* Posts by fajensen

525 posts • joined 18 Jun 2008

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US anti-encryption law is so 'braindead' it will outlaw file compression

fajensen
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Re: If passed

It would make the war on drugs seem like a school project.

Gotta Have Growth! War on Drugs and War on Terror have peaked.

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fajensen
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Re: Just a point of clarification...

I'm no fan of HC, but DT is dangerous to the whole world.

Maybe so - but - the facts are that somewhere between ten thousands and hundreds of thousands have died because of Hillary's need to show off her "Hawkishness" to her handlers.

Based on past performance Hillary is clearly the greater evil. In fact, Trump has so much catching up to do that the next genocidal "regime change" might not even happen before he is replaced and we get 4-5 years of relative peace.

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India's daft draft anti-encryption law torn up after world+dog points out its stupidity

fajensen
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Re: The cost of going off shore

With any luck, this sort of nonsense will encourage these business and departments to re-evaluate the cost of doing so. With any luck …

No such luck. As long as there is money to skim off for the CEx-segment, management will do whatever it takes to get at the trough! Who cares about the business or it's shareholders?

For example:

Businesses set up shop in China. To do this legally, the Chinese subsidiary has to be Chinese owned - the Chinese "partner" must by law hold at least 51% of the stock, the IPR owned by the "mothership", but used in China, must be signed over to the subsidiary - and there is exchange controls in place meaning "good luck getting you money out, should the situation require it!". All these assets are handed over "to be in China". And who cares? It's not the decision makers assets!

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Bundling ZFS and Linux is impossible says Richard Stallman

fajensen
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Re: You can already use ZFS as a bolt on

Ubuntu could probably distribute ZFS in much the the same way that VmWare distributes VmWare Tools.

The VmWare kernel modules are tgz'ed source code, which are compiled & installed by a Perl script. Probably to get around the same kind of problem. Ubuntu could do a "ZFS-Installer"-package which holds the build dependencies, management scripts and source code, on install / update it kicks off the build again.

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That naked picture on my PC? Not mine. The IT guy put it there

fajensen
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I imagine the police ..

It's the other way round: The police is maybe interested in the nefarious activities, to cover it up more effectively, while the press will want to "investigate" the Pedo-angle. That's the track record so far.

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Woman scales Ben Nevis wielding selfie stick instead of ice axe

fajensen
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Go

Re: @AC, "want to know, what do you do?"

You could do very small expeditions on well-marked roads or paths to an official shelter site. In the beginning stay there for cooking some tea, then try to make dinner, then perhaps sleep overnight. Tea is always needed for making "found" water drinkable using the rather cheap and unbreakable Trangia "kitchen".

"Micro-expeditions" is a good way to get experience with handling nature. Keeping the car at a distance of 1 hour of easy navigation and relaxed walking takes the stress of being "lost" away. Having an exit plan, it is just a personal preference to put up a with a wet night in the forest, because some moron forgot to pack the tent, rather than a survival issue. One can choose to suck it up - or - be a wuss ;-)

Two of those cheap 3 x 3 meter light-weight tarps sold at DIY stores and some string can make a decent shelter (bivouac) for 2 persons. Here (Sweden) we would bring a small axe too. All that is really needed for a 2 days hike will fit in a very small backpack.

Anyway, all the planning and doing of the little - totally safe - "expeditions" & "picnics" will build up real skills and confidence that will be very useful if one decide to do "a BIG expedition" (or eventually manage to get lost for real, or ditch the car in some god forsaken road without mobile cover, or is surprised by weather on a Scottish mountain. I have personally encountered a real snowstorm on Dartmoor in May while driving there).

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fajensen
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Paris Hilton

Re: Fucking moron

... or giving them a reason to exist.

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Did hacktivists really just expose half of Turkey's entire population to ID theft?

fajensen
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Re: We're only in april...

Denmark or any other place won't eventually suffer something similar.

Denmark DID. The "IT provider of last resort" as we call it, CSC, was hacked. The hackers had full access to things like the CPR registry, the motor vehicle registry, the criminal records database.

During the case it became obvious that CSC / "the authorities" in reality have no backups and no change controls - this despite hosting all in an IBM mainframe environment - the prosecution argued that it was not possible to determine if anything had been changed in the records.

The court case was a farce in general, the defence and the prosecution had no access to raw data (the alleged hackers disk drive) and the prosecution did not "get" the concept of a laptop being a server.

The IT skills on display were dire indeed, probably one of many reasons why we have one large IT project after another cratering with great fanfare, yet keep launching them.

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2014/10/30/danish_court_finds_pirate_bay_cofounder_guilty_of_hacking_csc_servers/

The Danish sites have better details:

http://www.version2.dk/fokus/csc-hacking

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'Panama papers' came from email server hack at Mossack Fonseca

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Big Brother

Re: Anyone noticed ..

.. that the reporting so far has studiously avoided to mention any Americans involved in this?

Well, the yanks have Delaware for their money-laundering and tax-fraud needs. There is that.

But it does smell, as you say. The message *could* be that certain officials supporting key American interests such as EU signing up for TTIP and TISA need not be listed - for now - and won't be in the future. Unless these things go the wrong way.

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fajensen
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Coat

Re: Given the scarcity of items on our cousins in the material released...

Or maybe the saddest part is after all that the Russian population

Why should they care? It's expected (both the part about their leaders having "business interests" on the side and the part about Putin being presented as the architect of all evil by the west).

... And, things being what they are Here, in the EUSSR, who cares about what "they" say about Putin?

The good part is, that If "they" want some credibility for the Putin story, "they" will need to grass up at least some of the higher-branch monkeys *here*. We know they exist. Their lobbying is why tax law is the way that it is and the reason we allow off-shore entities being *blatantly* used as vehicles for fraud and abuse.

It's probably not worth it, though.

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Former FBI spy hunter: Don’t trust China on ‘no hack’ pact

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"Former" - Exactly!

“Chinese firms don’t invest in research and development. They’re not interested in innovation themselves,” he claimed.

Keep believing that - while the Chinese secures their monopoly on state-of-the-art rechargeable batteries and bio-tech. Probably more. Fighters that works - unlike the F35?

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'$5bn for Slack?! I refuse to pay!' You don't pay – and that's its biggest problem

fajensen
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Devil

Re: Work has mandated Slack as the IM tool for the tech side of the business...

The idea that everything should be spewed forth to everyone instantaneously, and that one should have to mentally scroll back through a chat log and play it back in one's head to see what's been dealt with is not one of them.

It's a GREAT idea. Because, NOW you(r) business will urgently need an(other) intelligent tool to sort the deluge of crap into actionable information.

Don't think "stupid" or "broken", think "how can I USE this to bleed the bastards?".

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fajensen
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Angel

.... and there's bugger all hope of ever getting a return on the investment.

Depends. Converting just 5% of 300 million USD of "Other Peoples Money into "My Money" would yield a pretty good R.O.I. For me at least.

I would bet that the venture vultures providing the funding charges about that in management fees. Going further into the Gray, one could also set up a side-channel providing in-sourced services like management consultancy. Maybe once could even buy Credit Default Swaps on the business's bonds (It requires that someone takes the other side of the bet - again with "Other People's MOney" - but - there is a 5-10% fee for someone to do exactly that also).

The world demands to be fooled, of course Capitalism and Markets will cater to that need.

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fajensen
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Terminator

When that day comes, then my "virtual secretary" will contact your "virtual secretary" and they'll sort out everything between them and let us know what they've decided we ought to do.

That day is already here.

It's just that it's not "my" or "your" "virtual secretary" it's The Man's secretary - or - rather - Taskmaster. The fulfilment centres behind Amazon & Co equips staff with trackers and runs them like robots using optimal-path algorithms. The so-called "knowledge work" is coming right up for modernisation next on the same principles (ambulance drivers, police, health care are "getting it" now).

Whenever we encounter "digitalisation", what it really means is the down-sourcing of stupid internal bureaucracy to users by making them do the job themselves in order to get any service. This frees internal resources to invent more bureaucracy, so the escalation is geometric.

This is why we can't have any nice things. It would give us time to think, sooner or later we would get ideas and then ... change would come. The "Sir Humpreys" almost lost control in the 1960's, it's taken them more than 50 years to unwind all of that, so of course "we" wouldn't want to risk another "reality excursion". So - busy, busy, busy ....

PS:

Even 1990's "dumb-AI" like SpamBayes can figure out with extremely good accuracy what I consider spam or not by learning. If I had several classifiers in parallel, I could teach them to auto-sort all of my email according to importance and subject. Each filter would need one complete classifier, but, my 2016 computer is probably 1500 x faster than my 1990's ditto - so - wouldn't even notice this load.

Hmm. Maybe one should try it.

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Dodgy software will bork America's F-35 fighters until at least 2019

fajensen
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Re: @Ledswinger

So we really should be asking: WTF are we doing wrong? Why is our society unable to build stuff which does the job to the same extent as the Spitfire,

I'll take a guess: Structural Unemployment is what we are doing wrong.

We have at our disposal thousands of bright young things from the finest and most expensive universities ready and willing to work at any project. We have wonderful design tools, that really do work, can run on any recent computer (except Mac) and are affordable to a very modest budget.

However - there is not that much actual Work and what work there is, is quickly dispensed with, because, businesses these days are frighteningly efficient and the tools are really cheap and powerful.

So, what will we do? Usually, I see this a lot on the big projects I happen work with, the "solution" is to make everything very big and very complicated. Always use "big-iron" / "enterprise" tools, be very heavy with the "bondage & leather" processes A.K.A. project-, requirements- and change- management, and generally leave no stone unturned if it is suspected that a phd-thesis could be hidden underneath.

Maybe 10% of the resources allocated actually goes into the actual end-product that the project is supposed to deliver. But, thousands of engineers and con-slutt-ants earns big salaries and can take out mortgages, which creates moneys for the banks to waste. So, we don't have a recession.

I can, at my kitchen table, design and have manufactured electronics that only 10-15 years ago would require a team of engineers and some kind of factory. The web-2.0 douchebags can do even bigger feats in terms of money with a few developers in an attic office (The other side of web-2.0 are IS - which are now murdering quicker, faster and for less resources than PIRA did).

We are swimming in resources and capabilities, but we haven't solved the problem on how to change society to the new realities.

*) "enterprise" - A product that ejects warp-cores and who's crew generally spends entire episodes on barely getting out of self-created messes. Perfectly fitting.

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fajensen
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Re: Ouch!

What would happen if we didn't bomb random people? Not very much, I bet!

With the F35 to backstop "investors" we could simulate bombing villagers and no-one - apart from the villagers - would actually notice.

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fajensen
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Re: Sounds like it was developed using an Agile approach

And rightly so - If those slackers had been a-stoking properly as instructed by management, then the Titanic would have had enough momentum to jump right over that iceberg!

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How one developer just broke Node, Babel and thousands of projects in 11 lines of JavaScript

fajensen
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Re: Looks like everyone is being a dick

I suspect that if web browsers started refusing to load images from third-party sites,

We get THIS ;-)

"""

Here’s The Thing With Ad Blockers

We get it: Ads aren’t what you’re here for. But ads help us keep the lights on.

So, add us to your ad blocker’s whitelist or pay $1 per week for an ad-free version of WIRED. Either way, you are supporting our journalism. We’d really appreciate it.

"""

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fajensen
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Angel

Re: My reaction -- "WTF"

.... either that nothing important is actually done using browser-side code or that everyone involved is an idiot. You choose.

Why can't we have BOTH?

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Lost in the obits: Intel's Andy Grove's great warning to Silicon Valley

fajensen
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Ad-blocker fixes!

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fajensen
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Terminator

Re: Andy Grove, never annoying

Carly Fiorini's only skill is the ability to run whatever she, for occult reasons*, is given responsibility for into the ground.

*) I could do the same, faster and for less. Competition does not apply to the CEx-segment!

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Comms 'redlining' in Brussels as explosions kill up to 30 people

fajensen
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Mushroom

They ought to focus on methods to better identify the needles in what they already have.

Remember Donald Rumsfeld?

As we know, there are known knowns; there are things we know we know. We also know there are known unknowns; that is to say we know there are some things we do not know. But there are also unknown unknowns—the ones we don’t know we don’t know.

To which we could add:

There are known knowns, that we don't wanna know because once we know, we have to act.

Which is the governments Primary Directive when it comes to islamic terrorism!

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Michigan shooter says 'mind controlling' Uber app told him to kill

fajensen
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Re: Typical narrative in the US

Not saying this guy isn't crazy, but similar statements by a black man would never be reported,

... Mainly because Black Man is harder to interview, him carrying 3-5 Glock magazines worth of bullets inside his body, depending on how many cops showed up for the arrest (and subsequent paid vacation while the inquest clears them of any wrongdoing).

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Skype users were targeted by bad-ad pushing Angler crooks

fajensen
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Re: Idiot MS

Yep ... and they even have those extra shitty / spammy ads on Skype ("Memory Optimizer" and the "Missing Drivers", amongst others) that everyone else stopped serving in ... oh ... early 2000's or so.

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fajensen
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Re: Idiot MS

That's kind of the whole idea behind the flashing tiles interface, is it not? In the future every time one wants to run an app and click on a it's tile, one first have to watch some shitty commercial.

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'Just give me any old date and I'll make it work' ... said the VB script to the coder

fajensen
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Holmes

Arrr -back in me day, we didnae have rocks!

I had to add some extra functions to 4K of hand-assembled, hand-patched, 8085 code in EPROM's.

To do this properly I decided to disassemble the patch-work of code, using ".origin" directives to carefully insert each hand-crafted patch in the right place in the EPROM set until I could eventually re-assemble an exact 1:1 match of the existing EPROM's. Then get rid of the ".origin", rebuild, fix some timing constants because the code-loop was now 30% smaller and faster.

Then .... sometimes the parameters for the new functions didn't work properly.

Hmm. I had an expensive logic analyser, with a hardware debugger for the 8085, so I quickly found out that two memory locations in RAM changed, one of which was a local variable in my subroutines.

But ... the problem was HOW it changed! I could not find it!! No instruction referenced any of the locations in any way (the logic analyser could see all address pins), no DMA, no IRQ .... and it was not just that board - all of them behaved the same way.

After 3 weeks I finally gave up and simply defined two 8 bit variables placed over the offending locations so nothing would be placed there. The code still runs ....

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Mechanic computers used to pwn cars in new model-agnostic attack

fajensen
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FAIL

Re: Epoxy Resin

... faults too difficult for a mechanic to diagnose or fix without computer assistance will not be fixable.

That's all faults today. The whole work flow in a garage runs around the diagnostic tools. Ff the wheels fall off the car, the mechanic will simply not be able to diagnose and fix the faults without going through the diagnostics!

- because - pressure sensors!

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AMD to fix slippery hypervisor-busting bug in its CPU microcode

fajensen
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Re: Out of the Darkness Comes Light ‽ .

... and we should buy some Gold?

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fajensen
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Re: I'd have assumed that their test code suite would catch something like that...

Well, it works like this: You have good QA, the process works, you have good people and very few recalls. The the bean-counters arrive. They quickly conclude that since there are very few recalls and other disasters, there is not an urgent need for QA so the budget is cut ... and cut ... and cut. Then there is a major recall and scores of consultants come in to set up a QA system ....

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fajensen
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Trollface

Re: Learnt something new today

Including new_code.bin and new_code_fix.bin ...

If you need to ask what a blob is *for* then you are not smart enough to run it ....

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Photographer hassled by Port of Tyne for filming a sign on a wall

fajensen
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Re: Training required and Twitter suspensions

1) Security pays what? 6 - 7 quid an hour or thereabouts?

So, you are basically going to get either: Total monkeys "who like the uniform" or those people with other problems in their life (like being recently out of jail or supplementing their measly salary in ways that might land them in one). Neither character is going to be around for long, why train them? It's not like anything they do will come back to you (If it does, you can always sack them).

2) Twitter is a Business. It's not *our* business.

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Microsoft releases Windows 10 preview for Raspberry Pi 3

fajensen
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Re: Dear Microsoft,

I presume you also support removing books you don't like from school libraries.

Heh, maybe I do, or maybe not:

I don't like creationism, and I am all for vigorous "discriminatory practices" being applied against that kind of brain-rot in general. I also believe that religion and religious ideas shall be made fun off, so, we of course need some reference material around for that.

... Windows is there to be mocked and ridiculed, I guess. But, if it becomes a mandatory part of curriculum due to some misguided application of "fairness" to nut bags and crazies - then - kill it with fire.

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Google robo-car backs into bendy-bus in California

fajensen
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Re: Bus vs. meat bag

refusing to give way to cyclists.

In Denmark there is about 10-15 nasty fatalities every year with cyclist on the right side of bus or lorry going under the wheels when bus / lorry turns right.

Even though the cyclist are "in the right, legally", they should still stay the hell away from large vehicles!

The speculation is that women - who are the majority of the fatalities - simply trust more that others will follow the rules than men do.

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BOFH: This laptop has ceased to be. And it's pub o'clock soon

fajensen
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Angel

TWACK*!

YELLING: "Is that a straight enough answer? or do you want to taste the Righteous Fist of Golden Rings too!?"

About that long!!

*)The sound of the clue-bat reconfiguring a face into a new configuration.

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European Patent Office heads rapidly toward full meltdown

fajensen
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Angel

Re: "let the nation of Albania handle it all"

Why should some foreign nation's unelected quangos have any jurisdiction whatsoever over this country

Because you have to give them exactly the same rights as British unelected quangos - can't discriminate on nationality, remember?

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fajensen
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Trollface

Re: Outdated practices?

On the other hand it leads to the situation ...

Come On -Those "Bright Young Things" need to have something to look forward to other than working minimum wage 80 hours a day for their entire "career" - which is the reality today.

The old fart shows that the company "cares", there is a career rack and that loyalty is rewarded (as if!). That's why he is paid.

For many colleagues "Retired" just means "Having officially declared the intention of not doing any useful work". Which is *still* better than ambitiously turning out impressive kilo-line numbers of garbage - which is also the stark reality today. Especially web-developers, they are never done until the site doesn't work any more. People should learn from the Pharaohs, I say!

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Yelp minimum wage row shines spotlight on … broke, fired employee

fajensen
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Re: Trump?

Because Markets - Now DIE!

- Is what you are saying?

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FBI says it helped mess up that iPhone – the one it wants Apple to crack

fajensen
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Re: owned by the county?

Stupid enough to believe in sky-fairies and simultaneously not endowed with enough impulse control to stay with the original target schedule? I.O.W.. Very Stupid. Unstable too. If the TLA's were actually worth anything of what we pay for them, they would probably have seen a trail of aberrant behaviour a long way before.

I think that the happy couple were planning a little Paris-style atrocity, but before that the idiot loses his shit about some real or imagined offence at work, runs totally amok and shoot up work with wifey - thus destroying the original plan.

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fajensen
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Re: Sometimes I wonder...

The movie "Brazil" nailed it: Sure, The Authorities are incompetent toss-pots relying on decrepit and crumbling infrastructure - but - they are still capable of hauling your ass in and torture you to death as required by Protocol (and even if they happen to get the wrong guy, and they know about this, it's just easier to go on with the torturing than to do the Non-Conformance Report ....)

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Good thing this dev quit. I'd have fired him. Out of a cannon. Into the sun

fajensen
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Trollface

Re: #define spel spell

The only thing true in SNMP is the 'P* - yes, it's a Protocol, but, it's not Simple and it can't be used to Manage Networks!

KILL it with nuclear fire.

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fajensen
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Re: Let me guess, that last one was an academic?

Academics always have to prove how clever they are at whatever task attempted - and thus we get abominations such as: "NUMERICAL RECIPES IN C: THE ART OF SCIENTIFIC COMPUTING (ISBN 0-521-43108-5)" - where parentheses are banned from really hairy expressions because only a moron will be ignorant on the evaluation order of C operators.

.... and the lesser academics are copy-pasting the "FORTRAN in any language with C-quirks on top" code that they ripped from books all over the matrix.

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BOFH: In-depth IT training needs a single-malt distillery

fajensen
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Trollface

Re: Wrong approach

Leather belt folded double, then pulling hard on the ends sounds exactly like a High Voltage spark, that brisk "crack" that warns of the coming "BOOM+Fireball".

Perfect for my line of work and keeping colleagues blood pressure raised - for safety, of course.

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German Chancellor fires hydrogen plasma with the push of a button

fajensen
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Re: Bollocks

b) tokamaks are the best current bet (stellerators may be coming up from behind but at the present tokamaks are where the clever money is);

Disagree. Tokamaks - especially ITER is where the dumb money goes to die. I.M.O. Tokamaks are a technological rat trap. They will always be an infinitesimal amount away from "break even", performing juust well enough to suck in money but never actually delivering. Back in the day, ITER was "the biz", the Germans disagreed and built Wendelstein (which I and many others believed would never work) and now Wendelstein has gone and lapped ITER.

To really move forward it is often necessary to take a step back in finances, performance, whatever - we see this in computing, the top-of-the-range, best performance per dollar kit, is ruined by the worse (on all parameters), yet more adaptable technologies that can be evolved.

d) Controlled fusion is really hard to do. Pouring money on it does not really change this (much) unless one goes "Full-On Apollo" on the problem - Which I do think that we should, actually, both for our own and for the planets sake. Every dollar spent on oil is a direct donation to terrorism and the destruction of the ecosystem.

An Apollo-style program, several alternative paths - because this is hard and therefore will take real time and effort - is what we should do.

We can still use ITER, but ITER should be just one of many bets made.

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I love you. I will kill you! I want to make love to you: The evolution of AI in pop culture

fajensen
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Re: "In time you will come to regard me not only with respect and awe, but with love..."

Truth is: It would take at the most 0.3 generations before there would be a Colossus cult with tens of millions of followers with priests, robes, rituals, holy books, verified miracles and merchandise.

Just look at scientology, north korea, televangelism, the moon cult, islamic state, hare chrishna and neo-liberalism, craziness designed and engineered by mere humans, yet, millions and millions of suckers are irresistibly attracted like wasps to a picnic. Most people *want* to be controlled, they *want* to have all choices made for them, they *want* to have a complete check-list with all the answers for any situation.

With Colossus, there is a God who actually listens, always sees everything, punishes transgressors and probably can perform real miracles too. I'd say that 30 - 80% of the population would like that (and, following tradition, would ritually murder the other fraction in the traditional way).

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You've seen things people wouldn't believe – so tell us your programming horrors

fajensen
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Facepalm

Re: How much effort does it take to copy an SQLite database file?

Sounds like the average (which indeed is *very* average) Java programmer left to play. I once worked in a place where one would easily get 50% on the base salary doing on-call support for 6 days every month.

They used MySQL+Java+"stringify eeverything into objects" so, in general SQL is disabled and Java does "select", "sort", whatever. MySQL per design doesn't give a shit about what goes into an INTEGER - et cetera - field, anything is OK, and MySQL will politely ignore any SQL it doesn't feel like doing that day - like DELETE CASCADE.

And Yet - sometimes - MySQL doesn't and pukes and someone like me got woken up at night to fix it.

This unique team of brainiacs also used "util.logging ... ALL" - into a MySQL database of strings(!!!) - as well as logging in various places unknown to logrotate ....

The developers couldn't be arsed to fix any of it, of course, and PHB's opinion was that every brain fart issued in Java was pure platinum dust.

This gooey mess runs a five-nines service used by a multitude of major telecoms globally. One must admit that it does looks really shiny and up-with-the-latest-trending-buzzwords too (as long as one does not peel at the loose paint).

Having been there, I don't trust anything web-based (or IoT'ish), it's all built on brown, smelly, "sand".

PS:

SQLite has a "dump" command. This will lock the database and dump the entire database as textual SQL statements into a file (or socket, I would use a file if possible to minimise the lock time), which can then be transferred by any convenient method and imported on the other end. If someone want to muck with the fields / schema - then the textual SQL representation would be a good place to start, IMO.

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From Zero to hero: Why mini 'puter Oberon should grab Pi's crown

fajensen
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Trollface

Re: Click-Bait much?

I'll get flamed for saying this, but OS X is how desktop Linux should look and work...

I will - once the Gnome and the Systemd work is done!

Then Linux will have:

a) Totally obscure xml-ish-but-not-quite start-up files for services,

b) Applications as binary blobs, a weird concoction of statically linked code, yet with files shat everywhere (like windows),

c) Un-Install apparently not required, Good Luck tracking all the files shat everywhere (Hint: Time-Machine is your dearest, closest, most precious friend).

d) Weird bugs and "kinks" like the Swedish USB keyboard disconnecting itself, the UK one never does - usually can reconnect by changing USB socket on the display, but not always (and will not reconnect by connection to computer). On boot, the login promt is shown on the Thunderbolt display, yet, the Macbook Pro keyboard is the only one active. Sometimes the Ethernet connection has a "self-assigned address" for a day or so - nothing helps.

e) Apple doesn't give a shit about your problems - Ah, Linux has that part already ;-)

f) A Linux that will give you all of that for about 1200 EUR and up ;-))

However, VMware Fusion really does work flawlessly which fixes the problem with running applications that one must run but are never available on Mac.

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Trend Micro AV gave any website command-line access to Windows PCs

fajensen
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Black Helicopters

... attack vectors that AVs bring with them is the ability for an arbitrary bunch of folks to upload & run arbitrary code ...

Of course. Anti-virus software is certain to be an important part of the "Global War on Terror (and Everything Else, now we are at it)". That's why "we" need to have it.

Even if the junk-ware was honestly implemented and only checksummed files exactly as it sez on the tin, a database of those file signatures can be used to track the movement of information, what information is new, which is dynamic and which is static - so "They" can work out who to drone next.

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For fsck's SAKKE: GCHQ-built phone voice encryption has massive backdoor – researcher

fajensen
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Black Helicopters

Re: Clueless

.... absolutely not germain to terrorist or criminal activity ....

Oh. Lets ask the question: What are the threats and opportunities faced by the "intelligence" services?

Opportunities: Terrorism, organised crime, paedophiles .... politicians doing something they shouldn't

Threats: Politicians with real clout finding out that the "intelligence" services isn't actually very intelligent or competent and consistently have missed pretty much *every* major world-changing event(!) resulting in budget cuts and dismissals.

Solution: Spy on the politicians and the Civil Service, get some Dirt on Them before they do US.

Bonus: While "intelligence" are all busy doing that, the "Opportunities" will grow all on their own.

"They" actually wanted to engineer a pre-emptive attack on (at least) the Civil Service and Parliament, by pushing a back-doored "secure" communication protocol onto them disguised as "The most secure kit our boffins could come up with, Sir". Nice one.

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Fortinet tries to explain weird SSH 'backdoor' discovered in firewalls

fajensen
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Why upgrade?

If one assumes that this is an TLA-requested backdoor then, perhaps, it is counter-productive to update because the new software will have updated backdoors too, that we don't know about and therefore have to find and block.

Better the devil we know, sortt of thing?

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Hacks rebel after bosses secretly install motion sensors under desks

fajensen
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Re: Possibly naive observations...

1a) Eternal Suffering is *required* to placate the Many-Angled Ones.

1b) It pisses people off when, relieved from stupid colleagues, PHB-interference, commuting and meetings, the off-site people ends up being about twice as productive as their "managed" colleagues.

2) Of course. Perpetually expanding Brownian motion is 80% of the work in most large organisationg.

3) Yes. It's a Feature.

4) In order to game the numbers more effectively, management reorganise often so that no useful data is collected on the actual performance of said management. With no stability, there are no exceptions - or - rather, Everything is an Exception.

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