* Posts by Alan Brown

3636 posts • joined 8 Feb 2008

Super SSD tech: Fancy a bonkers 8TB all-flash PC?

Alan Brown
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"Replacing that with SSD is £400-500 of upgrade before I start any kind of expansion."

1TB 850Evos are 366 inc vat at Misco. Based on past performance, the next generation will be half that.

On the other hand, 5TB Hitachi 7k6000 SAS drives are about 50 quid cheaper and the price has stayed more or less static for years.

5 times the price, for several hundred times the performance? A lot of people will take that and endurance doesn't matter in an enterprise environment as long as it's "Long enough" to last the support period.

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Alan Brown
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Re: Long term storage

"Long term storage is a no no with SSDs"

I have eeproms last written 30 years ago which are still good. The reality is that noone's actually quantified storage lifetime on SSDs over decade-periods and in any case the bigger issue with backups (even LTOs) is that anything sufficiently old can't be read because there's no remaining technology which can read it.

Try buying a new Exabyte, AIT-1 DLT or LTO1 drive and you'll see what I mean.

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Alan Brown
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Re: When?

"When will SSDs go native?"

NVMe pretty much _is_ native, just in a standardised form factor which makes 'em compatible with existing tech and easy to changeout in servers if they go titsup.

You can already get PCIe SSD cards and their price is constantly falling.

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Alan Brown
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Re: Probably enterprise gear pricing

"3D Flash may be the answer, but does it scale?"

Yes. Samsung say they can ship 127 layers (up from their current 32) immediately

"Meanwhile, when HAMR goes into production, "spinning rust" will scale to tens of Tb per drive."

The last hard drive research lab was shut down in 2008 and staff laid off. Shingling came to market 5 years late. HAMR may rejuvenate the market, but our exoerience over a few thousand drives is that reliability is declining, so do you want to trust 10s of Gb to a single fragile drive?

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Alan Brown
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Re: Excuse me

"They don't have a write life limit and there is still the possibility that a failed drive can have data recovered off it, unlike a failed flash drive! "

If you can hit the write limit in a current generation flash drive then you're deliberately going out of your way to do so - and you're about to find that shingled spinny drives don't like repeated overwrites.

The trends on warranty periods for Spinning vs SSD drives are a good indicator of reliability. Bear in mind that _every single_ HDD marker which went out of business since 1990 did so because the failure rate within warranty period killed them.

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Alan Brown
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Re: Excuse me

"HDDs manufacturers have lost the storage density race to SSDs. They just have to hold on to the $/TB crown to survive."

One reseller has confided to me that buyers are avoiding shingled drives like the plague and as the vendors have been piling a lot of eggs into that basket I don't hold out much hope for long-term survival

The next generation of Samsung SSDs will probably be large+cheap enough(*) that the chinese ministry of commerce will decided that WD can fold HGST under its wing after all, because at that stage having 2 or 1 spinning oxide maker left in business won't matter.

The 850Evo could easily fit 4TB in its case already and the 850Pro 3TB. The reason Samsung didn't was simply that they didn't expect to be able to sell enough to make it worthwhile. I suspect they'll rescind that conservatism in the next round (hell, if they start selling 4Tb SSDs I'll buy 250-400 up front for a project I'm working on even if they end up around the 500 squid mark)

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UK spaceport, phase two: Now where do we PUT the bleeding thing?

Alan Brown
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Re: Manston ticks all boxes

"Because the overshoot is basically.. well it is.. Ramsgate."

So? Move Ramsgate.

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Alan Brown
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Re: Europe's first spaceport,

"energy considerations alone make it one the worst locations anywhere for launching anything into space."

Launching into space is easy.

Staying up there is the hard part.

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Alan Brown
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Re: North East

If you get the launch wrong, you might not have to worry about the North East. (Long March 4 and all that....)

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Alan Brown
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Re: Islands

"Moreover, Arianespace don't build their rockets in French Guiana. They manage to ship stuff across an ocean."

It's a _lot_ easier to move stuff to a launch site via sea than rail. No pesky tunnels limiting diameter for starters. The current USA setup is all about Pork Barrels, not practicality.

In the 1960s a lot of seriously large stuff was shipped to Canaveral by barge.

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Alan Brown
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Re: Where to put it?

"Although I suppose there must be a reason that the UK chose Woomera and not BIOT for its last and only previous orbital launch."

1: it's closer to the equator

2: They already had launch facilities there

3: not much downrange except roos and kiwis.

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UN: Fossil fuels should be TERMINATED 86 years from now

Alan Brown
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Re: I hate to sound like a broken record...

"Any nuclear company could have built one so long as it could raise the funds to pay for itself and get insurance."

That wasn't the problem. Insurance companies were happy to provide cover - statistically they're very safe.

The issue was the endless litigation brought to court by zealots to prevent them being built - fighting them off is expensive and if the opponents plan things so they act serially they can't be enjoined in one class and then defeated once and for all.

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Alan Brown
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Re: Must ... stop ... emitting ... CO2 ... by ... 2100

"I'll put a note in my 'To Do' list for 2080."

That's the part that worries me. This is being interpreted as "business as usual plus more business" until the cutoff date. Phaseouts won't happen.

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Alan Brown
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Re: @ Tapedor TL;DR

DDT is relatively harmless in low amounts as originally applied in farming and as still used in mosquito control. At correctly used levels it breaks down fairly quickly.

The problems with it occured when insects developed resistance to the stuff and instead of switching to something else farmers just kept increasing the amount they were spraying. It got to the point where it was being applied faster than it was breaking down.

Ironically, DDT resistance amongst farm pests is back down to the levels it was before the stuff started being used.

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Alan Brown
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Re: TL;DR

"Don't forget we also have to also shut down any other country which seeks to lift itself from the mud,"

The single biggest GW threat is caused by out-of-control population growth and paradoxically the best way to counter this is to help those countries do exactly that, because richer people have fewer children.

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Alan Brown
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Re: IPCC Credibility

"If Climate Change is irreversible, why are we spending so much money trying to stop it?"

There's a difference between "car crash at 30mph and car crash at 60mph" - generally if you see one coming you should apply the brakes to reduce the intensity.

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Alan Brown
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Re: IPCC Credibility

> Basically, as a scientific organisation, they should be comfortable saying that "this is the evidence for A"

They started out that way - the problem is the "nay" camp are vicious and IPCC people end up being the targets of highly personal public attacks on their credibility. This tends to back people into a corner and make them come out fighting.

Naysayers have a nasty habit of picking on several small periods in a trend which are slightly negative and when others point out that the values across much longer periods are vastly positive and that each "negative trend" has higher starting and finishing points than the last one, they again resort to personal attacks.

The diagram at http://www.skepticalscience.com/examining-the-latest-climate-denialist-plea-for-inaction.html illustrates this last point well.

The issues with human-accelerated global warming are these:

1: If it's true and we do nothing, things get worse (as in "extremely expensive" as well as other connotations)

2: If it's not true and we do nothing, things stay the same

3: if it's true and we do "something" - it's expensive but things either stay the same or don't get as bad (expensive) as they could do.

4: If it's not true and we do "something" - it's expensive but things stay the same.

Call it an insurance policy. Certain Arizona Sherriffs may decry such things but when bad shit happened he didn't have it to fall back on - and unlike him, if we do nothing and bad shit happens there won't be any other planets we can beg help from.

The same attitudes can be seen by those who refuse to insure their cars (or do it and whine about being forced to have insurance) - it's there for a reason and if you want to play the odds society doesn't have to bail you out. In the case of Global Warming denialists, most of the denialists either take the attitude of "if it happens I'm OK anyway" or digging a little deeper finds that they stand to make massive profits from what might happen if GW is true. (This is the same kind of thing as a pump-and-dump scam)

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Alan Brown
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Re: Hydrogen? Milk Bottles

It works the same in the developing countries, but most people just drink the beer and then reuse the bottles without thinking about it.

It's arguably more efficient to transport full bottles to destination and reuse them than to transport empty ones - and you know they've been pressure tested too.

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Alan Brown
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Re: Hydrogen? Milk Bottles

"I saw a picture recently of a plastic milk carton recovered from a beach. The price on the container was still visible. It was in old pennies."

And you don't think the beach isn't covered in bits of broken glass (ground down at the edges) including milk bottles? Go out a bit further and you'll find unbroken ones too.

Arseholes litter and always have. The fact that the bottles are plastic, glass or waxed paper makes no real difference to them, nor does putting a return value on them (as a kid I used to collect dumped bottles in parks and use them to buy stuff at the local shops. They're now worth nothing - but interestingly there's less dumping than there used to be)

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Alan Brown
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Re: Hydrogen?

"It is entirely possible that, on the whole, it is far less environmentally damaging to convert used plastic containers to bales of shredded plastic for bulk recycling than to make the massive investment of time, money and resources to close the loop on a per container Part Number basis. Same with glass and metal."

This is indeed the case.

It's ACTUALLY less environmentally damaging to use used plastic as fuel and make new plastic from oil - the amount of energy (usually in the form of oil or coal) consumed during the recyling process vastly outweighs that consumed making new stuff, because most plastics manufacture is incredibly sensitive to contamination, plus all the different kinds need to be separated for most applications.

Same applies to things like milk bottles. They went out of favour because it costs several times more to wash and reuse them than to buy in single-use plastic bottles or tetrapacks.

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Alan Brown
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Re: Hydrogen?

"Do Westerners eat Meat more than once a day? Do you eat Beef more than once a week?"

Even cereals don't come out well when you factor in all the fertilizers (oil consumption), machinery used to plant/harvest/transport and process, then transport the resulting products to market.

Multiple upvotes on Hydrogen being impractical. Those who push it haven't looked into the issues of hydrogen embrittlement for liquid/pressurised h2 and how much metal hydrides cost in quantities sufficient to hold hydrogen for automotive use (It would more than treble current vehicle costs)

Even methane (CNG) has multiple drawbacks. The tanks have a tendency to burst(*) if not looked after and even when they are, they have a limited lifecycle (massive pressure cycling = microcracking and boom). It has a role as a niche fuel but the drawbacks are bad enough that even at 1/4 the price of petrol its market share in New Zealand plummeted after the first couple of tank explosions and subsequent (expensive) increased safety checks and requirements.

(*) Websearch for CNG tank explosions. Most are _not_ BLEVEs (CNG tanks don't hold liquid), they're stress fractures and they usually happen during the filling process. Even without a subsequent fire it's spectacular and tends to shred the vehicle plus anyone unfortunate enough to be too close. The usual cause is our old friend Hydrogen Embrittlement.

They're also highly susceptable to invisible crash damage - http://www.mvfri.org/Presentations/Stephenson-SAE2008.pdf

Oddly, tanks caught up in fires, or which are full and damaged in a crash will usually vent safely. It's refilling which shows up damage (call it unsafe pressure testing)

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He can't give it away FAST ENOUGH: Bill Gates richest man in world again

Alan Brown
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The openly richest man in the world

There are certain people who are reliably rumoured to have more - around 8-10 times more - than Gates.

One of those people happens to be the president of Russia, which is as appropriate for a maficoracy.

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US military SATELLITE suddenly BLOWS UP: 'Temperature spike' blamed

Alan Brown
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Re: Defense Meterological Satellite

" so many military operations hinge on weather."

One of the most oft-cited operations: D-Day.

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Alan Brown
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Re: We Need An Orbital Hoover

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laser_broom

"able to bring down dozens of objects/day" is a worthwhile target, given the "natural" rate is ~1/day

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Alan Brown
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Re: A satellite overheated and exploded??

"So anybody with the ability to lift things into orbit and make them go "BANG" should be able to cause havoc. "

Where havoc includes "Nobody gets to go up there - or past that level either - for the next few hundred years"

Imagine a world with no new Geostationary or GPS birds.

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Alan Brown
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Re: Re. splatellite

"Could have been the space equivalent of a BLEVE"

Extremely unlikely.

This sat was 2 decades old.

The tech was probably 10 years old when it launched because there's usually that much delay between a bird being laid out and launched (once you build a spec you don't deviate from it and you _certainly_ don't include newer tech without re-engineering from scratch,)

Space-tech normally lags "state of the art" by another decade as it takes that long to prove reliability - just look at the type of microprocessors currently being launched (a lot of the justification for continued use of 90nm processes is radiation robustness)

In all likelihood it had NiCads as the battery technology of choice.

(Disclosure, I work closely with spacecraft engineers and scientists. The above are all answers given to common questions about the age of technology on launches.)

In my opinion this was the result of a microdebris hit. We'll find out soon enough in the investigation.

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Alan Brown
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Re: Re. splatellite

"hydrogen + oxygen has an alarming tendency to go BOOM as Apollo 13 mission commander Jim Lovell discovered to his cost."

There was no hydrogen involved in the Apollo 13 explosion.

The tank heater wiring insulation was damaged 5-6 years prior to launch and when he turned on the power there was a spark inside the tank - the resulting oxygen-fed fire generated a huge overpressure inside the tank, which popped.

http://www.space.com/8193-caused-apollo-13-accident.html

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Alan Brown
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Re: A satellite overheated and exploded??

"my understanding was that satellites didn't carry lots of combustible fuel, but something more akin to composite fuel that burned when mixed"

Hydrazine is the usual chemical fuel of choice in satellites. No need to mix anything.

Temp spike and explosion is a good indicator it hit something small enough to not be tracked but big enough to pierce the chassis and fuel tanks (which are essentially big plastic bags).

Even a paint fleck can do a lot of damage at orbital velocities - https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Space_debris_impact_on_Space_Shuttle_window.jpg - and the current tracking systems can't see anything smaller than about 4-5cm across.

A single 5mm nut would be more than sufficient to obliterate a microsat or kill/disable a small one.

The current orbital situation has been likened to a room full of armed mousetraps. At some point the debris from collisions causes a cascade of subsequent collisions and things are getting closer and closer to that point as more mousetraps enter the space.

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SanDisk launches 200GB microSD card

Alan Brown
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Re: Too Small?

"Am I the only one who never swaps sd cards?"

No. If it's rightsized in the firstplace you don't need to.

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Alan Brown
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Re: SDHC can't read 64GB either

"Oh that's right, a vested interest in keeping spinny disks around for a while, silly me."

The only vested interest they have is that they can't keep up with demand for SSDs.

"I realise that the chips are different, but they aren't THAT different that a MicroSD can be 200GB and a 2.5" can only get to 1.9TB!"

The _only_ thing stopping 2.5" 2TB consumer drives right now (Samsung 850Evo) is that Sammy didn't believe enough people would be willing to pay for them - and specifically said so when the 850s were released. If you pop the case, the 1TB devices only use 1/3 of the internal space.

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Alan Brown
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Re: Too Small?

"We could potentially make a memory card that's four times the size of a microSD card, but just as thin."

Alternatively we could simply stack 4 flash devices inside the existing microsd case (or use 3d flash) - and don't think for a moment that Toshiba and Samsung aren't working on it.

The thickness would still be at least 80% inert plastic.

FWIW, microsds tend to be where SSD reject memory goes (the controllers map out bad blocks) and my suspicion is that the lack of larger microsd sizes and the fact that prices are holding up on them is more down to SSD demand far outstripping supply than memory chip sizes.

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Alan Brown
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Re: Too Small?

"If we continue our obsession with this sort of miniaturisation then before long you'll be able to fit 1TB on a card the size of a pinhead"

This is a bad thing?

" but not be able to find it amongst the lint in your shirt pocket!"

That "lint" is the other 1TB cards making up your raid1 array :D

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Nokia boss smashes net neutrality activists

Alan Brown
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Re: Tosh

"The net can be neutral in that ISPs provide one speed / latency - ASAP. One can then choose whichever ISP provides the better network for their needs and budget."

In civilised parts of the world this is the case.

In many areas of the USA there is exactly 1 ISP (occasionally 2) available to connect to.

The others which used to exist have been systematically driven or legislated out of business, as have competing local loop providers and LD providers with increasing frequency. It's no real surprise to find out that incumbent telco ISPs pretty much throttle VOIP out of existance in order to protect their dialtone revenue, etc.

Also summarised in this old cartoon: http://ars.userfriendly.org/cartoons/?id=20060521

https://wiki.openrightsgroup.org/wiki/Net_Neutrality

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Alan Brown
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ISPs are free to oversell their connectivity.

What they're not free to do is throttle traffic to 3rd-party VOIP services whilst prioritising their own VOIP traffic, or pulling the same stunt with Netflix whilst prioritising Hulu.

The problem with telco/cableco as ISP is that they're acting as data carrier AND services retailer, which puts them in a unique position to be able to act anticompetitively (and they have been).

In a market with actual competition of supply customers would be free to go elsewhere but the actual broadband ISP choices across the vast majority of the USA are "Telco/Cableco" or nothing at all.

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Alan Brown
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Re: I wasn't under the impression that they were being argued for/against

"The fix is to allow more competition at the provider level, ideally by unbundling end-user services from the copper/fibre so that the businesses/homes get more choice."

Which is what is happening in most countries except the USA, which has been steadily going the other way at state and regional levels, often specifically outlawing LLU and shutting down CLECs as a result.

"I'm not sure the NN legislation will provide this."

It won't and it can't.

The problem is that LLU is an intrastate issue and as such virtually impossible to regulate federally, whilst Internet trade is interstate and as such it's a lot easier to regulate.

USA state-level government is even dirtier and more corrupt than at federal level and it's often worse at lower levels. There's not a hell of a lot of difference between Lagos and what goes on in a lot of backwater USA states/towns (except Lagos is improving thanks to growing middle-class african anger about corruption, whilst Joe America is rolling over and taking it)

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Google's broadband-in-the-sky goes TITAN-ic

Alan Brown
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s/hover/orbit/

Or more usually, a figure 8 flightpath above XYZ location

If it has sufficient payload and electrical capacity to run 24*7 after taking out battery overheads then I'm impressed.

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El Reg regains atomic keyring capability

Alan Brown
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Re: Just be careful

"A guy I once did some work with from Winfrith told me how his neighbour used to go on about the dangers of radioactivity right up until he needed radiotherapy for cancer, whereupon for some reason he went very quiet on the subject."

FWIW Rutherford's labs at Oxford were cleaned up and repurposed for other research many years ago. After a while staff started going down with various nasty cancers. It was assumed that material was missed and the place gone over wih a fine tooth comb - nothing found - and deep cleaned again.

Staff kept getting ill. After banging their heads against trying to find the source of radiation which was causing it, the source was found to be mercury.

More precisely, from broken mercury thermometers from decades ago which had seeped into the floorboards and been reacting with the atmosphere. Mercuric oxides are extremely nasty things and it only takes small amounts to cause trouble.

Radioactives are generally more benign, unless you're a smoker (Polonium buildups in the lungs are probably what causes most lung cancers that occur more than 6 months after a smoker gives up)

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FCC says cities should be free to run decent ISPs. And Republicans can't stand it

Alan Brown
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Re: Frrrrreeeeedommmmmmmm!

"5 people don't know that almost every American's healthcare is subsidised"!

And yet it's still amongst the most personally expensive on the planet. Why is that?

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Alan Brown
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Re: Opelika spent $7 million over 5 years for 30,000

Shareholder value worked really well for Enron, didn't it?

The reality is that sociopaths rise to the top of these companies and line their own pockets at the expense of the people they're supposedly working for (the shareholders). If handed a monopoly via whatever means they _will_ find a way to maximise their personal worth in the short term even if that destroys the ability to generate any income in the long one - they don't care because for the most part they'll be long-gone when that happens.

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Alan Brown
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Re: They should compromise

"Publicly owned railways have been an absolute sinkhole for public funds for many decades, I just don't understand why so many seem happy to keep pouring money down that same drain."

The economics of urban rail is simple: It's cheaper to pay for them than it is to provide transportation infrastructure for that many cars - even if parking the things was left entirely to private interests the traffic chaos would make cities virtually unnavigable.

non-urban transport is for the most part only viable because of large-scale hidden subsidies. A single 40-ton truck generates the same amount of roadbed damage as nearly 10,000 cars at the same speed but the fees truckers pay for road use come nowhere near covering this discrepency.

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Alan Brown
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Re: Infrastructure

"Rather than keeping things "fair", the regulations will introduce new barriers to entry that prevent small operators from chipping away at the slow-moving, unresponsive monopolies."

Things are already unfair. The Telcos have almost finished reforming into AT&T and virtually all CLECs legislated out of existance.

State PUCs have systematically handed more monopoly powers to telcos in exchange for promised upgrades which didn't materialise - then repeated the cycle without asking why the last promises hadn't been kept.

When private companies are handed regional monopolies by governments, then they are effectively quasi-governmental organisations. That they have a captive market they can rape-and-pillage is no different to the days of the 19th century railway robber-barons.

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Alan Brown
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Re: Infrastructure

"In the United States, much of the infrastructure that delivers electricity, natural gas, telephony, and cable, along with most rail lines and even some roads and freeways is in fact private property."

Private property generally allowed to be built by the govt and given monopoly govt protection from competition.

That's state control no matter how it's painted. In fact the USA is amongst the most regulated, anticompetitive environments on the planet with a total fixation on short-term profit over long-term stability The predictable result on infrastructure is starting to play out whilst the robber barons pull profits in ever tighter.

Ken Lay was far from unique or the last of his kind.

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Make room, Wi-Fi, Qualcomm wants to run LTE on your 5GHz band

Alan Brown
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Re: Get off my lawn, err, wifi.

"2.4GH is already a struggle in many places (just streets, not even apartment blocks)."

It's effectively unusable where I am.

"5GHz is fairly good at the moment, helped by not being as widely used and having shorter range."

That and having a lot more usable non-overlapping channels.

5GHz LTE _will_ have to compete with 5GHz Wifi. This could get interesting.

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Your hard drives were RIDDLED with NSA SPYWARE for YEARS

Alan Brown
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Re: Wait

"Or you go to Korea and show the geeks who wrote the software for the disc controllers a really good time"

Do you think this hasn't already happened?

One of the things which is coming out of the Snowden revelations is that like decent security, serious attack plans tend to be layered too.

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Alan Brown
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Re: Wait

"I'm sorry but it's embarrassing for you if your nuclear power plant is running on general purpose x86 hardware that loads from SATA and doesn't bother to check integrity of bootloaders, it really is."

Given that VMS is going off support 20 years prematurely, a bunch of existing plants are already in an awkward position.

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Alan Brown
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Re: but the '...w.dll'

"Tinycore Linux really screwed down @ about 8meg, "

I was able to run linux 24-port terminal servers with RADIUS in 4Mb back in the 1990s. Tinycore sounds a little bloated. :)

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MEGA PATENT DUMP! Ericsson, Smartflash blitz Apple: iPhone, iPad menaced by sales block

Alan Brown
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Re: By the way

"Somebody should remind the Ericsson lawyers that Ericsson is in the business of selling cellular base station hardware"

Ericsson makes far more from patent royalties than from selling hardware - even more so as other makers have made heavy inroads into selling base stations, but they have to pay patent royalties to Ericsson which is now a minority player in that side of the industry (Many of those patents are due to run out soon).

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Alan Brown
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@Rampant spaniel - the patents in question ARE in a patent pool. The issue is that Apple is refusing to pay up _at all_ whilst it tries to wrangle discounts over FRAND pricing.

The factor that they bring almost no new technology to the table means they have little to negotiate with (packaging a bunch of other people's tech and patenting the case it's shoved in is not innovative at the silicon level)

This tactic isn't new for Apple and allowing it to go to court is clearly worthwhile for them or they wouldn't do it - it's happened a few times already. I'd be vastly amused if they got hit with swinging punitive damages.

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Alan Brown
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Re: oIrony

"Seems that the law of return is hitting them with a very large clue stick."

Patent lawsuits were regarded as nuclear weapons back in the 1990s - powerful but extremely dangerous and likely to trigger all out patent warfare once one outfit started using them.

It was expected that any outfit launching them for non-egrarious violations would experience massive retaliation given that it's impossible to produce anything without multiple overlapping patents covering it.

That prediction is coming to pass.

As has been proven with the Exxon holding of patents on NiMH batteries there's no requirement to issue patent licenses _at_all_, let alone on a FRAND basis. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Patent_encumbrance_of_large_automotive_NiMH_batteries

It's possible to argue that standards-essential patents should be subject to compulsary flat-fee licensing but that's not where things stand at the moment virtually anywhere in the world - and in this case the argument is that Apple is refusing to pay anything at all (not the first case like this they're facing - and in the previous ones they settled).

It's worth noting that Apple's own "patent lawsuits" have been about "trade dress" - What the US calls "design patents" is what everyone else generall calls "registered designs". This one is much more serious as it's about their unauthorised use of the technology underlaying the pretty case.

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Alan Brown
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"The larger Chinese vendors such as Huawei by the way are investing loads of money in hardware R&D with the intention of getting their patents incorporated into future standards."

Not just in mobile.

Their proposal for distributed layer3 routing over TRILL is both a doozy and a game-changer for datacentre or mesh-connected campus switching - it increases robustness whilst reducing equipment count - generally a good thing - and it's equally applicable across MANs as it is across campus networks.

https://tools.ietf.org/html/draft-ietf-trill-irb-02

Byebye core routers and the SPOF that goes with 'em.

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