* Posts by Mike Pellatt

237 posts • joined 17 Apr 2007

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SCO's last arguments in 'Who owns Linux?' case vs. IBM knocked out

Mike Pellatt

Re: Tortious interference claims ..

Thanks for your ref. Now, that's interesting. The post has an insert headed "Update: 2014". Groklaw "closed" on 20th August 2013. All I had been aware of happening since then was updates to the various timelines (pretty much SCO vs IBM) and 2 or 3 new "news picks".

And those news picks have some PJ comments too, so it's not just Mathfox.

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Mike Pellatt

The trustee (sic) in bankruptcy and his cohorts made sure they bled the corpse dry. There was a few million kicking around that they sucked out. The accounts are there on Groklaw.

It was the sundry creditors who got screwed most of all. Including the local pizza place.

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Mike Pellatt

Kodak - ex-Interactive Unix. The only "other" Unix on 80386 in the mid-80s.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interactive_Systems_Corporation

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This is why copy'n'paste should be banned from developers' IDEs

Mike Pellatt
Joke

Yabut... The BSD implementation of true(1) doesn't give you any help. A serious omission, IMHO.

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Picking apart the circuits in the ARM1 – the ancestor of your smartphone's brain

Mike Pellatt

Re: actually the *86 goes back to the 8008 .

And one of the guys in my year at IC built a telephone switch using one as his final year project....

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SCO slapped in latest round of eternal 'Who owns UNIX?' lawsuit

Mike Pellatt

Re: Groklaw shut down in 2013

As a blog, yes.

But the timeline and document repository from the various cases (in practice, SCO vs IBM) continues to be updated.

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Mike Pellatt

Re: time for IBM to get angry

I thought they were already in Chapter 7.... <clickety-click>.... Yes, converted 24 August 2012

http://groklaw.net/pdf3/SCOGBK-1439.pdf

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Mike Pellatt

Re: How many conclusions

Yabut.... The esteemed Trustee in Bankruptcy swore blind to the Delaware Bankruptcy court that there was a really, really good chance of winning against Novell. Despite utterly losing that case, I guess he can't backtrack on the rest of the litigation's chances.

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Mike Pellatt

Re: “why do SCO's backers keep it alive?”

David Boies' law firm undertook to carry on (this part of) the litigation until its conclusion for a fixed fee, and, if I remember correctly, a share in any settlement. So they're contractually obliged to the "trustee"-in-bankruptcy to carry on this farce.

But that was for legal fees, not expenses. Which is why things are now moving at a glacial pace. Boies et al know the chances of profit!!!! are very low, so they really are doing the bare minimum.

So the answer to the question is - it was all paid for up-front a decade or so ago. You'll note that Microsoft had some involvement in one round of funding back then. Allegedly.

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The Mad Men's monster is losing the botnet fight: Fewer humans are seeing web ads

Mike Pellatt

Re: Look at all the people that care

Cats ?

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Docker bags unikernel gurus – now you can be just like Linus Torvalds

Mike Pellatt

Re: So a unikernel

But given most developers run everything at the highest level they could so it's easier to code, I won't be surprised if this stuff becomes common.

That. x100.

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Linode: Back at last after ten days of hell

Mike Pellatt

Region blocking is pretty much SOP for many organisations for SMTP traffic, and has been for years. This just extends it down to the IP level :-)

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BBC News website takes New Year's Eve break

Mike Pellatt

then the windows fall out

Or the architects decide that concave ones would look nice. Then they inexplicably focus sunlight onto the roadway below and damage cars.

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Think Fortran, assembly language programming is boring and useless? Tell that to the NASA Voyager team

Mike Pellatt

Re: High level languages?

Is there any other way to write Perl code ?

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Mike Pellatt

Re: Cycle times < 1MHz

Clock rates <1MHz. 4 clocks per cycle if you were lucky :-)

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Mike Pellatt

Re: HP Mainframes job open?

2100 was more of a controller

I only called it a mini 'coz the lab one had a teletype attached :-) I seem to remember programming an ISR for the keyboard was the task we had.

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Mike Pellatt

Re: Replace technology drudgery by automated life-cycle convention.

If you don't realise why he's been so royally downvoted, oh well.....

I'm sure you'd just love the reputation of being the guy who lost 2 deep space probes that had gone the furthest of any manmade object and had been doing just fine for decades. Through your bright idea for how Things Could Be Done Better.

Seems you couldn't be arsed to upvote him, either.

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Mike Pellatt

Re: HP Mainframes job open?

HP 2100 not a mainframe, 'twas a desktop mini.

2nd year elec eng, 1974/5, programming it was part of the optional computing course.

We had to write the assembler, then hand-assemble it into the machine code, then enter it in with the front panel pushbuttons.

I thus gained an intuitive understanding of how instructions are decoded, logic flows through the ALU, and the way an ISR works.

Can I have the job please ?? I still don't "get" object-orientation :-)

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Next year's Windows 10 auto-upgrade is MSFT's worst idea since Vista

Mike Pellatt

110 million PCs can't be wrong

That's priceless. Absolutely priceless.

The phrase "Eat shit. 100 billion flies can't be wrong" instantly entered the front of my consciousness. Who else did that happen to ???

Clearly not the Microsoft markerdroids

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UK ministers, not judges, to sign off on Brit spies' surveillance

Mike Pellatt

Re: Blind leading the blind, blindly then?

No, not really.

You guys elect your judges in many states - which would take away May's argument over that straight away (if it had any validity in the first place). However, do tell me how well that one's working out for you.

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Patch this braXen bug: Hypervisor hole lets guest VMs hijack hosts

Mike Pellatt

Re: C

C++ - agreed

C - show me another language which delivers damn near the same performance as assembler and allows explicit access to all the machine's registers (both of which are crucial for an operating system - I remember the OS that Olivetti wrote in Pascal) whilst giving you at last some decent higher-level constructs,and then I'd agree. And assembler with macros pretending to be higher-level isn't allowed. That's what we had before C.

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Europe fails to ban web 'fast lanes' – what now for Euro net neutrality?

Mike Pellatt
Facepalm

Re: "The European Parliament is essentially tossing a hot potato...

I looked.

It's 3 years old. A couple of decades, or more, in "Internet Time" (I feel dirty for saying that....)

Legislation trumps any voluntary code.

So the point is ?

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So what's the internet community doing about the NSA cracking VPN, HTTPS encryption?

Mike Pellatt

Re: The NSA just recommended dropping ECC

"This is about computer networks"

I'd make the case that this isn't about computer networks, but about communication networks. In which case, they most certainly did exist. With exactly the same challenge to address as today's networks - how to communicate securely over an insecure medium.

In WW2, the medium was morse code transmitted over HF radio. This was easily intercepted with a sufficient number of skilled operators at sufficient receiving stations. These operators are amongst the unsung heroes - accurately transcribing random characters is far harder than plain language.

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Top boffin Freeman Dyson on climate change, interstellar travel, fusion, and more

Mike Pellatt

Re: Scientists

If you've never heard of him, you've clearly watched very little Star Trek.

Two words. Dyson Sphere.

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BBC bypasses Linux kernel to make streaming videos flow

Mike Pellatt

Re: This is why I love the bbc

just large and with various bits that dont talk to other bits

Net result, the organisation says one thing and does another.

Hypocrisy, n.:

a pretense of having a virtuous character, moral or religious beliefs or principles, etc., that one does not really possess.

I daresay that attribute in a human is derived from the same root cause - bits of the brain that ought to talk to each other but don't.

Knowledge of the means by which a behaviour occurs doesn't alter the behaviour itself or its effect on others.

Also known as "an explanation isn't an excuse"

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Experian-T-Mobile US hack: 'We trusted them, now that trust is broken'

Mike Pellatt
WTF?

"steps must be taken to ensure that critical customer information is protected regardless of where it is in the supply chain."

So, tell me Mr Outsourcing Provider Salesdroid - how I can do that (with extra special emphasis on the word "ensure") without spending damn' nearly as much as (or very possibly more than) I'd have to to do the whole thing myself in the first place ??

Gone very quiet, all of a sudden.

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Doctor Who's Under the Lake splits Reg scribes: This Alien homage thing – good or bad?

Mike Pellatt

Re: I quite

its a pre-watershed show and we cant scare the kiddies too much...

I feel sorry for today's little kiddies, who will never, ever have memories of hiding behind the sofa from Daleks and Cybermen. So sad to miss such a vital part of growing up.

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Revealed: Why Amazon, Netflix, Tinder, Airbnb and co plunged offline

Mike Pellatt

Re: Still relevant

Yeah, well, I thought it was pretty clear that I was referring to the hardware layer on wired networks of a certain topology.

This whole subthread is pointing out that fixed-period retries is well-recognised as A Bad Idea. Has been for a Very Long Time.

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Mike Pellatt

Re: No exponential backoff?

No just (or even) DECNet - it's fundamental to CSMA-CD working properly, else everyone would keep trying to transmit at the same time.

With today's star network topology with switches and FDX links, rather than a shared bus, it's not relevant.

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If you absolutely must do a ‘private cloud’ thing, here's how

Mike Pellatt

Re: Application running as root

If I had my way, any requirement to run as root (*nix) or with Admin privileges would immediately rule out use of that piece of software.

What's even more depressing is that when a vendor claims that requirement, they don't really need it. I had this wit an accounts package - when questioned, it turned out they only needed write permissions to one - yes, just one - registry entry. Properly setting the permission on that entity enabled the app to run in the logged-in user's privilege context.

For some reason, accounts apps seem to be the worst at this. We had it at Olivetti in the early 80's with the app developers for the S6000. A large clue-by-four was needed.

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Jeremy Corbyn wins Labour leadership election

Mike Pellatt

Re: @LucreLout - Pyhrric victory

There are two slogans that are utterly meaningless when it comes to managing a country's finances.

These are

"Living within your means"

and

"Flogging off the family silver"

My bullshit meter goes to 100 when I see either of those used. Which is pretty much anything from either side of the political debate on how the macro UK economy should be run.

Maggie did economic debate a massive non-service when she compared UK finance to running household finances.

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Mike Pellatt

A monkey....

A monkey with the correct colour rosette would win here.

Wait did I say would?

Exactly what I used to say about Surbiton constituency in the 60's and 70's when Sir Nigel Fisher was MP.

A constituency merger and boundary changes, and the '97 GE, and look what happened.

Epsom & Ewell, on the other hand.....

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Mike Pellatt

Re: Does this mean there's hope now?

I remember 1974 - 1979.

It wasn't pretty.

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Mike Pellatt

Re: Labour... now unelectable

@jason 7 - and even better - guess what - nature managed to run a reactor for us underground a couple of billion years ago, so it's already tested what happens long-term to buried waste. Turns out it's likely to pretty much stay where it's been put.

Was gobsmacked to find this out - http://nuclearinfo.net/Nuclearpower/WebHomeWasteFromNuclearPower

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Mike Pellatt

Re: Proportional representation

Whatever. Either way, it's down to the LibDems for allowing it to be spiked for a generation.

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Mike Pellatt

Re: Congratulations!

...and when they get to retirement find out that Corbyn's wasted all the money...

Well, I suppose wasting it is better than stealing it, as Gordon Brown did, putting the final nail in the coffin of final salary schemes.

All so that they could keep their promise of "no rises in income tax". Which everyone heard as "no rises in taxes" in 1997.

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Mike Pellatt

Re: Proportional representation

Bring in proportional representation.....

We voted on that in 2011. We voted against it, mostly (IMHO) because the LibDems put up a stupidly flawed half-way house thinking that would do the job of persuading the waverers.

It may well be that another coalition will be the only opportunity to put such a change before the electorate again.

So another generation or two away, unfortunately.

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The last post: Building your own mail server, part 1

Mike Pellatt

MTA

Exim.

That is all.

Seriously, though, I jumped that way a few years ago when the only sensible options were Exim or Postfix. Far too many people were still using Sendmail. Or maybe it was so log ago (Exim 3, that's for sure) that Postfix wasn't as mature. If I started again, I think I might go the other way - simply because it's more popular.

Or is that not a good basis on which to make a decision ??

(I find Exim's teergrubing facility particularly satisfying)

(Oh, and this was on RedHat - before I discovered Debian and that Exim was the default MTA there)

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BOFH: Power corrupts, uninterrupted power corrupts absolutely

Mike Pellatt

Re: This rings too true...

And then there's the electricity company itself, too. Wrongly-rated overcurrent protection on a 275KV line led to around a quarter of London (and around half the tube) going dark a few years back.

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Mike Pellatt

Re: This rings too true...

Re: Aircon tripping the breaker.

You had the wrong type of breaker installed. Look up "Type B" and "Type C". And, if you've got really massive inrush current, "Type D".

Now, try convincing the refurb crowd who installed Type B breakers on 20A radial circuits that they were told were supplying servers (and therefore via UPS's which have a hefty inrush current) that they installed the wrong breaker types when you find this out over a year after the refurb, and ought to replace them FOC....

Another item that's now on my checklist.

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Don't want to upgrade to Windows 10? You'll download it WHETHER YOU LIKE IT OR NOT

Mike Pellatt

Re: "Personal" computer no more

Just make sure the "closed-off Windows VM" is XP. With a clean, freshly installed, updated and then left alone, one available to swiftly refresh the live one as and when necessary.

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Mike Pellatt

Re: I am not sure of the law in various parts of the world where microsoft operate

Only problem being, these statutory obligations are enshrined in consumer protection law.

So no redress if it's business use. Like a self-employed trader, f'rinstance.

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NHS to go paperless by 2020. No, really, it will, says gros fromage

Mike Pellatt

Re: It's not the pieces of paper that are unhappy

Absolutely.

Which is why, when speaking to any of the consultants' secretaries, my wife and I (!!) never, ever lose our rag. Always polite, 100% calm. Sarcasm turned down to, hopefully, 1 or less. We realise they're as frustrated with "the system" as we are at that point. Probably more so.

And it's why I 'phone on behalf of my 94-year-old father. I so know he'd piss them off......

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'Unexpected item in baggage area' assigned to rubbish area

Mike Pellatt

The latest stupid in these tills.

When I and the missus try to use the spawn-of-satan self-scan (why would I want to scan myself ?? Yes, I know it's an old one. So am I.) checkouts, we always hit another misfeature of them.

They won't scan an item until the previous fucking item is in the bagging area, weighed, and verified.

So any chance of me scanning the shopping rapidly and passing it to 'er indoors to bag up neatly and in her inexplicable positioning logic is totally lost.

I reckon it takes us twice as long as it needs to because of this, with me frantically re-scanning wondering if the lack of a beep is because the barcode won't read, the item isn't in the POS database, or she's still deciding which bag the previous item should go in.

Why not just weigh the whole fucking pile of shopping at the end and only then whinge if it's out by more than 0.00000001% ?

With the arrival of Aldi in town, I'm not sure I like their strategy. You are ordered to just take your stuff straight from the checkout operator and dump it in the trolley. Shelves are provided for you to take all the fucking shopping out again and bag it up.

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Mike Pellatt

Re: Fucking self-scan tills!

A fucking impressive rant, maybe you got into the pub at opening time today and drank a pint or ten waiting for your mates to arrive :-)

However, and it's a big however. There's many a word I could use to describe Graze boxes, after the word "expensive", but "fresh" sure as hell isn't one of them.

They have very, very neat branding, marketing, sales and pricing strategies.

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Power Bar: EE was warned of safety risk BEFORE user was burned in explosion

Mike Pellatt

Re: Cheap Chinese Fireworks

Let me tell you a little tale. Recently bought a cheap replacement laptop charger (as you do). After a few hours, it stop working.

Turned out the plug fuse had blown.

A 13A fuse in the plug for a lead that quite clearly wasn't so rated. This is a clear fire hazard.

emailed the dickhead eBay seller, and suggested it was in his interests to recall these mains leads. (S)he utterly failed to understand the issue.

5A fuses kept blowing randomly. Replaced the lead. All good. Clearly a faulty mains lead. But a 13A fuse ? Sheesh.

Then there was the ice maker bought off Amazon. Clearly not double-insulated, and had a Schuko plug with an earth connector. Supplied with a UK - Schuko adaptor which had no earth connection on the socket side.

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Mike Pellatt

Re: Common sense

Since hydrogen ignites when it reaches sufficant (sic) pressure....

You better tell that to the manufacturers of hydrogen-powered vehicles, then. They store hydrogen at up to 700 bar (according to http://www.hse.gov.uk/research/rrpdf/rr615.pdf).

I have a feeling that these little boxes would fracture before reaching even that pressure, meaning that this process is a bit unlikely in igniting them.

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Mike Bracken suddenly decides to quit GOV.UK outfit GDS

Mike Pellatt

I'll keep banging on about this.

Because it's beyond unbelievable.

Months and months since the new DartCharge system went online for the Dartford Crossing, the payments site is still tagged "alpha".

Un-be-f'ing-lievable. An alpha system for live payments processing.

The only saving grace is that the call centre systems appear to be pre-alpha from the grief that many people with payment issues have been having.

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So what the BLINKING BONKERS has gone wrong in the eurozone?

Mike Pellatt

Re: Germany really doesn't believe the last 60 years

The problem with your credit card in France wasn't its acceptability as such.

The French were way ahead of the rest of the world on card chip "security", and the 24-hour petrol stations only accepted chip cards, not magstripe. The chip system wasn't compatible with the one the UK one when it came in.

Been there, got the badge.

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Mike Pellatt

Re: Money supply

The basic problem is that money is divorced from the value of the thing it is supposed to represent.

Of course it is. Money replaced barter, and is therefore a proxy for the perceived value of everything. The determination of the multi-dimensional value of that proxy for everything that could be bartered is, I believe, called "the market' and notwithstanding certain views is far from ideal - because, I'd suggest, of the aforementioned multi-dimensionality.

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