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* Posts by David Dawson

393 posts • joined 2 Jul 2008

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Good grief! Have you SEEN BlackBerry's SQUARE smartphone?

David Dawson

Never had a blackberry before, but I'm going to get one of these.

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Poverty? Pah. That doesn't REALLY exist any more

David Dawson

Re: Ironic.

I'm with Tim on this one, debasing a word to try to manipulate people doesn't help a cause.

Reduction inequality is a laudable goal in an of itself when you're attempting to gain a more equal society for the expected social good that brings; why not discuss that up front?

In 2009 (from memory, might have been '08), poverty in the UK dropped for the first time in a while. The reason? Not because incomes went up, in fact they went down. No, the financial crisis meant that the median income dropped, thus meaning that many people on 13kish a year went from being in poverty, to being out of poverty. No change in financial conditions, food actually became more expensive in the period, yet they were now part of the celebration that poverty was being reduced. I found this quite distasteful.

There is a stated goal of ending child poverty in the UK, according to the relative median income measure. The most straight forward way to do this is to take a significant proportion of those earning above that median and sack them. This will have the desired effect, however it will also tank the economy.

By using a relative, percentage based measure, you will find that it is statistically virtually impossible to eliminate child poverty in a functioning economy.

This is one cost of debasing words, you lose the ability to have rational discussions using them, because the concepts they used to describe are being rewritten by anyone who wants to, in any way they see fit.

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Community chest: Storage firms need to pay open-source debts

David Dawson

Re: Real coding!

New network protocols required to be adopted. Unless you tunnel it over http, it's not going to be easy these days :-(

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HP: We're still running the ARM race with Moonshot servers

David Dawson

Re: New unit of measure?

I think they're maybe missing a trick. The old "should you use many or much".

1 huge is many of not very much as all the processors are a few generations behind, but there's loads and loads of them in not very much space. For some types of app, this could be epic. We're building lots of microservice based apps, this fits perfectly. If you run on an app on a software VM (eg, the V8/ Node VM , Java JVM etc), whether you are on Intel or ARM makes no difference to the code itself, the VM handles all that.

Personally, I want to see what The Machine would be able to do, if it ever comes out, this feels like something of a halfway house to that piece of HP magic.

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Next blockbuster you watch could be rendered on Google: Star Trek fx biz Zync gobbled

David Dawson

Transcoding and rendering are unrelated.

This allows people using Maya, blender(?) etc to gain extra compute/ storage power to generate new video. Transcoding that into an mpeg suitable for iPad afterwards, for example, is what you'd go to AWS' elastic transcoder service for.

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Assange™: Hey world, I'M STILL HERE, ignore that Snowden guy

David Dawson

Re: He needs the attention, but still...

Not quite.

The BBC were waiting for the police to arrive at his house, therefore they weren't just aware that there was an investigation in progress, but the date and time of the raid. That information was given to them, by the police, by their own admission.

The reason they gave was they the BBC said "we'll wait to publish if you tell us when the raid is", which they agreed to.

This is wrong, the BBC shouldn't be proposing deals like this, but the police should certainly not accept them.

What is now happening is that they are effectively investigating him completely in public, while he's not in the country. So, they haven't given him notification or questioned him yet, it might come to nothing.

To my mind, that seems somewhat prejudicial. By all means say "wait for the evidence", but this is trial by mob.

In these cases, there are broadly two totally conflicting and opposed points of view; one side says "we need to publicise the name so that others have the courage to come forward", like with Saville and the others over the past few months. On the other side, these allegations will never leave him now, he will forever be branded 'pervert', no matter the result of the investigation or any subsequent court case

A complex ethical question like this deserves a thoughtful answer, not the blunt destructive tool that is trial by media and collusion by the police with journalists.

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Docker kicks KVM's butt in IBM tests

David Dawson

Re: Isn't this less about docker

It doesn't use LXC anymore, it uses it's own library called libcontainer instead, as of version 1.

Both base onto the kernel primitive containerisation stuff like cgroups that Google originally contributed in.

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DAYS from end of life as we know it: Boffins tell of solar storm near-miss

David Dawson

Re: Taking out meteors

if an object is truly that big, then if you were to break it up and the earth were to be hit by the resulting buckshot, we'd be burned to a crisp by the firestorms that would sweep the globe as the debris entered the atmosphere and heats it up hundreds of degrees due to the thousands of compression waves all at once. So it wouldn't really help....

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Debian Linux, Android share a bed in upcoming distro

David Dawson

android is linux.

It actually appears that they are adding debian compatible libraries to an android distribution.

There, I've bitten.

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Boeing to start work on most powerful rocket ... EVER!

David Dawson
Headmaster

Re: Scary stuff...

Which begs the question.... why didn't they go with the F1? That thing worked.

--

Raises the question.

Begging the question is a rhetorical device where you try to ask (/ verbally coerce) your listeners to assume that your point of view (a potential answer to the 'question'), is a given and can be assumed; when in fact, it cannot.

:-)

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D-Wave disputes benchmark study showing sluggish quantum computer

David Dawson

We live in a world with quantum computers!

I'd still quite like my jetpack, but this is really cool.

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SCIENCE explains why you LOVE the smell of BACON

David Dawson

Re: It's how you cook it

That's strange, I know no one that cooks bacon in oil.

I've heard of it, but never come across it outside of the papers.

However, cooking bacon in a pan just used to cook a good steak in adds a while extra layer of flavour to the bacon sarnie.

Time to break out the bacon now.

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Rackspace: OpenStack is the 'Rebel Alliance' in fight for future of cloud

David Dawson

Would the reg fancy doing a comparison of openstack, cloudstack, eucalyptus, the many faces of vmware... ?

If so, I'd love to read it. Openstack seems to take the headlines, but everything I've read so far says that cloudstack is an easier install, eucalyptus is the most mature of the open(ish) source ones and vsphere et al is simply better. I want to be corrected, but the hype is a PITA.

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Amazon veep: We tweak our cloud code every 16 seconds – and you?

David Dawson

These things can all be automated away. It really is possible to do deployments this often, including full regression testing.

As already noted, if you have hundreds of components, which I'm sure they do, these deploy schedules aren't particularly heavy.

Internally, Amazon and AWS use web services heavily. In this instance that means that there are hard contracts for using services, each service expects to be abused, and you can have multiple versions of an API in use at any once time.

This gives a huge tolerance in the system for change.

They have also obviously invested very heavily in serious amounts of automation. They certainly will be able to throw up environments simulating full data centres for regression testing.

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GitHub probes worker's claims of hostile, sexist office culture

David Dawson

Re: Hmm

David Dawson: "Being treated equally does not mean being treated the same."

Uhuh. What precisely does that mean? Please explain. I need to know. Really, I do.

What do the NSA and gender feminist ideologues have in common? The same mindwarping semantic word games.

----------

This is the first time I've ever been called a feminist. I think I might have a good cry ;-)

If you look, I'm not actually spouting feminist ideology, the opposite in fact, and I did explain, you just didn't care to read it.

I don't want a world where all women are treated the same as I am, as there aren't any 6'6" ginger northern english women software developers.

I think of myself as an individualist. Everyone should be equal under the law, but that doesn't mean they are treated the same way, as they aren't all the same.

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David Dawson

Re: Hmm

David, are you comparing being a women to being handicapped and wheelchair bound? Absolutely disgusting, I expect some level of sexism when I'm on the internet but this just goes way over the line.

---

HAHAHAHAHAHAHA ... HAHAHA ...

( ... got tired of laughing ... )

I make a comment saying that someone should be valued as an individual, and you turn it into this. To answer "is being born a (wo)man (your choice) like being born into a wheel chair". Yes, it is, to an extent.

You get weird stereotypes applied to you all the time, forced into patterns of behaviour you don't want, denied certain opportunities for no reason than an accident of birth. Sure, that actually fits the point I'm making.

Deal with people. Some people need different things, that's the world. Trying to stick everyone into a generic box marked 'human' and thinking that's equality is delusion.

BTW, are you saying someone born into a chair is less valuable than a woman? (don't answer, that was hyperbole)

I expect some delusion when I'm on the internet, but this is AMAZING. ;-)

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David Dawson

Re: Hmm

ObnoxiousGit, have a good cry about it, it helps to vent your frustrations. (is that the pussy angle covered ok?)

I'll bite, but your hyperbole is just as silly as the first gents. Where is your reasoning, or properly marshalled arguments?

To take a different example to illustrate the point. Say, a person born in a wheelchair. We will install ramps, adjust heights of desks, remove lips around doors to give them free and easy access. Obviously more effort is being spent on this person, they are patently not being treated the same as someone blessed with being able bodied.

However, they are being treated equally. Given equal access to a working environment and something approaching the same opportunities in that environment.

So, treating someone the same is very different to treating someone equally. The first is based on encouraging similar behaviour, the second on valuing the individual. I know which I prefer in my staff.

Take another example, someone going through a major life crisis (death in family, divorce, whatever), you really wouldn't deal robustly with them in many a situation, you would (or I would), show some compassion. Someone else though, not undergoing those stresses, they don't get that extra tolerance.

They are not being treated the same, but are being treated equally according to what I consider reasonable.

Am I proud? Yup, extremely, thanks for asking.

(seriously though, get out of whatever work environment you are in where any of what you wrote exists, or is ok, it's not normal...)

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David Dawson

Re: Hmm

Being treated equally does not mean being treated the same.

Your examples are lazy stereotypes and hyperbole, try again.

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Get Quake III running on Raspberry Pi using Broadcom's open-source GPU drivers, earn $10K

David Dawson

Re: $10K bounty

Smells like a way to search and hire good coders. They already have the source code to the raspberry pi part, after all. Why not simply release that too?

If they were to discover devs the traditional way, they'd pay at least twice that to the recruiter and still not be sure. This way, there's less risk and they get to find people they'd never have come across.

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Inquietante testimonio gráfico: Electrosonda orgásmica anal aplicada… ¡a un TORO!

David Dawson
Pint

Digo bienvenida a nuestra jefes supremas bovinas...

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Antarctic glacier 'melted JUST as fast LONG before human carbon emissions'

David Dawson

Re: Climate Atheists

Unfortunately, eugenics, brought to the fore by the origin of species, was used, repeatedly, as a reason for conquest, and to justify genocide.

People can be horrible, no matter their belief system.

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Parking firm pulls app after dev claims: I can SEE credit card privates

David Dawson

Re: What?

And seriously, what kind of inept company did they use if they left all their logging in the release build? I mean, some logging stays in sure, but nothing on the sensitive data. After this I don't think I'd ever use the app no matter how many 'security updates' they release.

-------

Thats not the problem, logging shouldn't matter one bit.

The problem here is that the communication between client and server is not correctly secured and authorised. The server should enforce security in all cases. The client can do so too, but their issue is server side.

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Dart 1.1 bullseyes JavaScript performance in latest benchmarks

David Dawson

Re: Why not compile the Dart environment into JS?

Check out source maps. They let you debug code that is running in JS in the original language.

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David Dawson

Oracle sucks

Google seemed to be deeply enamoured with Java and the JVM up until a couple of years ago when Oracle kicked off over android. Since then they've thrown all their development into alternate languages and runtimes, Dart, Go etc.

A shame, if they'd improved GWT at the rate they've been improving Dart, it could've been great by now.

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Mozilla: Native code? No, it's JavaScript, only it's BLAZING FAST

David Dawson

Re: Just think - this could have been VBscript

LOL

No, it really isn't crap. You make the mistake of conflating polyglot with integration, and integration with middleware, and if you take it further, thence to the fable ESB, which is the evil everyone should really fear.

I'm talking doing some processing in one language, then other processing in a different language. how you shift data between them is certainly a problem, but it is a solved problem.

The JVM is good at this, so is the CLR. Javascript is well on its way to becoming another system that permits polyglot programming well.

If yoou have one runtime environment that permits many languages, the problem is solved. If you want to use a language that isn't in that same environment then you require some form of integration. Depending on your needs there are many different forms they can take, middleware is only one of them, and not a particularly nice one at that.

In a JVM system I could write my DB integration in Groovy, data transformation in Clojure and threading code in Scala, with each language helping me perform that task, and no integration code required.

So, is this crap? Or were you being a little... rapid in your judgements?

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David Dawson

Re: Just think - this could have been VBscript

Sounds like I saved myself a ton of hassle by never going down the J2EE + EJB road. I was spoiled rotten by 25 years in the cozy, insulated and isolated AS/400 world, which had all the built-in services that J2EE promised, so I never got excited by it. Today, Tomcat + JSP works for me on the backend, JS on the front. But who knows, maybe node.js tomorrow?

----

Try Groovy and friends before JS. It's still JVM, which is far faster than any Javascript VM still.

If you want the threading model from node (reactor is it's name), try Vert.x. Again, JVM, can use JS if you want, or build it in Groovy or Java.

JSP is ok-ish, but there's much improved view tech now. Thymeleaf comes to mind as a particularly good one, the offline support is good

Then try Clojure and it's Ring library. It's really, really nice.

JSON->Clojure data transform -> MongoDB all in a half dozen lines of lisp awesomeness.

It's Lisp! on the JVM, what's not to like.... ;-)

If all that fails, then JS on the server has a place I think, it really depends on your application needs.

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David Dawson

Re: Just think - this could have been VBscript

JavaScript is a hilarious language, and great fun to use. It can certainly be used to produce fairly large applications, certainly.

It's not yet a language that is particularly coherent or set up for large scale development in the way that it works. I have great hopes for the next version of ecma script, it looks good and fixes these problems.

The GNOME people used to make great noise about being able to do object oriented programming using C. It's true, they did, but that doesn't mean it's a good idea to do that if better options are available. Javascript is useful for many different problems, but it's missing some important features (a native module system for one) and others are a bit of an issue for large scale dev.

The culture around javascript is interesting as well. It appears to be tracking about 7-10 years behind the culture around Java (where I spend most of my time at the moment). back then, everything was about increasing them speed of the VM and building of a myriad of support frameworks. Just like JS is now. Now, Java-land is moving much more towards stripping down to the basics, removing frameworks, making things light weight. (eg, in web systems, the move from heavy J2EE container +EJB back then, to tomcat/ jetty + spring, to no container at all)

The world should be polyglot, many languages doing what is best for them to do.

I like the idea of asm.js. It's kind of similar to GWT before it, but more standardised at a lower level with the possibility to optimise.

Some interesting comments on the tinternets about supporting GWT on top of asm.js, something about having to implement a full GC subsystem in asm.js compatible JS. :-)

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Facebook's monster PHP engine ready to muscle into ARM server chips

David Dawson

Re: Impressive

32gb ram to service 500 concurrent users in java?

Either this is made up, or someone has done a truly awful job...

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'Disruptive, irritating' in-flight cellphone call ban mulled by US Senate

David Dawson

Re: Noise cancelling headphones

This is why you should always carry Noise canceling headphones.

When the noisy person starts up, you pop a fresh battery in, press the button on the top, wait for the red light to come on indicating that the unit is ready, then ram the whole shebang down their gullet until the noise stops.

You hostess has thoughtfully provided a little plastic package of "cheese" to keep their jaw open if they start biting your fingers, or just get another passenger to help - you'd be surprised how public spirited your fellow passengers can be.

----

GENIUS!

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Marketing told us: 'Justin Bieber is a fad. He’s not going to last.' – Company formerly known as RIM

David Dawson

Re: Monumental...

I may be showing my age but I have to ask, isn't he a fad?

----------

I hope so.

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CyanogenMod Android firmware gains built-in SMS encryption

David Dawson

Re: Man in the middle?

Without knowing the implementation they've used, asymmetric/ public key transfers are designed specifically to prevent man in the middle attacks over insecure networks.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Public-key_cryptography

It allows the creation of trust over a public network, and it does work, both theoretically and practically.

It has been subverted in a few ways :-

* Brute force decrypt the messages. Frankly highly unlikely, the good algorithms have an average decrypt time in the millions of years using todays hardware.

* Inject a flaw into the original crypto algorithm.

* Impersonate the remote by taking control of the trust key chain.

The last two are what the NSA does. If you are generating your own keys, then that leaves only the second, as there is no trust chain.

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Developer CEO 'liable for copyright infringement' over unlawful tool

David Dawson

Re: Exclsive rights

Yes, I think that is the issue really. Their process for accepting submissions appears to be fully automated, which is the mistake here.

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IDS finally admits what EVERYONE ELSE already knows: Universal Credit will be late

David Dawson

Re: Good job Iain-Duckegg-Smith doesn't work at Tescos.

While the implementation is obviously going quite wrong, the core idea is really quite sound.

The way that the current benefits system is constructed is a poverty trap. Once you are in, its really difficult to get out.

The reason is that you received many different benefits at once, housing, job seekers, income support etc. When you earn a pound more than the threshold, a pound is removed from each of your benefits. So earning a pound leaves you several pounds worse off. You have to get a large increase in income at once to get beyond the hump, essentially replacing all the benefit payments in one go, or you end up worse off for working harder. So, a poverty trap.

The core idea with this is to have a single benefit calculation that tapers properly, so earning that pound is actually worth it.

If it could work just like that, it will be better. If.

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Aussie boffins can detect orbiting SPACE JUNK using rock gods' radiation

David Dawson

I wonder, is there any particular direction that you need to look to see back that far? according to my pretty patchy understanding of the current theories of the creation of the universe, galaxies are all moving, generally away from the big bang that formed spacetime. So, would it be that you should look backwards along the direction of travel of the milky way to see farthest back?

Or is that too simplistic?

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How STEVE JOBS saved Apple's bacon with an outstretched ARM

David Dawson

Re: Apple/Samsung buying ARM

Last time I heard, many of the major licensees each already holds significant shareholdings in ARM, enough for just a couple of them to block a takeover by one of the others.

They are all invested in the continuing independence of ARM.

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HAPPY 15th BIRTHDAY, International Space Station! NASA man reveals life on-board

David Dawson

This is good.

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Anonymous Indonesia claims attacks by Anonymous Australia

David Dawson

Re: I AM ANONYMOUS !

Unfortunately, that renders you merely Pseudonymous. Which is still pretty cool; you don't get a pre-fabbed mask, but you get to choose your own icon.

In a somewhat revolutionary stance (cue jokes about legend in own wardrobe etc), I have chosen my pseudonym to be precisely the same as my current real name.

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Swish PaaS Bosh: Sons of VMware spin up Pivotal One cloud platform

David Dawson

Bosh is an automation/ lifecycle management tool, analogous to chef.

The message bus in cloud foundry is custom made, and called NATS, and the 'service broker' responsibility is shared between a few cloud foundry components, communicating via NATS. Last time I checked, cloud foundry proper has no knowledge of Bosh whatsoever.

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Backup software for HDD and Cloud

David Dawson

+1 for crashplan.

I back up desktops to a server/ NAS combo using it, and then to a second remote NAS.

I signed up for their pay service/ remote cloud thing too, so it all streams up to the interwebs. Took a few weeks to get synced properly, but it worked really well.

Got a dropbox daemon running against a section of it (documents), so I can get the benefits of that system as well.

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Can't stand the heat? Harden up if you want COLD, DELICIOUS BEER

David Dawson

Re: a simple thought experiment

You've missed the point of this a little.

The experiment is like this.

Sample 1, starts at 20c. Put it in a freezer, time how long it takes to freeze, that's result A.

Sample 2, starts at 60, put it in a freezer. Time from the moment it hits 20c until it freezes, that's result B.

You would expect them to be the same, being the time taken to freeze water from 20c, but it isn't. B < A.

Water that starts warmer will take a shorter time to freeze from a given temperature than water that starts at that same given temperature.

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Z30: The classiest BlackBerry mobe ever ... and possibly the last

David Dawson

Re: Here we go again...

iphones cost that much for a new 5s. (£549 in the apple shop)

Top end androids cost around this, or more.

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The importance of complexity

David Dawson

I've bounced around several fields of programming, from banking, utilities, small software shops and general consultancy.

I have never been asked to implement an algorithm of this nature, I asked around my known peeps a bit, and the general agreement was this.

The only people who will do this are either language library developers or developers on products that require this.

Everyone else does systems problems. Things like different data consistency models, message ordering/handling lossy data, optimising through put over latency in code or vice versa and differing concurrency models are vastly more important than algorithmic work for the vast majority.

I was never taught these at uni, and it would've

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Bonking boffins say bacon biters won't breed

David Dawson

We need some way to improve the fertility of the bacon producing pigs.

So we can get more bacon.

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David Dawson

Something that requires some melted cheese to become perfection.

Bacon and melted cheese improve any meal.

Possibly with a nice habanero/ scotch bonnet sauce, if you fancy.

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Gates, Zuckerberg to deliver free coding lesson

David Dawson

Re: One hopes ...

I'm currently helping to teach the new Computer Science GCSE that is replacing the ICT qualifications.

I'm also a programmer with 10 years exp in a variety of languages running a UK wide software consultancy doing work in big and small companies on system structure and design </appeal_to_authority>

The course is good, very good in fact. There are a couple of rough edges (notably the software life cycle bit), but overall its excellent. The kids are engaged and excited about making the computer do things they didn't know were even an option for them.

This is a tremendous success story for UK and everyone who pushed for it over the years, including the government, deserves a big pat on the back.

We have adopted python 3, as thats what the other schools in the area are using and resources are available for. The kids are amused by me teaching myself python in front of them, and they learn it all the better.

It will have replaced ICT at the GCSE level totally within another year, and across the region within another couple, as far as I can see, and is being pushed further down in the curriculum.

Just a few years from now, every child coming through school will have been exposed to programming and have seen and used imperative languages, mobile apps, declarative (HTML essentially) and made web pages from the bottom up.

This year 10 GCSE group is learning python and making simple programmes already, and they will each have made a game, with graphics and sound, by the end of the academic year, and understand how and why it works.

Now, you may say, there is a shortage of teachers, however there is not. There is a shortage of skills, certainly, and a big push is in progress to give the needed skills to teachers and provide them with help. Guess why I'm there? I provide the technical assistance until the teacher is confident enough to do things alone.

So, you cynics, get off your arses, stop complaining about ICT, and go and change things. The possibilities are there now --> See http://www.computingatschool.org.uk/

Run by Simon Peyton Jones aka, Mr Haskell (a very very clever chap, and all round nice guy).

Schools need programmers to go and help. (Reg staff, fancy promoting this more?)

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Assange: 'Ecuadorian embassy staff are like my family'

David Dawson

It is the UK, no territorial sovereignty is ceded to an embassy whatsoever, its confusing who owns the territory over who is permitted to control what goes on.

The vienna conventions, which the UK is signed up to, allow embassies and embassy staff to be temporarily excluded from certain laws and regulations.

Notably, the convention says that the host country cannot enter the embassy without the permission of the ambassador/ consul (can't remember which).

So, the UK retains ownership of the territory in all cases, but in some cases permits, through an act of parliament, the ambassador to control what goes on.

The law as it stands here is that any member of the embassy staff, the ambassador, and the embassy itself, can have its status revoked with notice can cause. This is what the home secretary threatened at the time, but backed down when they realised it would be far more productive to simply let him stew.

it does illuminate the sovereignty question though that this is possible.

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Canadian operator EasyDNS stands firm against London cops

David Dawson

Re: FACT talking bollocks

What ever happened in the case?

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NHS tears out its Oracle Spine in favour of open source

David Dawson

Re: Variety is the spice of life

Its describing all the bits of an entire stack explicitly rather than just saying 'we used oracle'.

The original oracle solution will have all of these bits too, just wrapped in proprietary boxes, or possibly as hardware (eg, a hardware load balancer rather than HA Proxy)

On python, the vast majority of time spent in this style of applications is in IO, normally with a database or messaging system. The application language is very rarely the cause of a slow down, as its not doing anything particularly algorithmic.

Witness the rise of systems like Node.js that solve this. Javascript is really quite slow (test it, please!) compared to other options, but the app framework is built to handle IO more intelligently, allowing far larger scale systems than the alternative systems with a more traditional threading model.

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David Dawson

The world is full of naysayers isn't it?

When you are presented with a major screw up, you find the good things and build on them, you do _not_ throw good money after bad.

This appears to be doing that.

FWIW, Basho (who make Riak), seem to be good at what they do, and so they'd be able to get this right as far as the infrastructure goes. The application side (tornado/ python and the JS web front end) leave more questions open, but the tech stack as said here is certainly high performance and very rapid to build services in.

BJSS is quite well known in the banking field for developing high performance trading systems, so they are certainly the correct type of company to build a large scale heavily loaded transactional system.

Or would you rather a better known company, like Capita say?

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KVM kings unveil 'cloud operating system'

David Dawson

Re: So one 0 day vuln in the JVM and...

ah, I see what your point was now, and it wasn't sidestepped, it was that I don't see this as an issue.

Yes, I would expect people to run multiples of these on the same hypervisor, however, the hypervisor is in charge of protecting itself, and does so. It stops its guests from doing naughty things, whether they are fully fledged multi tasking OS' or something very different, like these app container things.

Eg, You can run your custom OS on AW (which uses Xen), but you wouldn't expect to be able to take over host, no matter what guest OS you run.

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