* Posts by Graham Triggs

65 posts • joined 5 Jun 2008

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Firefox CEO BLASTS Microsoft over Windows 10, Edge shenanigans

Graham Triggs

And when you've find your browser has changed...

...you run Firefox from the start menu, and it sets itself as the default again.

Anyone capable of installing their own browser on Windows is capable of resetting the default after it has changed. For users, it's a minor irritation.

Put the handbags away.

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Amazon comes up with delivery-drone zones after watching Fifth Element all night

Graham Triggs

I'll happily take delivery of Leeloo

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Even Microsoft thinks Outlook is bloated and slow

Graham Triggs

Hmmm....

Quoting the article:

"Microsoft hopes you'll use Send in situations when you'd probably send a text message. The Send spiel suggests you'll use it when “You don’t have time to search your inbox, start a new thread, or even type out a subject line. You just want to ask that person, 'Will you be at the presentation?'”"

OK, so maybe sometimes you don't have a mobile number. Maybe you only have an email address. And maybe in those scenarios this makes a certain amount of sense.

But if you have a mobile number, if you were going to send a text message, then this app isn't removing a problem. In those circumstances, this app is ADDING TO THE PROBLEM.

I'm rather getting tired of all the attempts to make email better. Making email better is easy - fix the bastard apps so that they work properly, everybody actually agree to standards and use them, kill stupid shit like the "Google Mail Outlook plugin" (seriously - Microsoft and Google, just make your apps / services speak the same language and stop infesting us with malware), and ensure the technology can cope with a very large volume of email because guess what - we NEED to retain emails, and we end up with very large piles of them.

All of the other crap that people are inventing is just irritating shite that makes email harder to deal with.

1
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Hey, Spotify! Why do you internet companies hate competition?

Graham Triggs

Re: Oh look...

It's about time we stopped only considering whether somebody is a monopoly and actually have rules and practices that apply fairly to everybody - whether they are a minority player, or a monopoly.

Take the 30% Apple cut on App Store sales. OK, reasonable for one-off sales / in-app purchases, where Apple will (probably) host the content, review it, etc. - and it is broadly in line with what other retail outlets would retain for selling somebody else's product.

But subscriptions? Generally, Apple aren't hosting the content, or acting as anything more than a payment processor. So is it fair that they retain so much of the revenue? It should simply be legislation that if you are effectively only acting as a payment processor, then your retained revenue should be broadly similar to other payment processors - e.g. the 1% - 2% charge of cards. If you provide other services, charge them separately - even clearly, and transparently add a service charge fee to the consumer if need be (so, a subscriber would see £9.99 Spotfiy in-app subscription, and then a separate line item of Apple Service Fee £3). That is a ruling which is fair regardless of whether you are running a store that has 20% market share, or 95% share.

Same with preinstalling applications - the Apple Music streaming app should not be preinstalled. Ever. (Same goes for Google, etc. offering apps with streaming subscriotions). There is no justification for it, as if you can use a streaming app, you can go into the app store and download it. Pre-installing your own products whilst "burying" your competitors in anti-competitive. Doing so whilst also taking a 30% cut of your competitor's revenue should be taken very, very seriously, regardless of market share.

I also have sympathy with artists in all fields - I know a fairly significant number personally - and yes, creative people have to be fairly rewarded for their efforts. But the majority of complaints about the payments of streaming services miss out one very big factor - that there is usually a man in the middle of the service and the artist who is sucking up unfaiirly an awful lot of the otherwis fairly reasonable payments.

And I sympathise with your view on free content, but lets not forget that Spotify, etc. were always paying *something* for their free service provision. It was Apple that wanted to not pay anything for the three months of giving stuff away.

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Graham Triggs

Oh look...

an artist writes a thinly veiled Spotify hate piece full of half-truths and lies.

So, you like the idea of Apple Music because it pays a little bit more. For now. But that doesn't make it fair competition.

When a massive manufacturer of smartphones and portable media devices not only launches a streaming service, but pre-installs it by default on to all their devices (including all of the existing ones that can / care to upgrade their OS), AND charges less for subscriptions because it unnecessairly and unfairly takes 30% of external subscriptions sold through it's platform (meaning a competitor has to charge more, or swallow the cost and have less money to pay artists), then that is a blatantly anti-competitive practice.

To put it in context, Microsoft got rapped for shipping IE by default, and that's just free software competing with other free software, and you wouldn't be able to download an alternative browser if Microsoft hadn't provided one in the first instance.

Spotify encouraging people to unsubscribe *from in-appand re-subsribe via Spotify website* is not simply encouraging people to unsubscribe. It is being done now purely as a matter of survival, because if you don't tell people they can get the same subscription at lower personal cost (and making no difference to Spotify's revenue / artist pay out), then they are going to unsubscribe anyway - and switch to the "cheaper" service (which is only cheaper for in-app subscriptions because it isn't subject to the 30% Apple tax).

Whether you like Spotify or not, whether you like how much they give to artists or not, you aren't going to get higher artist payments by attacking their ability to generate/maintain revenue. It can only lead to lower streaming payments and/or the collapse of the service.

And an Apple Music monopoly on streaming services is not going to be any better for artists in the long run.

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Neil Young yanks music from streaming services: 'Worst audio in history'

Graham Triggs

At least he doesn't pass the buck

Credit to him for stating that his receipts are low more because of bad deals rather than payment rates per se.

But as for the comments on audio quality, please take your sanctimonious head out of your arse.

Tidal, Qobuz and Deezer Elite all provide streaming at CD quality. So you simply can't say that the options don't exist.

And whilst it does matter to me when I'm at home listening to my hifi, there are times when quality matters less. I can't appreciate the quality listening on headphones at work, or on the train. High quality MP3s are good enough in those circumstances.

It's other people that make the choice about what is good enough for them, it's not your job to dictate to them. But, if you don't want to receive any money as an artist, go ahead and remove the options for people to hear your music and earn you money, knock yourself out.

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Apple's iOS 9 public beta lands: El Reg pops it on a slab, strokes it up

Graham Triggs

Re: I hope it fixes the little UI niggles

I've only ever seen the size of the text change on top change when running an older app that isn't built for the newer resolutions, and it is having to scale the display.

Don't get me wrong, iOS 8 is definitely flawed - quite a few app crashes and (third party) keyboards not displaying, and I'm not convinced that is all because of bugs in the applications / add-ons themselves - but the text at the top hasn't been a problem.

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Windows 10 upgrade ADWARE forces its way on to Windows 7 and 8.1

Graham Triggs

Shock as Windows 10 upgrade deletes things that would be removed in a Windows 8 upgrade anyway.

Windows 8 definitely had some serious mis-steps (e.g. hiding the power button), which were all largely ironed out in 8.1. And having used 8.1 for a while, it's definitely better than 7 - it can just take a bit of getting used to.

The previews of Windows 10 look like a decent improvement, although ironically, the start menu is going to take some getting used to. After you've got over the initial shock, and learnt how to customize it, the start screen actually works reasonably well. From what I've seen of the new start menu, it's a fairly uncomfortable mix of menu and start screen, although it might get better with use.

1
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Microsoft discontinues Media Center with Windows 10

Graham Triggs

About time...

Nothing particularly wrong with Media Centre, but you are more likely to attach an Xbox One to your TV than a PC.

And if you do want to use a PC - a little bit of configuration, stick it into tablet mode... you just don't need media centre on a Windows 10 PC

0
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Major London rail station reveals system passwords during TV documentary

Graham Triggs

Assumptions...

That could just be the name and password of a local account for that particular PC, and the account only exists to restrict access away from administrator functions on that machine for general users.

In other words, it could be utterly useless, unless you have physical access to that PC, and if someone has physical access to that machine who shouldn't, you've probably got bigger problems.

Or, the labels could just tell people which password is in use - the password not being "Password1", but the first password in rotation.

It's easy to jump to conclusions without considering all the possibilities.

0
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Boeing 787 software bug can shut down planes' generators IN FLIGHT

Graham Triggs

Re: So...

It's the generator control unit, not a control unit powered by the generator.

Which suggests it may be receiving power (from a battery?) without the generators switched on. So the possibility of encountering it may be higher than you are assuming.

But practically, there will be safety checks and maintenance, which likely have resulted in GCUs being reset inside 248 days, so no real problem. Especially as now people know to consciously do it.

You never know though, we may have come alarmingly close to a catastrophe.

7
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Nvidia's GTX 900 cards lock out open-source Linux devs yet again

Graham Triggs

Freedom...

It's all very well for people the Linux community to have principles, but they have to stop trying to force them on to other people.

If Linux is going to give me freedom, then it should give me the freedom to make the choice to use certain hardware, even if the drivers are closed source. It's completely reasonable to let people have that choice, and if that isn't what you want, choose not to use that hardware.

I know they aren't preventing people from using hardware that has proprietary drivers - but distributions don't necessarily make it easy. There is no justification for this.

Of course, I would rather see open source drivers, but I can appreciate why they don't always exist.

3
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VirtualBox v. 5.0 beta 1 spins up for desktop virty lab chuckles

Graham Triggs

Actually...

There are more reasons to prefer VirtualBox than just price

1) The networking stack is sane, and a good citizen when you have to use VPNs (unlike, say, Hyper-V).

2) Good support of Guest OS additions (had less problems installing in Linux than, say, VMWare)

3) It's portable, so you can run the host on a variety of OSes (and OS versions), and move the guests around easier. (look at Virtual PC vs Hyper-V, various versions of VMWare, etc.)

0
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Smart meters are a ‘costly mistake’ that'll add BILLIONS to bills

Graham Triggs

IT disasters...

Really, government IT disasters fall into two categories:

1) Projects that are too ambitious

2) Projects that are not ambitious enough / outdated / not implemented

It's not sufficient to simply sit around not doing any IT projects, just because a few don't work out. Over the long run, not implementing anything will be far, far more costly - both in waste, and in having to do much larger projects to catch up, rather than smaller projects to renew.

It's ok for government projects to fail - what needs to happen is to restructure them to recognise that they might fail, and to ensure they don't fail quite so expensively. The problem isn't the project, but the archaic way in which it is constructed and awarded, which does not work for the benefit of the client (government / the public), but to ensure that contractors can extract as much money from the public purse as possible.

As for the IoD - they are an organisation that largely exists to ensure that the "haves", have more... I do strongly believe that a strong economy is important - we can't share wealth when we nobody has wealth - but more often than not anything that annoys the IoD is something we should be doing.

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The BBC wants to slap a TAX on EVERYONE in BLIGHTY

Graham Triggs

Re: @ Moeluk

"Why should everybody be forced to pay for the BBC's brand of dross, just because *you* like it?"

Why should everybody that wants any kind of TV at all be forced to pay 6 times the current amount of the licence fee, just because you don't like the BBC?

Because if the licence fee goes - without a secured, commercial and political interest free revenue stream to replace it - then that is exactly what we will end up with. You'll either pay £60 / £70 a month to Sky / Virgin / BT, or have nothing.

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Ugly, incomplete, buggy: Windows 10 faces a sprint to the finish

Graham Triggs

I've only had a brief play with Windows 10, but I was very impressed. Yes, they need to sort the browser out. And there probably are lots of other bugs that could be addressed. But my initial impression wasn't so much about what they need to do to the OS, but that hardware manufacturers need to get their drivers ready.

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Graham Triggs

Re: looking for apps

Horses for courses.

I always used to use the start menu, or the Applications folder on Mac. But with Windows 8, rather than try to deal with sorting out the start screen, if I know what I want I usually just hit the win key and type the name - and it pops up in search.

1
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EE squashes Orange UK: France Telecom's been 'destroying it for years'

Graham Triggs

Obvious solution...

EE / BT don't want the Orange brand? Fine... sell the name (not the network) back to Hutchison. Three doesn't make sense as a brand anymore with 4G services rolling out (or the potential acquisition of O2), Hutchison can do a lot more with the brand.

4
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Give ALL the EU access to Netflix, says Vince Cable

Graham Triggs

Or how about tying content to the account region, rather than the access region, and give people at least a reasonable amount of grace for accessing outside of their home region. (e.g. 30 days since last access from home region)?

More importantly, it should be enshrined in consumer law that if we can't access the services that we are paying for through an arbitrary restriction, then the service provider MUST give a way of "pausing" that subscription, rather than happily taking our money and not allowing us to use it.

2
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'If you see a stylus, they BLEW it' – Steve Jobs. REMEMBER, Apple?

Graham Triggs

Hardly surprising...

Different devices have different demands....

iPhone - whilst the small screen size might theoretically suit a stylus, the device itself is too small to house one that's comfortable to use, and for the general use of a phone, a stylus would be incredibly cumbersome.

iPad - arguments for and against, but in most cases the stylus would be unused

large iPad - you've got the room to house a large, comfortable stylus, and whilst the large screen would tolerate fat fingers poking at it, the more professional slant of what it would be used for lends itself to stylus use (e.g. if I was using it to access photo processing software, I would definitely want to use a stylus).

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Amazon's tax deal in Luxembourg BROKE the LAW, says EU

Graham Triggs

Re: PR is the special olympics of electoral systems - you get elected just for turning up.

There are a couple of potential fixes to that.

1) Vote for a party and candidate(s) separately - party votes are counted for PR to determine the split of MPs, which are allocated to constituencies based on the level of acceptance of candidates in each constituency.

2) Simply allocate the MPs based on most popularity for the party in the constituency - e.g. if LibDem poll 30 seats, they get the 30 constituencies where they had the highest polling percentage. By elections can just be voting on members of that party, rather than candidates from different parties.

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Graham Triggs

Re: EU "law"

Whereas it's entirely democratic that the leadership of a country is determined by the number of MPs, where the MPs are elected in constituencies where the boundaries are regularly moved to ensure as few votes for the current incumbents are counted in areas where they would be wasted.

And where the majority of MPs are elected on the basis of less than 50% of the turnout for their constituency - in many cases closer to 30%. So most constituencies have MPs where the majority of interested people voted AGAINST the winner, not for.

Sure, it's nice to laugh at BNP, etc. losing, but I would rather have a country where they have a - completely insignificant - say but where the government represents the view of the majority, rather than one where we can only be sure of it representing the view of the minority.

1
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Elite:Dangerous goes TITSUP

Graham Triggs

I wonder why I - and many others - were so peeved about there not being an offline mode?

What they are doing online adds *nothing* to the game as far as I'm concerned. In fact, many reviews have pointed out problems with trading which are likely linked to the online nature, so even when it works, it is - unless you actively want to participate with others - detrimental. And then there is the fact that it just doesn't work when their servers - so very, very unsurprisingly - go tits up.

How about you start working on that offline mode now Braben, you arrogant tit?

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HORRIFIED Amazon retailers fear GOING BUST after 1p pricing cockup

Graham Triggs

Re: Shurely

And I wouldn't use software that has small print instead of guarantees.

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RIP Microsoft Clip Art – now you can fill your slides with web cat pics

Graham Triggs

No problem...

I'll just do what I've always done - Google it and then paste the image in.

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Amazon DROPS next day delivery amid Cyber Monday MADNESS

Graham Triggs

Re: So does this affect Amazon Prime Members?

Have you reported this to Amazon? It happens sometimes, and they've generally been quite good at providing compensation when they fail to meet the delivery times on (what is effectively) a paid option - even when the failure is outside of their direct control.

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Graham Triggs

Re: So does this affect Amazon Prime Members?

To be honest, the whole Prime thing might be a little bit mis-sold.

It's not so much a next day delivery promise, as you get the cheapest paid delivery option free. Usually, that is a next day delivery. In some cases, it's an "expedited" delivery that may still take 2-3 days. (I think this means they are unable to physically ship it on that day, but it will go on a "next day" delivery service.

I don't necessarily have a problem with them pushing back the promise in times of high demand - it's more important that they are honest about what you will be getting at the time, you can't always anticipate every peak, every weather event, every service disruption ahead of time to ensure that you can always provide a next day delivery.

I'm not entirely happy with them mixing the "next day" and "expedited" services in general use - at least not in terms of marking an item as "prime eligible". It's too easy to see something as being "prime" and expecting to get it the next day, without noticing that it was only ever going to arrive in 2-3 days. They need to be much clearer about that - possibly splitting the markings to "Prime eligible" and "Prime next day".

But also, it's not much of a guarantee. I placed an order last week, that was shipped on Royal Mail with no tracking code. It should have arrived on Saturday, it still hasn't as yet. It's a bit early to chase up on a "where is it", but I'll be giving them hell in a couple of days about their failure to put it on a guaranteed next day service.

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'Open source just means big companies can steal your code.' O RLY?

Graham Triggs

They've got a point...

I really should stop buying these New Age flash drives. Bloody crystals.

1
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Mastercard and Visa to ERADICATE password authentication

Graham Triggs

NO NO NO!

Come on, please. Do NOT do this.

I absolutely do not want a system that depends on sending a text message to a mobile.

1) What happens if I lose my mobile / it runs out of juice when I need to make a purchase? (Like, maybe, a replacement mobile)

2) I do not get any mobile signal in my office. At all.

3) What happens when we are mugged and the crooks take our card *and* phone?

If they have a token generating app that can work offline (or just via a data connection), and/or multiple ways of validating, that may be ok. But sending to the registered mobile is a massive, massive no no.

0
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Amazon sells Fire Phone in UK ... on CONTRACT

Graham Triggs

Contracts are fine, but...

OK, I don't want to be on O2, but if they want to only offer contracts with O2, then fine.

What really gets my goat is that they have an option to buy the phone outright - but it's still locked to O2. There are other reasons not to buy the Fire phone, but they can take that "deal" and shove it...

0
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Who us, SHARE infrastructure? Networks reject gov proposal

Graham Triggs

Infrastructure as a public service

OK, one network is better than none, and competition might mean that one network goes to the expense to give it an edge.

But that still relies on the competitive edge being something that can generate a profit. If it doesn't why would they?

Just think if the infrastructure was provided by a public company, that leased access to the telcos at a reasonable rate. Then we could have a better service for everyone, and at a lower cost.

0
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Jony Ive: Apple iWatch will SCREW UP Switzerland's economy

Graham Triggs

Re: It's FAR too early to judge

TCO can be cut a number of ways. If you (or your organisation) is not the technical type, and you are going to rely on the manufacturer to provide support, then Apple does provide good support.

If you have technical ability and resources, then the risks and downtime of having an Apple can far exceed the alternatives. I've got a dozen HDDs lying around and could replace a failed drive in a PC laptop in 5 minutes. If an Apple SSD dies, I'm screwed until I can get to a store.

And because Apple offer so few options, most people would have to pay for a bunch of things they don't care about, in order to get what they need.

I really do like Apple. I'm currently using an iPhone. But even if they offered something that matched my needs, I couldn't buy into the desktops / laptops, because I can't rely on it not costing 2-3x my PC ownership over time.

0
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Virgin Media blocks 'wankers' from permissible passwords

Graham Triggs

Hmmm....

The only reason for banning anything from passwords should be based on technical capabilities of storing them. They should be stored as hashes from which you can't derive the original text, comparisons only ever being of the hash.

If you are ever worried about what the contents might be, then you are saying that the password list can be decrypted, which is very bad.

0
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Twitter displays our 'Favorites'. That is, like, PRIVATE, huff naive users

Graham Triggs

I don't care about people being able to see what I favourite - moreover, I want people to know when I favourite their tweets, and vice versa.

But I don't want to see things in my timeline just because somebody else has chosen to favourite it - that's what retweet is for.

As for people getting irate about a supposedly "private" thing not actually being private - wake up and research what you are using instead of just assuming.

3
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Microsoft KILLS Windows 8.1 Update 2 and Patch Tuesday

Graham Triggs

OneDrive

Oh, there was an update to OneDrive in June? That might explain why recently it has been consistently crashing on startup.

0
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Tech talk bloke compares girlfriend to irritating Java tool – did he deserve flames?

Graham Triggs

And yet...

Almost the entire set of respondents in the poll attached to this [correctly] decided that he wasn't generalizing about all women. Actually, he wasn't even generalizing about some women, or describing one in particular...

"[It's comparing women to objects, negatively, and] perpetuating idiotic harmful gender roles."

No, it isn't. It's comparing a spouse negatively, and perpetuating the stereotype of a partner. And *everybody* complains about their partners - men, women, straight, gay, lesbian... *everybody*.

7
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Audio fans, prepare yourself for the Second Coming ... of Blu-ray

Graham Triggs

Well, I guess there is no reason to avoid doing more, if you can easily.

But dynamic range? We're limited to 140db of practical hearing capability, and have to contend with a 30db noise floor, and a noise ceiling limited by the proximity of our neighbours.

Even in a concert hall you don't exceed 80db of dynamic range. There simply isn't any need for greater dynamic range than we have on CDs.

Increasing the sampling rate to reduce quantization errors, and give a bit more room at the top end may be welcome, as could increasing the capacity beyond 72 minutes. In some circumstances, even surround could be (although the cost / value of providing equipment fidelity across multiple channels is somewhat prohibitive).

But really, with the rise of digital downloads and streaming services, it seems the real battle is just preserving the fidelity that we are used to (and possibly increasing it - there's no reason why downloads can't go higher), rather than introducing more disc formats.

8
1

Lycamobile launches 'unlimited' 4G for £12 a month. Great. Now where can I get a signal?

Graham Triggs

Sure about those Three terms?

All-you-can-eat data is "all the internet use you need" whilst in the UK.

It's when you go abroad to one of the Feel-at-Home destinations that you are capped to 25GB per month.

http://support.three.co.uk/SRVS/CGI-BIN/WEBISAPI.DLL?Command=New,Kb=Mobile,Ts=Mobile,T=Article,varset_cat=internetapps,varset_subcat=3583,Case=obj%283833%29

9
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Sick of walking into things while gawping at your iPhone? Apple has a patent app. for that

Graham Triggs

Or...

You could just stop being a dick and pay attention to what you are doing.

Remember that? The time before smart / mobile phones? When people actually paid attention to what was going on around them instead of playing with a lump of plastic?

1
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Mozilla takes Windows 8-friendly Firefox out back ... two shots heard

Graham Triggs

Desktop users use the desktop

Nobody ever gave a toss about Metro apps on the desktop.

It would have been useful to have an alternative browser for Windows RT, but failing that there is no point for anyone to be doing a Metro interface.

10
2

Thanks a lot, Facebook: Microsoft turns Office 365 into social network

Graham Triggs

Not surprised by the negativity, but...

Like most things, the devil is in the detail. How does this work in practice? How does it scale with organization size?

The thing is, effective communication within a company is an important thing. I'm saying this as a developer who goes through daily rituals of stand ups, etc. Now, I'm not a fan of ritual communication - it generally means that you get information too late, or too early (which can be just as bad), and it interrupts your work day.

Potentially, discovering documents being worked on can be useful for everybody in a company in facilitating communication - not just managers keeping an eye on what people are up to.

Does this actually work in practice? Who knows, because I haven't tried it yet. But I'm actually kind of intrigued.

0
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Wii got it WRONG: How do you solve a problem like Nintendo?

Graham Triggs

Gameplay is more important than graphics. But as with most things, it's all relative. It was OK for the Wii to introduce a fairly radical motion control, coupled with not top of the line hardware. But the Wii U doesn't really do anything interesting, and the hardware is far behind the PS4 and Xbox One.

That doesn't just matter for graphics, but gameplay as well. If it was just slightly more basic graphics, coupled with an original, interesting input mechanism, it would be fine. But lacking in processing power affects also the kind of simulations / AI that it can run - limiting the possibilities for gameplay.

Tablets and phones are getting advanced enough now that it completely undermines Wii U's position in the market.

If you're going to do a dedicated console now, you need to give it enough power to make it worth being a console, otherwise it's impossible to sell.

7
0

Elderly Bletchley Park volunteer sacked for showing Colossus exhibit to visitors

Graham Triggs

Need to know more detail, but...

Everything I've heard about what is going on at Bletchley Park suggests that Lottery funding should be withdrawn, until they come up with a better plan that includes the National Museum of Computing.

And very serious questions should be asked both of the BP management, but also the lottery until this resolved.

22
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Make room, guys. Here comes the Postgres with the mostess on AWS

Graham Triggs

"at a large price"?

It's a *tiny* bit more expensive than MySQL, and an awful low cheaper than SQL Server or Oracle.

3
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Virgin Media to hike broadband prices by nearly 7 per cent

Graham Triggs

Wrong strategy

I don't need 152mbps. I don't even need 120mbps.

Getting rid of traffic shaping would be a far more useful prospect, and ensuring there is capacity for the advertised rates, so that it is reliable for things like iPlayer, Lovefilm, etc. streaming.

Also, making the service more reliable in general - too often the equipment and/or service flakes out.

Driving up unnecessary headline numbers, without providing the fundamental service behind it, will just lead me to switch to a lower tier.

6
2

Web daddy Tim Berners-Lee: DRMed HTML least of all evils

Graham Triggs

Re: He does have a point

"Boycott Netflix and any other streaming service which is contractually obliged and MUST use DRM to stream its content."

That's not the most helpful attitude. DRM has a time and a place. The main problem with DRM is the issue of ownership. If I believe I am buying an album, then I should have the same rights, the same capabilities, whether it is a download or on CD. I should be able to buy a new PC and be able to play my download from it. I shouldn't have to worry about an authorization service being taken offline in 1, 2, 5, 10 years time.

If I subscribe to Netflix (or Lovefilm, Spotify, Google Music All Access, etc.) then I am clearly buying a time based subscription. If the service disappears, so does my subscription. I'm only renting access, I don't expect to be able to keep anything. As long as it works, it makes no difference whether there is DRM or not.

The reality is if DRM wasn't available, then these subscription services could not exist. It would be too easy to subscribe briefly, download stuff, cancel, resubscribe, download, etc.

(That said, there are possiblities. Prevent people re-subscribing for a period after they have cancelled. Limit the amount of simultaneous accesses / continual accesses. But ultimately, it still needs to be secure between the client and the server, and have authentication, to prevent organised pirates from downloading material).

2
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Universal's High Fidelity Pure Audio trickles onto Blighty’s Blu-Ray hi-fis

Graham Triggs

Frequency, not resolution

I've seen elsewhere an examination of (bit) resolution, which appears to show that 16-bit is more than sufficient for encompassing the dynamic range in any recording.

What is important is increasing the frequency. There is an absolute upper limit of half the recording frequency in terms of the the highest frequency that can be represented, and as you approach that limit, you lose subtlety in terms of representing the waveform.

So higher frequency recording can be useful in representing higher frequency sounds more accurately. but resolution doesn't matter so much. What's more important is the audio being mastered correctly in the first place to retain the dynamic range of the recording.

2
1

Amazon: OK, OK. We'll let traders flog tat more cheaply elsewhere

Graham Triggs

I wish the competition commission would do something useful instead...

This was never a competition issue. Retailers are free to list goods at a cheaper price elsewhere if they like - they just can't list it on Amazon if they do.

There is no reason for Amazon to not protect it's customers by asking retailers to ensure that they are not charging more on Amazon than through another outlet. If we are going to declare this as anti-competitive, then we also have to stop any retailer from price matching it's rivals. Which is plainly ridiculous.

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Kevin Bacon avoids slapped wrist after TV pipe-fatness claims

Graham Triggs

Superfast

I'm reading this article through an EE 4G dongle, and I'm getting 35Mb/sec download (and 15Mb/sec up).

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First batch of Firefox OS phones sells out in hours

Graham Triggs

Re: I'll wait...

I downloaded the Ubuntu Touch beta. Imho, it has a UX that makes Windows 8 look like it was designed by a genius.

I'm sure it will be good for some people, but there are far too many (well, actually everything is) hidden behind non-intuitive gestures. And in many cases the gestures are overloaded (depending on where you gesture from). Worse, some parts simply don't work because of positioning (app tray getting in the way).

I've played with the Firefox OS simulator, and whilst it's a less "powerful" OS, it's a hell of a lot more user friendly than Ubuntu Touch. I was sceptical of Firefox OS, but it looks like it will be a perfectly usable OS for the majority of people (most don't need complex apps that can't be made HTML 5).

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