuse". According to my arithmetic, 3% of 50% of the population plus 11% of the other 50% adds up to 7% of the total population, not 14%.

1
0
Robert Baker
Devil

Re: Spy on the screen and loudspeakers

"Tick the box, post it back and they will not bother you again."[citation needed]

That's not my experience, nor that of at least one other poster in this forum; doing that merely changed their frequency of bothering me from once a month to once every few months.

I finally got fed up and slung all their letters in the recycling unopened.

3
0
Robert Baker
Big Brother

Re: Hounded

"The fact a set happens to be showing a given programme does not tell you how many (if any) people are watching it."

Sadly not relevant. The exact wording of the TV licence is that it is a licence to receive TV broadcasts — which is why it's a crime to watch TV without a licence, even if you only watch non-BBC channels. And which is why (contrary to what the TV Licensing Authority heavily imply in their adverts, whilst being careful not to say it outright and thus open themselves to challenge) it isn't a crime to use a TV set solely as a monitor for a games console or DVD player or whatever, as established by a test case (in 1984, appropriately enough). It is also why you need a colour TV licence to use a TV recording device, even if your actual set is only B&W — because the recording device isn't.

The fact that a TV set is receiving broadcast TV in a particular household is enough to require that household to have a licence; whether that set actually has a human being attending it is neither here nor there.

3
0
Robert Baker
Black Helicopters

Re: I got exactly one letter.

"I chuck them in the bin now."

Bad, bad thing to do.

You should chuck them in the recycling. ;-)

9
0

Flying Spaghetti Monster is not God, rules mortal judge

Robert Baker

Re: Apologies in advance to all Christians......

". which some here seem to hold as a religion, QED"

In Unix there is strength.

0
0

It's Wikipedia mythbuster time: 8 of the best on your 15th birthday

Robert Baker
FAIL

Re: Based in reality

Don't speak to me of Wikia — it's at least as bad, after all it too was founded by Jimmy Wales.[cetacean needed]

Most of the articles on the Beatles Wikia are of two types — those copied from Wikipedia, and those stolen from Wikipedia. Not helped by the fact that there are sometimes idiots who remove the {{Wikipedia}} tags from articles, thereby converting them from "copied" to "stolen".

Anyone wanting Fab Four information is best advised to head straight for Wikipedia, and cut out the middle man.

0
0
Robert Baker
Pint

Just regard Wikipedia as the world's largest trivia site, and you won't go far wrong.[citation needed]

2
0

Official: Toshiba pulls out of European consumer PC market

Robert Baker

Re: Toshiba laptops

I bought myself a Toshiba craptop in August 2013, naïvely believing that because it was a "top brand" it would be good. It seemed to be good at first (except for the fact that a 1366x768 resolution isn't all that high these days, especially not the vertical bit), but the keyboard started failing after only a month, and had totally failed after only 6 months — and not in the sense of "no keystrokes" either, but in the sense of "random keystrokes making the machine all-but-unusable". It took another month for the keyboard to finally die completely, so I could get the machine working again with an external keyboard.

0
0

Google API spring cleaning ends after four and a half years

Robert Baker

Re: They could have fixed it...

I had a similar problem the other day -- I wanted to search specifically for "Skin'ead O'Connor" (the nickname she commonly had in her early days, due to her ridiculously short hair), but Google assumed that the search I wanted was "Sinèad O'Connor". If that was what I'd wanted, I would have typed it (probably without the grave).

I hate it when dumb people or bots assume that they know better than me what I want; they don't.

0
0

Microsoft researchers smash homomorphic encryption speed barrier

Robert Baker
Joke

Re: Stamp out homophorbia

I don't believe in J. R. Hartley, therefore J. R. Hartley must be eliminated. OBEY! OBEY! EX-TER-MIN-ATE!!!

1
0
Robert Baker
Joke

Pity we don't still have Alan Turing

He would have been great at this -- after all, he was homogeneous.

0
0

This Android Trojan steals banking creds and wipes your phone

Robert Baker
Joke

"Я сделал, но теперь я не могу преобразовать его обратно. Помогите!!"

I will not buy this tobacconist's, it is scratched, comrade.

0
0

UK ISP Sky to make smut an opt-in service from 2016

Robert Baker

"the parents who would rather the state taught their children right from wrong cry and moan that it's too easy to search "tits" on Google"

Which could be a problem for the kids if they're trying to do homework on the wild birds of Britain.

0
0

Kids' TV show Rainbow in homosexual agenda shocker

Robert Baker
Joke

Re: Or the Twanger episode

"Then there were Bill and Ben in a bed with little Weed."

What were Bill and Ben smoking in those pipes of theirs?

Weeeed!

(They say the old ones are the best...)

0
0
Robert Baker
Pint

"Let's give them a bottle of Glen's Vodka or Merrydown Cider instead,"

Whoever downvoted this post is clearly too dumb even to recognise sarcasm, much less understand it.

0
0

Music lovers move to block Phil Collins' rebirth

Robert Baker

Re: Non Story?

It's well known that e-petitions aren't worth the paper they're written on.

1
0

Oh dear, Microsoft: UK.gov signs deal with LibreOffice

Robert Baker
FAIL

Re: Cue all the usual stuff about incompatibility etc

"pish

[Ctrl-Home] and [Ctrl-End]"

Once more, I get an idiot response from someone replying to what they believed I said, rather than what I actually said. The keys above move to the beginning or end of the document; what I was referring to was moving to the beginning or end of a range (a contiguous block of non-empty cells, running in any of the four principal directions).

Can LO do this? If so, why doesn't it do this using the standard [End] followed by the relevant arrow key functionality offered by all previous spreadsheets? Why should the end-user have to flap about with key bindings, just to get the thing working properly?

1
0
Robert Baker
Flame

Re: Cue all the usual stuff about incompatibility etc

LO isn't anywhere near as strong as Excel.

I sometimes use Excel for working on very large spreadsheets. Libre Office Calc is useless for this because it lacks the vitally important navigation feature of using [End]+[arrow key] to quickly move to the start or end of a large range. But when I pointed out this lack to the LO team, they just replied "that's a Microsoft feature" as if this were somehow a valid reason for not including it in LO. (And in any case they're wrong; it dates back at least to Lotus 1-2-3, which is probably why it ended up in Excel in the first place).

Microsoft Works; LO doesn't, for me at least.

3
5

'I posted winning race ticket in Facebook selfie ... and someone stole it!'

Robert Baker

Re: Obviously intelligence is not involved in either betting or boasting.

"It seems it's easily done: only a couple of years ago a Reg writer included a photo in an article in which his credit card details could be read (except of course for those numbers on the back by the signature strip)."

It's for that reason that, when I took and uploaded a picture of my Raspberry Pi with a "credit card" for size comparison, what I actually used was my Costa Coffee Club card; no identity information on the front.

0
0

Wikipedia’s biggest scandal: Industrial-scale blackmail

Robert Baker
Joke

Re: I gave up on Wikipedia a while ago...

"However, I can't complain about the spiced meats and interesting cheeses they use"

Because if you do, you get reverted? :-)

0
0
Robert Baker
FAIL

Re: I think Captain Scarlet would go under

"The Captain Scarlet page was created on 8 January 2003."

And Wikipedia existed long before then.

What are you wittering on about?

0
0
Robert Baker
Holmes

Re: An experience with Wikipedia

Reminds me of another revert I suffered — the Chuck-a-Luck article included a section about two computer variants involving three-sided and nine-sided "dice", but a quick web search revealed that the only other published information was the inserter's own web site (to which, of course, the section gave a link). So I deleted it on the grounds of the rule "Wikipedia is not for things you made up one day" — only to be reverted on the grounds that "I had removed information", by a self-important twit who didn't bother to check what I had removed, nor why (he didn't even read the edit summary). (So I just redid the deletion, reiterating that the deleted section was non-notable self-promotion; and it was the other editor who got in trouble for the incident, not I.)

2
0
Robert Baker
FAIL

Re: I think Captain Scarlet would go under

"I have no idea..."

Try reading what I posted again; and bear in mind that Wikipedia is being constantly edited. Just because the information is there now, that doesn't in any way "disprove" what I wrote.

1
0
Robert Baker
FAIL

The problem with Wikipedia

One big problem with Wikipedia is that it hinges on the dubious concept of "notability". "Notability" is one of those ideas which sounds fine, as long as you don't look at it too closely; the problem is, who decides what is "notable", and on what basis do they decide?

I have had at least two of my Wikipedia edits reverted on the grounds that it isn't enough for virtually everyone in Britain over the age of 30 to have heard of something; to be notable, it has to be something that Americans have heard of. One of them was Captain Scarlet.

(Wikipedians are indestructibly stupid — you are not. Remember this and do not try to imitate them.)

2
0
Robert Baker
Joke

Re: Was the USSR an ally of Nazi Germany?

Sounds like that Wikipedian has an Axis to grind.

5
0

ICO fines anti nuisance call company for making nuisance calls

Robert Baker
FAIL

Re: One small step

"Time to ban anonymous calls, IMO - at least from non-residential lines..."

Unfortunately, there are legitimate reasons for anonymous calls; I used to volunteer for a local branch of Mind, and their calling was set to anonymous in case, for example, they ever needed to return the call of an abuse victim without the abuser later finding out from the phone bill or whatever that they had done so.

If I blocked anonymous calls, my GP surgery would be unable to contact me.

0
0

'WOMAN FOUND ON MARS' – now obvious men are from Venus

Robert Baker
Pint

Men are from Mars, women are from Venus?

Ideas like that are from Uranus.

1
0

Pan Am Games: Link to our website without permission and we'll sue

Robert Baker
Coat

Re: Bigger place...

Sometimes the train journey from Blackpool to London takes almost that long.

0
0

Wake up, sheeple! If you ask Siri about 9/11 it will rat you out to the police!

Robert Baker

Re: re: 2015-June-02 is pretty unambiguous @James O'Shea

Actually, it wasn't the Greeks (at least in Biblical times) who screwed up the dating. The AD epoch was established in 520-something AD by Dionysius Exiguus, and it's believed that he deliberately fudged his calculations to make the year he established AD be the start of the second Easter cycle.

0
0
Robert Baker
Joke

Re: Depends...

In which case "phone the ${expletive} ambulance" is more likely to be uttered...

If someone says/shouts "Call the fucking ambulance!", will Siri try to despatch an ambulance all the way from Austria?

3
0

ZX Spectrum 'Hobbit' revival sparks developer dispute

Robert Baker
Coat

Re: Mondegreen

Reminds me of the time I could have sworn I'd just seen a magazine cover advertising Resident Elvis. Then I did a double-take and saw that it was actually Resident Evil 5.

0
0

RADIOACTIVE WWII aircraft carrier FOUND OFF CALIFORNIA

Robert Baker
Pint

Re: Someone set us up the bomb!

Er, it was "someone set up us the bomb".

In AD 2015, AYB was continuing. :-) (Old memes never die, they just smell that way.)

1
0
Robert Baker
Mushroom

Bad use of SI units, again

"...a distance of about 80kms from San Francisco"

80 kilometre-seconds? WTF is a kilometre-second when it's at home?

Presumably El Reg meant "80km", just as batteries are commonly (mis-)rated as "2000mAh" instead of 2Ah.

2
0

Web geeks grant immortality to Sir Terry Pratchett – using smuggled web code

Robert Baker
Flame

"Am I the only person who thinks this is a crass waste of time, effort and bandwidth by people who usually consider themselves more intelligent than average?"

Very likely; look at the number of downvotes your post has gathered. One of the few times recently that downvotes here have actually made sense.

1
1

Page:

Forums