* Posts by tony72

227 posts • joined 2 Jul 2008

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Microsoft's Surface 3 is sweet – but I wouldn't tickle my nads with it

tony72

Re: Why Why I always asked myself for Surface

You have to move the mouse up to the top and wait before the bar with the close gadget appears. If you don't know it's there, you aren't going to do that. This is exactly the problem with all the swipe-in-from-here, hover-the-mouse-here stuff. I guess you're also in the camp that doesn't have any contact with non-techical users.

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tony72

Re: Why Why I always asked myself for Surface

"The furore over the Win7 interface vs Windows 8 does bemuse me; The difference between the interface has never bothered me; I find the start menu navigate to "programs" the slowest way to start a program; I've used launchy since ~2011 so I just use that, I haven't touched a start button since then."

No it doesn't bemuse you, unless possibly you have absolutely no contact whatsoever with non-technical Windows users. Maybe you say things like that just to sound superior, or maybe you really are happily isolated from the non-technical reality, you tell me. I'm happily using 8.1, you're happily using 8.1, but we are technical. My mother had to phone me up the other day because she'd double-clicked a PDF on her new 8.1 ultrabook, which opened in the default Metro reader, and she couldn't figure out how to close it. No visible close gadget in the top-right, and no file menu, the two methods by which regular Windows users have learned to close applications since forever. The furore is because ordinary users are having to re-learn how to do basic things like that, to no great benefit to anyone.

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Microsoft discontinues Media Center with Windows 10

tony72

+1 for MediaPortal, although prepare to roll your sleeves up and get stuck in to configure some parts of it.

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Poseidon's Wake, Naked at the Albert Hall and Farewell Kabul

tony72

Re: Way too harsh on poor Alistair

Of Reynolds' work, I've only read Century Rain and Revelation Space. Century Rain was great, but Revelation Space suffered a lot of the same criticisms that Mark just levelled against Poseidon's Wake; man, was it wordy! Maybe because Century Rain was a stand-alone book, and Reynolds wasn't trying to build a universe to hold an ongoing epic series, it seemed a much tighter story, and didn't get bogged down in detail like Revelation Space. It proves that the guy can tell a good tale if he wants to, anyway.

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BATWINGED DINO-PIGEON causes FLAP in bone-boffinry circles

tony72

Petrosaurs?

"Its bat-like wings are made of membranous skin, rather than feathers, just like the wings of the extinct flying reptiles known as petrosaurs, of which it is a contemporary but not a relative."

What are petrosaurs? Gasoline-guzzling flying dinosaurs if I had to guess; sounds scary.

Pterosaurs, on the other hand...

[Yes, I could have used the corrections button, but where's the fun in that?]

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Fondleslab deaths grounded ALL of American Airlines' 737s

tony72

Re: Now an intelligent design

The person I replied to said specifically "[...] software written by two independent companies", so if it's bespoke software, you'd pay twice for that; bespoke software is typically more a development cost than anything else. Granted, if it's off-the-shelf, then that might not be the case.

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tony72

Re: Now an intelligent design

"Would have used pads from two different makers, different OSs, and with the software written by two independent companies. Otherwise they're a single point of failure, as demonstrated."

Hmm, that would more than double the cost of getting the software written and of maintaining the two systems, and you'd still have got half your flights grounded today. Unless you're suggesting that every pilot should have permanent acces to two tablets, rather than deploying a mix, in which case even more cost. Hard to justify for a non-safety-critical system. Maybe better to have a web-based fall-back, so in a pinch pilots could use their own smartphones or tablets to sign in and grab the data?

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Cheer up songwriters, there's shedloads of money rolling in

tony72

Cry Me a River

Cry Me a River - Justin Timberlake

If your song is very successful, you can make millions in songwriters royalties. If only a handful of people listen to it, you won't make much. Just like pretty much every artistic field, it's only the exceptional talents that make the big bucks. Deal with it, or get a proper job.

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Ding Dong, ALIENS CALLING

tony72

Don't they know anything?

"Not only that, but according to a couple of scientists working for Raytheon, it doesn't matter whether Einstein's proposition that you'll never accelerate matter beyond light-speed is right or wrong: collisions with matter will probably rip your spaceship apart anyway, and photons will slow you down."

That is what the Main Deflector is for. "The deflector commonly took the form of a dish-shaped force beam generator containing heavy-duty subspace accelerators at the extreme forward end of the vessel's secondary hull. It performed its primary function by emitting low-power deflector shields to deflect microscopic particles and higher-powered deflector beams and/or tractor beams to deflect larger objects."

What do you mean, Star Trek isn't real?

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Microsoft update mayhem delays German basketball game, costs team dear

tony72

And moreover, what if that laptop had crashed and not come back up at all? Where was the spare? Certainly seems mission-critical considering what this problem cost them, so I suspect they will be investing in a backup system now.

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Microsoft RE-BORKS Windows 7 patch after reboot loop horror

tony72
FAIL

It's still there!

So, five days later and the problem patch is still there. My gaming rig is doing the "Failure configuring Windows updates. Reverting changes." thing if KB3033929 is selected. I've just hidden the update for now, I'll take my chances. I can't believe Microsoft haven't pulled this update yet, given the number of reports. WTF, Microsoft!

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Super SSD tech: Fancy a bonkers 8TB all-flash PC?

tony72

Re: Excuse me

Maybe read Why filling hard drives with helium can boost storage capacity by 50%. Less dense gas = less turbulence = more platters in a given volume. Apparently, anyway; I know nothing but what the internet tells me.

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Nokia boss smashes net neutrality activists

tony72

Press simplification

"[...] while the consumer press here sees a simple moral issue before it: Neutrality – whatever that is – is good, while Neutrality opponents are evil."

I think the consumer press is, quite rightly, aware of the need to simplify any complex technical issue down to a level where the general public will grasp the key points, and I think "neutrality good, non-neutrality bad" is a good enough approximation in that regard.

Joe Public doesn't have the faintest clue how the internet works, but he can grasp that if he's paying for his high speed internet connection, and yet he can't get a decent connection to YouTube or NetFlix, something funky is going on. He can understand the dangers of the lack of tranparency in that landscape; "How good a connection am I actually paying for, huh? How come someone else paying for the same speed of connection doesn't have these problems?" Joe doesn't want to live in this world, and if "Net Neutrality" is the thing that's going to prevent that from happening, he'll be all for it.

Now if there are good reasons why this net neutrality concept shouldn't be absolute, and exceptions should be made, it's for more technically nuanced people to advocate those exceptions in the proper context, and explain them to Joe. But that has to happen after the basic principle of net neutrality is well established, and if the consumer press is generally promoting it, then they're doing the right thing.

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Boffin: Use my bionic breakthrough for good, and not super cyborgs

tony72
Thumb Up

Re: I applaud this research

I wonder if there's enough control of that hand for the old five knuckle shuffle? My natural hand is going to wear out one day, and I could use a bionic upgrade!

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Facebook security chap finds 10 Superfish sub-species

tony72

"Take a look at any browser certificates and you'll see a whole lot of companies you would never personally trust, "[...]

I think you may be making some incorrect assumptions about what these certificates mean. They are purely and simply there to certify that a given web site belongs to a given organisation. They are not there in order to imply "trust" in any more general sense.

"[...] you are just taking Firefox/Chrome/IEs word for it. Unsurprisingly this is how the browser makers make some of their income."

Umm, no. The browser makers do not issue certificates or make any money from them. They can block fraudulent certificates, and they can require certain information from certificate issuers to insure that the certificates they issue are valid.

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UK.gov can't get farmers onto its Verify service – even to claim subsidies

tony72

Re: From the Whitehall Home for the Hard of Thinking

During a broadband outage last year, I had no 3G signal either, and I actually had to use dial-up via a 56k modem for a few hours (yes, there are still dial-up ISPs providing payg access). Yes you wouldn't want to access netflix or youtube on it, but to log on to my bank and make a few transactions, it was usable. Not having high-speed broadband shouldn't prevent anyone from logging on to a portal and filling in a few online forms, as long as they've got some sort of internet connection.

Now I can't claim to know any farmers or rural types, so if a significant number actually don't have any internet, then this is an issue, but I find that hard to believe. And if that is the case, then we should be talking about getting them online, not about using low-tech solutions so they don't have to go online.

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'Tech' City hasn't got proper broadband and it's like BT doesn't CARE

tony72

Re: Revenue !=Profit...

She said revenue, so I think it's fair to say she meant revenue, she will have used that instead of profit because it's a bigger number, not because she doesn't know the difference. Politics, like marketing, always goes for the biggest number that's vaguely relevant.

Can't be bothered digging further for the current figure, but the first Google result says that Openreach made 711million euros profit off of 5.2billion euros revenue in 2013, which is a pretty decent ratio.

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CHAINSAW HORROR advert earns GiffGaff a slap from regulator

tony72

Link

As we're all probably old enough here, here's a link to the horror on Vimeo. Pretty funny, props to GiffGaff.

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Bluetooth-enabled miracle washing orbs? Are you kidding?

tony72

Re: Funny...

Very droll, but somewhat misleading. The benefits of soap for cleaning over water alone have long been recognized, considerably before Proctor and Gamble et al ever came on the scene. This is as true for cleaning laundry as it is for cleaning oneself. Yes, you'll get most of the easy dirt out if you wash without detergent, but there will be significant dirt that you would clean with detergent that you won't with plain water, especially the greasy or fatty stuff.

And modern laundry detergents have other benefits in addition to basic cleaning; as someone who lives in an extremely hard water area (think visible chalk layer after one boil of the kettle after descaling), I can guarantee that that expensive washing machine wouldn't last five minutes without the water softeners contained in the detergent.

That's detergent though. Magical bio-ceramic balls, I think I can live without.

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Want a cheap Office-er-riffic tablet? Microsoft Windows takes on Android

tony72

Re: I bought one of these for Christmas

"How much will it be when you've renewed your Office 365 subscription for a couple of years?"

I was going to make that point. If you're planning to keep using Office 365 beyond one year, which I imagine you would be if you're going to use it at all, then start factoring that into the price, and don't tell me it's an £80 tablet. And if you're not planning to do that, then the value of the included subscription is 0, unless you're unfamiliar with Office, in which case treat it as a free trial.

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Fake Android The Interview app actually banking Trojan

tony72

Re: Installing an app from a random torrent is definitely smart

There's almost no information in the article as to how the malware works, so we actually have no idea what permissions the app requires, or how it extracts information from the user. So before getting hysterical about "why would the app have so much power", we ought to give that some thought. It may simply present as a fake banking app for example, which simply asks the user for their credentials and sends them on; no great power or permissions are required for that, just a user gullible enough to fall for it.

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Blind justice: Google lawsuit silences elected state prosecutor

tony72

It's all Google's fault

"Google continued to profit from rogue sites. For example, Google helpfully completed the query "buy oxycodone" into "buy oxycodone online no prescription cod"."

This translates as "Google continued to do its job as a search engine." If many people enter those search terms in the land of the free, then they ought to be thrown up by autocomplete.

"Hood asked why, if Google could amend its results in response to governments around the world, it couldn't amend them to protect Mississippians?"

And the correct answer is that they shouldn't have rolled over to those governments in the first place, although they didn't have much choice. Of course, now we're in a situation where every Tom, Dick and Harry with an ounce of political power thinks they should be able to get Google to manipulate search results to serve whatever hot issue they think will get them some votes. Or sue them for some of their supposedly bottomless funds.

We really need to get past this whole idea that the solution to every problem is "make Google fix it". Piracy and copyright violations? Google's fault. Kiddie porn? Googles fault. People want to buy prescription drugs? Google's to blame. Somebody broke the law, and now their reputation is damaged. Oh look, it's Google's fault. Give it a rest already.

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Who wants SLEEP DEPRIVATION for Christmas?

tony72

Re: Flawed Results

Where did you find that? I read the paper and did not find information on the readers used, but in articles such as this one talking about the study it says they only used an iPad for the actual study (they measured the light from other devices for comparison).

I would be very interested to see the study repeated using some different devices, especially e-ink with reading light and OLED displays as well as LCD. Also different modes; these days I read before bed using FBReader in night mode (light text on a black background) with minimum brightness, and my sleep is actually the best it's been for years, but of course that's just a sample of one.

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High Court: You've made our SH*T list – corked pirate torrent sites double in a day

tony72
Facepalm

Re: No one cares...

The money is not entirely wasted; the goverment is providing the useful service of highlighting the most active and useful torrent sites on the internet. Any pirates or would-be pirates looking for new torrent sites to check out, and willing to spend the five minutes it probably takes to circumvent the block, should make that list their first stop!

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Ten excellent FREE PC apps to brighten your Windows

tony72

Re: VLC

To whoever gave that a thumbs down, I do hope you know that until about four years ago, VLC didn't even support hardware-accelerated decoding at all, and in most of the time since it did get support, it was partial, and in some cases actually ended up with little net benefit in CPU usage. The latest version still defaults to having hardware-accelerated decoding disabled, at least on windows, and there appears to be no support for it in Raspbian. This may all be due to the cross-platform nature of VLC, but the comment about VLC's support for hardware-accelerated decoding is very much factual.

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tony72
Alert

Opinions differ on this; personally I would never use tools like CCleaner, and I have seen systems completely trashed by using such tools. They do things that you either don't need to do and don't benefit from, or else can do more safely manually. There are plenty of articles on the dangers of registry cleaners, and on how little good they do, however as that article says, there will always be those who swear by such programs, and say they've never had a problem themselves, so I guess you pays your money and you takes your chances.

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tony72

Re: VLC

+1 for MPC-HC. I usually have a copy of VLC installed as well, but it's a player (/streaming server/converter) of last-resort. VLC has always been way behind on hardware-accelerated decoding, so lots of battery suckage on your ultrabook or tablet, and it's behind in other ways as well, but it has its uses.

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Blade Runner sequel might actually be good. Harrison Ford is in it

tony72
Happy

Well, going in with low expectations is the surest way to avoid disappointment. You seem to have that covered!

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The Pirate Bay co-founder exits jail, now, er, free to eat vegan food

tony72

Re: Does he actually *want* to remove copyright?

It's not my model, and I'm not advocating any particular system personally, but you're kind of missing a few obvious points, so I'll bother with a very late reply.

"Maybe my costs are different. Maybe I sell to a smaller but more affluent market. If it costs a lot to get an orchestra together but classical music lovers are more affluent on average, how would I be shoe-horned into a "X plays = Y pennies" model? If I make a specialist film that is not much interest to most, but highly valued by a certain group, who are you to say I can't sell to them directly?"

Who says you can't? Not having copyright protection doesn't mean that you can't sell the product directly. Many artists already practically give away digital downloads of their works, but sell premium versions on vinyl or limited edition CD, with extras. Seems to work pretty well for them.

"Customer pays for what they want is vastly simpler than any centralized system"

Simple maybe, but look at the context here. Pirate Bay users aren't paying for what they want. It remains to be seen if someone can assemble the technical and legal machinery to put the piracy genie back in its bottle, but right now it's not looking good. If piracy can't be beaten, then a system that assures artists of some remuneration if they produce decent work is surely better than what they're earning from Pirate Bay users.

"And if your model is an alternative to copyright, how invasive would you have to be to actually guess what people are listening to / watching?"

Ridiculous argument. If downloading is legal, there's no trouble monitoring what gets downloaded, it's no different than the way download charts are assembled now. And a large percentage of people aren't shy about sharing what they watch or listen via social media; you can go to trakt.tv right now and see all the tv shows and movies trakt users, have watched in recent times, and their ratings, automatically scrobbled from their HTPCs and media players. Go look.

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tony72

Re: Does he actually *want* to remove copyright?

Getting rid of copyright doesn't necessarily mean not remunerating artists. For example schemes such as a form of tax or levy, with revenue distributed to artists based on some measure of popularity (perhaps some formula involving number of downloads and ratings) have been mooted. This is not such a crazy idea, since the taxpayer already supports the arts in various ways in most European countries, so this would just be taking that to the next level. I wouldn't want to get into the pros and cons of any particular scheme anyway, but it's unlikely that anyone advocating the abolition of copyright intends to do so in a vacuum.

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tony72

Re: This is what it takes to get into the high security wing of your local clink.

To be fair, drugs and prostitution make a significant contribution to a country's economy (I couldn't be bothered looking for a specific link for Sweden, but I'm sure it's comparable to the UK), whereas piracy is probably a net drain on the economy. So at least the drug dealers and pimps probably have a case for being left alone. Bit harder to defend the murderers and rapists though :).

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Yes! It's DRONE PORN. And we don't mean shiny pics of UAVs

tony72

Re: How dull

You know, I like porn as much as the next guy, but this felt to me like the couples were photobombing otherwise perfectly good landscape sequences. Good gimmick, I suppose, though.

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Securobods RAGE over $600k Kickstarter Tor box components

tony72

Re: Never mind the source of this box

What, you can't think of any reasons to protect ones privacy other than downloading pirated movies and porn? No consideration for whistleblowers? No consideration for people living under totalitarian regimes trying to avoid a trip to the gulag? Oh, the depths we have sunk to.

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tony72

Never mind the source of this box

What I want to know is how bad is this type of product for Tor? I met someone recently who was using Tor Browser; turns out he had no single clue what Tor was or how it worked, he just wanted to download from those file lockers that restrict you to downloading 1 file every two hours or whatever, and Tor Browser lets him circumvent that restriction and download as many files as he likes, by changing his apparent IP address each time. That's the trouble with making something too easy to use, you let the riff-raff in. With products like this Anonabox gettinging out there, get ready for Tor to become a lot less useful for legitimate purposes as it gets hammered by people downloading stuff.

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Snapchat 'hack' pics mostly clothed user snaps, odd bits of legacy pr0n – report

tony72

Re: the local Police Officer won't have to call round

"... which begs the question - if the analyst had seen any "obviously under age" subjects while investigating, would they have said so?"

Well, he's not the only person who's seen the archive, so if he claimed there was no obviously under-age material and there actually was, it would have been a pretty obvious lie.

Also, contrary to slightly hysterical popular opinion, the law is not usually applied in a completely blind and stupid fashion; if you come into possession of some under-age material entirely inadvertently, and then do the correct thing thereafter (report/delete/etc), you are not going to be in trouble.

So no good reason for the analyst to lie.

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NAKED CELEBRITY PICS LAW BOMB dropped on ad giant Google

tony72

Re: Am I the only one

I did look (doesn't take much effort), but you didn't miss much. They were mostly pretty much as crap and uninteresting as pretty much every celeb set tape/leak that has ever occurred. As you implied, if you want to watch porn, there is not exactly a shortage of the stuff online, so a few grainy nude selfies of some celebs most of whom you've never heard of aren't much cause for excitement.

However I don't feel the slightest bit dirty, I felt a natural curiosity to see what all the fuss was about, and whether my low expectations would be met. And there is to me a certain degree of interest in seeing what certain celebs look like when they're not all made up and photoshopped for a magazine.

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tony72

Easy money?

1. Set iCould password to "Password1"

2. Upload nude selfies

3. Wait to get "hacked", pics all over the net

4. Sue Google

For those slutebrities who can't quite bring themselves to "leak" a sextape, I guess this is plan B.

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Want to see the back of fossil fuels? Calm down, hippies. CAPITALISM has an answer

tony72

I hope you're right

I hope you're right. The reality is third-world countries just aren't going to accept any measures to save the environment if those measures put a brake on their economies, not while their populations are still poorer than developed countries. And developed countries aren't going to take measures that put a brake on their economies while they're struggling to sustain any kind of growth, and getting caught up by the likes of China and India. So politically, nothing of significance is likely to happen in the forseeable future, regardless of how much talking gets done, and how many climate summits are held.

The only way we will get on top of climate change is if, as you say in the article, the necessary measures actually make direct economic sense, and we'd want to do them anyway. So whether it's the things mentioned in this article, or other technologies that people are working on, such as cost-effective synthetic fuels or biofuels that don't use food stocks, I hope things do indeed come along that make it so switching away from fossil fuels actually becomes a no-brainer, and it certainly doesn't seem impossible.

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tony72

Re: The problem with this article...

But surely if we were to stop burning fossil fuels for energy, that wouldn't stop us from drilling for and refining an amount of fossil fuels for use in industry? Petrochemicals would clearly still have value, so there would still be an industry to support them.

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iPhone 6: The final straw for Android makers eaten alive by the data parasite?

tony72
Thumb Up

Re: Once some players drop out then....

Congrats on making it though an Android article without using the "landfill Android" slur though Andrew, you almost managed to sound balanced there.

Just like the transition the PC business went through when PCs became mainstream, the smartphone business will transition from a high margin business to a predominantly low margin business, and there will be casualties along the way. My first laptop was a 100MHz Pentium Olivetti with 8MB of RAM and Windows 95, I hate to think how much that cost in today's money. Olivetti, like many others, isn't around any more, but there are still plenty of people making fantastic Windows PCs, and I am pretty sure there will be plenty of companies making money out of Android smartphones in the years to come, even if they aren't all the same companies in the business right now.

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Buying memory in an iPhone 6: Like wiping your bottom with dollar bills

tony72

Re: "A little eBay shopping and you can find 128GB Micro SD cards for under a tenner"

Yes, although even at a more realistic £80 for a 128GB card, Apple is still 2.5x more expensive, so I guess the point of the article still stands.

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New 'Cosmos' browser surfs the net by TXT alone

tony72

Re: Bytes?

Worried about server load, I guess.

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'Aaaah FFS, 'amazeballs' has made it into the OXFORD DICTIONARY'

tony72

Re: Eh ?

I know, cray cray, right?

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Samsung Galaxy Tab S 8.4: 4G Android tablet is easy to swallow

tony72

Re: Whither Nexus 8

Ditto, my first gen Nexus 7 is still in pretty good nick, bar a creaky edge to the screen, but it's always had those image persistence issues that some units had, and the speakers are pathetic, and the lack of a card slot has occasionally irked me when traveling. If there was a cheaper, wifi-only version of this Samsung, preferably without the Samsung bloat (dream on I guess), I'd buy it right now, but I'm not quite sold on it as it is.

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Google's Pankhurst doodle doo-doo shows the perils of using Google to find stuff out

tony72

Yes, I was trying really hard to see some sort of ironic angle to this article, but I really can't. If there hadn't been a birth certificate or official record, or if there was some significant reason given to indicate that the official records were wrong, then there might be a case to answer, but that doesn't seem to be the case here. In fact it's the opposite, a good reason is suggested as to why Mrs Pankhurst might have claimed to have been born a day earlier than she actually was. Wikipedia is 100% in the right here.

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'iPhone 6' survives FRENZIED STABBING. Truly, it is the JESUS Phone

tony72
Coat

Surely...

...to be truly the Jesus Phone, it would have to die from the stabbing, then come back three days later? Christ was, in fact, not impervious to penetration by nails, thorns, and spears, although I do not recall if a knife was ever tested.

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We got behind the wheel of a Tesla S electric car. We didn't hate it

tony72

Re: There are cheaper, less environmentally harmful options.

"The difference is, that the Prius (and most other cars) also have mechanical switches for the important stuff, like turning on the lights!"

I don't know for sure, but I suspect you still have regular stalk controls for those basic operations in the Tesla too, from a google image search they certainly appear to be there. I'm sure you can control lots of additional parameters from the touchscreen, but they're not likely to change or remove the basic and familiar controls that people learn to drive with. You can quite clearly see what appear to be conventional lights and wiper stalks in this image of the Tesla S dash.

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How practical is an electric car in London?

tony72

Re: On Street Parking

I won't cover the same ground as other posters, who have already pointed out some issues with the reality of what you suggest. But I would have to ask, why do you find the end of the ICE even a desirable thing? The electricity your electric cars run on isn't created by magic, much of it comes from fossil fuels, and you can work out the emissions by looking at the energy mix supplying the grid you are charging on. I don't have figures for the UK, but in the USA, electric cars in areas with the cleanest energy mix were equivalent to a petrol with a 95mpg fuel efficiency, but in the areas with the dirtiest energy mix, they were only equivalent to a petrol car with a less than 40mpg fuel efficiency. Read this report for example, excerpt "About 37 percent of Americans live in regions where a Leaf’s greenhouse gas emissions would equate to a gasoline-powered vehicle rated at 41 to 50 m.p.g.". I get 50+mpg from my diesel Scirocco.

With combustion engines becoming ever cleaner, and the energy mix of our electric grids not changing significantly anytime soon, it's simply wrong to promote electric cars on environmental grounds. Clean petrol/diesel cars are competitive on emissions, and the other advantages are huge.

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Eating a fat bacon sarnie? Have a defibrillator handy

tony72

Statistics

The statistics being used to maximum scare effect of course. The study is concerned with isolating the effect of processed meat, hence they quite sensibly and reasonably adjust for all other factors. However in the real world, your processed meat consumption is just one of many factors affecting your chances of cardiovascular disease. So even if you are in the worst category, your real-world heart failure risk increase due to processed meat will not be 2.43 times higher than your bacon-abstainer friends; once you adjust back in all the things they adjusted out in order to obtain their measurement of interest, it will probably be an overall increase of a few percent. If you are healthy, not overweight, do some exercise and don't have a genetic predisposition to cardiovascular problems, then enjoy that fry-up and don't worry.

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