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* Posts by BlueGreen

1025 posts • joined 15 Jul 2008

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Inside the Hekaton: SQL Server 2014's database engine deconstructed

BlueGreen
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Re: I don't know where to start @Tony Rogerson

> and one of the reasons why in-memory OLTP tables has been added into the product

That's funny, mssql had in memory tables. DBCC PINTABLE in sql server 6.5. I think they were removed in 7.

To be more accurate, once read in the data was never paged out, but much the same thing I guess.

> Basically with the new Hekaton bits I can take an existing database, pick out an individual table I think might benefit from the in-memory bits (durable or non-durable at the table level unlike sybase) and put that in memory.

I'm being dumb, but can you explain how this is supposed to help? If a table access is hot, it's pulled into memory and, being hot, is kept there. If a table access is cold, it is better to be paged out by hot data than take up space while cold. I am missing something significant here.

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BlueGreen
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Re: I don't know where to start @Avalanche

MVCC has its tradeoffs, it's not 'better' or 'worse'. And Interbase was a flaky POS.

And while I'm here, "ACID compliance, now a feasible technique as each row is stored in memory rather than disk" isn't the D in ACID rather meaningless in this whole sentence. That's what I meant when I called the article contradictory.

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BlueGreen
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Re: I don't know where to start @Matt 21

> but it does read to me as if it has been written by someone with little experience in the DBA world.

It does seem to be a mix of fluff, marketing and some contradiction. It's a pretty crappy and unhelpful piece overall.

Which is disappointing given the track record of the authors at the end of the article.

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MtGox chief Karpelès refuses to come to US for g-men's grilling

BlueGreen
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Re: Boring Green Andrew Ferni Anonymous Cluetard Nonesuch I wouldn't..... @Plump & Bleaty

> drown out dissenting views with personal attacks and waffle

But why then do you repeatedly not address what I say? you just back out when it gets inconvenient. You did it twice before, you've made the hat-trick now. Kind of getting a habit with you.

> But that would be simply dishonest, something you obviously do not have a problem with

But plumpness, that is hardly something you can accuse of others of, is it. Shall I make a list? No? That's because you'd have to back out yet again.

> you cannot defend the indefensible

Tautologically not, so why do you say such a silly thing?

> If you were to post an original and good argument in any post then I would ...

... ignore it if it's inconvenient then make personal attacks. Q.V. much of this thread.

> the voting system is not a tool for recognition of the intrinsic value of a post's argument

Yes it is you silly sheep

> you just can't think independently

I envy your individuality, plumpness. You're special.

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BlueGreen
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Re: Boring Green Andrew Ferni Anonymous Cluetard Nonesuch I wouldn't..... @Plump & Bleaty

Hiya plumpness, it is odd that you see this as personal. The lack of response to my pointing out of your errors suggests I'm in the right area, even more so now that you've backed down. Backed down twice in fact.

And twice I have acknowledged your honesty in your response, don't you think that's worthy of an upvote? Maybe it's because you didn't read my response properly. Try again, and address my points, thanx.

I've upvoted your post BTW. I upvote you, you upvote me, everyone wins, right plumpness? That's the power of socialism, lambchop.

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BlueGreen
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Re: Boring Green Andrew Ferni Anonymous Cluetard Nonesuch I wouldn't..... @Plump & Bleaty

(Dear Plump & Blleaty, kindly refrain from stripping the title of your monicker as this makes the thread hard to follow. I had to add it back again, sorry)

> LOL, still trying with the personal attacks

Defintely not a personal attack, plumpness! Just pointing out your repeated error.

> right-think sources

I thought you were right wing so I fail to see how you present this as criticism.

> Well, I suppose you could say I have done nothing of 'value' seeing as value is itself intrinsic dependent on the beholder's own values.

So even in your own eyes you haven't done anything worthy. Honest, I guess.

> I may have done plenty that most responsible, educated, intelligent and law-abiding citizens

Implying that you also may not have done? Peculiarly honest of you, lambchop

> but then I can see why that would equate to zero for you.

I honestly don't think that of you. Not at all.

> Why do the lefties always think everyone is just dying to shriek 'me, me, me', just because their icons are so egotistical?

I was asking about *you* but you seemed to have missed that (again, D- for plump, must try harder), like pretty well every point people make to you that you don't like. I kind of admire that in ewe.

> Seriously, you need to realise there is more than just a difference in political views here

I don't think you're cut out to understand that someone can hold a different political view to you.

> that are better mannered and don't seek to promote self at every opportunity

This, coming from mr. reticent, plumpo hisself! Wooooh hoooo!

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BlueGreen
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Re: Boring Green Andrew Ferni Anonymous Cluetard Nonesuch I wouldn't..... @Plump & Bleaty

> You seriously think I'm going to share any personal history

In short, you've done nothing of value.

> and attempting to divert into a personal attack

You're so good at bitching at the ineptitude of others I thought I allow you the chance to show how much better you were. That does not constitute a personal attack. Describing you as tedious would, but I'm not going to do that.

> I notice you are desperate to avoid any discussion of AI, could that be because...

... because you raised the issue of Amnesty International, not me? Correct. My post did not refer to them except by copying from yours.

More wool from plumpy.

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BlueGreen
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Re: Andrew Ferni Anonymous Cluetard Nonesuch I wouldn't want to set one foot.....

> that thinks Amnesty International are some sort of untaintable font of moral wisdom?

An udder Plump and Bleaty tactic; ascribe to those who disagree some absurdly extreme position then attack them for it.

So, in contrast to Amnesty, as your counsel such perfection in others, I wonder what good you've done in this world. Let us know. (NB, token production of meat and wool don't count). Seriously, show us the goods. Something verifiable as I know you can be a bit 'careless' with facts.

Show us.

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BlueGreen
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Re: Nonesuch I wouldn't want to set one foot on American soil either... @Matt Bryant

> have taken upon themselves the right to charge anyone in any country with war crimes, even in cases where neither party involved has nothing at all to do with Europe

Mismanagement of a novel currency is not the same as trying to enforce justice regarding events of genocide, torture, rape as a weapon of war, ditto mutilation, the use of child soldiers, that kind of thing.

> with professional handwringers like Amnesty International.

Are you for or against genocide, torture, rape, child soldiers, mutilations etc? Please be clear in your answer, thanks.

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Fusion-io: Ah, Microsoft. I see there's in-memory in SQL Server 2014... **GERONIMO!**

BlueGreen
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FAIL

Re: 10 years+ later

Quality trollings!!!!

Not.

Must try a bit less hard.

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Windows 8.1, which you probably haven't upgraded to yet, ALREADY OBSOLETE

BlueGreen
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Re: Does ANYBODY still believe this tripe?

A small pair of anecdotes about vista.

Tried it on a mate's machine. Shut down, and it took a few minutes of it just spinning before I decided it must have crashed and physically pulled the plug. Found out later it took about six minutes to shut itself down, you just had to leave it, and leave it, and leave it...

While there I also downloaded a smallish (few dozen meg) file. I had the option to get the compressed or uncompressed file. Both had the same contents. Obviously the zipped one is better, less bandwidth, be a nice net citizen etc. so I grabbed that one and it took just a few seconds. Then I tried to unzip it. Baaaad. The progress meter hovered around 40K *PER SECOND* for the unzipping. It would literally have been many times faster to download the unzipped file than get the zipped and unzip it locally. What a crock.

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Russian deputy PM: 'We are coming to the Moon FOREVER'

BlueGreen
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Re: About Time @TitterYeNot

> Vill zer be anything else

ur rusky smells a bit german, TBH

On a more serious note, russia will bankrupt itself trying. Sounds more like putin's in the final stages of whipping up the dumb masses for another reason, perhaps rather more about this planet, maybe for another like trip across someone elses border or to consolidate their existing work in ukraine.

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OpenSSL Heartbleed: Bloody nose for open-source bleeding hearts

BlueGreen
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@Gene Cash

> has anyone ever seen a code review actually catch a problem?

yes

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Murdoch says Microsoft needs 'big clean out'

BlueGreen
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Re: Professional immigrant

> Murdoch is just a chancer

The 'h' is silent.

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BlueGreen
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Re: "[MS] was early to understand and realise the potential of XML" @Getriebe

MS did not follow the spec on whitespace normalisation. Whitespace normalisation was given from v 1.0 of the spec. That's a fact. I don't believe it was an accident it was borked either. I recall there were other problems but don't remember the details.

> MSFT did have their own version of XML because in the early days the standard was not useful

erm, in what way 'not useful' (except for being a bit opaque perhaps)

> Their 'extensions'

Curious, what extensions are these?

> We constantly tried to use other browsers

Ah, my point has zilch to do with browsers, just using MSXML for parsing. Browser irrelevant.

> XML spec trying to get it extended so it would carry more information

Eh, now I am interested. Except for binary data, where did xml fail originally? Note: am not trying to defend xml, just intrigued.

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BlueGreen
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"[MS] was early to understand and realise the potential of XML"

That pretty much overrates a simple markup language. And incidentally MS's early implementations of XML (MSXML) were non-conforming (e.g. did not normalise whitespace in attributes & more). That was no accident.

I remember a most entertaining conversation (prob still on the web somewhere) between some MS rep and one of the creators of the XML spec (might have been Tim Bray himself), where the rep just insistently bleated 'our implementation is conforming' only to be slapped down by the spec writer - again and again. Such fun!

To put it more simply for the author of this article, MS tried to break XML because it wasn't theirs, like they try to break everything.

And Murdoch, if you're reading this, I hope the coppas sniff their way up the chain of corruption right to the top. There's a noose waitin' for you, dog.

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Oracle's NoSQL nightmare MongoDB goes to version 2.6

BlueGreen
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Re: Scoffing @bigtimehustler

Postgres is free, but I guess that's not your point. Genuine experts are going to proportionately expensive in either technology I'd have thought, however you can probably do with *less* of them in an RDBMS because the intelligence (in the form of the optimiser) is built into the software so there's likely less effort to write complex queries.

> ...cludge together some make do solution...

Empty emotive words.

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BlueGreen
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Re: Scoffing

> Postgres has recently merged support for binary JSON

I doubted that you could index on a json sub-part, but to my surprise, you can <http://stackoverflow.com/questions/17807030/how-to-create-index-on-json-field-in-postgres-9-3>.

Assuming you wanted to do that, I mean. I have to say I still don't understand what mongo is supposed to be giving us that a typical sql DB can't. The one claimed difference, 'unstructured information' is entirely blobbable, and apparently now indexable by subcomponents (in PG anyway), so what's left? Anyone?

> Can we have less coverage of industry PR and more DBA meat, please?

Yup, in spades.

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'Yahoo! Breaks! Every! Mailing! List! In! The! World!' says email guru

BlueGreen
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usenet

hey, don't knock it! I found it prefereable in almost every way to what we've got now. Simple, quick, low bandwidth, not proprietary, no need to sign in to anything, update then browse offline... YMMV but I thought it great. Spam killed it.

We need to handle spam somehow as it, and its variants in the form of ads etc., will kill a lot more of the net eventually, I fear.

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BlueGreen
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Re: @ xperroni (was: What legit email admin ...)

> it has to do with the folks you are rubbing virtual shoulders with

Instead of posting snobby I'm-a-techno-god comments with no useful content, perhaps do something constructive instead.

As you're so evidently knowledgeable, share it. Light a candle and push back the darkness like Trevor Pott; write an article or two for the reg, for us plebs. Earn your stripes instead of being a slightly upmarket troll.

You going to put up or shut up then? Either works for me.

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Microsoft's Windows 8.1 updates also tweak Windows Server 2012

BlueGreen
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Re: Don't need to reboot each time @Tim Jenkins

TBH if you work in a small company and you're the sql dev and the other guys are devs or business then a sysadmin is just an unaffordable fantasy.

TBH many companies are like this.

TBH if MS completely broke the interface to make basic tasks such as rebooting so obscure as to require googling then TBH MS got it wrong and TBH perhaps you could throw a little less blame at the people trying to use an unnecessarily screwed up interface.

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BlueGreen
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Re: Don't need to reboot each time

Don't. Just don't give windows any excuse to mess up again. Just go for the reboot, it's only a couple of minutes each time, really just do it. If your way works 95% of the time I can guarantee that last 5% will cost you more than you ever save.

(and the interface to server 2012 sucks like a pro. When you have to google how to reboot it becaues you've never done it before and it resembles nothing you've ever seen, and the other guy has forgotten how, then you have to open a command prompt... Dump it, MS)

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Torvalds rails at Linux developer: 'I'm f*cking tired of your code'

BlueGreen
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Re: coding @AC 2014-5-5 SometimeOrOtherPerhapsElRegCanRestoreTimestampsPlease

> I quoted the bit you got wrong.

what, this bit?

"

> It seems some people are really struggling to get what I say

We're not - it's just that what you say is wrong.

"

Erm, can you even distinguish between a formal and an informal understanding?

And me saying "I do have the strong innate understanding that allows me to use english as well as, or better than, many." simply is me claiming that I'm good with it, but that's not expertise. I'm not an expert. Now I've said it explicitly twice.

You do seem to be reading into things what you wish.

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BlueGreen
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Re: coding @AC 2014-5-5 SometimeOrOtherPerhapsElRegCanRestoreTimestampsPlease

> it's just that what you say is wrong

just saying 'you're wrong' repeatedly doesn't advance the debate.

> But you set yourself up as being some sort of expert

likewise your inability to read my prior post disclaiming exactly this.

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BlueGreen
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Re: coding @AC 2014-5-5 SometimeOrOtherPerhapsElRegCanRestoreTimestampsPlease

@Don Jefe, @Vic

It seems some people are really struggling to get what I say. It should be clear enough.

> It is just extraordinarily silly for someone to argue that developing their own rules for the use of a language is a valid use of that language if the target audience doesn't also use the same rules

This is completely true and I fully endorse it, however it has no relationship to what I originally said, that one could grasp and apply the informal rules of natural language without being taught the formal rules of the language.

This does not relate to mutating the rules of the language. I mentioned not capitalising some words to make clear it was by personal choice not typo, so you wouldn't get all smug on me. If that single item has managed to distract you from my main point, that is depressing.

> You can't just go mixing them up as you please until you've first demonstrated a comprehensive understanding of the accepted ways of their use

I thought I had.

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BlueGreen
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Re: coding @AC 2014-5-5 SometimeOrOtherPerhapsElRegCanRestoreTimestampsPlease

> Yours? Got a receipt?

Très glib. It's mine by use, as it is yours by use.

> some sort of linguistic expert

I did not claim this, I claim I can use english competently. I'm not e.g. David Crystal who has earned that title.

> quite such a ballsup of said expertise

A disagreement between us does not necessarily comprise a ballsup on my part. It may, and you're free to show where I failed, but I've put my point as cogently as possible. I'd like this discussion to be constructive, please.

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BlueGreen
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Re: coding @AC 2014-5-5 SometimeOrOtherPerhapsElRegCanRestoreTimestampsPlease

> Every language has rules

Exactly! I agree totally.

There are formal rules about sentence structure etc. which are taught in schools, and there's the innate grasp which comes from exposure to the language. I have the latter only, which includes an informal but still strong set of rules, which embody the formal rules, and go much further.

The idea that one can't use language unless it's taught in class is as bizarre as saying one picks up the meanings of words only from a dictionary.

> Think of it this way - web browsers use formal specifications in order to interpret web pages.

There's a fundamental difference between natural language and formal languages. Formal languages are for a limited domain and *require* an unambiguous definition. English is *not* a formally defined language. If you don't realise the difference, you're going to struggle in IT (Incidentally I do have a background in formal semantics though I've forgotten most of it).

> to the extent where your message is warped and difficult to understand.

Seriously, what in my original post was 'difficult to understand'?

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BlueGreen
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Re: coding @AC 2014-5-5 SometimeOrOtherPerhapsElRegCanRestoreTimestampsPlease

@localzuk

Oh yes I do get to choose. My language, my choice, and I chose. Feel free to 'correct' my capitalisation to what you think it should be, all the while ignoring its larger point I'm making.

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BlueGreen
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Re: coding @AC 2014-5-5 SometimeOrOtherPerhapsElRegCanRestoreTimestampsPlease

> If you do not know what the first person pronoun is, [ ...] If language is a tool of your trade, you should know some basic grammar

No (kind of), yes (kind of), you need to be clear about definitions and here you're conflating two things.

A formal understanding of language is entirely separate from the instinctive grasp necessary for use. I have no formal understanding; I don't know how to parse a sentence and label its parts. I don't know what a pronoun is, never mind the first person type. Or adjectives, or adverbs or gerunds or...

I do have the strong innate understanding that allows me to use english as well as, or better than, many. Look over my previous posts. Therefore I'd say this demonstrates that a formal understanding is unnecessary. Honestly, what would I gain from it?

Notes.

1) english is my first and (regrettably) only language

2) The spelling of english uncapitalised is by choice.

3) Transmission of a clear message is far more important than the minutiae of precisely 'correct' spelling (whatever that is), but the former is never so bitched over as the latter. When some commenter says "you could have said that in half the number of words" instead of picking on the greengrocer's apostrophe, I'll cheer.

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BlueGreen
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Re: Odd timing @Ken Hagan

> If the kernel can't protect itself against bugs in user-space programs, it isn't a very good kernel.

upvoted as it's a good point, but I don't think systemd is a *normal* userspace process. From wiki "systemd is a system management daemon designed exclusively for the Linux kernel API. For systems using it, it is the first process to execute in user space during the Linux startup process. Therefore, it is also the parent process of all child processes in user space. "

It isn't kernel but it does seemed privileged in some ways so *perhaps* it can be expected to be written more carefully than other userspace code.

(disclaimer: am linux noob)

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Hey, Michael Lewis: Stop DEMONISING Wall Street’s SUPERHUMAN high-speed trading

BlueGreen
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Re: @Tim Worstal @ BlueGreen @Squander Two

No, I was unclear. funny thing is, this bit

>> Yes, they had to lie because they fucked up because those wankers couldn't see what was coming even though it was their fucking job?

was clear. That it was about banks as entities, not libor fixers. is utterly clear. Here is that quote in context (from here):

"

>> Right, so the banks didn't predict the collapse they in large part led us into so when it when it blew up in their faces they had to lie to avert a likely disaster?

>> Yes, they had to lie because they fucked up because those wankers couldn't see what was coming even though it was their fucking job?

"

Banks + established policies, see, not libor fixers. Don't misrepresent me here like you tried to misrepresent me before (I did not say the two things you attributed to me in your previous post, here).

You're working hard to defend the banks & their greed, ineptitude and the danger that came from this. You're most insistent. Curious.

(by the way you've not said anything about my post here about whether the Community Reinvestment Act did nearly as much damage as you say it did. As I don't have the background to judge I'd be interested in your opinion.

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BlueGreen
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Re: @Tim Worstal @ BlueGreen @Squander Two

Right, I see what you're saying. OK, my original use of 'they' was referring to banks as corporate entities in their entirety. The 2nd use was libor fixers as a few individuals. I was unclear. My mistake.

> Have you never worked somewhere where some people fix or alleviate the errors of others?

Let me try to be clear: I don't think banks (as collective entities) did an acceptable job. Libor fixing was insider by individuals, ok, fair enough, but insane lending practices were systemic to the banks' structure, not isolated pockets of people within. That's the problem.

> Are you suggesting that no-one in banking lost their jobs over the '08 crash?

Are you implying the people responsible were all held accountable? Perhaps any sent to prison? The people responsible for loosening banks' lending practices? What are you trying to defend?

Yes, the line between a banking corporation and the people that compose it is not being well represented here by me. I accept that.

> far more bankers would have lost their jobs, being judged unfit for their posts by the market itself, as they should be.

The idea of 'the market' ... I have no faith in it any more (as it stands currently).

> This isn't a sob story, just a counterexample to your claim that no-one has been judged unfit

Don't misrepresent me. I never said that.

> in response to your insistence that every single employee of every single bank is directly guilty of causing the crash.

Or that.

> No, I think there was some incompetence and some deceit, with large-scale effects.

SOME?? jesus, SOME??!?

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BlueGreen
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Re: crash was caused primarily by bad mortgages. @ Tom 13

> You are going to get so many downvotes

Reg commenters aren't perfect by any means but a valid point still counts. Let's actually count the downvotes when they happen, ok?

> The US Congress still requires banks to make loans to people who can't afford them or face being charged with racial discrimination.

This may or may not be valid. I can't judge but maybe you can <http://www.minneapolisfed.org/publications_papers/pub_display.cfm?id=4136&TC=1> "Did the CRA cause the mortgage market meltdown? / / Two Federal Reserve economists examine whether available data support critics' claims that the Community Reinvestment Act spawned the subprime mortgage crisis."

Summary:

"Two basic points emerge from our analysis of the available data. First, only a small portion of subprime mortgage originations is related to the CRA. Second, CRA-related loans appear to perform comparably to other types of subprime loans. Taken together, the available evidence seems to run counter to the contention that the CRA contributed in any substantive way to the current mortgage crisis."

Like I said, I can't judge the veracity of this.

> British retail banks did a certain amount of bad lending too

Yes, I know a couple that got into huge debt (like, huuuuge), and the deeper they went, they observed that the more the banks pushed loans at them (until it went titsup). The bank then reduced their repayments to sweet FA & evergreened the loans so they don't materialise on their books for as long as possible. They certainly weren't an isolated example.

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BlueGreen
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Re: @Tim Worstal @ BlueGreen @Squander Two

> The first quote is you doing exactly what you claim in the second quote you're not doing.

First quote is *They* should be given 'credit' for lying to cover up the continent sized turd *they* created?.

That we me sounding incredulous that you could even propose as excusable their lying to cover up their mess.

second quote is I did not suggest that the libor guys necessarily had anything to do with the mortgage guys.

Which says I agree with your point that the two banking sectors were distinct and likely unrelated.

What's the link between them? Where's the contradiction?

And you've avoided my questions, to wit

> And how badly does one have to fuck up before one is judged unfit for a post?

-and-

> Do you detect a pattern? (viz. of large scale incompetence and/or deceit)

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BlueGreen
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Re: @Tim Worstal @ BlueGreen

OK, maybe I've missed something or been dumb. Please point it out explicitly then I can try to address it, thanks.

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BlueGreen
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Re: @Tim Worstal @ BlueGreen

> The first is that you seem to be suggesting that, if someone does something wrong, they may never ever be allowed any credit for trying to alleviate the problem.

*They* should be given 'credit' for lying to cover up the continent sized turd *they* created?

And how badly does one have to fuck up before one is judged unfit for a post? (this is stuff that could trash a country's economy, just in case you hadn't noticed. Saying Oops and giggling over your little mistakes is less attractive in the banking sector than it is in children, I find).

> The crash was caused primarily by bad mortgages. The guys responsible for the Libor fixing had sod all to do with that.

I did not suggest that the libor guys necessarily had anything to do with the mortgage guys. However if you stand back and squint you might notice the former were dishonest and the latter were incompetend (and in some cases dishonest as well, packaging up known-crap mortgages as AAA and flogging them off, some US banks did that, recall?). Do you detect a pattern?

> Well, why the hell not?

Something seems systemically broken. We need to find out what it is and fix it, not make excuses.

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BlueGreen
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Re: If it were an article on the bad badness of the market, yes, but... @Hollerith 1

> but can we park that for a moment and talk about HFT and the interesting issues that arise simply within this topic?

First time I've ever disagreed with anything of yours, but no we cannot park it up to admire the paintwork. Things have consequences and however intriguing HFT may be as a tech and intellectual problem, it is potentially another sharp stick in the hands of idiots.

(edit: apologies, that came out a bit rough, but I've spent my entire working life considering the consequences of what I do and in some cases turning down jobs because of that)

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BlueGreen
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@Tim Worstal

> Second flavour: the banks themselves misreporting Libor in the depths of the crisis. [...] No one's actually going to come out and say it publicly (well, me, but I mean anyone important) but everyone's damn glad that the banks were lying through their teeth that couple of weeks.

Right, so the banks didn't predict the collapse they in large part led us into so when it when it blew up in their faces they had to lie to avert a likely disaster?

Yes, they had to lie because they fucked up because those wankers couldn't see what was coming even though it was their fucking job?

And you're presenting their lying as a good thing while kind of not noticing why it was needed??? You are beyond incredible.

I suppose genocides in africa aren't all bad because, damn, gonna be a lot of jobs re-sharpening those machetes afterwards.

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BlueGreen
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Permit me. I'm no economist but some things seem evidently crap. So...

It's about the *attitude*, which is that any tool (HFT is one) is to be exploited to the max and damn the consequences: 1) TBTF, let the peasants pick up the pieces 2) the mythical balance that the free market tends towards. I don't believe (2) any more, at least under the system we have now.

a) HFT gives advantages to the biggest guys. Most can't afford it but they can, so they profit at the expense of those who can't.

b) HFT may be associated with volatility; from <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High-frequency_trading>

"HFT may cause new types of serious risks and dangers to the financial system.[14][1][15] Algorithmic and HFT were both found to have contributed to volatility in the May 6, 2010 Flash Crash, when high-frequency liquidity providers rapidly withdrew from the market.[1][15][16][17] Several European countries have proposed curtailing or banning HFT due to concerns about volatility.[18]"

c) Morality doesn't matter, as exemplified here. "and can be thought of as being a bit naughty.", "Certainly, if you get the information from your mate executing the large order and do this you're guilty of insider trading. ... Whether this is important is another matter"

'naughty'? whether illegal trading is 'important'?

d1) divorce from reality. This is what causes bubbles which inevitably explode. The more divorced, the bigger the bubble, the bigger the final bang. I've seen a bloomberg terminal and it feeds you apparently pure information from which to make decisions. Knowing a specialist corner, we checked it out and the info was markedly dodgy. If you don't realise that info is corrupt you make wrong decisions as a human, and far more so if you get a program to deal with it.

d2) divorce from reality redux. Manipulating the markets at a distance allows one not to see what it does the peasants[*] at the bottom of the heap working in virtual slavery in many places. Their lives can be unpleasant, sometimes short. Also they get pressured in other ways. I knew a thai woman, she said that the poor in her country used to get by because there were many small areas where food would grow wild or could be grown. These areas are now being snapped up, consolidated into bigger farms and the poor go hungry. These bigger farms grow stuff for export. I'm sure the corporations owning them show up on bloomberg terminals in nice colours.

e) They'll just use it to fix other stuff to their advantage. Just another tool to abuse.

In summary HFT is a tool but I don't trust the wielders. I also simply don't trust Tim Worstall to even try to present a balanced picture.

Just a thought from a non-economist, so, does that at least make some sense or am I missing something crucial, Victor?

[*] I'm sure he used that word deliberately to provoke.

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BlueGreen
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Yes indeed, perhaps Mr. Worstall could address these little financial pecaddillos?

Instead of ignoring them quietly as he seems wont to do.

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Microsoft: Let's be clear, WE won't read your email – but the cops will

BlueGreen
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Megaphone

We've advocated that governments should rely ...

...on formal legal processes and the rule of law for surveillance activities

Well, fuck me.

Brave MS. Well done you all. Holding back 1984 all on your lonesome.

(icon represents your brave stand)

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Say WHAT? ATVOD claims 44k Brit primary school kids look at smut online each month

BlueGreen
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Re: Does not add up! @Eponymous Cowherd

> Where did I say it was?

I think it may have been your use of the word 'rape' that threw me there.

But maybe a difference in meaning, too. I'd have thought that porn must have all its performers fully and freely consent to it by my definition, so anything with real rape, in my mind, is an act of violence not sex, therefore not porn. You may not agree...?

Realistic *simulations* of rape, yeah, that would be classed as porn in my world, I understand these exist (never seen, never want to see) and I would never want a child to see it, along with a whole lot of other stuff (people can be soooo creative....)

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BlueGreen
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Re: Does not add up!

> If its my 15 year old watching a video of a gang rape

rape != sex. Very, very !=

(edit: To the article author, and the reg in general, kindly stop referring to it as 'smut' or 'filth' etc., you sound like children yourself).

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Sticky Tahr-fy pudding: Ubuntu 14.04 slickest Linux desktop ever

BlueGreen
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Re: Head to head

> any chance of The Register doing a series of articles that compare and contrast Windows against a Linux?

> however I think there are a good amount of people who simply not used a Linux before..

An article on VirtualBox, leading to how to install linux in a VM, would be both short and far more effective. IMO. And I'm never wrong. Except when I choose to be. Which I sometimes do.

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Nvidia unveils Titan Z: An 8TFLOPS off-the-shelf supercomputer disguised as a gfx card

BlueGreen
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Re: Yowser (info needed)

> IRC a Core i7 reaches around a hundred GFLOPS or so

I've long lost track of cpu architectures (they're 'fast enough' for me to now not care) so I'm struggling to see how the above is possible. At 3Ghz that's about 30 flop/cycle. How?

I suppose if you mean per processor rather than per core, and you have say 6 cores then that's ~5 flop/cycle. If that was a multiply-accumulate (fmac) heavily pipelined over 2 vectors of effectively infinite length then that's 2 cycles/flop, say you have 2 such units that's 4...

I'm struggling to see how even a peak of 100 gflops can be reached, never mind in practice - anyone shed any light? TIA

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Pivotal: So who fancies skinny-dipping in our 'Business Data Lake'? PS: It'll cost you

BlueGreen
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Re: so...

Thanks for the reply, sorry I didn't see it earlier. Unfortunately I'm still unclear.

> GemFireXD is meant to be an OLTP database that also stores data on HDFS.

I thought HDFS was unsuitable for OLTP as it's optimised for few writes but many reads?

> It stores all data in memory

If it can do that then you don't have much data; probably not enough to justify using hadoop.

> but allows evicting data from memory based on a SQL clause.For example, if you had a TRADES table, you can choose to keep only the last month of data in memory for super fast access, although GemFireXD will also be able to read/query historic data on HDFS too. You will not have to archive your data.

and if you just limit yourself to querying the last month's data then an sql DB will also keep it in memory. And what's this about archiving data anyway. But as you said "It stores all data in memory" then why evict any of it anyway?

And why not use hive?

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They want me to install CCTV to see what YOU did in the TOILET

BlueGreen
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Re: SLA definition

I believe I recall the AAAA - the Association for the Abolition of Asinine Acronymns. FTW!

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Airbnb might get $10bn price tag ... despite its legal woes

BlueGreen
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@David W.

> And to think economists still make an assumption that investors act rationally.

I'd upvote this 100 times if I could.

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Keep your quinoa, hipsters: Boffins back healthy slabs of choc

BlueGreen
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Re: Let's not get carried away

> Pure chocolate I.e. 100 per cent cocoa powder is totally bleeding unpalatable!

Dunno. I regularly mix 100% cocoa powder (fairtrade, natch) with hot water to make a thick paste, nothing else added, and it's fine. I also have in front of me (ok, chewing a lump now) of 100% chocolate. It's colombian (calls itself LUKER, I guess that's the brand, bought in london btw) and I like it more than sweetened stuff. It's quite acceptable, according to taste.

Ah, whiskey. Recently got a bottle of cask-strength stuff as prezzie for a mate, got a big splash of it to try, nice stuff! May I recommend it to you, or falling back to Talisker FTW[*]

[*] Fucks The Wallet, at least if it's the good stuff.

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