* Posts by Alan Brown

6523 posts • joined 8 Feb 2008

Google rushes in where Akamai fears to tread, shields Krebs after world's-worst DDoS

Alan Brown
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Re: Big pipes are the only protection

"Nice to see Google take up the challenge."

Google are connected enough to be able to work out who's behind the attacks.

This is the only long-term solution.

The (totally non-ironic, honestly) part of this story is that the vast majority of the traffic is coming out of IoT "security" devices such as cameras. I'm surprised that El Reg didn't pick up on this part.

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Dutch bicycle company pretends to be television company

Alan Brown
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If it's valuable/fragile

Then it's worth looking at shockwatch.com - their transport ranges are useful.

http://shockwatch.com/products/impact-and-tilt

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Alan Brown
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Urban legend in New Zealand is that one guy was testing his brand new camcorder around a cargo terminal in the days when computers were expensive enough to be airfreighted and filmed 19 computers being unloaded onto the baggage trollies (back in PC-XT/PC-AT days when they were a few thousand dollars apiece)

As they trundled off, there was a shout of "Hang on, there's one more", followed by the sight of a carton arcing out of the cargo door and landing on the tarmac with a distinct *crunch*

The recording found its way into the hands of the importer - who were most grateful as the item in question was badly mangled. The airline quite predictably refused the damages claim and offered to pay a few hundred dollars at most - until the recording was played to their lawyers as part of a court case. The story goes that the resulting settlement was worth a LOT more than the computer in question, simply so that the airline could prevent circulation of the recording.

Not that it's changed airline cargo handling procedures. I took delivery of a £120k item direct from Heathrow last year which had been crushed - and it was packed well enough that the only way that could have happened was if it had been dropped from at least a metre. The airline (predictably) denied all responsibility until they found out the shipper had put an impact logger inside the carton.

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Alan Brown
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Re: Doesn’t always work

"Sometimes the parcel can't be delivered "because nobody was home" when there were several of us at home. And the delivery truck never leaves any tyre-tracks in the muddy road on those occasions."

This is where having a security DVR helps a lot:

"I have CCTV recordings of the claimed time your courier was here. Would you like to view them to see that noone showed up?"

They've also shown couriers dropping stuff so badly that boxes burst and stuff scatters across the carpark, followed by a hasty pickup and scuttling off, with delivery the next day in a new box with new labels. This is extremely handy when they refuse the damages claim. Handing the recording to the supplier makes for belligerent couriers becoming amazingly compliant.

(not to mention when couriers sideswipe parked cars at work and then scarper. Insurance companies love this kind of evidence for hit and run claims.)

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R2D2 delivery robots to scurry through the streets of San Francisco

Alan Brown
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Re: fixed hazards will be the real challenge

"Dog poop everywhere. "

That's a bot opportunity all by itself. Two of the biggest impediments to decent street cleaning are the cost of human operators and the size of the equipment needed so they can ride in/on it.

Paris was awash with dogshit prior to the bicentennial but discovered after the clean up for that, the citizens liked it. For many years there were mobile cleaning squads (https://anotherbagmoretravel.wordpress.com/tag/france-dog-shit/) but they're gone (costs) and you need to look where you're walking.

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Alan Brown
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Re: R2D2

"somebody will be claiming that an R2D2notreally knocked them off their feet causing life changing harm."

Which will last as long as it takes for the first case to get to court and the company to play the onboard surveillance (from the 9 cameras, natch) showing it didn't happen, then countersuing.

This will be one of those cases where they LET it go to court, in order to make an example of the scammer and the scammer's lawyer.

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High rear end winds cause F-35A ground engine fire

Alan Brown
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workaround?

face into the wind when starting?

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Australian border cops say they've cracked 'dark net' drug sales

Alan Brown
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profit

That's the underlaying motivation for all this shit.

Making something illegal makes it _far_ more profitable to sell. Enough so that someone will always decide the risks are worthwhile - and that attempting to cut off the supply is like fighting a hydra with enhanced regeneration capacity and an immunity to fire.

There are better ways to handle this shit than funnelling trillions of dollars into organised crime and billions into fighting organised crime.

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SpaceX: Breach in liquid oxygen tank caused Falcon 9 fireball ... probably

Alan Brown
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Re: A few notes

"that glass internal wall"

Are you sure it isn't transparent aluminum?

(more seriously, 4-6 laminated 6mm glass will stop most things thrown at it and an internal partition wall would be just as susceptable to being blown out for the event envisaged (the glass has much higher mass)

Bomb/blast resistant glass walls have been a thing for quite a while. I encountered my first one in the mid 1980s. (http://www.wrightstyle.co.uk/curtain-wall-facades/blast-resistant-curtain-wall-facades/) Some bright spark decided to try and shoot his way through one where I worked and only scratched the top layer.

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Plusnet broadband outage: Customers fume as TITSUP* continues

Alan Brown
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"Apparently +net are moving away from BT's network to their own"

Why would a wholly owned brand of BT be moving to another network?

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LG uses sucky logic to force Dyson admission its vacuums suck badly

Alan Brown
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Re: LG no longer Less Good

"My only gripe is that the design of the user end of the hose is too big for me to get it into some of the shelves and smaller spaces"

You can buy generic adaptors for that.

And yes, the paddle thingie is brilliant.

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UK copyright troll weeps, starts 20-week stretch in the cooler for beating up Uber driver

Alan Brown
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Re: Interesting person

Well well...

Company struck off some time back. Someone should be letting HMRC and trading standards know.

He could end up staying a little longer at Her Majesty's pleasure.

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Alan Brown
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Re: Only 20 weeks!?!?!?

" I can only hope that some aspiring legal vulture contacts the Uber driver "

Yup. This in spades. the Uber driver now has an open and shut compensation case, the only question is how much a suitable landshark can wrangle.

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Alan Brown
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Re: I have one reservation

" we have no idea how obnoxious the little toad was during his trial."

I've only ever seen judges make comments like this when the answer is "extremely".

That said she complied with sentencing guidelines so he's going to have no grounds for appeal to lighten the length of it and if he keeps that attitude up he won't get early release.

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Alan Brown
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Re: "Get used to life being different."

"Because the Home Office don't have enough real jail capacity he'll quickly be classified as a low risk white collar type"

This is ABH. He's not going to be classified as low risk anytime soon - and if the entitled wanker gets out early you can guarantee he'll feel that it gives him free rein to do it again.

Much as I'd like to see him go in for longer, it's a first offence and sentencing guidelines don't allow it unless he caused permanent injuries. On the other hand _next_ time he won't be let off so easily - and there _will_ be a next time (may have been previous times, but CCTV not around to capture it).

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Latest F-35 bang seat* mods will stop them breaking pilots' necks, beams US

Alan Brown
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"And 62KG seems awfully specific."

62kg ==140 pounds == 10 stone

Someone's being overly precise when converting measurements which are plus or minus 10 pounds anyway.

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Alan Brown
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Re: minimum weight

"I was reading an article a while back about that way of thinking; apparently, there is a real problem with civilians flying ex-military aircraft in that they really don't want to eject."

In many countries ex-military craft have the ejector seats removed so a civilian pilot can't eject even if (s)he wanted to (explosives being illegal in a non-military craft, etc). There's also the issue that being in the aircraft means that pilots tend to take more care about where it ends up when things go ultimately pear-shaped.

"I think that might have been true for very early seats, but that was a long time ago. There's been lots of development on ejection seats."

Indeed there have, but a 1 in 4 chance of permanent disability is still far too high for my liking. There are quite a few pilots who've ejected once and are still in cockpits but very few have ejected twice and been able to resume active duties.

WRT ejector seats and head clamps: Older ones don't. Newer ones do - along with the also-mentioned airbags to securely clamp the pilot in for the duration of the (short) ride. The issue at point in the F35 is excess helmet mass and I'm pretty sure that the pilot mass requirements are a kludge answer as neck strength and crush/whiplash resistance are wildly variable even for people at the same mass and fitness (Think wrestlers vs footballers)

Presumably the problem could be solved in the short term by moving as much of the mass of the helmet as possible somewhere else but dangling umbilical cables are going to be problematic and it means the ease of dropping a pilot into any available aircraft will be compromised (plus it's something else to go wrong in the field).

Longer term, lighter components will probably be available but by that point piloted craft will probably be obsolete.

In any case the F35 was never designed as an air-combat/air-superiority machine. That's a job for the F22. The F35 is too tubby, too underpowered and with too stubby wings to be an effective fighting machine(*)(**) and by the time it gets into the field its much-vaunted stealth(***) capabilities will be so hopelessly compromised by countermeasures that most of its armaments are likely to be on external hardpoints as there'll be no point hiding itself.

(*) Because the F22 will never be sold to other countries you can expect the Eurofighter and other aircraft to keep working alongside the F35 for a long time to come (assuming it isn't cancelled - and even the SDI got cancelled in the end on cost grounds despite massive multistate pork-barelling)

(**) These same features make it badly compromised as a ground-support aircraft. Short range and low carrying capacity mean it's less capable than what it replaces.

(***) F35 is ONLY stealthy on a 30 degree cone around the nose end of the longitudinal axis(+), ONLY stealthy at currently used SHF radar frequencies(++) and ONLY stealthy with the doors closed(+++)

(+) Networked detection systems can see it clearly from side or rear and transmit to AA batteries located along the flightline. Newer AA missiles can be guided from those side/rear radar systems rather than relying soley on the onboard smarts or controllers near the launch site. F22's role is to eliminate this threat but other countries won't have the F22

(++) Painting with VHF/UHF radar has been shown to work (UK air defence can see B2s even when they're fully stealthed up) and past US stealth tech has failed hoplessly when the wings are wet (which is how the F117 got shot down). Water is a pretty good reflector so all the matte paint in the world may not help much.

(+++) Neither of the above points matter much when you have a "stealth" aircraft so badly designed that the weapons bay (and other) doors need to be opened in flight every 10 minutes or less due to the avionics overheating and needing emergency cooling. At that point it'll cause even the dumbest radar systems to light up like a christmas tree.

The F35 is one of the most expensive clusterfucks the USA has ever engaged on and it's going to fuck their economy even worse than Ronnie RayGun's Star Wars program (which left the USA deeper in debt than it had ever been at any point in history). The best thing that any other country can do is hedge on purchases (many have already cancelled) and try to make as much money out of the program as possible in the meantime.

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Alan Brown
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Re: This sounds a bit odd.

"the pilot isn't anywhere near the most expensive part of the whole system."

The pilot is an officer and is therefore valuable.

Whirlybirds are generally piloted by grunts or noncomms and as such are expendable.

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Alan Brown
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Re: Handling the G's

"That and the fact of building an ejector seat that could shoot someone through the rotor blades without turning them into mince is ... tricky."

Helicopter ejector seats do exist. There are explosive charges which blow the rotors off before the seats fire. The fact that this turns the "helicopter" into a "rock" means that you don't want to stay onboard after one has been activated.

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Alan Brown
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Re: Handling the G's

"Which is more important, the fact that they are women or the fact that they are shorter ?"

Both. Women handle G forces better than men do and jet pilots tend to be short legged/long-armed (most male pilots are in the 5'4-5'6 range)

Being long legged is decidedly unhelpful when ejecting. Tales exist of pilots being amputated at the knees by the canopy or instrument panel.

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Alan Brown
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Re: minimum weight

"Maybe F1 style helmet brace would work."

Unlike F1 drivers, pilots are expected to be able to look over their shoulders, etc.

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Alan Brown
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Re: minimum weight

"I guess you've never read or heard about the violence that happens once someone pulled the eject lever?"

I have, enough to know I'd never want to do it unless there's no other choice.

A substantial proportion of pilots who eject spend the rest of their careers flying desks thanks to spinal damage.

The fact that this is related to the mass of the helmet indicates that this is related to the compression forces generated on cervical vertebrae when the eject rocket fires. Ejector seats clamp the pilot's head to the seat back during eject specifically to ensure that forces are vertical and to prevent whiplash injuries when the chutes open.

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Pull the plug! PowerPoint may kill my conference audience

Alan Brown
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Re: "Intel speed step has been activated"

Given the (in)competence of most teachers(*), this was a smart step. Unlocked teacher laptops are a morass of malware and assorted (video and other) nasties.

(*) My parents are teachers. I got to interact with their cow-orkers over a 30+ year period and for the most part was left wondering how some managed to tie their shoelaces in the morning, let alone actually teach. There were the (sometimes very) odd bright ones but the vast majority of teachers would have trouble organising a piss up in a brewery.

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Alan Brown
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Re: Amateurs

"the other laptop is a MacBook Air and comes without a network socket"

Apart from the one you can plug into the lightning port.

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Alan Brown
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Conference kit:

Set of decent whiteboard pens (the kind with visible ink tanks).

Set of decent marker pens (using whiteboard pens on flipcharts ruins the pens)

Pump spray bottle of whiteboard cleaner (50:50 water/isopropanol with a shot of detergent) and cleaning rag

Pack of tissues (most places have paper towels in the bathroom for large scale cleaning jobs but some dont)

Flipchart pad(s) and stand(s) (you'd be surprised how many venues don't have these)

Whiteboard(s) and stand(s)

Portable PA and projector. (ditto)

Several dozen magnets (for the flipcharts)

Every conceivable adaptor you can think of for connecting your laptop to the AV system.

Or just write out your requirements and add a bowl of skittles that's had all the orange ones removed. If you see any orange skittles then you know that they probably haven't bothered with the rest of it.

What amazes me is going to various venues and seeing the same glaring deficiencies again and again - with regular attendees apparently not learning the lesson from the last visit.

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Alan Brown
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"You forgot the final item: depending on internet connectivity"

Or assuming that the presentation which is dependent on internet connectivity can be accessed from outside the organisational firewall.

Extra points for bring at the conference and being laughed at for this, sending email at 5am (UK time) demanding it be fixed RIGHT NOW and then a very snarky email CC'ed to the director at 9am because it hasn't been done.

Did I mention that the people responsible for maintaining that firewall don't start until 9:30am? or that _NOOONE_ is in before 9am. Or for added laughs, once the firewall was reconfigured, the venue has its own firewalling which prevented the connection anyway (and they wouldn't budge on it).

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Alan Brown
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Re: Ho Hum

"It came to my rescue that I brought my talk (outline) on paper, as I always do. Paper. Always. Works."

It used to be that our staff would take along a copy of the presentation on OHP "just in case".

Eventually we noticed that the (inkjet) printer used to generate OHP transparencies hadn't been used for several years. Apparently overhead projectors are now rarer than rockinghorse shit.

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'Faceless' Liberty Global has 'sucked the very soul' out of Virgin Media

Alan Brown
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Re: Hmm

"The only thing I wish is that they'd stop sending me physical junk mail."

Even after being told _in writing_ to stop.

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Alan Brown
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Re: Ha ha

"outsourced everything to The Phillipines- where I've discovered using pidgeon Spanish is more easily understood- than English........"

That'll only work if whoever you speak to speaks Tagalog (there are a dozen other languages and hundreds of dialects which aren't basically spanish with some local words overlaid).

English is the official language of the Phils thanks to their USA colonial overlords - and there's the clue. Fake an american accent to be understood perfectly (or a Carlisle one if you want to get transferred to someone who might have a clue)

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Alan Brown
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Re: Was it ever really Virgin?

"went as far a printing sales materials before someone pointed out the possible difficulties of trying to offer the public a Virgin foreplay service"

That's actually the kind of marketing that gives people a bloody good laugh and increases sales.

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Alan Brown
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Re: US business

"Having worked for a company that was taken over by a large American Corp. none of this is surprising."

Indeed. I worked for a Telco (govt department, then state owned enterprise) which was sold off to american interests about 30 years ago. What's described by you and by VM is almost identical to my experience in the late 1980s.

Those american interests? they asset-stripped the telco over a 14 year period (no new capital jobs) jacked costs as high as the market would bear (squeezing until the pips squeaked) and sold most of the land/premises off/leased it back via holding companies), then flicked the carcass off to a vulture capital group stupid enough to pay even more for it than the original sale price (which was based on insane rates of return caused by chronic underinvestment and monopoly market abuse) who then tried to turned the screws even harder on what remained.

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Alan Brown
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Re: Ha ha

" his first response was "Its working, the light is on!""

They're paid per visit, not how long it takes to fix them. Saying it's working and getting the hell out is par for the course for both VM and OR "techs" (and I use that term loosely, the vast majority are monkeys barely housetrained enough to not hurl their own shit around the place)

Loving the service whilst it works is one thing. The true mettle of customer service is what happens when it's not - and as you've already seen, they don't care enough to ensure that jobs are being done properly.

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Alan Brown
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Mushroom

Not just consumers and staff getting shafted

"I think I'm going to have to give Virginmedia the heave-ho because I've had enough of their gouging."

VM have been getting the heave-ho by corporate clients over the last couple of years because of poor service - coupled with operating practices dictated by the operating interfaces with Openreach where even in a critical emergency proven to be in the Openreach network, they won't be onsite until the next day.

This is why we dumped them and we were paying upwards of 50k/year for our circuits (small fry, but I'm aware of clients spending millions who're even less happy about the quality of support VM.

Mind you if you think VM is bad, BTOR are worse. In areas where there's no competition they can effectively charge what they want (creative accounting practices mean they can justify nearly any figure) and do so - with extremely poor levels of service. It took them 2 years to bother getting around to installing new circuits because their contractors wuould show up, do 1/2 the joba nd then leave. BTOR techs would show up to blow fibres, find that ducts weren't connected to anything (in one case, 3 feet buried at each and and 200 feet missing in the middle), so have to reschedule everything - cue another 3 months delay.

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Uni student cuffed for 'hacking professor's PC to change his grades'

Alan Brown
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Shitty security

"After his arrest, investigators found the usernames and passwords for at least 36 faculty members in a notebook stored at his home, we're told."

No matter how he got those passwords (shoulder surfing, plaintext in the system, keylogger, postit notes under the keyboard), it shows that security is incredibly lax.

It's not just the kid who needs a good kicking (being a business major, he's demonstrated exactly WHY he should be unemployable). The problem is that there are no penalties for careless operation of a computer network.

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Forgive me, father, for I have used an ad-blocker on news websites...

Alan Brown
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Re: No guilt at all

I've specifically told my local rag's editor that I block adverts because they're intrusive and a malware vector, but on the other hand i also buy paper copies of said rag.

The ironic thing is that he uses adblockers too, for the same reasons.

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Alan Brown
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"the fight with Adblockers"

There's no fight.

Adblockers don't block adverts coming from the same site as the content. There are other tools for that (frame blockers for the annoying ones)

If you want to curate your own adverts and take responsibility for them, then I'll let them display.

Adbrokers have amply demonstrated that they can't be trusted. If you have them on your web site: more fool you.

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Intel XPoint over-selling criticism surges as Chipzilla hits back

Alan Brown
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Re: The Long Term View

My understanding (as a purchaser) is that Intel made these claims about what the first release would be capable of, sans wrapping in logic to make it a drive.

In any case, as a purchaser there are 2 options: "Buy" or "Not buy" - and that will be dictated by the actual real world performance and price of the release product - which is going to have to be _very_ good and on par with equivalent flash respectively - bearing in mind that once there's another technology in the market flashmakers are likely to respond by lowering prices a bit.

Being twice the speed for 10 times the price won't cut it - and the kinds of buys who want that kind of performance are going to be _extremely_ sensitive to latency.

If Intel tells porkies about performance of the released products then that will catch up with them _very_ quickly and Xpoint will become yet another casualty on the road of solid state storage. History shows that companies which make wildly optimistic statements about their pending products don't do very well out of it. This kind of thing could end up driving Intel out of the sector entirely.

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Insurance companies must start buying security companies

Alan Brown
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Re: The auto insurance industry might just disappear instead

"Why should you and I buy policies for our self driving car?"

Theft, vandalism, hit'n'run drivers, falling trees....

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How cyber insurance actually works

Alan Brown
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Re: I saw one of these proposals recently

> Struck me that there were so many "get out" clauses for the insurer that we were unlikely to ever be able to make a claim.

Most of them are aimed at making sure that the entity taking out the insurance is actually making sure they take care of the basic self-protection steps.

It's also worth noting that most liability insurance is null and void (or payouts drastically reduced) if you're warned of a situation, fail to act on the warning and an event subsequently occurs because of the failing or where the failing has a significant impact on what happened next.

Hence the comment in the article about taking out insurance being a major driver of security improvements.

Insurance is about risk reduction and compensation when the unexpected occurs. If it's expected then you can't insure against it (well, you can, but your premiums will be vastly higher).

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Uncle Sam rules on self-driving cars

Alan Brown
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"....lots of people's jobs redundant"

Yes. At least 140 million worldwide, plus the support industries that rely on them.

The future will have far fewer roadside greasy spoons.

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Alan Brown
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Re: Here's hoping ...

If you root your car, then legal responsibility when it breaks something (or someone) is yours.

Oh, and you'll probably find your insurance has been voided.

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Alan Brown
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Re: In the UK...

"In Norway..."

Try SE Asia. Outside of the the more urbanised countries it's sheer chaos.

People don't indicate because the moment you do, drivers will close the gap to prevent you changing lanes, etc.

But at least you don't have to worry about hitting a moose.

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Alan Brown
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> All it takes is some idiots to be too close to each other, so that they are forced to brake instead of slowing down if the traffic decreases in speed and before you know it it, that motorway (freeway) comes to a complete halt.

On the flipside, all it takes is ~10% of drivers to observe 2 second following distances and drive courteously for those traffic snarlups to dissipate rapidly, so there's a good chance having enough automatons in control of individual vehicles will mean that these kinds of events become rarer.

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1TB SanDisk flash cam card

Alan Brown
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Wake me when it's MicroSD

*yawn*

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Vodafone UK blocks bulk nuisance calls. Hurrah!

Alan Brown
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"presumably this relies on the presented Caller ID number right?"

Wrong.

CallerID data is entirely separate to the routing and ANI data that circulates within the network. You can see that if you have a ISDN PRI (even if callerID is suppressed) and like reading email headers there's more than enough data there to identify fraudulently injected calls if you can be bothered doing so.

Voda is doing this because the cost of doing so it lower than the losses they're taking in allowing the calls to go through (they don't get paid for these calls, so terminating them is a dead loss). Now that threshold's been passed it's in their interests to dress up an automated DNC system as being in the interests of the consumer.

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Alan Brown
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Re: Shame it is only Vodafone....

"Unusually it did have caller ID - 001701538412"

Which is syntactically invalid for the North American Numbering System it claims to be from - 3 digit area codes and 7 digit localparts have been the standard there for 50 years so it's missing a digit.

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Alan Brown
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Re: Nuisance calls are a plague

"TPS is pretty much useless now. Most of the spam calls I get on the landline are either international, even with a proper CLI, or VOIP with a made-up CLI. "

Yup. The only way to work out who's behind them is to get them talking. Sooner or later they'll let slip enough information to allow the ICO to ID them and in the meantime it keeps them busy not being able to defraud someone else.

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Alan Brown
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Economic reasons

Telcos haven't been getting fat off the interconnect charges.

The vast majority of these calls are injected fraudulently and the terminating telco is having to bear the cost of carrying them across its network without being paid for it.

It's in their own economic interest to block such calls from getting into their system. This is self-interest dressed up as consumer protection.

Voda might well be first but the other telcos will follow very quickly. The factor of the crooks concentrating their efforts on the other networks will see to that.

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Autonomous vehicles inquiry set up in the UK

Alan Brown
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"ensure the vehicle is in roadworthy condition"

Technically, it must also be in MOTable condition too.

The number of cars I see driving round with only one working headlight, etc makes it clear that many drivers don't bother - and having noticed the same cars with the same busted headlights for more than a year it's clear they haven't bothered with MOTing them either. What else is wrong?

One of the more interesting side-effects of self-driving automobiles is that taxi fares will become a lot lower (the single biggest expense is the driver), plus likely to be easier to hail. In such a case the case for private ownership will be greatly diminished - and yes, the vehicle operator will be responsible for keeping it in a roadworthy condition but when the vehicle itself can identify it's not in such a state and check itself in for repair, overriding that kind of decision should attract substantially higher penalties than are currently applied.

FWIW, if your car isn't in MOTable condition, then your insurance company won't cover you (it's a specific clause in many policies), meaning that you could be done for driving without insurance in a lot of cases - and in the case of an override order being issued by the operator I'm willing to bet that some form of network telltale will result in insurance being cancelled before the vehicle even hits the road.

On the other side of the coin: Self-driving vehicles may be the trigger needed to reassess the entire way that vehicle driving licenses are issued - making it much tougher and requiring that all existing drivers are rechecked. I witness middle aged drivers doing something massively boneheaded several times per day and the main reason that they don't crash is because people react to avoid them - and most days I'm only commuting the 40 minutes to/from work. The simple fact is that whilst some drivers are brilliant, the vast majority are not, and in any case we're unstable monkeys which drive beyond their reaction abilities and tend to behave emotionally rather than logically when on the road.

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Hackers hijack Tesla Model S from afar, while the cars are moving

Alan Brown
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hmmm

Based on the description of the attack I'm wondering if Teslas are using http:// by default instead of https:// and keeping certificates onboard. If so, they're in good company: Toyota and others did it too - and it certainly explains the ability to make a MitM attack. I'd take paranoia at least a step further and use some form of secure DNS so that a MitM attacker can't simply do redirects that way.

Yes it's good that "Tesla fixed it" but without full disclosure of the vulnerability and the changelog it's impossible to know if they just slapped a bandaid on the problem or dealt with the underlaying issues.

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