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* Posts by Terry Barnes

396 posts • joined 21 Jul 2008

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Boffins say they've got Lithium batteries the wrong way around

Terry Barnes
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Re: Green Prince of Darkness

"On the other hand, clouds, generally speaking, are not so reliable."

Agreed. But you'd be surprised how little of the earth's surface, near the equator, would need to be covered in solar panels to provide 100% of global energy requirements 24/7 - even with clouds. There's "a bit of work" required to make that happen, but it's feasible - meaning we'd use batteries for portable devices (like cars) rather than to smooth sporadic grid input.

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Terry Barnes
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Re: Green Prince of Darkness

"Since DC generation from wind and photovoltaics is sporadic"

I believe the sun's output is pretty reliable. Life on our planet rather depends on it.

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Evil mining firms? Please. Obeying profit motive is KINDER to the environment

Terry Barnes
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Erm

"If the environmentalists are right, in that new mines will inevitably be more expensive to develop than the old mines with the easy stuff in it, then when mines close because of falling prices it must be the new mines that close, right? "

That's quite a straw man. Older mines will have less un-mined material left and ageing capital kit. A newer mine will have the latest tech and, presumably, a worthwhile amount of material to be mined.

Development cost is not operational cost.

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Microsoft's SELFIE-TASTIC Nokia 830, 730: Complete with DOG SMILE WHITENER

Terry Barnes
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Re: But Will They Have Any Useful Attributes?

I'm not sure I understand. My 820 does handsfree, and does it pretty well. I think it's a standard feature.

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Terry Barnes
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Re: Flash/Non Flash.

"many consumers wouldn't buy a Microsoft phone anyway ... such a poor record on lies and mistruths."

Do you mean in much the same way as practically no-one in the world has a PC running a Microsoft OS?

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CNN 'tech analyst' on NAKED CELEBS: WHO IS this mystery '4chan' PERSON?

Terry Barnes
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Re: Journalistic Integruhty

"So, people that break into safes are safehackers?"

I don't believe such a term is in general usage amongst the population, so no.

The use of "hacker" to mean a person who gains unauthorised access and use of a computer system *is* in general usage.

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Terry Barnes
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Re: Journalistic Integruhty

"they still call people that break into systems for nefarious purposes 'hackers'"

Usage defines meaning. Much as it may pain you, hacker is the right term.

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Nokia: Read these Maps, Samsung – we're HERE for the Gear

Terry Barnes
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You need to buy a 2 Amp charging lead and try to have at least 50% battery when you start navigating. I've just driven to the south of France with my Lumia 820 as a sat nav, the battery was fine. Before I bought a better charging lead it would run out of puff after a couple of hours.

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One step closer to ROBOT BUTLERS: Dyson flashes vid of VACUUM SUCKER bot

Terry Barnes
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James Dyson said in an interview that they've never made a vacuum with an motor that powerful - they rely on efficiency rather than grunt to work.

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Bright lights, affordable motor: Ford puts LED headlights onto Mondeo

Terry Barnes
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Re: Great, maybe...

"Either visibility is such that you don't need your fog lights turned on, or you shouldn't be doing anything like 70 mph."

I was taught to only use rear fog lights in fog (obviously) and only for as long as no headlights were visible behind. Once I could see lights behind, turn them off - on the basis that they had served their purpose at that point and leaving them on was likely to just mask braking.

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Terry Barnes
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Re: Dazzle and indicators

"For example you will not find me stopped at traffic lights, in a lane where I can only turn right, sitting there with my indicator on."

Even though such indication would be of use to young people who've yet to learn to drive, or to people with less than perfect vision? Don't presume that just because you know it's a turn-only lane that other people do too.

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Terry Barnes
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Re: pushbike headlamps

"Most night cyclists I see have poor or no lighting at all"

Your statement contains a logical conundrum. It seems to suggest that cyclists with no lights are easier to see.

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Terry Barnes
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Re: Dazzle.

" a smaller headlight will appear brighter when looked at head on"

isn't that why in the UK headlamps have to aim down and to the left? It shouldn't be possible to look at an oncoming car's headlights head on because they should never be pointing that way.

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Terry Barnes
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Re: Daytime running lights

" Now with daytime lamps, the dash lights are always on, making people sometimes think their headlamps are on."

That's not the case with our VW. Only turning side or headlights on illuminates the dash lighting. with the lights set to 'off' and the DRLs on (conventional bulbs, not LEDs on our car) only the needles are illuminated.

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Huawei: 'Tizen has no chance', Windows Phone is 'difficult'... it's Android all the way

Terry Barnes
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Re: This is terrible news!

There are seven in our house right now. My work phone and personal phone. My wife's personal phone and work phone. My father-in-law and mother-in-law both have one, as does my son's carer.

Maybe I fit an odd demographic, but I don't know anyone who has bought a smartphone in the last six months who hasn't bought a windows phone.

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Stalwart hatchback gets a plug-in: Volkswagen e-Golf

Terry Barnes
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Re: No spare wheel?

I'd imagine exactly the same as with the many modern cars that come without a spare - a can of squirty puncture fix stuff to get you to the nearest tyre repair place.

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Who will kill power companies? TESLA, says Morgan Stanley

Terry Barnes
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Re: Why Li-ion?

"It matters very little whether a house-scale solar storage battery weighs 10kg, 100kg, 1 tonne or possibly even 10 tonnes."

It kind of does unless you want to undertake significant building work to strengthen your floors.

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Terry Barnes
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Re: Lets price up a car battery

"I went into all this is some detail years ago."

Clearly not all that deeply. Lead acid batteries are ruined quickly by deep discharge cycles, so to avoid replacing your cells every few months you would need to buy multiples of your actual intended usage. That takes up a ton of space and requires a reasonable amount of maintenance.

You also seem to have ignored the requirement for a means of charging this huge shed full of batteries - which is becoming cheaper on seemingly a monthly basis.

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Terry Barnes
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Re: Net energy gaiin?

"The same probably goes for solar cells, and wind turbines. If you're using solar cells or wind turbines to make energy you're probably better burning the fossil fuel directly."

Er what?

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Bring back error correction, say Danish 'net boffins

Terry Barnes
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No. MPLS is a method of managing traffic priority across a managed network. It works well where you can make a reasonable prediction about the expected volumes of different traffic types in a private or virtually private network and dimension network elements accordingly. It couldn't work in a public network because users have a strong incentive to game the system by marking all packets as being of the highest priority. You end up back at square one.

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Terry Barnes
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My bold prediction is that we will see some return to circuit switching to run alongside packet switching in our public networks. That would most likely take the form of an overlay network and traffic would be split out at edge routers. For some types of traffic, for some usage and routing scenarios, packet switching is awfully inefficient and difficult. At some point it becomes easier to just circuit switch that traffic than it does to try and engineer an illusion of circuit switching over a packet switched network.

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Termination charges drop smacks Vodafone and EE in the WALLET

Terry Barnes
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Re: EE / Orange lost me as a customer after 12 + years

"They've left me no choice."

Haven't you just described your choice? Better service at a higher price or poorer service at a lower price.

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Major problems beset UK ISP filth filters: But it's OK, nobody uses them

Terry Barnes
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"but as long as it's all or nothing who'd sign up for it?"

It's not - or it's not with BT. You get to tick "yes" or "no" to each of the listed categories.

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WTF is ... Virtual Customer Premises Equipment?

Terry Barnes
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Re: Makes sense to me

"You don't know every subject in the world to an equivalent level to that, why are computers special? Because you already know them and think everyone else should too?"

I agree. Why buy medicines from a pharmacy - that's just giving control to an elite. Everyone should learn chemistry well enough to make their own common medicines at home. Etc...

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Oh girl, you jus' didn't: Level 3 slaps Verizon in Netflix throttle blowup

Terry Barnes
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Re: Monopoly = Artificial Scarcity

"Competition works, monopoly doesn't. Let's do this."

Rarely in the last mile though.

Your proposals would take away all the profitable revenue from those providers. No new entrant is going to want to come in and invest a fortune to compete with the incumbent when you've ensured that there's no money to be made. Two providers in a market that used to have one results in half the customers for each mile of cable laid - making the economics even worse. That's why we don't have multiple last mile electricity or gas or water or sewage networks - it would just make the cost of those networks higher, not lower.

I think you're really arguing for a regulated monopoly.

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Nokia emits Windows Phone 8.1 'Cyan' upgrade for Lumia gear

Terry Barnes
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Re: HERE we go again...

Navteq kit is used widely, not just in phones. Many car manufacter's OEM satnav kit is Navteq based.

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F1? No, it's Formula E as electric racing cars hit the track

Terry Barnes
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Re: Are electric cars really usefull?

"Bottom line: This technology hasn't really been thought out thoroughly."

Bottom line: Thorough answers to all these questions exist, you've either incapable or have chosen not to find them for yourself. Your not thinking something through properly does not mean that other people haven't.

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New MH370 search zone picked using just seven satellite 'handshakes'

Terry Barnes
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You, er, know what the word 'probably' actually means right?

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FCC to spend $2 BEEELLION to install Wi-Fi in US schools

Terry Barnes
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Re: Nice that they're thinking of us, but ...

"Actually, it would be nice if they simply took a lesson from history and declared internet access services to be a public utility! Under those rules, similar to electric and telephone and such, if a private corporation wishes to make money serving an area, they are obligated to offer service to everyone in that area "

Guess what would happen if you did that. Almost certainly the opposite of what you intend.

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Tesla, Nissan, BMW mull all-for-plug, plug-for-all electrocar charger plan

Terry Barnes
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Re: Industry not thinking things through - whatever next?

Your figures presume zero capacity left in the batteries of cars that use the facility.

1,000 cars a day seems optimistic for the early days of this technology. It might be a good number if few petrol stations serve electric cars, it might be way too high if facilities are more widespread.

I don't generally wait for my car to be empty of fuel before filling up. It seems reasonable that the same would be the case for both battery swappers and battery rechargers.

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Psst. We've got 400Gb/s Ethernet working - but don't tell anyone

Terry Barnes
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Re: 400GB

" 400GB

Wow. That is crazy stupid fast"

It would be - but this is 400Gb. Units are important.

"Too bad my avg home speed is still between 1-7MB (depending on the moon cycles and coin flips and horse races)."

You could have 400Gbps to your home today via DWDM. You might not be too happy about the bill though.

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Terry Barnes
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Re: Way ahead of the access layer

Data traffic is more than just the sum of consumer broadband connections. Thing about the amount of data that will be flying around as the result of Big Data and Internet of Things. IBM are delightedly telling people at the moment that 90% of all the data ever created was created in the last two years - and that data wants to go places.

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Terry Barnes
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Re: Entire article fails to mention the other factor...

"It's kinda an important detail. Right?"

Yes, but in a different context. This kit is capable of generating a datastream at a very high rate but it's not a transmission device. The transceiver of this device would be connected to some kind of transmission kit to leave the building. This bitrate is easily handled today by DWDM kit - mind-boggling data rates over fibre is unexceptional in telco core kit. In terms of distance - how long is a piece of fibre?

If what you're asking about this as an access line technology - out to an end user site - no. You could put the same telco DWDM kit in someone's house but they wouldn't like the bill.

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UK govt 'tearing up road laws' for Google's self-driving cars: THE TRUTH

Terry Barnes
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Re: @'s water music

"Have you seen how stupid people are? We let them drive.

We also let people design hardware and write software that will be used to control autonomous vehicles. Could you safely say that out of all the code required someone won't introduce a few bugs here and there?"

Probably not the same people in all likelihood. I don't think safety critical programming jobs are handed out randomly to people and the testing regime is likely strenuous.

Do you every fly in a commercial airliner, or is your disdain for programmers reserved only for those involved with cars?

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Terry Barnes
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Re: I'm against it at this time. here's why...

"Out of interest, if a gearbox failure (or other mechanical issue unrelated to driver decisions) happened on a vehicle causing loss of control and subsequent road traffic incident, who is currently considered liable? Both for a vehicle in-warranty with a full service history, and for a vehicle out of warranty being self-serviced?"

It's always the insurer of the vehicle that caused the incident.

That insurer is then free to attempt to reclaim its loss if it feels that someone else is culpable. That could be the manufacturer but it's unlikely to be the owner if the car has a valid MOT and they didn't knowingly drive the vehicle on the road with a fault. If the car was road legal at the time of the accident, the owner isn't liable for mechanical failure, even if they have never had the car serviced.

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Terry Barnes
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Re: Driverless car

">The Docklands Light Railway?

Is it the Victoria line that has drivers only because computers can't strike?"

No. The DLR was built to allow evacuation by foot on footpaths. There's always a TFL employee on board, just not driving.

The model with the underground is that the driver is expected to be able to deal with most technical problems - usually by isolating faulty equipment. If they can't they're there to guide people off a train for a reasonably tricky walk down a tunnel with no footpath.

The models are different.

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Ofcom's campaign against termination rates continues

Terry Barnes
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Re: Solving telemarketers

"OFCOM need to add a rule which says that calls with UK CLI must originate in the UK."

And with that single step you break mobile roaming.

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Look inside ELON MUSK'S CAR! Tesla S wundervehicle has voom

Terry Barnes
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Re: Poorly researched reporting

"That means relatively few daytime chargers."

So battery swap during the day and charge them at night.

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Terry Barnes
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Re: Superchargers Free!

"For everyone in the UK to change to an electric car within one year, we would need to build more lithium ion batteries than have ever been made since they were invented."

So what? If we all switched to space hoppers we'd need to build more space hoppers than have ever been made since they were invented.

Your maths is kind of wonky because increased demand shifts the economics of accessing the resources required to make Li-Ion batteries. It's bizarre to do some sums on a completely different transportation model than exists today and then presume that there wouldn't be a similar shift in production of the raw materials.

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Terry Barnes
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Re: Battery swapping

"That's way beyond charging with some 'spare" energy from renewables, you're looking at major grid infrastructure."

Well, it doesn't seem intractable. Just charge overnight when demand is low. The gap between daytime peak usage and nighttime low usage in any given conurbation is plenty enough to charge some batteries. This probably isn't the right site on which to proclaim a technical challenge as being somehow beyond the wit of man to address.

"5. What would the planning folks say about a warehouse with 100+ full Tesla-style Li-Ion batteries stored? I doubt the local fire brigade would be keen to have it on their patch"

Let's hope no-one tells them about petrol stations.

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Terry Barnes
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Re: Battery swapping

"2. You've just bought a shiny new electric BMW. After you've driven it a couple of hundred miles, how happy will you be for the battery (~50% of the value of the car) to be swapped for one from a 10-year-old rust-bucket Toyota?"

Why would you care? You're buying the energy but leasing the container. If the battery doesn't perform properly, you take it back, get a refund and swap the battery. Forget about battery ownership - they're owned by the manufacturer.

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Telstra kills ZOMBIE BOXES all over Australia

Terry Barnes
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You get the benefit of forced concentration too. Where there's a platform in decline you might have four boxes supporting a product, each capable of handling 1000 connections but now with just 100 or so on each box. If you're forced to replace those boxes you'll put them on a single, smaller box. If there's no fire or other disaster, why would you spend any Capex on a platform in decline when what is there works just fine?

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Android is a BURNING 'hellstew' of malware, cackles Apple's Cook

Terry Barnes
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Re: Idiot misses the point... on purpose?

"Apparently, the reason most Apple users run the latest iOS version has nothing to do with how easily Apple makes new versions available, it has to do with the facts that most of them will slavishly upgrade their hardware every time Apple brings out a new version."

You're rather ignoring the fact that those 'slavish upgraders' tend to sell their old devices and the new owners put the latest OS on. Or - are you suggesting that they just bin their old devices?

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US citizens want stricter CO2 regulations by two to one – Yale poll

Terry Barnes
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Re: It is an outright lie.

"There is no way that carbon dioxide is causing global warming. It is a measly 0.035% of our atmosphere. There simply is no way it can have any effect at all on global temperature at that concentration."

I look forward to reading your published, peer-reviewed paper on the subject.

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Vodafone turns to EU, asks it to FORCE 'fair' fibre pricing

Terry Barnes
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Re: So how did EE manage to launch 4G?

Why the thumbs down? How can the addition of a user to a network create anything other than a linear increase in bandwidth requirement?

It could only be exponential if each subsequent user requires more bandwidth than the previous one, which is plainly nonsensical.How many users would you need to add before the next user requires more bandwidth than has ever existed in the world, ever, just for themselves?

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It's Google's NO-WHEEL car. OMG... there aren't any BRAKES

Terry Barnes
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Re: I don't want one

You're already being driven by a computer if your car is in any way modern. Accelerator response, steering assistance, braking response and ESP are all controlled by computers, programmed by "some unknown programmer".

Do you ever fly? If so, I have some news for you...

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Terry Barnes
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Re: Worrying

"If the guys in the video were in their 40's and 50's and were all ex transport industry (rail, flight avionics etc) then okay, you'd know that those guys were well versed in their subject and had very probably followed a certifiable design process."

You don't think Google might have the money and means to employ appropriate experts? The amount of time and money they've spent on this leads me to believe that they probably did use the brightest and best people with the right skills and experience. I'd imagine the US government was quite keen on that being the case too before letting them loose on the streets.

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Terry Barnes
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Re: Why?

Off the top of my head;

-Nearly all accidents are caused by human error.

-We live in an ageing society and old people still need to get around.

-Automatic driving makes more efficient use of energy.

I don't think Google say anywhere in the video that owning one will be compulsory.

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Terry Barnes
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Re: So what happens...

"...when an automatic software update bricks them all at once?"

Crikey, what an intractable problem. If only someone, somewhere had thought of a way to avoid such things.

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Terry Barnes
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Re: Who is liable

"When these things start hitting the streets I predict insurers will cover their arses by wanting to charge sky-high premiums"

They'll set their premiums based on a statistical analysis of the risk. If they crash less frequently than cars with human drivers, the premiums will be lower. It would be in the interest of insurance companies to steer people towards automation if it lowers accident rates.

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