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* Posts by Charlie Clark

2554 posts • joined 16 Apr 2007

Apple: We'll tailor Swift to be a fast new programming language

Charlie Clark
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Re: Just what the world needs

Go is finding fans all over the place, though mainly in systems, because of its concurrency support. C# is, er, a rehash of Java for the MS runtime.

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Android is a BURNING 'hellstew' of malware, cackles Apple's Cook

Charlie Clark
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Poor performance

This was the first time I've seen Cook on stage and man was he poor. Okay, the numbers don't lie and Apple is still creaming the money, but the performance was nothing like Jobs. Relying on quote from a ZD hack to attack Android would have been below Jobs, even if the very idea of Android made his blood boil.

Fragmentation? How about properly (the I-Pad Mini is a hack) supporting multiple form factors Apple? Android is running on watches, phone, tablets, notebooks and TVs.

Update - tell us about the 10 % or so who can't update to the latest version or even the version before that because Apple invalidated the hardware. Then again, many of those users may, like the millions of Android users with older versions, be perfectly happy with their hardware.

I switched off after about 5 minutes. Did it get any better?

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YOSEMITE GLAM: Apple unveils gussied up OS X

Charlie Clark
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Re: Question is...

I'm with you in the heterogenous hardware environment: most of this release produces "meh" at most.

But I don't mind yearly updates for the OS as long as these aren't used to arbitrarily exclude older hardware or APIgasms don't break lots of software. Version updates are one of the best ways of making sure everyone installs the security patches.

We'll probably need to wait to find out more about what's going on under the hood (support for MacOS on ARM or similar) but some of the stuff looked to me like intelligent use of the underlying OpenDoc/Taligent stuff in the OS that has been so underused in MacOS.

Also, Federighi is quite a good presenter / salesman. That might become increasingly important if Cook's performance on stage doesn't improve.

See what the summer brings. I won't be installing this on release day: will wait at least until MacPorts has binaries for most of my packages.

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Charlie Clark
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You mean your headset isn't multipoint capable?

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Apple's steamy OS XXX picture leak riddle: Blurry snaps deleted

Charlie Clark
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Re: Oh bollocks

I can understand the reason to flatten on mobile OS's - the requirement to save battery life seemingly overriding style

I'm not sure why you think the IOS 7 aesthetics does anything to improve battery life because it doesn't. It was a necessary move away from skeuomorphism + Sir Jony's need to mark his territory. If you hold a new I-Phone up to your nose you can still smell the piss! ;-)

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Charlie Clark
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Re: I'm having a Windows XP moment here..

10.6 (Snow Leopard) was a bit of a brown bag to be honest with the move to x86_64 pretty hamfisted. Some of the bugs have still not been properly ironed out: my system will pause for a couple of seconds every time Time Machine fires up the external (Firewire) drive. It never did that in Leopard. Lots of drivers were broken and some got broken in the series. Can't remember exactly when but Bluetooth audio got totally fucked and the only solution was to upgrade.

While I understand the basic rationale behind the release cycle (cleaning up the toolchain) and simplifying patch levels, a key part of it is creating obsolescence by somewhat randomly declaring certain hardware no longer supported. So my MacMini (x86_64 capable) can't be updated because Apple and or nVidia won't update the drivers. I assume another generation of hardware will get the chop with 10.10 so that owners can go out and buy some new kit. If they're really lucky they'll have to get new peripherals as well: quite a few manufacturers don't support Mavericks. Fortunately, this is one of things that Windows VMs are good for, so I can still use my Canon scanner the odd times I need to.

The notification centre is okay with most things disabled. Pity you can't disable the fecking Finder messages!

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HP reveals Apple-powered Android 'SlateBook'

Charlie Clark
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Re: You Do Get Something for Your $100

You already get that with tablets. The OS does make it pretty easy to target other form factors.

A bigger challenge is the support of the OS for keyboard and mouse. I'd to get a look at one of these machines re. ergonomics and weight.

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Rich bitch sorority girls actually more likely to put out than low-class 'sluts': Study

Charlie Clark
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Re: @Charlie Clark (was:Duh!)

Controlling STDs is an entirely different kettle of worms.

Not going to dispute that. My main point was about possible motivation for behaviour.

Then again, being rich is generally associated with better medical care and, therefore, lower perceived risks associated with personal choice. I think this has been shown across a range of activities from substance abuse to driving.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: Duh!

Birth control is key. Sleeping around without becoming unwantedly pregnant and, even the event, with the resources to "deal with it", depends upon informed access to methods of birth control. Remove that and it becomes a whole different, er, ball game.

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Linux Foundation flings two full-time developers at OpenSSL

Charlie Clark
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Re: It is puzzling!

Tells you a lot about the PR value of joining such an industry group. And that tells you a lot about the real aims of such a group.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: LibreSSL

and it took a major vulnerability…

That attitude in a nutshell is a part of the problem with much of the commercial approach: we won't admit it's broken till it's breached.

The OpenBSD project was born out of an explicit need to make software as secure as possible. This doesn't guarantee security, but by making it an explicit priority they have certainly helped improve the chances of something being secure.

Other than politics I see little reason for this move by the "Linux Foundation". Working with LibreSSL with the perspective of using it in future instead of OpenSSL would be proper infrastructure development. Unless there are licensing or technical issues that I'm not aware of.

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100% driverless Wonka-wagon toy cars? Oh Google, you're having a laugh

Charlie Clark
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Re: Some things over-exaggerated.

And who pays if it's the Google car's fault? Google? Or the passenger for not pressing stop?

That's a big question isn't it? Nobody is going to be allowed to use of these on the road without the insurance question being resolved. But in the event of these cars being run as fleets (great opportunity for better yield) I can see Google quite happily negotiating with the insurance companies. It already has vast amounts of telemetry from the existing trials and one recorded accident, where the human took control and was responsible.

Assuming they can get the telemetry then I would imagine insurance companies will happily offer terms. It's becoming increasingly common to provide telemetry for car insurance. In fact, it's now standard with rental cars.

No, I don't think either insurance or traffic in <insert-hellish-place-to-drive-here> are going to the real problem. It will be working out quite how much redundant kit is required in order to be able to still function reasonably. There is already some information on this for ships, planes, space vehicles, etc. But very few of those are really involved in such dynamic environments as traffic, especially where other people aren't necessarily obeying the rules.

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Sony Xperia Z2: What we REALLY thought of this Android fondleslab

Charlie Clark
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Re: Where's the content?

Maxdome maybe German only. Watchever is pretty international. Both were set up by companies that have been trading in film rights so they tend to be heavy on films but deals for series are becoming more and more common.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: Where's the content?

Maxdome, Watchever, Netflix, etc. not available where you live?

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What's up, Zuck? Facebook asks Brussels to probe its GIGANTIC WhatsApp deal

Charlie Clark
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Agreed. But then again it's what the single market is for.

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It's Google's NO-WHEEL car. OMG... there aren't any BRAKES

Charlie Clark
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Go

I like it

When we switch to driverless cars we will need to give up the illusion of control that an accelerator or brake appear to give us. As we will become accustomed not to trying to control the car then we will quickly lose our already limited ability to act sensibly in an emergency. I drive infrequently and will freely admit that partly as a result I'm not a very good driver: town traffic quickly pushes me to my cognitive limits.

Yes, there are still lots of problems to iron out but I suspect the lack of manual controls aren't one of them. How robust is the software? Can it be manipulated easily? How much redundancy is built in so that the car still works if some sensors fail or are impeded?

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Charlie Clark
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Re: What happens when

If you're stuck in a queue then you're stuck.

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Still using e-mail? Marketers say you're part of DARK SOCIAL

Charlie Clark
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Re: ZOMG! I'm not on $TrendySocialMediaSiteOfTheNanosecond!

I'm with you in spirit - you can't beat text/plain for general communication. Encrypt or use another channel when required. The trackers and beacons are a cancer on the internet and their use somewhat shortsighted. I used to be far more tolerant of them than I am now: as a result virtually all are blocked by default.

But when it comes to statistics - I'm not interested per se in where you've been and what browser you personally have - but there is value in the aggregate data.

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Google's SPDY blamed for slowing HTTP 2.0 development

Charlie Clark
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Re: I stopped seeing SPDY as an alternative...

Latency on wireless depends a lot on what kind of wireless. 3G and below is high latency, LTE, which is what's in Google's backyard, isn't that bad.

SPDY deserves some credit for persistency, better handling of multiple requests and encryption. A working implementation is always better than the best pipe dream. Without SPDY we'd probably still have little prospect of getting off HTTP 1.1

However, the criticisms should be taken seriously. Google normally plays pretty nicely in such discussions - better than most "industry leaders" in any case. Maybe they'll take the criticism onboard and try and fix SPDY if the WG does decide to drop it.

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Pirate Party runs aground in European Parliamentary elections

Charlie Clark
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Re: no recent copyright outrages

Plus, racism and general nowtrage and are more accessible to the average voter.

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Concerning Windows Phone and its relevance to the larger business

Charlie Clark
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But there’s no arguing with the fact that Microsoft, more than any other mobile device vendor, is at least familiar with the needs of enterprise IT

I reckon BlackBerry is at least as familiar with corporate customers.

For any large corporate deployment pretty much any manufacturer will provide custom ROMs as required (plain Android, Cyanogen, corporate app-store, etc.). For smaller orders fulfilment will be key as I believe Don Jefe pointed out recently.

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Silent Circle raises $30m to make more anti-snoop smartphones

Charlie Clark
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Fuck me, funding for a real product!

NFT

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Redmond slow to fix IE 8 zero day, says 'harden up' while U wait

Charlie Clark
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Re: Good!

No-one wants to get companies upgrading to newer versions of Windows than Microsoft. They would far rather people were using IE9+ on Windows 7+ than legacy old stuff which they are contractually obliged to support

Most corporates are on Windows 7 but they still have to use IE 8 because of its "legacy" support. But Microsoft is happy because it usually means Office 2010 and relevant server kit.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: To be fair...

IE 8 still makes up a around 30 % of corporate desktops. Quite often because legacy "browser apps" that were designed to work in IE 6. Probably because of ActiveX

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Charlie Clark
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Re: Good!

One of my customers is a large company and IE 8 is still the standard IE version because of the legacy support for internal browser-based apps written for IE 6 back in the day. Rewrites are either prohibitively expensive or not even possible so I think Browsium is the only solution.

Makes you wonder why companies stick with Microsoft but there are still too few alternatives for desktop machines. As long as Microsoft can continue to collect licences for this kind of shoddy product management then they're unlikely to change their practices.

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Panda-monium as Google updates key search algorithm

Charlie Clark
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Happy

Re: Just checked. Phew

You are Jeremy Clarkson and I claim my five pounds...

Also: go straight to jail, do not pass go and do not collect any endorsements!

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Microsoft Surface 3 Pro: Flip me over, fondle me up

Charlie Clark
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Re: So close...

The processor didn't need taking up to an i7.

I'm inclined to agree with you on this. It's for the same reason that Apple doesn't put i7's in their Air: there's very little call for that kind of oomph on the go and the cost in terms of battery and heat isn't worth it.

Along with many I quite like most of the specs but I'd rather have them in a notebook without a touch screen at half the price. For tabletty things I'll stick with my slightly more expensive than cheap as chips tablet that weighs less than 500g.

Still, good luck Microsoft. Maybe targeting the professionals will work better than the mass market. Competition is good™.

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Charlie Clark
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Downvotes

I wouldn't worry about it. 4 downvotes seems par for the course on this topic if you're even slightly critical. Surface has its fanbois, too.

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Users folder vanished after OS X 10.9.3 update? Here's a fix

Charlie Clark
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Re: Uh oh

Actually, it’s gotten much, much better. From 10.0 - 10.4, I would never update until I had read the litany of issues over at Macintouch. I remember issues like losing Wifi, or even losing RAM from cheap suppliers—all from OS updates.

I think 10.5 was my first version and it was pretty solid. 10.6.0 (the move to x86_64) was a "brown bag" release and I generally steer clear of the x.0 releases. The OS is in general better now that the number of toolkits has been reduced but there's still room for improvement: adopting a "ports" like approach for the Posix stuff would be a big plus.

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So you reckon Nokia-wielding Microsoft can't beat off Apple?

Charlie Clark
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Straw Town

That Apple isn't invincible has nothing to do with Microsoft's chances of taking them on.

X-Box aside, Microsoft has yet to show success in a market outside its core Windows+ area. And with Windows Phone it's still not clear whether it is going to go for exclusivity or continue the tried and tested OEM + software route to domination. Until that decision has been taken and communicated it's not possible to say much. In the meantime both IOS and Android are becoming more accepted in the enterprise: taking MS on where it is strongest and beating it; having already whipped it in the consumer space. The Windows 8 own goal isn't going to help much there, either.

If MS decides to become a services company then it can hope to be a winner, whatever OS is running. MS services on devices could be very attractive and it could ironically call upon competition authorities to enforce market access.

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Charlie Clark
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Some good points, but…

The retrospective justification of Apple's success based on theory X has the bias of hindsight. Extrapolating it for the future is, therefore, somewhat unwise.

Regarding Beats - I think it's best to see whether there will be a deal and if so, exactly what the terms are. I'm not really convinced by either the "move into wearables" or the "move into streaming" arguments. But such a purchase hardly fits into Apple's purchasing history: they tend to buy smaller companies with good IP portfolios. Or partner. Do we have any figures from the ITunes streaming service to indicate whether it's a Ping-type flop or not?

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Charlie Clark
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Re: wireless vs wired and analog vs digital headphones

The obvious problem with wireless headphones is that they must be charged.

An obvious advantage is that the wires don't get tangled and you can keep the phone somewhere convenient/secure. I've been using Bluetooth headsets for this reason for years and only use a cable when I want to use the FM radio.

Most of the headsets have pretty good battery life. My Sennheiser MM 200 was the best but the buttons stopped working and they discontinued it. Currently got a Jabra which is okay if susceptible to interference. So, Apple pushing wireless headsets is conceivable but not really worth shelling out a couple of billion for.

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Game of Thrones written on brutal medieval word processor and OS

Charlie Clark
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Specialist tools

Every now and then I read about specialist programs for writers (novelists) which have no WYSIWYG whatsoever but provide other tools for writers than include minimising distractions. If Wordstar works for George then good luck to him.

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Get cracking on STARTTLS says Facebook

Charlie Clark
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And…?

What's the conclusion of this research? Are they going to start blocking anything without STARTTLS?

Certificate mismatch isn't really a problem, just an example of the problems in the certificate infrastructure. I've been using TLS for all my e-mail for over ten years with my domains but not my mail servers.

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Charity: Ta for the free Win 8.1, Microsoft – we'll use it to install Win 7

Charlie Clark
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Re: Why Windows in the first place?

Giving it to charities is like giving it to schools: it encourages dependency. And as you yourself admit, you've only just started to explore the alternatives, why should other businesses be any different?

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Europe's shock Google privacy ruling: The end of history? Don't be daft

Charlie Clark
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Google is allowed to display anything it wants

Nope, they are numerous cases where that is already not the case. We all know about China.

I could be wrong on this but I think an example are pro-Nazi listings in France which are banned for all media.

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Charlie Clark
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A practical example

On a related note Google has already acted.

The wife of the former president of Germany, Bettina Wulff, has been alleged to have worked as a prostitute in the past. As far as I know the allegations have never been proven correct and in fact have been proven in correct. However, the interest in the subject was so great that Google promoted some of the terms to "search as you type". It was argued that this continued to spread unproven and possibly defaming allegations without qualification. Just imagine something similar with your own name and something like "child sex offender".

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Charlie Clark
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Re: Actually I'm quite impressed

Indeed. Apparently, it is becoming not unusual in America for employers to demand access to potential employees online accounts. Asserting the right to privacy certainly puts an end to anything like that in Europe.

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Tick-tock, Jock: Dock schlock for mock-stock in ad-hoc shop squawk

Charlie Clark
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The Bitcoin economy is tiny. Were Scotland to adopt it, in some bizarre fantasy world, Scotland would take control of it, and marginalise all other users. Were Scotland to create the ScotCoin, then it wouldn't be valued as some bitcoin wannabe, it would be treated as a national currency and traded as such.

I doubt that very much. Having your own currency includes having the right to print more of it and then play the game of whether you can convince people to accept debts denominated in it. The great attraction of the digital currencies for nerds is that money printing is essentially impossible. This makes it very unattractive for any central bank.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: Debate worthy of a playground

I seem to remember that the Tories used to depend upon the rural Scottish seats (smaller number of constituents) for a majority up to an including Maggie's first government which is why pricks like Rifkind and Younger got into cabinet.

If Scotland does vote for independence then it's reasonable to expect newly emergent tensions within England and Wales to be reflected in different voting patterns. This is already happening with the North of England becoming more solidly Labour while the South becomes more solidly Tory as regional allegiance expressed through party preference replaces the outdated class warfare model.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: Taking a leaf out of the Thatcher playbook CeX?

north of Watford

There, fixed it for you.

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Teardowns confirm $1,500 Google Glass hardware is DIRT CHEAP

Charlie Clark
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Re: BOM

Sure, the BOM is, of course, relevant when working out whether to go with the production of something but this is just another case of clickbait trying to provoke nowtrage that Google is going for even bigger margins than Apple, ignoring that it already has these in many parts of its business due to lower capex. It also completely ignores how expensive glasses can be, especially if you want to be fashionable.

When it comes to fantastic profit margins it's still hard to beat coffee with a BOM of about € 0.10.

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Australia targets software maintenance costs with Drupal plan

Charlie Clark
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Re: Makes a lot of sense

Most of the PHP-based CMS (you have to use the term very loosely to include Joomla with them) have a very long list of CVEs. Sure, you can build secure sites with them but you're the one who'll be doing the security. Furthermore, for government sites there's something to be said for security through diversity: crack one site and you've cracked them all and they might have data you don't want leaking.

Drupal is in vogue especially since whitehouse,gov went on it but that doesn't make it good. And it isn't cheap once the SIs get involved. So, while the licensing will be cheap, what about the customisations? And what is the performance when you have 50 or so editors working on the same site (not unusual for government departments)?

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Microsoft blinks, extends Windows 8.1 Update deadline for consumers

Charlie Clark
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Re: I'm not Eadon

At least Apple notifies you of the update whether you're logged in or not.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: Windows 8.1 - the secret update

The 8.1 update in the app store* is designed to get you to use the app store.

That has class action lawsuit written all over it. Time for the popcorn.

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Archos ArcBook: An Android netbook for a measly hundred-and-seventy clams

Charlie Clark
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Re: Quite tempting - but I won't be buying one.

With you regarding this machine. Never had any Archos kit but it's good to see them trying stuff out. Will be interesting to see if the OEM actually making the things has other models in store. There are PC makers out there desperate to sell to a market that has voted against Windows 8.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: This is not the netbook you're looking for

It's a cheap tablet with a keyboard. That will work fine for some.

For others, it's a first toe in the water to see how the additional hardware works and what the demand is.

If Google gets its arse in gear and does a notebook suitable version of Android then I can see demand picking up pretty quickly for better-specc'd machines (what kind of screen could we get for $ 300?)

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NO, Microsoft hasn't given up on .Net, and YES it's all about cloud

Charlie Clark
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The catch

How much of the fluff do you actually expect to work?

So, they've finally improved packaging, though I'm not sure if I like dependency injection being handled by the runtime.

And what is designed for the cloud supposed to mean? Is everything suddenly massively parallel?

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Boffins say hot air makes Antarctica COLDER

Charlie Clark
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Re: there's a lot....

Yes, sorry, I meant 1953. :-/

I know about the ability to flood polders because of the rain. The real point is that higher sea levels can lead to tides bigger than the defences can cope with. In an ideal world you don't massive runoff and exceptionally high tides and West winds but climate change theory suggests that such combinations are more likely.

However, the Netherlands is less likely to be affected than other places (such as the east coast of America) due to the way any rise in sea level is spread unevenly around the world.

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Charlie Clark
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Re: there's a lot....

@Grikath

What about 1956? I've been to the delta works and impressive as they are, there are limits to them. The rise in sea level itself isn't so much a problem for them as would be a combination of lots of meltwater / rain in the alps and strong winds and high tides in the Channel, similar to the conditions of the coast of Schleswig-Holstein a few months ago.

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