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* Posts by Destroy All Monsters

8138 posts • joined 3 Jun 2008

Our Milky Way galaxy is INSIDE OUT. Just as we suspected, mutter boffins

Destroy All Monsters
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Trollface

Re: Of course, Polonium cannot exist!

I think just settling on the BB is lazy

That's right, I'm totally down with the WinPho theory. There are just two or three other retards with me here, room's pretty empty. We can have a beer, talk smack ...

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Destroy All Monsters
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All that metal!!

Where is Mittal?

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And the winner of the most reliable disk drive award is ...

Destroy All Monsters
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Re: Quite interesting .....

Hitachi results as in the early 2000's

That's 13 years ago, so probably not really relevant.

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Destroy All Monsters
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Re: Google did a similar study in 2007

But Google kept schtum about the drive makers.

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Destroy All Monsters
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Re: 120%

“dead on arrival on arrival”…

Correct if you need an RMA sandwich.

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Destroy All Monsters
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Re: Misuse of Drives

> Using desktop drives in a 24/7 environment will kill them.

[Citation needed]

> RAID ... exacerbates the failures

[Dubious statement - Discuss]

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DNS poisoning slams web traffic from millions in China into the wrong hole

Destroy All Monsters
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Headmaster

That Walls Street Website is for people with financial braincancer.

Why do they put STOCKTICKERS behind COMPANY NAMES IN THE ARTICLE?

Stockwanking taken too far? I assure you not! It's for people with financial nous that mere mortals cannot reach!!

Meanwhile, China is making a creaking sound. Bizarre, it sounds like U-Boat that is reaching crush debt, are you sure those bank reinforcements are sufficiently str--- CARRIER LOST.

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LogMeIn: We're stopping our free offering from, errrm, NOW

Destroy All Monsters
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Re: Shock, horror

..but life goes on.

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Romanian Bitcoin baron 'stumps up $20k to keep OpenBSD's lights on'

Destroy All Monsters
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Re: Why no Apple?

Quite so.

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Destroy All Monsters
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Holmes

The solution is "sponsoring"

Whole so-called "not for profits" survive very well indeed using that policy and there is still money left at the end of the year for a bottle of Chardonnay.

Someone must have trouble building up a network of sponsor and hitting up people for donations.

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Destroy All Monsters
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You better observe them immediately, then.

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Destroy All Monsters
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WTF?

20'000?

Which are missing??

That's like "cents" to fatcats.

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Haribo gummy bears implicated in 'gastric exorcism'

Destroy All Monsters
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WTF?

Who you gonna call? Arsebusters!

so the extra mass which people dropped was probably most of the digestive flora losing grip on the intestines and just falling out

This does NOT evoke nice images.

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Destroy All Monsters
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Hotol lives!

A homegrown single-stage-to-orbit project.

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Destroy All Monsters
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Black Helicopters

Re: Maltitol is evil incarnate." EEEEVULL

Many chemical companies here have a smorgasbord....

Yeah, chill out with the black helicopters. I will grant you this for Agent Orange and Depleted Uranium, but these are wholly different levels of the Military-Congressional Complex.

Or are they?

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Destroy All Monsters
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Re: Maybe not trolls

Don't forget - you are in this forum forever!

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Destroy All Monsters
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Re: Drama queens

> How to avoid huge ships

3 new from £182.08

6 used from £139.98

The fuck?

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IBM to offload System x this week: Our sources spill the beans

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Paris Hilton

Re: Amdahl

Isn't the BS2000 an S390 clone by Siemens?

Also, shouldn't there be ex-Soviet clones on the market somewhere or did they all go under when Yeltsin seized the bottle privatization control lever?

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Look out, Earth! Here comes China Operating System (aka Linux)

Destroy All Monsters
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Re: It will never work

Bad troll, 0/10. Could not get any service. Avoid.

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Destroy All Monsters
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Re: The long march!

It's the one on which you don't want to have landwars.

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Destroy All Monsters
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Re: Under the GPL

Chinese don't care about western-style "Intellectual Property".

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Destroy All Monsters
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Re: Under the GPL

This is actually the modified Glorious People License!

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Destroy All Monsters
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Paris Hilton

The long march!

Hold on. China is not Yurop, and hasn't been in some time?

Anyway, the question is: Will it be gloriously open?

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Devs write 'film my shag' sex app for Google Glass

Destroy All Monsters
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Re: Automatic point scoring.

One Up!

mario_dogs_princess_loop.gif

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Destroy All Monsters
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Re: Oh god - I can't get rid of this image

I am eagerly awaiting Google Squids.

That movie was spot on on "current trends in cop behaviour" though.

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Destroy All Monsters
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Paris Hilton

Re: Well thats the ......

What are you saying I don't even.

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Hey, G20. Please knock it off with the whole tax loophole thing - we're good guys, really

Destroy All Monsters
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Trollface

Hungry for some redistribution?

There is no way out

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Ancient carving of 'first human-built holy place' = Primitive Vulture Central

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Re: There are 60 rooms at the potbelly hill

And if it can eat you, worship harder.

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Destroy All Monsters
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Headmaster

Re: Prior art?

Clearly a seer's warning against IP vultures and scorpions.

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Eight EXCELLENT languages for the fondleslab-friendly Intranet of Thingies

Destroy All Monsters
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Thumb Down

Re: The answer is "JavaScript"...

> To be fair the answer is _still_ C++

Derp.

To the person with a C++ compiler, everything looks like C++ problem.

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Destroy All Monsters
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Paris Hilton

Re: Please God no

Isn't a monad something that Leibniz dreamed up to explain the System of the World?

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Destroy All Monsters
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A game of thrones

Both are vying for the next crown:

D versus Go comparison [closed]

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Destroy All Monsters
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Mushroom

By the Spirit of Baltar

Also, no mention of Golang and D?

What is this, 2005 all over again.

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Destroy All Monsters
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Yes, I saw the movie by Dino de Laurentiis. UGH.

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Destroy All Monsters
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Mushroom

Ye Gods, Jesus Frack Holy!!

Fab technology #1: the dominant browser-side language will be JavaScript.

This is like saying your next fab resort will be a Stalin's gulag.

You may not necessarily want to be there, but you ARE in a military truck with GPU goons on all sides, so choices are restricted.

Still doesn't mean the destination is "fab".

Also, do people differentiate between a JVM and Java?

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EE BrightBox routers can be hacked 'by simple copy/paste operation'

Destroy All Monsters
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Childcatcher

Re: Whose routers ARE secure?

Backdoor codes passing each other, high-fiveing, HOLDING THE DOOR!

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Destroy All Monsters
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Alert

Sure was a firmware update to 7.62

I hope someone picked up the not exactly biocompatible pieces from woodland, innit?

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Consumers shove EMEA PC market down giant hole of DOOM

Destroy All Monsters
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CHRISWELL PREDICTS!

There is a feeling among analysts that the market may have bottomed out and the only way is up, and there are some PC vendors and suppliers praying they are right.

HAIL MARY!

Maybe it is time for a call to helicopter money?

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'Climate change' event dishes up sous vide supercomputers

Destroy All Monsters
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Re: Poor Design

Yup. The superconducting cooling fins didn't even reach the stratosphere. What sort of fucking design is THAT?

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Destroy All Monsters
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Trollface

Spasming out?

Sounds like someone pushed the hot buttons of a denytard here.

And who mentioned Occupywallstreet and Kyoto?

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Marvell stuck with $1.17 billion patent bill

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“Marvell’s decision to continue production despite this infringement action demonstrates Marvell’s apparent acceptance of the business and legal risks”

You got it, judge.

Business in America - It is risk-based.

If it isn't an "IRS audit" because you displeased some bureaucrat, it's "Intellectual Property" tripwires, "class action lawsuits" or NIMBY protesters out for a good time. Then unions wreck your shit.

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Almost everyone read the Verizon v FCC net neutrality verdict WRONG

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Holmes

Careful with axe of myths, Eugene!

In 1934 the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) was created to regulate the airwaves and communications over wires – meaning it had to scrutinize the gigantic Bell telephone monopoly. Most telephone companies around the world at that time were state-owned monopolies, but Bell was a private giant, offering Americans the worst of all worlds: touchy-feely USSR-style customer service, and Robber Baron-era monopoly profits.

Not so fast with the presentation of Stuff that My Friendly Bureaucrat told me! Correct history is important for correct analysis. Think AT&T was unbridled capitalism and the FCC was created to fix that? Not so.

First, the FCC was the follower of the Federal Radio Commission, whose business was to regulate spectrum since the 20's, so creation of the FCC was not an idea that came out of nothingness.

Then, 1934 was the time of Mussolini-inspired state interventions all over the US. It was also the time of the neverending Great Depression. As today, these two things are very strongly linked, but that's for another time.

Big Phone was not to be shackled and controlled by the FCC. Big Phone had very good relations to Washington, D.C. Indeed, a bit early, Bell Illinois angled for a little bailout. As Murray Rothbard writes in "The Great Depression: The Hoover New Deal of 1932":

"If Hoover eagerly embraced the statism of the Reconstruction Finance Corporation, he gave ground but grudgingly on one issue where he had championed the voluntary approach: direct relief. Governor Franklin D. Roosevelt of New York led the way for state relief programs in the winter of 1931-1932, and he induced New York to establish the first state relief authority: the Temporary Emergency Relief Administration, equipped with $25 million. Other states followed this lead, and Senators Costigan and LaFollette introduced a bill for a $500 million federal relief program. The bill was defeated, but, with depression deepening and a Presidential election approaching, the administration all but surrendered, passing the Emergency Relief and Construction Act of July, 1932 - the nation's first Federal relief legislation. Particularly influential in inducing Hoover's surrender was a plea for federal relief, at the beginning of June, by leading industrialists of Chicago. Having been refused further relief funds by the Illinois legislature, these Chicagoans turned to the federal government. They included the chief executives of Armour, Wilson, Cudahy, International Harvester, Santa Fe Railroad, Marshall Field, Colgate-Palmolive-Peet, Inland Steel, Bendix, U.S. Gypsum, A.B. Dick, Illinois Bell Telephone, and the First National Bank."

But let's get to the meat of the matter: Regulation. Is it meant to improve the consumers' lot and foster competition? Nope! It is meant to cement existing structures:

In Unnatural Monopoly: Critical Moments in the Development of the Bell System Monopoly by Adam D. Thierer [Cato Journal, Vol. 14, No. 2, 1994 - yes I know ... KOCH BROTHERS!!], we read:

On regulation before the FCC:

Second, the initiation of extensive federal rate regulation is important because it propelled state regulatory commissions to follow suit by greatly extending the scope of their authority. By 1922, 40 of 48 states were regulating telephone rates (Noll 1991: 180), The public utility commissions at the state level immediately began to mimic federal policies established during World War I. Businesses and urban subscribers were charged more than rural customers to help extend service to distant locations. Likewise, long distance rates were averaged to ensure a company could not charge more for toll calls of the same distance. Robert Garnet (1985: 152) describes this state-based rate regulation: “Statewide rate averaging would eventually become a distinguishing feature of Bell System subscriber charges and would be embraced by regulators as a strategy for promoting the extension of telephone service to areas of marginal earnings potential.” And that is exactly what happened. By 1925 not only had virtually every state established strict rate regulation guidelines, but local telephone competition was either discouraged or explicitly prohibited within many of those jurisdictions. Third, by averaging rates geographically to artificially suppress rural rates, policymakers and regulators created a serious disincentive to local telephone competition. Few firms, after all, will seek to enter a market and offer service if they realize it is difficult, if not impossible, to undercut the subsidized service of the incumbent carrier.

Hence, universal service, the final element of AT&T’s strategy to eliminate competition, was in place thanks to the explicit actions of both federal and state legislators and regulators. Once AT&T’s motto was adopted as the nation’s de facto regulatory policy, no other firm was in a position to adequately extend service in accordance with the

new federal and state mandated social policy. The Bell monopoly was here to stay.

The FCC and Telephone Entitlement:

A few years later, this new unwritten law of the land was codified as the raison d’être of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) with the passage of the Communications Act of 1934. The commission was created, “for the purpose of regulating interstate and foreign commerce in communication by wire and radio so as to make available, so far as possible, to all the people of the United States a rapid, efficient, Nation-wide, and world-wide wire and radio communication service with adequate facilities at reasonable charges.”

In effect, every American was henceforth found to be entitled to the right to telephone service, specifically cheap telephone service. To carryout this difficult policy objective, the FCC was given sweeping powers. Beside its powers to regulate rates to ensure they were “just and reasonable,” the FCC was also given the power to restrict entry into the marketplace. Potential competitors were, and still are required to obtain from the FCC a “certificate of public convenience and necessity.” The intent of the licensing process was again to prevent “wasteful duplication” and “unneeded competition.” In reality, it served as a front to guard the interests of the regulated monopoly and the FCC’s social agenda. The overall hostility to competition by the FCC and the drafters of the legislation that gave birth to it is best illustrated by a 1988 Department of Commerce report on the development of the telecommunications industry. The report notes, “The chief focus of the Communications Act of 1934 was on the regulation of telecommunications, not necessarily its maximum development and promotion. [T]he drafters of the legislation saw the talents and resources of the industry presenting more of a challenge to the public interest than an opportunity for national progress” (164). Over time the FCC would come to see the Bell System simply as the implementor of its agenda. Consequently, it would continue to use its power in favor of AT&T when potential competitors threatened the firm’s hegemony. Their bureaucratic mismanagement of the radio spectrum (which was nationalized under the Radio Act of 1927) meant the most capable competitor of the era would never be given a chance to compete. Despite the fact that wireless technologies would be greatly developed in the near future, the possibility of serious wireless competition rising up to meet the Bell challenge in the first half of this century became less likely once government forces, instead of market forces, controlled how the spectrum was allocated. Just as the wireline technologies where subject to blatant political manipulation, the wireless spectrum became the tool of regulatory and special interests; competition was again dealt a severe blow.

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Java, Android were THE wide-open barn doors of security in 2013 - report

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Larry don't care

He wanna get all the chickens onto the monetization conveyor belt, and Java on clients just ain't on the road to that kinda program.

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Boffins find ALIEN WORLD orbiting the Sun's LONG LOST TWIN

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Paris Hilton

Re: Bah!

Freddy Mercury?

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Destroy All Monsters
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Holmes

Re: Lords of Kobol!

I say!

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9,000 heads to roll at Dell? Tosh. It'll all go down in Feb and it's THOUSANDS more - insiders

Destroy All Monsters
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Re: Here's a bit of a change...

Don't make me mention ... OLIVER CROMWELL!

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Childcatcher

Re: Here's a bit of a change...

This shall be remedied forthwith, I hope. It's like not making a joke about the holocaust.

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Destroy All Monsters
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Holmes

Texas Dellsaw massacre!

“You know, you learn in business school that you need the right CEO for different phases of a company. Clint Eastwood said famously in Magnum Force: 'A man's got to know his limitations'. MSD [Michael Dell seems] unaware of his.”

A strong statement. I don't see this at all. How exactly doesn't Michael Dell know his limitations?

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We wuz right: Big Blue ARE stuffing System x boxen with ULLtraDIMMs

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Definitely a few kernel fixes and probably a years or so until one knows the best way how this shall be used.

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SAY MY NAME, ALIEN SCUM. NASA to send 'you' into SPAAACE...

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Re: The greys are coming

Only after the probing.

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