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* Posts by Stevie

2643 posts • joined 12 Jun 2008

George Clooney, WikiLeaks' lawyer wife hand out burner phones to wedding guests

Stevie
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Bah!

All the negatards here would be first to jump all over any story that pictures had been leaked with "helpful" after-the-fact advice like "they should have secured their environment".

Azathoth on a bike, give the man a break. He did what the security "experts" here always tell people they should have done - got a clue and put some serious dosh behind a serious attempt to secure the digital environment surrounding his wedding.

As for where he chooses to sell his pictures of the event, that is his affair and not that of some nosy twat with a ridiculously long focal length lens or a team of haxxors on the payroll.

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Bad boy builds beastly Bash bug botnet, boxen battered

Stevie
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Re: Linux doesn't have Bourne shell,

...but uses an emulator for #!/bin/sh, and that emulator is usually bash.

I did not know that. Now I do. I die less dumb. Result!

Thank you Nick.

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FBI boss: Apple's iPhone, iPad encryption puts people 'ABOVE THE LAW'

Stevie
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Bah!

Hey, the tech sector finally grew a pair. Who'd'a thunkit?

Now if the politicians can remember why they were put into office maybe this country can, you know, "function" again.

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Latest Firefox and Thunderbird updates plug CRITICAL SSL vuln

Stevie
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Bah!

Oh well. There goes my Thunderbird calendar plugin again. Every update seems to make it "invalid".

But what do I expect; it's free!

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iPhone 6: The final straw for Android makers eaten alive by the data parasite?

Stevie
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Re: That would never happen as PUC's (Public Utility Commissions ...

... across the country would have blocked that move. As soon as someone tried to rip the copper out, PUC's would be asking what they will be replacing the copper with.

Possibly. I have little faith that any laws would protect the public against the Great God Profit during the heady days of the late 1980s and early 1990s though. Everyone was distracted for some of it by the catastrophic failure of the Savings and Loan industry for one thing and the corporate raiders seemed unstoppable at the time.

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Stevie
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Bah!

"Perhaps now more will begin to understand why profit, far from being evil, is a necessary thing."

Profit is never an evil thing. Excessive profit often is, or did you miss the slash-and-burn of the 1980s? I remember the quote by an AT&T executive who said that throughout that era he was terrified some corporate raider would realize how much copper AT&T had, and would acquire the company to strip mine the phone infrastructure for short term profit.

Shareholder profit quite often is, as it is all-to often the altar on which the core business of the public company in question is sacrificed. Only this morning yet another radio commentator was surprised at the number of private companies that outspend and outperform their larger publicly-held rivals in R&D.

As with all "isms", capitalism works well until it is allowed free rein, when the wheels come off alarmingly quickly. You must have noticed the events of 2008 (including the snouting-at-the-public-trough that went on in bonusland).

The key to profit != evil is the invisible qualifier *reasonable*. The problem is that in the new something-for-nothing millennium, people's definition of "reasonable" is "whatever I think I can get away with".

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Moon landing was real and WE CAN PROVE IT, says Nvidia

Stevie
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Re: Bonus: not much of a gravity well so leaving and going to points more interesting is easy

Agreed. It's just that gravity is so thunderously useful most of the times it is helpful to have some around. Microgravity makes a case for less human occupation of space, not more.

Its such a shame that Neil and Buzz weren't taken prisoner by Selenites. There'd have been a fleet of Heinleinesque proper space rockets c/w fins sitting in launch cradles around Luna City as we type.

That's why the general public hates space. It is boring to anyone not involved in post graduate science because there is nothing to excite the popular imagination. They haven't the faintest idea how cable TV, worldwide communications or weather reporting works and NASA et al have made no effort to educate them.

Try "It costs less than a penny per person per day to ensure you get Game of Thrones and an early warning of any hurricanes coming your way".

A bit more punch than wittering on about the cost of a space craft you won't get to ride taking people you won't know to places you won't get a chance to visit so they can do things you don't understand.

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Bono: Apple will sort out monetising music where the labels failed

Stevie
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Bah!

"Apple is working on a new music format that will make buying music “irresistible” all over again"

Arr, be they packaging it in a gatefold 12 inch cardboard sleeve with a nice paintin' er two and a lyric sheet to look at as y' listen to the sounds? Mebbee a five page booklet bound into the spine like Fragile had? Perhaps a clever 4 square foot pop-up, fold-out design like a certain Man album had? Cunnin' cutout "inner sleeve seen through the outer" art like Physical Graffiti had? The fascinatin' pictures inside the ELP Pictures at an Exhibition sleeve? Geiger art?

"Multimedia experience". We had that back in the 1970s so we did, an' y' didn't need no electron microscope to read the sleeve notes neither blast ye fer a pasty-faced landlubber!

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Damien Hirst, eat your heart out - these guys chop up TAXIS

Stevie
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Bah!

A scooter made from bits from a 3d printer?

So you can ride to the shops *and* knock off a plastic gun on the way with which to hold them up?

Brilliant!

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Top Gear Tigers and Bingo Boilers: Farewell then, Phones4U

Stevie
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Bah!

No phone for Victor?

UNBELIEVABLE!

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Every billionaire needs a PANZER TANK, right? STOP THERE, Paul Allen

Stevie
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Re: take my hat off to those crews

Absolutely. Actually, I take my hat off to all servicemen and servicewomen, indeed everyone who for whatever reason got stuck in.

But if a hat is coming off it should be mentioned that one Russian anti-Tiger tactic I came across was to have a soldier run alongside a moving Tiger while feeding barbed wire into the roadwheels.

I mean, how much Vodka would *you* need inside you to contemplate that?

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Stevie
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Re: Who came second?

"Whatever is said about German vs. Russian tanks - the deciding factor is - who's was in front of the Reichstag on May 2nd 1945?"

Agreed. Apropos of nothing I saw both a new Rolls Royce and a new Mini Clubman yesterday.

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Stevie
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Re: what about all the tanks from the uk and ussr or dont they count ?

Not if you don't want to die laughing they don't. The only British tanks that could be said to have been successful designs for most of the war were the superb Churchills and Matildas, and they were infantry support AFVs that could not fulfill the then-current "cavalry" mode the Germans were showing everyone they'd need to fight effectively on account of the top speed being on the order of 14 mph.

The history of the British Cruiser Tank is perhaps suitable fodder for a Dad's Army reboot but one doesn't hold them up in polite tank conversation unless one is playing for laughs.

The USSR were the silly buggers who showed the Germans how antiquated their Panzer designs were. It was the shocked reaction to the BT-type tanks (that would soon morph into the T34) with their radical sloped armour that set the Germans stampeding along the track to the Panther and the "King" Tiger.

Better thank providence that even the Germans had their own doctrinal stick-in-the-muds or the manufacturing plants would have been race-tuned to make only Panzer Vs and derived hulls therefrom.

And for all the complaints that the Panthers broke down, various armies across the world were happy to deploy War Reparation Panthers through the mid 50s. Newsflash: All tanks break down eventually, and a lot sooner than you might think in them days on account of the Weapon Calibre/Armour Thickness/Power Plant balancing act producing the same results no matter who did the sums. The Panther had its problems but in its weight class was a superb fighting machine.

I might mention the doctrinal idea common to all German WWII designs that the Commander should be a commander and not a loader or gunner, and the consequent provision of space for a larger more role-focused crew. I might mention the cupola with its periscopes so the commander could fight without poking his nice soft head out into all the bullets and shrapnel. CF the T34 that had a roof hatch for the commander to crouch behind, or the Sherman that sat so high it was hard to get hull down in fighting terrain - important since the Sherman's armour was so thin and adding improvised armour like the popular sandbag/concrete/battlefield-junk glacis caused the tranny to fry out prematurely.

The Panther's main failure mode was the breaking of the front torsion bar due to the weight of the gun being born primarily by that wheelset. It should be understood that even drooping the Panther could and did fight on.

Yesyesyes the battle of Kursk. But they learned what was wrong and fixed what they could in record time to produce a superb AFV well ahead of anything the western allies had in the field in that role. Fast, hard and hard-hitting.

Hate the people that made 'em, hate the people who drove 'em, hate the people who told them where to go, but don't rubbish the design 'cos it weren't half bad.

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Stevie
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Re: Panther IVs were the workhorse of the German army

Actually, mein generale, I think you'll find that role was assumed by the Panzer III. Many of the German high command felt there was more need for those than any other Panzer Tank Tracked Armoured Fighting Vehicle (that should get the redundancy Nazis firing up their engines and heaving on their epicyclic steering). There were certainly more upgrade variants of the model than any other during WWII.

The IV was a heavy support tank in concept - intended to supplement formatiopns of IIIs - and had weaknesses the III did not (such as removing most of the rear armour to save weight so the tranny didn't fry). Doctrine said the IV should stay at the back and so it wouldn't get shot in the arse.

However, the fate of the III was sealed when turret ring could not be upgraded to carry heavier armament - similar problem suffered by the M4A1 Sherman which resulted in the eventual introduction of the Patton.

There's a bloke out near me has a Tiger Ausf B in drivable condition, apparently. I've never seen it but I've been invited to go for a ride sometime.

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Jihadi terrorists DIDN'T encrypt their comms 'cos of Snowden leaks

Stevie
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Bah!

At least the spooks can still read domestic encrypted traffic just as well as they ever could, so no real damage done by The Traitor Comrade Snowden Terrorist Lackey Criminal after all.

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Was Earth once covered in HELLFIRE? No – more like a wet Sunday night in Iceland

Stevie
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Bah!

These bloody "scientists" should bloody well make up their minds about stuff!

I've got an idea: Instead of rushing out to re-edit and reprint all the school textbooks why not simply thaw out one of those frozen-in-a-glacier cavemen and ask him what it was like when dinosaurs ruled the world?

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'Windows 9' LEAK: Microsoft's playing catchup with Linux

Stevie
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Re: And a lot of the whining comes from Anonymous Cowards. Just saying.

So, is RobbieCrusoe your first or your last name?

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Stevie
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Bah!

Let's hope its a bit more responsive than the Raspbian distro for the Raspberry Pi. I learned to right click and select as a mouse habit since the double-click is so quirky and unreliable on that GUI no matter how much I played with the config.

It got a slight bit better when I ran the mouse through a powered USB hub rather than the onboard ports, (but then I had the power sneaking through the hub and preventing the cpu from shutting down properly issue).

And everyone has Jeep Owner syndrome* on the forums: "Nope, not an issue, never see it".

* - A Jeep is the perfect vehicle until it is sold, whereupon a raft of issues will be complained of by the former owner.

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Apple gives fanbois The Sweetest Thing: A delete button for that U2 album

Stevie
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Bah!

Wow. U2, the all-purpose git-attractant.

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Infosec geniuses hack a Canon PRINTER and install DOOM

Stevie
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Bah!

Aiee!

All my Expedia itineraries are belong to evildoers!

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Sun's MASSIVE solar storm belch to light up Earth's skies

Stevie
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Re: Just saying.

WHAT are you "just saying"?

I was saying that despite people running around tearing out their hair and pouring ashes on their heads yet another flare has happened without significant incidence of exploding electric infrastructure.

I cannot see the connection between that and your unsupported claim that a putative sunspot minimum equates with Doom Flare In The Offing.

Unless, of course, you are speaking in terms of Geological Timescale in which case you win the internet.

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Stevie
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Bah!

And yet the internet lives on and my cellphone didn't melt.

Another win for doom-predicting "scientists".

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New Snowden leak: US and Brit spooks 'tap into German telco networks to map end devices'

Stevie
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Re: Atlas of Cyberspace!

Would that be a Cloud Atlas?

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Boffins say they've got Lithium batteries the wrong way around

Stevie
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Bah!

Finally, scientists do real science!

Bravo!

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Net neutrality protestors slam the brakes on their OWN websites

Stevie
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Re: @ Stevie

Heh heh heh. Good one.

The comment I was taking issue with was that in NORTH AMERICA one always has a choice. Not even true for some of the United States. But I take your FCC point.

However, your Geography skillz need enmaddening.

Because Northwest Territory is not in Alberta, in the same way that Wales is not in England and New York is not in California.

Which you'd know if you either had the benefit of a real Geography class at school instead of the modern "equivalent" "Social Studies".

Or had looked at a map. A map is like GPS but you don't need electricity to use it. If it looks like a bleak, featureless wasteland, you are looking at the wrong side. Don't worry if you can't re-fold it afterward. Maps are designed so you can never figure that out.

My folks live in Grande Prairie. Well, about five kilometres outside it. You need to remember the "Alberta" bit when you go check it out on Google, otherwise you'll be looking at Texas and get more geographically confused than you already are.

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Stevie
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Re: Ole Jule Cretins.

I'm sorry, this is just inaccurate. My parents who live in northern Alberta which, last time I checked, is in North America, cannot get broadband via cable because no cable company will lay the required pipe to where they live no matter how much dosh is in the offing.

So: dial-up or satellite.

Which is not really a choice, is it?

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City hidden beneath England's Stonehenge had HUMAN ABATTOIR. And a pub

Stevie
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Bah!

Beer, fire pits and a torn down village?

Not a settlement then, but the remains of Ye Burnynge Manne encampment.

Turns out Stonehenge is not a calculator or a temple or a UFO landing strip, but a piece of neolithic installation art.

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California blue whale numbers soar to historical levels, say boffins

Stevie
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Bah!

Free in the harbour

The blackfish are sporting again

Free in the harbour

Untroubled by comings and goings of men

Who once did pursue them as oil from the sea

Hauling away, hauling away

Now they're Calgary roughnecks from Hermitage Bay

Where the Whales make free in the harbour.

Thank you Stan.

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Don't bother with Apple's 9 Sept hype-day: Someone's GONE AND BLABBED IT ALL

Stevie
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Re: ROTFLMAO

That would explain the cracked screen on your S2 (and everyone else's I've seen to date).

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Finally, a USEFUL smart device: Intel boffins cook up gyro-magneto-'puter bike helmet

Stevie
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Bah!

If the cyclist were to wear a welding helmet with flip-up shield, a bit of jiggery-pokery with an old air force surplus TFR, a couple of springs and a relay would see a primitive version of Beeblebrox's Peril Sensitive Shades at their disposal. About to hit (or be hit by) something big, fast and hard? Down slams the opaque visor and you can crash in peace without all the screaming one usually deploys in such situations.

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Cyber-hoodlum tripped, fell, landed in Obama's Healthcare.gov server

Stevie
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Bah!

They really should catch that 4chin chap CNN were complaining about before he does something really bad.

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True fact: 1 in 4 Brits are now TERRORISTS

Stevie
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Re: without Wikipedia...

Or you could just read The History of the Peloponnesian War.

Or play the two-person Strategos wargame that came packaged with Imperial Governor, for those times when you couldn't scare up three or more would-be dominators of the Mediterranean Theatre.

Wikipedia is faster, Strategos is more fun and THOTPW more historical, innit? You pays your drachma you takes your chance.

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Stevie
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Bah!

Description in final paragraph nails it.

Someone should launch a kickstarter to fund a reward for the outing of the real name and a matching photo of the git in the snuff movie.

Which I haven't watched on two principles: I don't watch torture porn and I don't contribute knowingly to the no-doubt sky-high web hit stats that make these videos so attractive to the murderers.

If they want to suppress all press coverage in their domain I say fine, and I'll start with yours.

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Stevie
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Re: first used by the Spaniards

There's an account of what *I'd* call a concentration camp in Thucydides' Peloponnesian War which I read in the Penguin translation back in the late 70s.

Wassat, like 460 BC or something?

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NASA finds ancient films that extend Arctic ice record by 15 years

Stevie
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Re: that about wraps it up for climate research

Next up: World Peace.

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CNN 'tech analyst' on NAKED CELEBS: WHO IS this mystery '4chan' PERSON?

Stevie
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Re: Kludge-meister!

"Bodger".

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Stevie
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Re: Hacker/Cracker

Oh dear. Someone who actually read those 45 pages at the start of a unix textbook.

Sorry mate, that war was lost almost as soon as it began.

And you can say "safehacker" if you want. You'll sound silly unless the rest of your circle start saying it too, but it's a free country.

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Ballmer PERSONALLY wrote Windows' Blue Screen of Death text

Stevie
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re: Not as good as Guru Meditation

Metal Guru!

Is it you?

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Stevie
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Re: Give rhe devil his due .,,

I can beat that. Angered by all the talk-but-no-action at work over Linux (then the new kid on the block) I bought a copy of "Linux Unleashed" - I'd had a very positive experience with "Unix Unleased" and was hoping that experience would carry into the New World O' Linux - which came with Red Hat 4.2 on a CD-ROM.

I built the two floppy "boot discs", then popped the first one into the machine-to-be and was shown the message: "Error".

That was the entire text of the message.

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Sex is great in books, lousy in apps, says Apple

Stevie
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Bah!

I see by the terms and conditions printed in the article that Apple still charmingly believe they are in control and that people can't do evil stuff on an apple device because.

Just because.

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Hello, police, El Reg here. Are we a bunch of terrorists now?

Stevie
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Re: Collective Delusion.

I'm not annoyed.

This whole matter is of little import to me (like tennis). I've tried to explain that so you can get some traction in your own thinking instead of trying to understand atheism as a sub-genre of your own belief system.

Of course, I am failing because to a person who Believes, the core of their faith is likely the most important thing in the world. It would be difficult for them under those circumstances to see that I wouldn't be putting my "Atheism" (big A is probably the way they see the word) in a similar central position in my life, but at the risk of sounding like a broken record it doesn't work that way.

I didn't take philosophy courses at college so I cannot engage you in twenty dollar word exchanges but I *think* the relevant term from that field is "category error".

People seem to want to classify atheism as the obverse side of the religion coin. I'm telling them that as far as I am concerned there is no coin.

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Stevie
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Re: the crucifixion scene

If you own a print of the Picasso work you'll be done as a drug fiend too.

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Stevie
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Re: Definitions

Again, you try and define my viewpoint in terms of your own and then discuss it as a variation on a theme. My atheism is only a theistic philosophy because of a trick of linguistics. Any understanding you have achieved of how I stand on the subject is fundamentally flawed as it is based on a false premise.

I'll try again, but not in an attempt to convert you.

I think the one thing all religions share that *might* be the definition you are looking for is the belief in the continuation of the human self after death.

It's phrased differently of course. People speak of souls but what they really speak of is the Self.

I have concluded, based on the evidence available to me, that humans have no undying part. To me it is evident that the self is the mind, which in turn is an emergent behavior of the brain's natural complex recursive activity. No brain, no self.

Understanding that this complex brain is possible to develop without some sort of helping hand is made easier if on spends some time thinking about massively parallel evolutionary processes over geological timescales.

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Stevie
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Re: Collective Delusion.

You missed the point. The many who misuse the word "Religion" to mean philosophy of life or obsession notwithstanding, religion is a belief that there is a point to it all. One or more "gods" are usually involved, and invoked as a cosmic doorstop whenever the thinking gets too hard, and thanked whenever sheer chance caused the believer to personally not become involved in some catastrophe or other.

The real difference (for me) between anyone's religion and my atheism is that I *never* stop to say "this event could only be possible in the complete absence of a creator" and I rarely waste brainpower worrying about lack of gods and random universal chaos because it doesn't work that way.

People with a strong and firm belief in a creator and life after death often find themselves pondering the whichness of the why and can't understand that I simply don't, in the way I don't think about tennis or horseback riding or how paper is made unless I have some definite question about those subjects.

I am happy not knowing where reality all came from and the prospect of dying *still* not knowing (I wouldn't spurn the knowledge if it was there to be had of course). I don't need gods to invent it because they don't solve anything. Show me a real honest to Offler god and my next question is "Well, who made it"? All a creator does is drop a curtain in front of an unreachable problem horizon.

I've bent a few brain cells wondering about where the universe is, and can appreciate that for some the comfort of saying "this far and no further shall ye look" is appealing. The problem is that then they get upset when I don't share their views and start talking "atheism is religion" nonsense.

As for life after death, when asked once by a friend where I thought we went after death I answered "The same place the numbers go when you turn off your calculator". The question seems meaningless to me.

But I'm no evangelist, determined to make you all see the sense in my argument because it doesn't work that way. I'd be more likely to demand everyone stop thinking about tennis (except it would not occur to me to discuss tennis most days).

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Stevie
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Bah!

I have to read The Daily Mail?

Damn you, this is just like what happened in Orwell's 1984.

(Doubleplusgood New Rule though. Tried to upvote it twice.)

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BAT-GOBBLING urban SPIDER QUEENS swell to ENORMOUS SIZE

Stevie
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Re: JG Ballard

Hmm. I remember a throwaway conversation involving a spider spinning neural material as needed in a story by Delany. Possibly one of the Fall of the Towers books. Delany burned up ideas like that twenty times in any given novel.

Maybe my own tatty neurons are misfiring on this one, though. I remember the conversation revolving around how the reason the creature was spinning web was because it was thinking about the people looking at it.

Stupid brain, wearing out just when I need it most.

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UK fuzz want PINCODES on ALL mobile phones

Stevie
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Re: Bah!

You won't learn about magnetos and alternators by doing your own servicing.

You don't "mill" a spindle.

And as for my point, you just made it for me.

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Stevie
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Bah!

"If you are a parent, it's up to you. If you don't understand either learn or pay someone who does. Simple."

I quite agree with this simple demand made in the most reasonable tone.

I trust you'll reciprocate my own sensible and reasonable suggestion that anyone wishing to use anything with moving parts be conversant with the operation of a capstan lathe to machine a variety of materials (or pay someone who is to explain it to them).

Shouldn't drive a car or use a disk drive if you can't make a spindle or a bearing journal in my opinion.

And don't get me started on why you shouldn't have an internal combustion engine if you can't explain the difference between a magneto and an alternator/points setup.

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Wall Street woes: Oh noes, tech titans aren't using bankers

Stevie
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Bah!

It couldn't possibly be because Wall Street Investment Banking has been graphically shown to be incapable of managing it's own house to the extent it actually crashed several world economies by means of its witless, self-destructive behavior and demonstrated in 2008 that the American Capitalistic Model was fundamentally flawed to the world?

Because, well, that's what I'd stick at the top of the answer list.

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e-Borders fiasco: Brits stung for £224m after US IT giant sues UK govt

Stevie
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Bah!

Well, the actual answer is to define requirements clearly, clearly understand and explain the difference between a development life cycle and a maintenance life cycle and where in each of those the "new requirements" fit, and (after the Govt. reps have finished frothing about how impossible this all is) sweeten the deal by writing whopping great monetary penalty clauses into the contract.

The real problem on these sorts of projects is that they run so long. If you can define your goals so that they can be delivered in the short-term (i.e. months rather than years) you stand a good chance of getting something useful for your money. The clue that this project was far too long here is "a change of government".

Personally I fail to see in this object oriented world why delivery on these systems is an all-or-nothing monolithic deal rather than a modular approach. We could cancel Cobol systems in the same time scale as these buggers and that would be using your old mainframe kit too.

Of course the whole thing reeks of "special relationship" collusion at high levels.

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